July 23rd, 2014

Study puts a hefty price tag on dementia

By loganlafferty

A new study shows caring for dementia patients is now costlier than heart disease and cancer, and those costs will double by the time baby boomers reach their 70s…Winnie Pao, a neurologist with Mayo Clinic Health System in Mankato, says costs associated with treatment of dementia can come from both inpatient and outpatient settings. Pao said dementia patients are prone to falls, delirium, sleep-wake dysregulation and behavior issues while in unfamiliar environments.

 

Mankato Free Press by Robb Murray

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Tags: dementia, Dr. Winnie Pao, health cost, inpatient settings, Mankato Free Press, outpatient settings


July 17th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

KAAL
Mayo Clinic Takes Top Spot on Best Hospitals List
by Jenna Lohse

Mayo Clinic in Rochester earns the top spot on a prestigious list of the nation's top hospitals. U.S. News and World Report ranked Mayo Clinic number one on its yearly list of the nation's best hospitals…"Oh, awesome. They know everything and if they don't know it they know where to get it,” said Peg Lesmann, who traveled to Mayo from North Dakota. "It's very well organized and run,KAAL-TV-6 logo everyone has been very friendly,” said Wayne Davis. "I’ve never seen anything go like clockwork, it's perfect," said Mary Bailey, patient at Mayo Clinic…"The fact that we're recognized for providing outstanding care in the community of outstanding health care organizations around the country, we're just very proud of that and I have to say, I think there's a little bit of a spring in our step today,” said Dr. John Noseworthy, Mayo Clinic CEO.

Reach:  KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Additional coverage:

Star TribuneMayo Clinic is ranked as top U.S. hospital by U.S. News

Baltimore Sun, Hopkins Hospital bumped from top spot to No. 3 on U.S. News ranking

ABC 15 ArizonaU.S. News and World Report ranks Mayo Clinic No. 1 in Phoenix and Arizona. Additional coverage: Tucson News

La Crosse Tribune, Gundersen, Mayo-Franciscan in top 15 Wisconsin hospitals on U.S. News list

WEAU Eau Claire, Mayo Clinic Health System recognized in annual best hospitals list

Eau Claire Leader-Telegram, Health Matters, High ranking: Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire is ranked No. 6 in Wisconsin and is recognized as the No. 1 hospital in northwestern Wisconsin in the 25th U.S. News & World Report annual America's Best Hospitals list released Tuesday. 

Endocrine Today, U.S. News & World Report announces top hospitals for endocrinology and diabetes care

US News & World Report, CNN, Huffington PostChicago Tribune, ABC News, Huffington Post, KTTC, Post-Bulletin, KSTP, New4Jax, KTTC, CBS News, MPR, KARE11, One American News, WebMD, Healio, NBC4 Calif., Twin Cities Business

Context: Mayo Clinic has achieved the highest honor in U.S. News and World Report’s ranking of top hospitalsMayo Clinic earned more number one rankings than any other provider, ranking number one or number two in 11 of the 12 specialties based on reputation, services and volumes, safety and clinical outcomes. “We have a deep commitment to delivering high-value health care that best meets patients' needs. We owe our success to truly dedicated staff that provide a seamless patient experience and the care that each individual needs,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Noseworthy, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Rebecca Eisenman

MPR
6 ways to improve childhood mental illness treatment

MPR News logoGuests: Jarrod Leffler: Child and adolescent psychologist in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychology at Mayo Clinic.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Jarrod Leffler, Ph.D., is a child and adolescent psychologist with Mayo Clinic Children's Center.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

Bloomberg Alzheimer Researchers See Protein as Target for Drugs by Michelle Cortez A protein discovered less than a decade ago appears to play a role in whether symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease emerge, suggesting another avenue for exploration in efforts to find a treatment…“This injects new vigor in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease,” said Keith Josephs, the lead author and a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, Bloombergin a telephone interview. “The world has focused on two proteins, beta amyloid and tau. TDP-43 is going to be the new kid on the block.”

Reach: Bloomberg has 2,300 media professionals in 146 bureaus across 72 countries. Bloomberg delivers its content across more than 400 publications, over 310 million households worldwide through Bloomberg Television and 500,000 in the New York metro area and 18.5 million subscribers through satellite radio.

Additional Coverage: AP, New brain protein tied to Alzheimer's disease Bloomberg, Alzheimer’s Drug Fails to Help Moderately Ill in Trials 

Tampa Bay Tribune, My FOX Philly, Gainesville Sun, WebMD, HealthDay, Star Tribune, ABC News, My FOX Phoenix

Context:  Since the time of Dr. Alois Alzheimer himself, two proteins (beta-amyloid (Aβ) and tau) have become tantamount to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). But a Mayo Clinic study challenges the perception that these are the only important proteins accounting for the clinical features of the devastating disease. In a large clinico-imaging pathological study, Mayo Clinic researchers demonstrated that a third protein (TDP-43) plays a major role in AD pathology. In fact, people whose brain was TDP positive were 10 times more likely to be cognitively impaired at death compared to those who didn’t have the protein, showing that TDP-43 has the potential to overpower what has been termed resilient brain aging. The study was published in the journal Acta Neuropathologica. “We wanted to determine whether the TDP-43 protein has any independent effect on the clinical and neuroimaging features typically ascribed to AD and we found that TDP-43 had a strong effect on cognition, memory loss and medial temporal atrophy in AD,” says Mayo Clinic neurologist Keith Josephs, M.D., the study’s lead investigator and author. “In the early stages of the disease when AD pathology was less severe, the presence of TDP-43 was strongly associated with cognitive impairment. Consequently, TDP-43 appears to play an important role in the cognitive and neuroimaging characteristics that have been linked to AD.” More information on the study, including a video interview with Dr. Josephs, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

Reuters
Mustaches may raise burn risk with home oxygen therapy
by Krystnell Storr

ReutersA new case report from U.S doctors suggests that men who use home oxygen therapy should consider a clean-shaven look to reduce their risk of serious facial burns. “If you’ve ever tried to start a campfire, you always start with some dry little twigs and once that starts - and that’s kind of the mustache - then that oxygen tubing lights on fire, it’s like a blow torch shooting up their nose,” said Dr. Andrew Greenlund of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. “So, if we can prevent it, it would be good.”

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world news, business news, technology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile, and interactive television platforms.

Additional coverage: Chicago Tribune, News Channel Daily

Context: Facial hair and home oxygen therapy can prove a dangerously combustible combination, a Mayo Clinic report published in the peer-reviewed medical journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings finds. To reach that conclusion, researchers reviewed home oxygen therapy-related burn cases and experimented with a mustachioed mannequin, a facial hair-free mannequin, nasal oxygen tubes and sparks. They found that facial hair raises the risk of home oxygen therapy-related burns, and encourage health care providers to counsel patients about the risk. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

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Tags: ABC 15 Arizona, ABC News, ABC15 Phoenix, Albert Lea Tribune, Alzheimer's Association Medical and Scientific Advisory Council, alzheimer's disease, AP, AP Associated Press, Apache Mall, Argus Leader, Arizona Newszap, Arizona Pop Warner Football


July 16th, 2014

Decision looming in HIV CHIPS case

By loganlafferty

A Brownsdale couple in court because of their child’s medical conditions and their views toward his HIV treatment should soon know if they retain full custody…Yet earlier Monday, Jones questioned Dr. W. Charles Huskins, a Mayo Clinic expert in pediatric infectious disease who was on call when Rico was born, about concerns the clinic staff had at the time of the birth…Lindsey testified that Mayo medical professionals already knew she was HIV positive from past records, confirmed it with her while she was pregnant, and she never received any advice about HIV risk-reducing drugs for her unborn child.

Additional Coverage: Post Bulletin, Pierce County Herald,

 

Austin Daily Herald by Matt Peterson

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Tags: Austin Daily Herald, Dr. W. Charles Huskins, HIV CHIPS, HIV treatment, pediatric infectious disease, risk-reducing drugs


July 10th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Wall Street Journal
Side Effects: Telling the Real From the Imagined
by Sumathi Reddy

…Eric Matteson, chair of the division of rheumatology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., said he tries to educate patients about the balance between the benefits and risks of taking certain drugs. For example, methotrexate, a drug used to treat some rheumatoid-arthritis patients, increases the chance of getting certain types of cancers. He tells these patients the disease itself putsThe Wall Street Journal newspaper logo them at greater risk for cancer, even without treatment.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Eric Matteson, M.D. is chair of Mayo Clinic Rheumatology. Rheumatology provides state-of-the-art diagnosis and treatment of diseases affecting the joints and connective tissue (rheumatic diseases), including more than 100 types of arthritis and many autoimmune diseases. The first chair of Rheumatology at Mayo Clinic, Dr. Philip S. Hench, started the tradition of research that still motivates the division today. His efforts led to the discovery of the beneficial effect of cortisone in rheumatoid arthritis, an observation that led to his sharing the Nobel Prize in 1950.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Traci Klein

 

USA Today
Fun — not winning — essential to keep kids in sports
by Hon-Tran Bui

That whole idea of winning ... well, it seems like it's overrated when it comes to what determines whether kids are having fun playing USA Today Money Section Logosports, a new study suggests…The study was conducted amid an alarming rise in obesity rates, according to Edward Laskowski, a physical medication and rehabilitation specialist from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. bout 70% of kids drop out of organized sports by the time they reach middle school, the report said.…"We're seeing a lot less activity in kids than we did before," said Laskowski. "About one-third of kids in the U.S. are considered overweight or obese. It's certainly an epidemic."

Reach: USA TODAY  has the highest daily circulation of any U.S. newspaper with a daily average circulation of 2.9 million, which includes print and various digital editions.

Context: Ed Laskowski, M.D., is co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center. The Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center is a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

Chicago Tribune
A gut reaction?
by Julie Deardorff

Rheumatoid arthritis has confounded efforts to identify its trigger. Mounting evidence points to a new suspect: a disturbance in the bacteria that live in the intestineChicago Tribune newspaper logos…The condition is known to have a strong genetic component. But not all patients carry the genes, so environmental factors — smoking, hormones, aging and infections — must be involved too, said researcher Veena Taneja, an associate professor of immunology at the Mayo Clinic.

Reach:  The Chicago Tribune’s average weekday circulation is more about 425,000. Average Sunday circulation is more than 781,000. According to the Tribune, its newspaper reaches more than five million consumers while covering 76% of the market.

Context: The billions of bugs in our guts have a newfound role: regulating the immune system and related autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, according to researchers at Mayo Clinic and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Larger-than-normal populations of specific gut bacteria may trigger the development of diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and possibly fuel disease progression in people genetically predisposed to this crippling and confounding condition, say the researchers, who are participating in the Mayo Illinois Alliance for Technology Based Healthcare.  "A lot of people suspected that gut flora played a role in rheumatoid arthritis, but no one had been able to prove it because they couldn't say which came first — the bacteria or the genes," says senior author Veena Taneja, Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic immunologist. "Using genomic sequencing technologies, we have been able to show the gut microbiome may be used as a biomarker for predisposition." More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Samuel Smith

 

KARE11
Mayo researching ALS stem cell treatment
by Renee Tessman

Seventy-five years ago, Lou Gehrig was diagnosed with the rare, neurological disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) at the Mayo Clinic. On July 4th, 1939, he gave his famous farewell speech KARE-11 TV, Minneapolis-St. Paulto baseball fans. Doctors now have a better understanding of the fatal disease but apart from medication that may give someone an extra couple of months, there is still no good way to extend someone's life. Mayo Clinic researchers are working with stem cells to develop a new treatment. A New Brighton woman hopes to benefit.

Reach: KARE is a an NBC affiliate in the Minneapolis-St.Paul market.

Additional coverage: ESPN Outside the LinesUSA Today,  ABC News, Star Tribune

Previous coverage in July 3, 2014, Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Seventy-five years ago, on July 4th 1939, baseball legend Lou Gehrig delivered the famous speech bidding farewell to the ballpark and his fans. Two weeks before Gehrig had been diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Accompanied by his wife, Eleanor, Lou left Mayo Clinic with the devastating diagnosis on June 20th 1939, a day after his 36th birthday. He died in June two years later, not quite 38 years old, of the rare neurological disease that would come to bear his name. ALS is a type of progressive motor neuron disease that typically strikes at middle to later life and causes nerve cells in spinal cord, brain stem and brain to gradually break down and die. These nerve cells are responsible for muscle function so eventually, ALS can affect the ability to control the muscles needed to move, speak, eat and breathe. While ALS still evades cure and effective treatment, researchers at Mayo Clinic are conducting a Phase I clinical trial in the hope that they can guide newly grown stem cells to become protective of neuromuscular function. “We use fat-derived mesenchymal stem cells from the patient's own body. These cells are modified in the laboratory and delivered through a spinal tap into the fluid around the patient's nervous system to promote neuron survival,” explains neurologist Anthony Windebank, M.D, deputy director for discovery in the Center for Regenerative Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Rochester. “We hope that the growth factors that they are producing will help protect and promote the survival of nerve cells and therefore slow down or arrest the progression of ALS. If we can halt an ALS patient's loss of cells at 20 to 30 percent, that person’s function would be well-preserved," says Dr. Windebank. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic


Post-Bulletin
A century-old technique prevents extra tumor surgeries at Mayo
by Jeff Hansel

Patients getting a lumpectomy for breast cancer at Mayo Clinic in Rochester are far less likely to need follow-up surgery than patients having the same procedure done at other clinics. In fact, the rate of second surgeries needed after lumpectomies at other clinics is four times that at Mayo. The reason is Mayo's "frozen-section technique" — perfected at the request of the MayoLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaper brothers themselves — which has been used for more than 100 years. "We have something here that's going to minimize your risk of a second operation," said Dr. Judy Boughey, chair of the Division of Surgery Research at Mayo in Rochester.


Post-Bulletin
Mayo pathologists decrease need for repeat surgeries
by Jeff Hansel

At laboratories tucked inside Rochester's Mayo Clinic Hospital, pathology teams work to analyze tissue samples from patients who are still laying on the operating table under anesthesia….Mayo Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperClinic's version of frozen sections was pioneered in 1905 and is unique to Rochester. But today it has increasing relevance at a time when Mayo is seeking to solidify its position as the top medical destination in the world. The treatment could help attract patients flying in from elsewhere, said Dr. Gary Keeney, Mayo chair of anatomic pathology.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Additional coverage: Insurance News Net

Previous coverage in May 29, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in April 11, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Unique laboratory testing during breast cancer lumpectomies to make sure surgeons remove all cancerous tissue spares patients the need for a repeat lumpectomy in roughly 96 percent of cases at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, a success rate much higher than the rate nationally, a Mayo study shows. During the years reviewed, 13.2 percent of breast cancer lumpectomy patients nationally had to return to the operating room within a month of their initial surgery, compared to 3.6 percent at Mayo in Rochester, which uses a technique called frozen section analysis to test excised tissue for cancer while patients are still on the operating table. The findings are published in the journal Surgery. More information on this study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

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Tags: A.L.S., ABC News, alzheimer's disease, Arizona Republic, Art and Healing at Mayo Clinic, Bayasaa Bars, Becker’s Hospital Review, behavorial disorder, Best Workplace, Bethel Lutheran Church, Big Blue Dragon Boat Races, Bloomberg


July 3rd, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

New York Times

Medical Boards Draft Plan to Ease Path to Out-of-State and Online Treatment
by Robert Pear

Officials representing state medical boards across the country have drafted a model law that would make it much easier for doctors licensed in one state to treat patients in other states, whether in person, by videoconference or online…The Mayo Clinic, in Minnesota, for example, has established links with more than two dozen hospitals The New York Times newspaper logoand health systems…“Cross-border licensure is a strategic imperative as we move forward in this brave new world,” said Kathleen M. Harrington, who is in charge of government relations at Mayo.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Context: In stroke telemedicine, also called telestroke, doctors who have advanced training in the nervous system (neurologists) remotely evaluate people who've had acute strokes and make diagnoses and treatment recommendations to emergency medicine doctors at other sites. Doctors communicate using digital video cameras, Internet telecommunications, robotic telepresence, smartphones and other technology.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Fortune
Test-driving the Mayo Clinic's new plan for healthy living
by Larry Armour

The famed clinic has a fresh approach to helping patients stick with a fitness program. I went to check it out. I’m sharing a gym in Rochester, Minn., with 16 men and women. We are part of a pilot program for a new venture called the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Plan. We were told to wear comfortable clothes and athletic shoes, butFortune magazine logo the hardcore workout we all expected never shows up. Instead, we are introduced to a concept called NEAT, which stands for Non-Exercise Activity Thermogenesis.

Reach: FORTUNE has a circulation of more than 845,000 readers.  It's website receives more than 4.5 million unique visitors each month.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is designed to help people break down barriers, dispel myths and give participants a comprehensive wellness experience tailored to their individual goals. What makes this program unique is that it doesn’t end once the person leaves the campus; it offers ongoing support long after the person returns home. “Mayo has been dedicated to the health and wellness of individuals for 150 years, and this program continues that tradition by offering life-changing experiences to people seeking whole-person wellness who want to maximize their health,” says Donald Hensrud, M.D., medical director, Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. “We’re committed to partnering with each participant to design an individualized wellness plan to help them reach their wellness goals so that their success continues once they return home and are immersed back into the reality of their busy lives.” More information on Mayo's Healthy Living Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

MPR
Researchers, advocates see better ALS therapies on the horizon

This weekend marks the anniversary of one of pro sports' most poignant moments: Baseball great Lou Gehrig, standing before microphones near home plate at Yankee Stadium on July 4, 1939 as a standing-room only crowd honored him as one of the most famous players of his time...There are two stem cell therapy trials going on atMPR-News-300x45 Mayo Clinic. Both involve using stem cells grown from a participant's stomach fat. One is looking at the safety of injecting ALS patients with varying doses of their stem cells. The other trial uses a patient's stem cells, modified with growth factors, and reintroduced into the patient's spinal fluid. Researchers hope those tweaked stem cells will protect cells that control movement from further damage and death from ALS. Dr. Anthony Windebank, with the Center for Regenerative Medicine at Mayo, calls the fledgling therapy a "radically new kind of treatment." 

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Additional Coverage:

Men’s HealthGehrig's Final, Finest At-Bat

Post-Bulletin, Gehrig honored, 75 years after speech 


Context:
 Seventy-five years ago, on July 4th 1939, baseball legend Lou Gehrig delivered the famous speech bidding farewell to the ballpark and his fans. Two weeks before Gehrig had been diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Accompanied by his wife, Eleanor, Lou left Mayo Clinic with the devastating diagnosis on June 20th 1939, a day after his 36th birthday. He died in June two years later, not quite 38 years old, of the rare neurological disease that would come to bear his name.

ALS is a type of progressive motor neuron disease that typically strikes at middle to later life and causes nerve cells in spinal cord, brain stem and brain to gradually break down and die. These nerve cells are responsible for muscle function so eventually, ALS can affect the ability to control the muscles needed to move, speak, eat and breathe.

While ALS still evades cure and effective treatment, researchers at Mayo Clinic are conducting a Phase I clinical trial in the hope that they can guide newly grown stem cells to become protective of neuromuscular function.

“We use fat-derived mesenchymal stem cells from the patient's own body. These cells are modified in the laboratory and delivered through a spinal tap into the fluid around the patient's nervous system to promote neuron survival,” explains neurologist Anthony Windebank, M.D, deputy director for discovery in the Center for Regenerative Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Rochester. “We hope that the growth factors that they are producing will help protect and promote the survival of nerve cells and therefore slow down or arrest the progression of ALS. If we can halt an ALS patient's loss of cells at 20 to 30 percent, that person’s function would be well-preserved," says Dr. Windebank. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Post Bulletin
Hockey players get cognitive training from Mayo Clinic staff
by Jeff Hansel

Mayo Clinic's new Rochester training center for elite athletes has taken a cue from the Israeli military. The facility, in the Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center, this year Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperbegan cognitive training designed to increase hockey players' "hockey sense" — their awareness of where the puck and other players are on the ice. It uses "applied cognitive engineering" developed with USA Hockey…Dr. Michael Stuart, co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center, said athletes can actually improve their ability to anticipate what's going to happen on the ice based on the location of the puck or other players, including "both teammates and opponents."

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center is a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, sports performance optimization, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

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Tags: 3D mammography, A.L.S., AftenPosten, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimer's disease, Apple, Arthritis Today, Augie Nieto, autism spectrum disorder, birth control, Bloomberg Businessweek, BMI


June 26th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Wall Street Journal
Obesity Is Undercounted in Children, Study Finds
by Sumathi Reddy

…A new study finds that the commonly used body-mass-index measure may fail to identify as many as 25% of children, age 4 to 18 years, who have excess body fat. The meta-analysis, scheduled for publication online in the journal Pediatric Obesity on Tuesday, reviewed 37 separate studies involving a combined The Wall Street Journal newspaper logo53,521 participants. "BMI is not capturing everybody who needs to be labeled as obese," said Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, director of preventive cardiology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who headed the study with Asma Javed, a pediatric endocrinology fellow.

Additional coverage:

KAAL, Mayo Study Finds Fault with Youth BMI Measurements
WJXT Fla., KTVZ Oreg., ANSA Italy


Wall Street Journal Lunch Break
Video: Obesity Undercounted in Children, Study Finds

A new study finds that the commonly used body mass index measure A new study finds that the Wall Street Journal Live Logocommonly used body mass index measure may leave out as many as 25% of children with excess body fat. Dr. Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, co-author of the study and director of preventive cardiology at the Mayo Clinic, joins Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero.

Context: Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Lopez-Jimenez's research program has studied obesity and cardiovascular disease from different angles, from physiologic studies assessing changes in myocardial mechanics and structural and hemodynamic changes following weight loss, to studies addressing the effect of physicians' diagnosis of obesity on willingness to lose weight and successful weight loss at follow-up.


Wall Street Journal
How to Keep Your Muscles Strong as You Age
by Laura Landrow

...For now, however, the best medicine available to maintain muscle mass and strength is less complicated and costly—namely, exercise and a healthy diet. Yet about 60% of people over 65 are insufficiently active or overtly inactive, and many have poor nutrition, says Nathan LeBrasseur, a researcher who directs the Muscle Performance and Physical Function Laboratory and the Healthy Aging and The Wall Street Journal newspaper logoIndependent Living Initiative at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Dr. LeBrasseur estimates that most people will lose approximately 30% of muscle mass over their lifetime, and as much as 50% by the time they reach their 80s or 90s.

Context: Nathan LeBrasseur, Ph.D. is a Mayo Clinic researcher and is affiliated with Mayo Clinic's Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging and Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. More information about his work can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

 

Wall Street Journal
How Bad Sitting Posture at Work Leads to Bad Standing Posture All the Time
by Jeanne Whalen

Good posture means aligning ears over the shoulders, shoulders over hips, and Wall Street Journal Life and Culture logohips over the knees and ankles…Many deskbound office workers have started standing and walking in this position, too, says Andrea Cheville, a rehabilitation physician at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. To counteract kyphosis, it is important to stretch the pectoral muscles and strengthen the trapezius muscles in the upper back, which hold the shoulder blades back, Dr. Cheville said. Remembering to keep the ears and head over the shoulders, and not jutting forward, is also important.

Context: Andrea Cheville, M.D., Mayo Clinic Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, is an expert on exercise in the elderly and also focuses on the delivery of supportive care services to optimize the functionality and quality-of-life for patients with cancer in all disease stages.

Wall Street Journal
Can Data From Your Fitbit Transform Medicine?
By Elizabeth Dwoskin

Many runners and fitness fanatics have been quick to embrace wearable wireless tracking devices for Wall Street Journal Tech Logomeasuring physical activity and calories burned. Now, a growing number of physicians are formally studying whether such "wearables" can improve patients' health by spurring people to get moving…David Cook, an anesthesiologist at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, who, along with colleagues, used Fitbit Inc.'s namesake gadget to track activity levels of cardiac-surgery patients. The researchers found that patients who moved more the day after surgery were more likely to be discharged sooner. The findings prompted the hospital to dispatch physical therapists to study patients who weren't moving as much, said Dr. Cook.

Context: David J. Cook, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

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Tags: 3D mammograms, ABC News Australia, ABC30, aging, Agnes Rapacz, Allevant Solutions, alzheimer's disease, American News Report, angina, ANSA, anti-obesity devic, AP


June 19th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Wall Street Journal
Effort Seeks to Reduce Ear-Tube Surgeries for Small Children
By Sumathi Reddy

Parents of young, otherwise healthy children fear them like the plague: ear infections…Contributing to a desire by doctors and parents to avoid surgery are concerns about the use of general anesthesia in young children. Researchers and doctors are exploring devices that would enable ear-tube procedures to be The Wall Street Journal newspaper logoperformed using alternatives. Preceptis Medical, a Plymouth, Minn., company, is testing a device, the Hummingbird, that uses nitrous oxide instead of general anesthesia in clinical trials at four sites, including the Mayo Clinic…Randall Flick, director of the Mayo Clinic Children's Center, said his and other studies show the risk seems to occur after multiple exposures.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Randall Flick, M.D. is director of Mayo Clinic Children's Center. For 150 years, Mayo Clinic has provided trusted answers for children and their parents. Mayo Clinic Children's Center includes providers from over 40 medical and surgical specialties, all focused on children's health care needs.

Public Affairs Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Traci Klein

 

Science Friday
Pre-Surgery Routine Needs an Update

Says Doc, For years, patients preparing for colon surgery have been told to stick to a liquid diet and do a colon cleanse. The only problem? There's not much science to back up those suggestions, says Robert Science FridayCima of the Mayo Clinic. He and his Mayo colleagues subscribe instead to the “enhanced recovery” approach, which spares patients the fasting and heavy narcotics in favor of regular meals and over-the-counter painkillers. Surgery is like running a marathon, he says, and the body needs to be in a normal state to brace for the big event.

Reach: Science Friday is a weekly science talk show, broadcast live over public radio stations nationwide from 2-4pm Eastern time as part of NPR's 'Talk of the Nation' programming. Each week, we focus on science topics that are in the news and try to bring an educated, balanced discussion to bear on the scientific issues at hand.

Context: Robert Cima, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic surgeon and chair of Mayo’s surgical quality subcommittee.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

KSTP
Burnsville Father and Son Hope for Gift of Life
by Naomi Pescovitz

As Minnesota families celebrate dads this Father's Day, a Burnsville family is especially grateful for another year together. Last winter, David Costello's double organ transplant saved his life. This year, theKSTP-TV Eyewitness News Log Costellos are hoping for the gift of life once again. David Costello waited four and a half years to finally get the call. "My phone lit up, the ID said Mayo Clinic," Costello said.

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Context: Mayo Clinic Transplant Center, with transplant services in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota, performs more transplants than any other medical center in the world.

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

Orlando Business Journal
Brevard County hospital first in C. Fla. to join Mayo Clinic network
by Matthew Richardson

Parrish Medical Center in Brevard County has formed a partnership with Mayo Clinic— the first hospital in the Central Florida area to do sOrlando Business Journal newspaper logoo, reports News 13. Parrish is now the 29th member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, under the umbrella of the original Mayo Clinic. The century-old, renowned nonprofit is focused on medical care and research, helping millions every year.

Additional coverage:

Florida Today, Parrish to benefit from Mayo's expertise

Bay News 9Parrish Medical Center joins Mayo Clinic network

Post-Bulletin, KROC AM, Becker’s Hospital ReviewStamford Advocate, Cincinnati Finance, EMoney Daily,Virtual-Strategy magazine, Townhall Finance, Review Seeker, News13 Fla., MoneyShow.com, Minyanville, KVVU Las Vegas, Financial Content, KAIT 8 Ark., Florida Today

Context: Mayo Clinic and Parrish Medical Center officials have announced Parrish Medical Center (PMC) as the 29th member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. PMC is the first Central Florida member of the network and the third in Florida. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

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June 17th, 2014

Mayo, Scottsdale hospitals concerned about impact of Medicaid expansion

By loganlafferty

When Gov. Jan Brewer announced her plan to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, one of the few hospitals in Arizona to object was the Mayo Clinic. Under the plan, Arizona would pay for its share of the expansion by taxing hospitals and using the revenue to qualify for massive amounts of federal matching funds. Even though they would be paying a new assessment, most hospitals would get more money back through federal reimbursements for Medicaid patients.

 

Capitol Times(subscription only) by Jeremy Duda

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Tags: Affordable care act, Capitol Times, federal matching funds, federal reimbursements, Gov. Jan Brewer, medicaid, tax


June 12th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Wall Street Journal
Apple’s New Health Focus Comes at Propitious Time
by Clint Boulton

…Apple and the Mayo Clinic are collaborating on one such integration in which HealthKit, capturing data from a blood pressure app, will notify the hospital in the event a patient’s blood pressure falls outside normal range. Mayo Clinic physicians will provide the patient recommendationThe Wall Street Journal newspaper logos — take medication or come in immediately — in the context of the app, said John Wald, Mayo Clinic’s medical director for marketing and public affairs.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Additional Coverage:
Forbes, In Healthcare, Apple Will Struggle To Match Huge Samsung Ambitions

Product Reviews, mHealthNews, Pauls Valley Daily Democrat, Fast Company

Previous Coverage in June 5 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: During last week's  keynote address at the Worldwide Developers Conference 2014Apple, Inc., unveiled HealthKit, a digital repository for various types of health-fitness related data. Apple highlighted HealthKit through a new Mayo Clinic app under development that would offer users a more personalized experience and make their health data more actionable in supporting healthier lifestyles. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

Minneapolis/ St. Paul Business Journal
Made at Mayo: Cultural shift lets Mayo Clinic researchers helm their own startups
By Katharine Grayson

For most of its history, Mayo Clinic has lauded innovative medical research, but made entrepreneurship against the rules. The health care giant barred its Minneapolis-St. Paul Business Journal newspaper logodoctors from owning medical companies or serving as C-level executives. That meant researchers had to bid farewell to their inventions, as Mayo licensed their medical therapies to new firms they couldn’t lead or to larger companies.

Reach: The Minneapolis-St. Paul Business Journal is published by American City Business Journals which owns more than 40 other local business newspapers.

Related Coverage in Minneapolis/ St. Paul Business Journal:
Made at Mayo: Mayo professor doubles as founder of text tech company
Made at Mayo: Oncology professor launches startup to track cells and viruses
Made at Mayo:
Zumbro uses custom peptides to battle hypertension

Context: The Mayo Clinic Business Accelerator provides infrastructure that enables entrepreneurism for the Rochester community. Founded by the Rochester Area Economic Development, Inc. (RAEDI), City of Rochester, Mayo Clinic Treasury Services and Mayo Clinic Ventures, the Mayo Clinic Business Accelerator provides collaborative space for new companies, venture capital firms and entrepreneurs. It also works with existing companies and service providers to support entrepreneurial ventures. It encompasses over 2,000 square feet within the skyway level of the Minnesota BioBusiness Center. The Accelerator promotes local and regional economic development through new company creation and expansion. "Our goal with the Mayo Clinic Business Accelerator is to bring together like-minded entrepreneurs, investors and advisers to share ideas, resources and expertise, and by doing so we hope to build a unique ecosystem and support the spirit of entrepreneurism in Rochester," says Jim Rogers, chair, Mayo Clinic Ventures. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Brian Kilen

 

Post-Bulletin
Hockey: Stuart ready to get Jets back to postseason

Mark Stuart is settled and content in Winnipeg. The Rochester native is an assistant captain of an NHL team, he likes the city and the hockey-mad fans who call it home. "It's always nice to have that stability and in a place I enjoy," said Stuart, who was at the new Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center on Wednesday to Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperwork out and talk to Rochester youth hockey players and their parents about the Center's hockey training program. "Winnipeg is where I wanted to be. I'm excited to be there."

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center is a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, sports performance optimization, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

WCCO
Study: Sharing A Bed With Your Pet Can Disturb Your Sleep

This is an obvious statement — pet owners love their furry family members. There’s always debate though, on where you let them sit or sleep. A new study from WCCO logothe Mayo Clinic says while cozying up with your dog or cat may sound nice, pets actually disturb your sleep.

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

Additional coverage:
Daily Mail UK, Sidebar: Pet Owners Are Increasingly Being Kept Awake By Their Animals
Prevention magazine, The Cutest Reason You Can’t Sleep
Health24, BringMeTheNews, WBZ-CBS Boston, WDAF Kansas City, WFLD-FOX  Chicago, WOIO-CBS Cleveland, KTLA Los Angeles

Context: While countless pet owners peacefully sleep with a warm pet nearby, a new Mayo Clinic study, presented this week at the 29th Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, finds an increase in the number of people experiencing sleep disturbances because of their pets. A previous Mayo Clinic study published in 2002 reported that of patients who visited the clinic’s sleep center and owned pets, only one percent reported any inconvenience from their pets at night. The new study shows a larger number of patients — 10 percent in 2013 — reported annoyance that their pets sometimes disturbed their sleep. “The study determined that while the majority of patients did not view their pets intolerably disturbing their sleep, a higher percentage of patients experienced irritation — this may be related to the larger number of households with multiple pets,” says Lois Krahn, M.D., Mayo Clinic psychiatrist and author of the study. “When people have these kinds of sleep problems, sleep specialists should ask about companion animals and help patients think about ways to optimize their sleep.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

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Tags: 2010 dietary guidelines for Americans, ABC30, ALTTO Trial, American Academy of Sleep Medicine, American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, American Society for Preventive Cardiology, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Apple, Arizona Republic, ASCO, ASCO Post, Beth Padesky


June 5th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

The Guardian (UK)
Apple previews new mobile software iOS 8 at WWDC 2014
By Alex Hern

Apple demonstrated iOS 8, its newest version of its operating system for iPhones and iPads, at its worldwide developers conference in San Francisco. The new OS introduced a new Health app to offer "a single comprehensive overview of your fitness," as well asThe Guardian newspaper logo
updates to features including Mail and Notification Centre. The Health app integrates with apps such as Nike+, or even apps made by healthcare providers, to let users manage their health through their iOS devices. "We believe Apple's healthkit will revolutionise how the healthcare industry interacts with people," said John Noseworthy, CEO of the prestigious Mayo Clinic hospital.

Reach: The Guardian is the world's 3rd largest newspaper website. US traffic topped 12.7 million monthly unique users in June 2013.

Additional Coverage:

Pioneer Press, Apple, Mayo partner on iOS health monitor
MPR, The doctor will see your phone now
Forbes, Apple Gives Epic And Mayo Bear Hug With HealthKit
CNBC, The OpenTable for doctors hits the office
KAAL,  Mayo Teaming with Apple on Breakthrough Technology
Post-Bulletin,  Apple, Mayo Clinic team up

Financial Post, ReadWrite, Florida Times-Union, Star Tribune, Modern Healthcare, FOX News, Huffington Post, WCCO, Washington Post, SELF magazine, Reuters, NY Times, NBC News, FOX10 Phoenix, CNBC, Chicago Tribune, CBS News, Bloomberg, ABC News, Atlanta Journal-Constitution (AP), BringMeTheNews, Forbes, Times of India, Mashable, MedCity News, Daily Mail UK, Trust.org, Trust.orgHeartScore, MediaPostPost-Bulletin, International Business Times UK, InformationWeek, Star Tribune, KIMT, Wall Street Journal

Context: During this week's  keynote address at the Worldwide Developers Conference 2014Apple, Inc., unveiled HealthKit, a digital repository for various types of health-fitness related data. Apple highlighted HealthKit through a new Mayo Clinic app under development that would offer users a more personalized experience and make their health data more actionable in supporting healthier lifestyles. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
Mayo Clinic targets $3 billion for research funding
by Coleen Michele Jones

Mayo Clinic is publically kicking off a capital campaign to raise $3 billion by 2017 for biomedical research and education across its three campuses, including Jacksonville…“We’re partnering Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logowith benefactors to bring medical breakthroughs which will enhance patient care,” said Dr. Michael Camilleri, executive dean for the department of development at Mayo’s headquarters in Minnesota. “As we have seen, reliable funding is the best way to ensure better outcomes.”

Reach: The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Previous Coverage in May 15 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage in May 8 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: To accelerate the pace of research, solve unmet needs of patients and improve the quality of health care, Mayo Clinic announced on May 8 a philanthropic campaign to raise $3 billion by Dec. 31, 2017, strengthening Mayo’s strategic priorities in patient care, research and education. “Reliable funding is the biggest barrier to advance medical breakthroughs that can benefit patients suffering from diseases,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. “Traditional funding sources, such as federal grants, cannot cover the cost of discovering cutting-edge science and implementing those solutions in clinical practice.” More information can be found on the Mayo Clinic News Newtwork and campaign website.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Arizona Republic (HealthDay)
Flying after surgery may be safe, experts say

If you're returning home after having chest surgery at an out-of-town hospital, flying is as safe as driving, an expert says.  It's widely believed that ground travel is safer than air travel after chest surgery, but a Arizona Republic newspaper logorecent study by Mayo Clinic thoracic surgeon Stephen Cassivi found that isn't true. He also concluded there is no reason to wait for weeks after chest surgery to fly home.

ReachThe Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday. The newspaper’s website Arizona Central, averages 83 million pages views each month.

Previous Coverage in May 29 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Summer travel isn’t for vacation alone. For some people, it may include a trip to an out-of-town hospital for surgery. If you are traveling for chest surgery, you may wonder whether it is safer to return home by car or plane. A new Mayo Clinic study found that, contrary to conventional wisdom, air travel is just as safe as ground travel after chest surgery, and there is often no reason to wait for weeks after an operation to fly home. Lead study author Stephen Cassivi, M.D., a Mayo Clinic thoracic surgeon, offers these five tips for safer, more comfortable travel home after surgery on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Delta Sky Magazine
Wiping out Cancer
by Karen Springen

Leading doctors take stock of the current state of cancer care and the exciting developments on the Delta Sky magazine logohorizon…Dr. Sameer Keole, a radiation oncologist specializing in pediatric cancer at the Mayo Clinic, has used proton therapy to treat kids with cancer and estimates that 3,000 to 3,500 U.S. kids could be treated with proton beam therapy each year.

Reach: Delta Sky is the inflight magazine for Delta Airlines. The magazine has a circulation of more than 600,000. Delta Sky online serves as the online companion to its parent magazine.

Context: Mayo Clinic Cancer Center combines personalized cancer treatment with leading-edge research to provide patients with unparalleled cancer care.

Public Affairs Contact: Joe Dangor

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Tags: "Mayo's Pain Reliever" pills, ABC News, ADHD, ALTTO, American Academy of Sleep Medicine, Amy Donohue, AP, Apple, Arizona Republic, Arthritis Research UK, ASCO, Associated Press


June 4th, 2014

Is Wheat Gluten Really Bad for Everyone?

By loganlafferty

"Originally, I thought there was more celiac because we were better at finding it," said Dr. Joseph Murray, a gastroenterologist and professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic. But he was mistaken. For a 2009 study in the journal Gastroenterology, Murray's research team compared blood samples collected from about 6,500 young men at a US Air Force base between 1948 and 1954 with a comparable number of modern-day samples. Today's young men, they found, tested positive for celiac at four and a half times the rate of their forebears.

 

Mother Jones by Kiera Butler

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Tags: celiac disease, Dr. Joseph Murray, gastroenterology, gluten, Mother Jones, wheat gluten


May 29th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations


NY Times
Ask Well: For Fitness, 2,000 Calories a Week?
By Gretchen Reynolds

I have read and heard that a person should aim to expend 2,000 calories weekly in exercise for optimum health. Is there any basis at all for this notion?...Adhering to these guidelines means that most of us would burn about 1,000 calories per week in planned The New York Times newspaper logoexercise, said Michael J. Joyner, an exercise researcher at the Mayo Clinic. And with the stairs we climb and chores we do, we come closer to that 2,000 calorie a week number, he said.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anthesiologist. Dr. Joyner and his lab team are interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci KleinBryan Anderson

 

ABC News
Wrong Women Getting Double Mastectomies, Study Finds
By Suneeta Ganji, MD

…A growing number of women with cancer in one breast are choosing to have both breasts removed. But new research suggests that the women who should be doing this aren’t – ABC News logoand, ironically, those who don’t need to take this approach are opting for it.The study, published Wednesday in JAMA Surgery, reveals what some doctors are pointing to as a problematic trend – as well as possible evidence of a breakdown in communication between women anxious about a breast cancer diagnosis and their doctors...Dr. Judy Boughey, a breast surgeon at Mayo Clinic who was not involved in the study, said breast cancer patients often have various reasons for either opting for or avoiding surgery to remove a healthy breast.

Reach:  ABCNews.com is the official website for ABC News. Its website receives more than 16.9 million unique visitors each month.

Previous Coverage

Context: Unique laboratory testing during breast cancer lumpectomies to make sure surgeons remove all cancerous tissue spares patients the need for a repeat lumpectomy in roughly 96 percent of cases at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, a success rate much higher than the rate nationally, a Mayo study shows. During the years reviewed, 13.2 percent of breast cancer lumpectomy patients nationally had to return to the operating room within a month of their initial surgery, compared to 3.6 percent at Mayo in Rochester, which uses a technique called frozen section analysis to test excised tissue for cancer while patients are still on the operating table. The findings are published in the journal Surgery. More information on this study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

US News & World Report
Air Travel Safe After Chest Surgery, Surgeon Says

If you're returning home after having chest surgery at an out-of-town hospital, flying is as safe as driving, an expert says. It's widely believed that ground travel is safer than air US News & World Report Logotravel after chest surgery, but a study by Mayo Clinic thoracic surgeon Dr. Stephen Cassivi found that isn't true. He also concluded there is no reason to wait for weeks after chest surgery to fly home.

Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional Coverage:
HealthDay, Air Travel Safe After Chest Surgery, Surgeon Says
Health.com, MSN Healthy Living, Philadelphia Inquirer, HHS Healthfinder.gov, Newsday, Yahoo! Health, Winnipeg Free Press Ciencias Medicas News

Context: Summer travel isn’t for vacation alone. For some people, it may include a trip to an out-of-town hospital for surgery. If you are traveling for chest surgery, you may wonder whether it is safer to return home by car or plane. A new Mayo Clinic study found that, contrary to conventional wisdom, air travel is just as safe as ground travel after chest surgery, and there is often no reason to wait for weeks after an operation to fly home. Lead study author Stephen Cassivi, M.D., a Mayo Clinic thoracic surgeon, offers these five tips for safer, more comfortable travel home after surgery on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Star Tribune
Miracle fruit: Is the coconut all it's cracked up to be?
By Allie Shah

…“I always say: If all else fails, try coconut,” said Oprish, who recently wrote about the wonders of coconut for the Twin Cities Moms blog. The 33-year-old is part of a consumer movement that is transforming a tropical fruit once maligned for its high fat content into aStar Tribune Health newspaper logo super food embraced by people who swear by its therapeutic powers. The coconut’s healing abilities are said to be vast — from bad-breath-erasing mouthwash to Alzheimer’s treatment. As with other so-called miracle foods, “things start snowballing, and that’s what happened with coconut,” said Dr. Donald Hensrud of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Donald Hensrud, M.D. is a preventive medicine expert at Mayo Clinic and medical editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet; David Knopman, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist and Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L.D. helps people sort through the facts and figures from the fads and the hype to learn more about nutrition and diet.

Public Affairs Contacts: Joe Dangor, Duska Anastasijevic, Ginger Plumbo

 

KARE11
Mayo Clinic says sideline test detects youth concussions
by Renee Tessman

On the sidelines of youth sports, a new Mayo Clinic study shows a simple test, known as KARE-11 TV, Minneapolis-St. Paulthe King-Devick,can detect concussions. Dr. Amaal Starling of the Mayo Clinic is co-author of the study. She said for youth athletes, "This is really the first accurate, rapid, cost effective, removal-from-play tool that is available for concussion screen."

Reach: KARE is a an NBC affiliate in the Minneapolis-St.Paul market.

Additional Coverage:
KSTP, Forum at Edina High School Addresses Concussions in Sports
Healio Optometry News, King-Devick test effective in detecting concussions for adolescents, study finds

Context:  A rapid, easy-to-administer eye movement test is showing great promise as a sideline concussion test for youth sports, a Mayo Clinic study finds. In the study, Mayo Clinic researchers assessed high school hockey players using the King-Devick test. The test requires an athlete to read single-digit numbers displayed on cards. After suspected head trauma, the athlete is given the test, which takes about two minutes, and the results are compared to a baseline test administered previously. If the time needed to complete the test takes longer than the baseline test time, the athlete should be removed from play until evaluated by a medical professional. Amaal Starling, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist and a co-author of the study. More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Post-Bulletin
Back and Forth: Mayo’s 150 Years Included Dr. Donald Balfour
by Harley Flathers

One of the many people we might describe as a "Rock" at Mayo Clinic shortly after entering the 20th century was Dr. Donald C. Balfour, an early associate with Drs. Will andLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaper Charlie Mayo...Balfour took a liking to Dr. Will and Hattie Mayo's daughter Carrie…One of the Balfour daughters, Mary, married the late Henry Frederic Helmholz Jr., who died Jan. 6, 2012, at age 100. Their daughter, Martha Mayo Helmholz-Anderson, told me Balfour was a loving grandfather.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: This year marks 150 years of continuous service to patients, and Mayo Clinic is launching a yearlong recognition that will honor a legacy of medical accomplishments and a model for the future of health care. Dr. Mayo’s sons, Drs. William and Charles Mayo, joined the practice in the late 1880’s and, with their father, created Mayo Clinic’s medical hallmark: The integrated care model that focuses a team of experts on one patient at a time and puts patients’ needs first. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

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Tags: 2018 Super Bowl, ABC News, ABC Salud, accidents, Affordable care act, air travel, Al Schilmoeller, Arizona ABC 15, atrial fibrillation, AVM, back pain remedies, Barbara McCarthy


May 22nd, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

 

 
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

TIME
Measles Vaccine Cures Woman Of Cancer
by Markham Heid

Mayo Clinic researchers have wiped out a 49-year-old Minnesota woman’s blood cTime magazine logoancer with a radical new virus-based treatment that involved injecting her with “the highest possible dose” of a measles vaccine, suggesting virotherapy could treat some cancers.

Reach: Time magazine has a weekly circulation of 3.3 million. Time Online receives mores than 4.6 million unique visitors to its website each month and its monthy page views are more than 32.8 million.

Additional coverage:  USA TODAY, Imperial Valley News, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Chicago Tribune, SELF, LA Times, Boston Globe, Reuters, Telegraph UK, Hawaii Reporter, Design & Trend, Post-Bulletin, KSDK, Forbes, Leadership Newspapers, Le Figaro Sante, EveryJoeStar Tribune 

Previous coverage

Context: In a proof of principle clinical trial, Mayo Clinic researchers have demonstrated that virotherapy — destroying cancer with a virus that infects and kills cancer cells but spares normal tissues — can be effective against the deadly cancer multiple myeloma. The findings appear in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Two patients in the study received a single intravenous dose of an engineered measles virus (MV-NIS) that is selectively toxic to myeloma plasma cells. Both patients responded, showing reduction of both bone marrow cancer and myeloma protein. One patient, a 49-year-old woman, experienced complete remission of myeloma and has been clear of the disease for over six months. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis


KARE11
Fort Hood shooting survivor faces challenges in MN
by Boyd Huppert

Patrick Zeigler sits quietly in a traveling museum celebrating 150 years of the Mayo Clinic. KARE-11 TV, Minneapolis-St. PaulPatrick is volunteering his time at the wounded warrior display. Visitors stop to read the text and view the pictures around him. Some notice Patrick's army cap and his service dog Ranger, then extend a hand to thank Patrick for his service.

Reach: KARE is a an NBC affiliate in the Minneapolis-St.Paul market.

Context: Army Staff Sgt. Patrick Zeigler was critically injured in the shooting at Fort Hood in November 2009 -- Zeigler was shot four times, including once in the head, during the attack. His first trip to Rochester came at a critical point in his recovery, and the soldier credits his Mayo Clinic team with saving his life.

Public Affairs Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Rebecca Eisenman

 

KSTPKAAL
Mayo Clinic Develops New, Less Invasive Weight Loss Procedure
by Naomi Pescovitz

A new study was underway for a weight loss procedure not meant for the morbidly obese. "This is radically different from the surgery because the surgery is radical," said Dr. KSTP-TV Eyewitness News LogChristopher Gostout, Consultant at Mayo Clinic and Director of the Developmental Endoscopy Unit. Gostout and Dr. Barham Abu Dayyeh, Assistant Professor of Medicine at Mayo, had developed a way to shrink a person's stomach, without the scarring or slicing through the skin.

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.  KAAL, like KAAL TV logoKSTP,  is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Additional coverage: KTTC, WXOW La Crosse

Context: Christopher Gostout, M.D., and Barham Abu Dayyeh, M.D., are Mayo Clinic physicians in Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Public Affairs Contacts: Brian KilenRebecca Eisenman

 

Arizona Republic
Kidney donation leads to friendship between women
by Wendy Neri

At first glance, Nancy Shaver and Kati Walker could hardly be more different. Two decades apart in age, one is a longtime elementary-school principal with closely cropped Arizona Republic newspaper logowhite hair and an exuberant laugh; the other, a vibrant young mother, artist and fitness enthusiast with ombre hair and tattoos.…Soon after, Shaver, Walker, and both the transplant and donor teams at Mayo Clinic scheduled the transplant surgery for the following January. At that point, Shaver and Walker began meeting for coffee to get to know each other better.

ReachThe Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday. The newspaper’s website Arizona Central, averages 83 million pages views each month.

Context: Mayo Clinic doctors actively perform research in kidney transplantation, presenting their work at national and international meetings. The Mayo Clinic Transplant Center supports many studies for kidney transplant research.

Public Affairs Contact: Lynn Closway

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Tags: 12 Habits of Highly Healthy People, 2014 Recognition of Outstanding Contribution Award, 2018 Super Bowl, Advance for Occupational Therapy Practitioners, Advance Healthcare Network for Nurses, Alaska, All About Jazz, alzheimer's disease, Amy Purdy, antibiotics, antiviral medications, Arizona Republic


May 15th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80 Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations


NY Times
AGING AMERICA: Exercise as the Fountain of Youth

…Exercise may be the closest thing we have to a fountain of youth, one of the best ways to age happy and well. "The mantra now is, exercise is a drug" — able, like some medications

The New York Times newspaper logo are, to prevent and treat a host of age-related ailments, said Dr. Andrea Cheville, a Mayo Clinic expert on exercise in the elderly.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Star Tribune (AP), KAAL, ABC News, Huffington Post Canada, Monterey Herald, Ottawa Citizen

Context: Andrea Cheville, M.D., Mayo Clinic Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, is an expert on exercise in the elderly.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

KSTP
On the Road with Jason Davis: Mayo Clinic Celebrates 150 Years

KSTP's Jason Davis goes on the road to Arizona, Florida and Minnesota fKSTP-TV Eyewitness News Logor his feature on Mayo Clinic. This was Davis's last report for his On the Road series before retiring at the end of May 2014 after nearly four decades with KSTP.  This year, one of Minnesota's best known institutions celebrates its 150th anniversary. It was in 1864 that Dr. William Worral Mayo started his small clinic in Rochester, and just how that small practice grew into a world-renowned facility is a fascinating story. Jason Davis went on the road to learn about the past, present and future of Mayo Clinic.

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Additional Mayo Clinic 150th Anniversary and history of Mayo coverage:

KTTC, Mayo Clinic celebrates 150 years by Courtney Sturgeon

KARE11, Recovering Brokaw hosts Mayo's 150th anniversary 

KTTC, The early beginnings of the Mayo Clinic Mid-century advancements, Recent history

KTTC, Dr. John Noseworthy reflects on 150 years of Mayo Clinic success 

MPR, Mayo's mark: 5 innovations that changed health care 

Post-Bulletin, Jordanian king touched many in Rochester 

Post-Bulletin, Descendants of Dr. W.W. Mayo visit family home 

Post-Bulletin, Massive medical team focused 'millimeter by millimeter' to separate twins 

Post-Bulletin, 150th anniversary: Mayo Clinic helped U.S., allies win World War II 

Post-BulletinOddchester: 150 years in less than three hours

Greenhouse Grower, Mayo Clinic Will Promote Coreopsis ‘Electric Avenue’ As Its Flower Of Hope

Perishable NewsMayo Clinic Chooses Yellow Coreopsis As Its 'Flower Of Hope'

WCCO, Star Tribune, Big News Network, WCCO AM, Coon Rapids Herald, Post-Bulletin, Post-Bulletin, Post-Bulletin

Context: On July 1, 1907, Dr. Henry Plummer and Mabel Root, Dr. Plummer's assistant, inaugurated Mayo's system of patient registration and medical record keeping. The single-unit record was central to the new system. It brought together all of a patient's records -- clinical visits, hospital stays, laboratory tests and notes -- in a single file that traveled with the patient and was stored in a central repository. This simple system quickly became the standard for medical record keeping around the world. This year marks 150 years of continuous service to patients, and Mayo Clinic is launching a yearlong recognition that will honor a legacy of medical accomplishments and a model for the future of health care. Dr. Mayo’s sons, Drs. William and Charles Mayo, joined the practice in the late 1880’s and, with their father, created Mayo Clinic’s medical hallmark: The integrated care model that focuses a team of experts on one patient at a time and puts patients’ needs first. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Rebecca Eisenman, Kelley Luckstein

 

FOX47
Mayo Clinic announces campaign to raise $3 billion
by Mary McGuire

Mayo Clinic is looking to the future in a big way as it launches a camFox 47 TV station logopaign to raise $3 billion. It's all part of the "You are ... the campaign for Mayo Clinic" being announced Thursday. The goal of the campaign is to raise $3 billion by the end of 2017 to strengthen patient care, research and education at Mayo.

Additional coverage: KTTC, Becker’s Hospital Review, KROC-AM

Previous coverage

Context: To accelerate the pace of research, solve unmet needs of patients and improve the quality of health care, Mayo Clinic today announced a philanthropic campaign to raise $3 billion by Dec. 31, 2017, strengthening Mayo’s strategic priorities in patient care, research and education. “Reliable funding is the biggest barrier to advance medical breakthroughs that can benefit patients suffering from diseases,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. “Traditional funding sources, such as federal grants, cannot cover the cost of discovering cutting-edge science and implementing those solutions in clinical practice.” More information can be found on the Mayo Clinic News Newtwork and campaign website.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic trial: Massive blast of measles vaccine wipes out cancer
by Dan Browning

Stacy Erholtz was out of conventional treatment options for blood cancer last June when she underwent an exStar Tribune Health newspaper logoperimental trial at the Mayo Clinic that injected her with enough measles vaccine to inoculate 10 million people. The 50-year-old Pequot Lakes mother is now part of medical history…But the experiment provides the “proof of concept” that a single, massive dose of intravenous viral therapy can kill cancer by overwhelming its natural defenses, according to Dr. Stephen Russell, a professor of molecular medicine who spearheaded the research at Mayo.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:
KARE11Minn. woman's cancer in remission thanks to measles 

Washington Post, Woman’s cancer killed by measles virus in unprecedented trial

MPR, How the Mayo Clinic handles potential patients in clinical trials

USA TODAY, Massive dose of measles vaccine clears woman's cancer

WGN-TV, Mayo Clinic: Woman’s cancer cured with huge dose of measles vaccine

International Business Times UK, Mayo Clinic Landmark Trial: Measles Vaccine Wipes out Cancer in Patient

Daily BeastMeasles Vaccine Killed Patient's Cancer

MashableMeasles Vaccine Wipes Out Cancer in Groundbreaking Test

UPI.com, Massive dose of measles vaccine knocks out woman's cancer

azcentral.comMeasles vaccine cures woman's cancer in study

Reuters, CNN, International Business Times, La Parisienne (France), Le Monde (France), Telegraph (UK), Globe and Mail, Fox 19 (OH), Examiner, Detroit Free Press, Green Bay Press Gazette, ABC 15 Arizona, Fox News, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, News 4 Jax, L’Economiste, 11 Alive Atlanta, Le Figaro (France), Yahoo! France, Le Huffington Post, ABC.es (Spain), Access Atlanta, Honolulu Star-Advertiser, Yahoo! Health, Business Standard India, France 24, Yahoo! News UK & Ireland (AFP), Yahoo! MexicoKTTCNational PostDaily MailThe BlazeThe Daily BeastRefinery 29

Context: In a proof of principle clinical trial, Mayo Clinic researchers have demonstrated that virotherapy — destroying cancer with a virus that infects and kills cancer cells but spares normal tissues — can be effective against the deadly cancer multiple myeloma. The findings appear in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Two patients in the study received a single intravenous dose of an engineered measles virus (MV-NIS) that is selectively toxic to myeloma plasma cells. Both patients responded, showing reduction of both bone marrow cancer and myeloma protein. One patient, a 49-year-old woman, experienced complete remission of myeloma and has been clear of the disease for over six months. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

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Tags: 11 Alive Atlanta, 3-D printing, 3D printers, Abbigail Carlsen, ABC 15 Arizona, ABC.es (Spain), ABC15, Access Atlanta, Advanced Primary Stroke Center at Mayo Clinic in Florida, aerobic activity, aging, American Academy of Neurology


May 8th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Prevention
The Hidden Type of Alzheimer's Doctors Miss
by Markham Heid

…The study team examined the brains of more than 1,800 confirmed Alzheimer's patients. They found the types of protein blockages and tangles associated with the hippocampal sparing form of Alzheimer's in 11% of those brain specimens. InPrevention logo this subtype, one type of protein called tau forms "tangles" in the parts of brain that control behavior, motor awareness, speech, and vision, explains Melissa Murray, PhD, who led the Mayo Clinic research team.

Reach: Prevention is published monthly with a circulation of 2.8 million.  Prevention - Online has more than 1.1 million unique visitors each month and has 9.3 million average page views each month.

Additional coverage: HealthDay, Alzheimer's Variation May Often Go Unrecognized: Study; Canada Journal, Health.com, Aetna InteliHealth, Bayoubuzz Health, BioPortfolio, DoctorsLounge, Hawaii News Now, Counsel & Heal, Innovations Report, KAIT Ark., FOX19 Ohio

Context: Neuroscientists at Mayo Clinic in Florida have defined a subtype of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) that they say is neither well recognized nor treated appropriately. The variant, called hippocampal sparing AD, made up 11 percent of the 1,821 AD-confirmed brains examined by Mayo Clinic researchers — suggesting this subtype is relatively widespread in the general population. The Alzheimer’s Association estimates that 5.2 million Americans are living with AD. And with nearly half of hippocampal sparing AD patients being misdiagnosed, this could mean that well over 600,000 Americans make up this AD variant, researchers say. More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

TIME
11 Reasons Why You’re Not Losing Belly Fat

…You’re getting older, As you get older, your body changes how it gains and loses weight. Both men and women experience a declining metabolic rate, or the number of calories theTime banner body needs to function normally. On top of that, women have to deal with menopause. “If women gain weight after menopause, it’s more likely to be in their bellies,” says Michael Jensen, MD, professor of medicine in the Mayo Clinic’s endocrinology division.

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Michael Jensen, MD. is an endocrinologist and diabetes expert.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

 

KAAL
Mayo Clinic Rolls Out Mobile Exhibit to Celebrate 150 Years
by Hannah Tran

150 years of service. Mayo Clinic is celebrating 15 decades of care and it wants to share its KAAL TV logogsuccess across the nation. For the past 18 months, Mayo staff have worked on a mobile exhibit to encapsulate its accomplishments and development in core values. "This exhibit is showing the story of Mayo Clinic to the people," said CEO John Noseworthy, who addressed an audience outside of the exhibit before preliminary tours commenced.

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Additional coverage:

Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic's big-rig exhibit arrives Tuesday
KTTC, Mayo Celebrates 150 Years of Medicine
La Crosse Tribune, 500 tour Mayo's 150th anniversary exhibit
KTTC, Mayo Clinic celebrates 150 years of service with traveling exhibit
Post-Bulletin, 150 years: Franciscan sisters integral to Mayo Clinic's development
Post-Bulletin, Mayo at 150: Brothers' values continue to guide clinic
Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic didn't profit from major discovery
KIMT Online (video), In-Forum, N.D.

Context: Mayo Clinic's traveling mobile exhibit has begun its journey. In 2014, we honor 150 years of serving humanity. This is one way Mayo Clinic can give back – to thank the patients and friends who’ve been part of our story, and share our vision with the public. People from all walks of life turn to Mayo Clinic … so we’re reaching out, bringing Mayo Clinic to the people. This exhibit is sponsored by the Mayo Clinic Sesquicentennial Committee with generous support from many patients and friends. 

Public Affairs ContactsRebecca EisenmanRick Thiesse, Kelley Luckstein

 

MSNBC Morning Joe
How diet impacts brain function in seniors

Dr. John Noseworthy and Dr. Rosebud Roberts, both of the Mayo Clinic, join Morning Morning JoeJoe to discuss 150 years of the Mayo Clinic. Dr. Roberts also discusses how a poor diet in old age can impact the brain.

Reach: MSNBC provides in-depth analysis of daily headlines, political commentary and informed perspectives. MSNBC’s home on the Internet is tv.msnbc.com. Joe Scarborough hosts “Morning Joe,” with co-hosts Mika Brzezinski and Willie Geist, featuring interviews with top politicians and newsmakers, as well as in-depth analysis of the day’s biggest stories. Morning Joe has about 375,000 viewers daily.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic President and CEO, and Rosebud Roberts, M.B., Ch.B.. appeared on Morning Joe May 8. Dr. Roberts' research  focuses on identifying risk factors for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia, both diseases of aging that affect memory and thinking skills. People who develop diabetes and high blood pressure in middle age are more likely to have brain cell loss and other damage to the brain, as well as problems with memory and thinking skills, than people who never have diabetes or high blood pressure or who develop it in old age, according to a new study published in the March 19, 2014, online issue of Neurology. Middle age was defined as age 40 to 64 and old age as age 65 and older. More information about the research can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Duska Anastasijevic

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic announces it is more than halfway to its goal of raising $3 billion from private benefactors by the end of 2017
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Clinic, which has campuses in Rochester, Minn., Scottsdale, Ariz., and Jacksonville, is in the midst of a $3 billion fundraising campaign that will be formallyFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo announced Friday in Rochester. The campaign, which began with a “quiet phase” in 2010 and has already achieved 58.5 percent of its goal, “addresses reliable funding as the biggest barrier to medical breakthroughs,” said Cheryl Hadaway, chief development officer for Mayo Clinic.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic asks grateful patients to help endow its top treatment
By Jeff Hansel

Mayo Clinic today announced a $3 billion philanthropic fundraising campaign to help pay Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperfor research, as federal funding has become less reliable because of budget cuts. Mayo has raised more than half the money, or $1.7 billion, as the quiet phase of the campaign began in 2010. The campaign will continue untilDec. 31, 2017.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: To accelerate the pace of research, solve unmet needs of patients and improve the quality of health care,Mayo Clinic today announced a philanthropic campaign to raise $3 billion by Dec. 31, 2017, strengthening Mayo’s strategic priorities in patient care, research and education. “Reliable funding is the biggest barrier to advance medical breakthroughs that can benefit patients suffering from diseases,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. “Traditional funding sources, such as federal grants, cannot cover the cost of discovering cutting-edge science and implementing those solutions in clinical practice.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Newtwork and campaign website.

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Tags: 150 Great Places to Work in Healthcare, 5K training, Aaron Taylor, acute myeloid leukemia, adult-onset diabetes, Aetna InteliHealth, affordable housing, Alabama.com, alzheimer's disease, Arkansas, arthritis, ASCO