December 12th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Wall Street Journal
Mayo CEO: Focus on Health Care, Not Health Insurance
Wall Street Journal Video logoAt WSJ’s CEO Council, Mayo Clinic CEO John Noseworthy, M.D., talks with the WSJ’s Sara Murray about the Affordable Care Act and ways to provide better health care.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Dr. Noseworthy participated in the Wall Street Journal CEO Council. In early December, top global CEOs gathered once again in Washington, D.C., for the annual meeting of The Wall Street Journal CEO Council.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

 

Star Tribune
Part 1: The Next Mayo / Remaking a Medical Giant, Mayo Faces New Price of Success
by Jeremy Olson

(The Next Mayo is a Star Tribune series examining Minnesota’s legendary clinic in a competitive new era for health care.) Mayo has been lauded by President Obama and influential health economists as an example of superb care and medical efficiency. Yet Mayo also has a reputation in Star Tribune logoMinnesota — confirmed by publicly available health data — for high prices. How Mayo resolves that paradox will determine the future of a clinic that has become a signature Minnesota brand. Additional stories: A conversation with Dr. John Noseworthy, Q&A: Mayo Clinic Care Network director Dr. David Hayes, Q&A: Mayo Clinic gastroenterology dept. chair Dr. Vijay Shah

 

Star Tribune
Part 2: Mayo Cautiously Builds An Empire
by Dan Browning and Jackie Crosby

Jordan Hatfield’s case puzzled the doctors. A champion javelin thrower and top student at Northern Kentucky University, Hatfield developed stomach pains and insomnia during his sophomore year. Then came headaches, vision problems and nerve pain...Hatfield is among dozens of patients in Star Tribune Health newspaper logoKentucky to benefit from the Mayo Clinic Care Network, an ambitious effort by the Rochester-based health system to expand its reach and secure its place in an era of rapid changes in health care. In just four years, Mayo has signed up 31 affiliates in 18 states, Mexico and Puerto Rico.

 

Star Tribune
Part 3: Mayo Seeks to Dominate with Data
by Jackie Crosby

The patients arrive at the Mayo Clinic from all over the world, thousands a day, each presenting a different medical challenge. Some have illnesses so rare that even medical journals don’t offer a time-tested treatment plan. Others bring a complicated combination of ailmStar Tribune Business section logoents — diabetes with heart failure and kidney disease — that offer conflicting treatment options… “What we’re trying to find out, if we can, is what does health care cost, and what of that spend really adds value to a patient’s outcome over time, especially with these high-impact diseases,” said Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy. Additional stories: ‘Big data’ is changing American medical care, Timeline: A look back at key events in the history of the Mayo Clinic

 

Star Tribune
For Mayo Patient, helping medicine even in death
by Jackie Crosby

Tony Luebbers was one of the first patients in which his hometown doctors at St. Elizabeth Healthcare could work hand-in-hand with the Mayo Clinic Star Tribune local logoin Rochester. It turned out to be one for the medical books. Luebbers, a retired accountant, had gone to see his family doctor in this northern Kentucky city complaining of stomach pains. Multiple screenings and biopsies left doctors baffled. Through St. Elizabeth’s affiliation with the Mayo Clinic Care Network, Luebbers’ Kentucky doctors were able to share lab results and medical records, and consult directly with Mayo’s deep bench of experts.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: The Next Mayo is a Star Tribune series examining Minnesota's legendary clinic in a competitive era for health care.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

 

Post-Bulletin
Cannon Falls grad survived 20 hours of surgery, accepted paraplegia
by Brett Boese

The phone rang, and all Tess Pfohl could do was pray. It was the day before Thanksgiving, about three months since the 25-year-old Cannon Falls native had undergone 20 hours of surgery to remove a potentially fatal cancer that had wrapped itself around her spine. Pfohl had voluntarily chosen to become paraplegic in hopes of extending her life, but Mayo Clinic doctors were unwilling to discuss her chances of survival. Mayo Clinic surgeon Dr. Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperMichael Yaszemski said the world-class facility has performed just 160 such surgeries in the past 18 years…Pfohl, who normally is an avid social media user, went silent during the wait. She returned only after breathing a sigh of relief when the Mayo Clinic called to report the spot wasn't cancerous.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn. and southeast Minnesota.

Context: Michael Yaszemski, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon. Dr. Yaszemski investigates bone, cartilage and spinal cord regeneration using synthetic polymeric scaffolds, cells and controlled delivery of bioactive molecules. Dr. Yaszemski's Tissue Engineering and Biomaterials Laboratory is equipped to perform polymer synthesis and characterization and scaffold fabrication utilizing injectable techniques and solid freeform fabrication techniques. His research team cultures cell-polymer constructs, studies delivery kinetics of bioactive molecules from microparticles and microparticle-scaffold combinations, and studies these scaffold-cell-biomolecule combinations in vivo. The team investigates musculoskeletal sarcoma biology and works on the controlled local delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to osteosarcoma, chordoma and chrondrosarcoma.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

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Tags: animal therapy, antibiotics, Arizona Research Consortium and Mayo Clinic, Austin Business Journal, AZO Nano, Baby Boomers and health care, Barron News-Shield, Becker’s Hospital Review, BetaBoston (Boston Globe), big data and health care, Bill Marriott, BioWorld


December 4th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Charlie Rose (PBS)
John Noseworthy, President and CEO of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota (24-minute interview)

John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic, was interviewed in New York City on Dec. 1 by Charlie Rose, host of his nationally distributed PBS show since the early 1990s. Dr. Noseworthy Charlie Rose Bannerwas interviewed about Mayo Clinic and as a thought leader on health care in the U.S. The in-depth interview covered a range of many topics from Mayo's history to the future of health care.

Reach: Charlie Rose engages America's best thinkers, writers, politicians, athletes, entertainers, business leaders, scientists and other newsmakers in one-on-one interviews and roundtable discussions. The program is taped at Bloomberg LP's headquarters in New York City and airs on PBS stations across the U.S. as well as during evening hours on Bloomberg Television around the world. Charlie Rose also co-anchors "CBS This Morning" and is a contributing correspondent to “60 Minutes.”

 


Bloomberg TV (PBS)
Mayo Clinic CEO John Noseworthy: Charlie Rose (11-minute interview)

Bloomberg TVOn “Charlie Rose,” a conversation with John Noseworthy, the President and CEO of  Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. (U.S. News & World Report named Mayo Clinic the best hospital in the nation this year.)

Reach: Charlie Rose engages America's best thinkers, writers, politicians, athletes, entertainers, business leaders, scientists and other newsmakers in one-on-one interviews and roundtable discussions. The program is taped at Bloomberg LP's headquarters in New York City and airs on PBS stations across the U.S. as well as during evening hours on Bloomberg Television around the world. Charlie Rose also co-anchors "CBS This Morning" and is a contributing correspondent to “60 Minutes.”

 

FOX Business
Mayo Clinic CEO talks health care innovation
Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy discusses how innovation is being used to get ahead of disease and the Affordable Care Act’s impact.

Reach: FoxNews.com has more than 13 million unique visitors each month. Fox Business Network is headquartered in News Corporation's studios in midtown Manhattan with bureaus in Chicago, Los Angeles, San Opening Bell Fox BusinessFrancisco (Silicon Valley), Washington, D.C. and London.

 

Baltimore Business Journal
What Johns Hopkins can learn from Mayo Clinic
by Sarah Gantz

Mayo Clinic is seemingly everywhere. Over the past few years Mayo has built up a network of 29 affiliated hospitals in 18 states (plus hospitals in Mexico and Puerto Rico). These hospitals use the Mayo brand and can tap Baltimore Business Journalinto Mayo resources but are not owned by the Minnesota health system… "When we look at health care in this country, we are at a crossroads in terms of what's going to happen — the industry is changing quickly," said Mayo CEO Dr. John Noseworthy.

Reach: The Baltimore Business Journal has more than 8,700 paid subscribers and has more than 244,000 unique visitors to its website each month. The Business Journals are a division of American City Business Journals.

Additional Coverage:
Minneapolis/ St. Paul Business Journal, Mayo Clinic, Johns Hopkins take different paths to out-of-state growth by Katharine Grayson, Mayo Clinic and Johns Hopkins each view forging partnerships with out-of-state hospitals as a growth strategy, but the big-name international health care brands are taking different approaches to expand their reach.

Post-Bulletin, Heard on the Street: Johns Hopkins takes different strategy by Mike Klein. Johns Hopkins, the Baltimore-based health-care giant that's a nationwide competitor of Mayo Clinic, is taking a different route toward expansion.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Bryan Anderson

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic study finds many people who think they are allergic to penicillin are not
by Charlie Patton

When Lisa Dickelman-Foster was 16, she was given penicillin to treat her mononucleosis. She went into anaphylactic shock, a life-threatening condition…He urged Dickelman-Foster, who works as a nurse at the Mayo Clinic’s hospital in Jacksonville, to get tested to see if she was still allergic to penicillin. Thanai Pongdee, a specialist in allergy/immunology with the Mayo Clinic, tested her and found that she was no longer allergic.Florida Times-Union newspaper logo

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Thanai Pongdee, M.D. is an allergy and immunology expert at Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville, Florida. Physicians in the Division of Allergy see patients with immunologic and allergic disorders. Their goal is to provide patients with comprehensive evaluations, diagnosis, treatment and education about allergic conditions.

Public Affairs Contact: Cindy Weiss

 

Harvard Business Review
Why Health Care May Finally Be Ready for Big Data
By Nilay D. Shah and Jyotishman Pathak

There has been a lot of buzz about “big data” over the last few years. This is hardly surprising, given the sheer scale of the data sets that are being Harvard Business Review Logoproduced daily. A total of 2.5 quintillion terabytes of data were generated every day in 2012 alone, and it is estimated that as much data is now generated in just two days as was created from the dawn of civilization until 2003. While other industries have been far more successful at harnessing the value from large-scale integration and analysis of big data, health care is just getting its feet wet. Yes, providers and payers are increasingly investing in their analytical capabilities to help them make better sense of the changing health care environment, but it is still early days. Here are some key elements that are crucial for health care to truly capture the value of big data.

Reach: Harvard Business Review – Online provides editorial content designed to complement the coverage found in its parent print publication, which focuses on business management. The site receives more than 232,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: Nilay D. Shah is an associate professor in the Division of Health Care Policy and Research at Mayo Clinic, where he focuses on studying and improving the health-care-delivery system. Jyotishman Pathak is director of clinical informatics services at Mayo Clinic and an associate professor in its Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics. He also serves as director of clinical informatics at the Mayo Clinic Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 


Post-Bulletin
Pulse on Health: Regenerative medicine guru shines light on cardiology
by Jeff Hansel

The director of the Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine has received the American Heart Association's 2014 Basic Research Prize. An auditorium filed with thousands of researchers honored Dr. Andre Terzic at Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperthe 2014 American Heart Association Scientific Sessions in Chicago as the group's sole annual recipient.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn. and southeast Minnesota.

Context: The American Heart Association (AHA) awarded the 2014 Basic Research Prize to Andre Terzic, M.D., Ph.D., of Mayo Clinic. The award, presented at the annual meeting of the American Heart Association in Chicago, recognizes outstanding contributions to the advancement of cardiovascular science. Dr. Terzic was commended for pioneering applications of emerging technologies to advance the diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. “In the year when we celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Division of Cardiovascular Diseases at Mayo Clinic, we are particularly proud that one of our own has been recognized with such a prestigious national award,” says Charanjit Rihal, M.D., chair of Mayo's Division of Cardiovascular Diseases. “Dr. Terzic has truly advanced the frontiers of medical science. As a pioneer in cardiac regenerative medicine, he and his team have been at the vanguard of health care.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Jennifer Schutz

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Tags: ABC News, ABC15 Ariz., Aerospace Medicine Program at Mayo Clinic, Albert Lea Tribune, American Heart Association's 2014 Basic Research Prize, American Psychologist, Amit Sood, anorexia, Arizona Republic, Austin Daily Herald, Bernie and Edith Waterman, big data


November 26th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

KARE11
Family hears son's heartbeat in another man's chest
by Adrienne Broaddus

Throughout life, we all wait for something or someone. Tom Meeks spent three years waiting for a heart transplant. Back in April of 2011, the Vietnam Veteran was diagnosed with a rare heart disease called amyloidosis. KARE-11 TV, Minneapolis-St. PaulDoctors said he wouldn't survive without a transplant…Meeks was led to the Mayo Clinic. Meeks said doctors didn't make any promises but told him they would run the test to see if he was eligible to be placed on a waiting list.

Reach: KARE is a NBC affiliate in the Minneapolis-St.Paul market.

Additional Coverage:

Buzzfeed, A Family Listens To Son’s Heart Beating In Another Man

Mashable, Daily Mail (UK), Massachusetts Newsday, WJXX, Mirror (UK), E! Online, De Telegraaf (NL), The Blaze, The Independent (UK), The Telegraph (UK), 9 News (AU), Metro (UK), WLTX, The Coast (NZ)

Context: Mayo Clinic doctors actively research heart transplantation techniques, presenting their work at national and international meetings. The Mayo Clinic Transplant Center supports many studies for heart transplant research. Mayo Clinic researchers seek new ways to treat people who need transplants of all types.

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

Washington Post
Going gluten-free? Mayo Clinic offers advice, with recipes included.
By Nancy Szokan

Here’s a news flash: There are a lot of fad diets out there and a lot of people claiming to be experts in what you ought to eat. You’re wise to be wary. Which is why it’s worth noting when a reputable source comes out with a Washington Post newspaper logoguide to one of today’s dietary fixations: avoiding gluten. “Mayo Clinic Going Gluten Free” is the latest addition to the clinic’s extensive series of personal health guides. This one is written by Joseph Murray, who became interested in celiac disease (where reaction to gluten results in damage to intestinal lining) as a medical student in Ireland and gained what he calls “a new appreciation” of the disease’s complexity since coming to the United States.

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post averages 518,700, and Sunday circulation averages 736,800.

Additional Coverage:

Medical Daily, Gluten-Free Diet Does Not Make You Healthier: Only People With Celiac Disease Should Go Gluten-Free

Allergic Living, Q&A with Celiac Expert Dr. Joseph Murray by Lisa Fitterman, His patients call him ‘Doc’

Context: Joseph Murrary, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic expert in celiac disease. “Mayo Clinic Going Gluten-Free is a “backpack for survival” for those who have celiac disease and other related conditions, empowering patients to live productive lives,” said Joseph A. Murray, M.D. gastroenterologist and celiac disease expert at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Murray discusses his recently published book that helps consumers learn how to manage a gluten-free lifestyle and live healthy lives. The interview can be found here.

Public Affairs Contact: Brian Kilen

 

Florida Times-Union
Patients, families at Jacksonville's hospitality houses bond during treatment
by Beth Cravey

When June Levin was diagnosed with a rare form of leukemia in March and told she would need a bone marrow transplant, she worried most about losing her long hair and falling behind in graduate school. But after theFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo 26-year-old North Dakota woman entered the world of cancer treatment — she received a bone marrow transplant at Jacksonville’s Mayo Clinic in July — she met other patients in far more dire straits.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Gabriel House of Care  is a hospital hospitality house for transplant recipients and caregivers receiving care away from home. Gabriel House of Care is located on the campus of Mayo Clinic in Florida and is operated by St. Andrew's Lighthouse, Inc.

Public Affairs Contact: Paul Scotti

 

WQOW Eau Claire
Common cold leads to brain surgery for Eau Claire woman
by Bridget Curran

It's not every day that the common cold leads to brain surgery. Masked as something minor,  “I had gotten a little cold that weekend,” says Renee Wininger, an Eau Claire resident.  The problem was anything but that. “But WQOW TV Logowhen I sneezed, it felt like there was a knife going through my temple right here,” says Wininger.  “When I hear that, you know, I'm thinking, this is something that needs to be explored further.  So I don't usually do a neurological exam when people come in with a cold,” says Catharine Decker, a MD at Mayo Clinic Health System.

Reach: WQOW is an ABC affiliate serving the Eau Claire, Wis. area.

Context: Catharine Decker, M.D. is a physician at Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire.

Public Affairs Contact: Paul Meznarich

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Tags: 9 News (AU), ABC15, Albert Lea Tribune, Allergic Living, alzheimer's disease, Angela Lunde, Arizona Republic, athletes and concussions, Austin Daily Herald, Barry Alvarez, Becker’s Hospital Review, Big Ten Network


November 20th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

National Public Radio: Sound Medicine News
Research Encourages Surgeons To Ask About Quality Of Life Before Operation

Our next story is about the conversations that surgeons and patients have before the operation. Traditionally surgeons have wanted to know whether any health problems may pose a risk to patients’ safety during the procedure. But a new study may encourage surgeons to spend a few extra minutes asking, “How’s your qualitySound Medicine logo of life?” Dr. Juliane Bingener of the Mayo Clinic joins us to tell us more. Your new study found that people’s quality of life before colon cancer surgery might affect their odds of complications shortly after surgery. How did you measure their quality of life before the surgery?

ReachSound Medicine is hosted by Barbara Lewis and features in-depth discussion on scientific research and the latest medical developments.  Sound Medicine is produced by WFYI and the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis. The show is broadcast on a variety of NPR affiliates nationwide.

Context:  Juliane Bingener-Casey, M.D., is a gastroenterologic surgeon at Mayo Clinic. Her  research and clinical practice focuses on minimally invasive surgery and endoscopy. The long-term goal of her research program is to utilize novel minimally invasive technology to improve patient outcomes by reducing the impact of surgery on patients' quality of life.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer 

 

Twin Cities Business
2014 Person Of The Year: Mayo Clinic President And CEO John Noseworthy
by Dale Kurschner

He may perhaps become best known in Minnesota as “the $6 billion man,” given his success in launching what is expected to become the state’s largest-ever development project: the transformation of downtown Rochester Twin Cities Businessinto a “Destination Medical Center.”… But the Destination Medical Center (DMC) is just the tip of the iceberg Mayo Clinic president and CEO Dr. John Noseworthy is carefully navigating through churning economic and industry waters.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Additional Coverage:
Digital Journal, Twin Cities Business Names Mayo Clinic President and CEO Dr. John Noseworthy 2014 Person of the Year

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

 

Star Tribune
Rochester becoming a hot market for foreign investors
by Maya Rao

… With word of the Mayo Clinic’s massive expansion and the state’s $585 million aid for the project spreading, Dickson has orchestrated separate sales of a nearby bank and skyway plaza to companies from the Middle East. Other real estate brokers have talked to investors from Venezuela, SaudiStar Tribune newspaper logo Arabia and India who are drawn by the idea that major medical centers are recession-proof.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Related Coverage:
KTTC, Tale of Two Cities: Cleveland 

Post-Bulletin, Slatterly Park residents in Rochester talk DMC

Context: Destination Medical Center (DMC) is an innovative economic development initiative to secure Minnesota's status as a global medical destination now and in the future.

Public Affairs Contact: Jamie Rothe

 

Post-Bulletin
Coleman named Mayo Clinic Board of Trustees member

The Mayo Clinic Board of Trustees has named a new public member during its recent quarterly meeting in Florida. Biochemist Mary Sue Coleman, Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperPh.D. — named by Time as one of the "10 Best College Presidents" — is president emeritus of the University of Michigan and also previously served as president of the University of Iowa.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn. and southeast Minnesota.

Additional Coverage:
The Michigan Daily, President Emerita Coleman appointed to Mayo Clinic board. Former University President Mary Sue Coleman has been appointed to a seat on the Mayo Clinic’s Board of Trustees. According to a release published on the clinic’s website, Coleman attended her first quarterly meeting of the board Friday…“Trustees are invited based upon their experience, expertise, and other priority characteristics identified from time to time by the Governance & Nominating Committee,” Oestreich wrote in a statement.

Michigan Daily, President Emerita Coleman appointed to Mayo Clinic board by Sam Gringlas. Former University President Mary Sue Coleman has been appointed to a seat on the Mayo Clinic’s Board of Trustees. According to a release published on the clinic’s website, Coleman attended her first quarterly meeting of the board Friday.

Michigan Live, Michigan News

Context: The Mayo Clinic Board of Trustees welcomed Mary Sue Coleman, Ph.D., as a new public member at its quarterly meeting Nov. 14. Dr. Coleman is president emeritus of the University of Michigan, (U-M) an institution she led for 12 years before retiring in July 2014. Time magazine named her one of the nation’s “10 best college presidents,” and the American Council on Education honored her with its Lifetime Achievement Award. She previously was president of the University of Iowa. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

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Tags: A.E.D., AARP, ABC15 Phoenix, activity trackers, aging, alzheimer's disease, American Humane Association, arthroplasty, artificial turf safety, arts and healing, ASCO Post, asthma and risk of heart disease


November 13th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Today Show
Allergic to Penicillin? You're Probably Not

Most people who think they are allergic to penicillin in fact are not, researchers said Friday. It’s something doctors have suspected for a long time, but the researchers say they were surprised by just how manyTODAY Show people weren’t allergic to the antibiotic: it was 94 percent of them. Dr. Thanai Pongdee, an allergist at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida and colleagues tested 384 people who said they were allergic to penicillin. Tests showed 94 percent of them were in fact, not allergic.

Reach: The TODAY Show reaches an average daily audience of 4.25 million viewers each week.

Additional coverage:

NBC News, Allergic to Penicillin? Maybe Not by Judy Silverman. Most people who think they are allergic to penicillin in fact are not, researchers said Friday. It’s something doctors have suspected for a long time, but the researchers say they were surprised by just how many people weren’t allergic to the antibiotic: it was 94 percent of them. Dr. Thanai Pongdee, an allergist at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida and colleagues tested 384 people who said they were allergic to penicillin. Tests showed 94 percent of them were in fact, not allergic.

Bayou Buzz La., WRC NBC Washington DCBreaking News, Daily Mail UK, Allergy/Immunology, KVOA Tucson, Pharmaceutical Journal

Context: Thanai Pongdee, M.D., is an allergist at Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville, Florida. This study was presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Annual Scientific Meeting, Nov. 6-10, 2014 in Atlanta.

Public Affairs Contact: Cindy Weiss

 

Huffington Post
5 Benefits Of Being A Curious Person

by Leigh Weingus… It can help protect your brain.Keeping your brain mentally stimulated is a lifelong enterprise,” David Knopman, a professor of neurology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, said, according to Bloomberg. “If one can remain intellectually active and stimulated throughout one’s lifespan, that’s protective against late-life dementia. Staying mentally active is definitely good for youHuffington Post Healthy Living Logor brain.”

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique viewers.

Context: David Knopman, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist.

Public Relations Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

US News & World Report
10 Questions to Ask Your Doctor About Prostate Cancer
by Kristine Crane

… Does my cancer need to be treated? “Active surveillance” is a buzz term in prostate cancer care because many men with the disease can practice it for years without treatment. “If you have low-grade, low-stage cancer, you may elect to do nothing,” says Erik Castle, a urologic surgeon and urology professor at the Mayo Clinic in US News HealthPhoenix.

Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional coverage: MSN

Context: Erik Castle. M.D. is a urologic surgeon at Mayo Clinic's campus in Phoenix, Arizona.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

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Tags: 12 News Phoenix, AARP Bulletin Today, ABC News, AEDs, Albert Lea Tribune, Allergy/Immunology, Amanda Kubista, animal therapy, Argentina Star, Arizona Republic, Arizona State University, Aurora Health Care


November 6th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Boston Globe
Yes, sitting at work is bad, but is standing actually better?
By Deborah Kotz

…In a June study, 28 office workers who were given a sit/stand desk for a month reduced their time spent in a sedentary position by 38 Boston Globe Logominutes a day compared to when they used a traditional desk. They also reported a mood boost, increased energy, and reduced fatigue. “I think it’s correct to say we’re in the middle of a ‘stand up movement,’ but the emphasis needs to be on movement,” said the study author Dr. James Levine, director of the Mayo Clinic/Arizona State University Obesity Solutions Initiative. “I don’t want people to think that they should stand up like still soldiers. That is not a good idea.”

Reach: The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 215,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Additional coverage: Boston Globe10 ways companies can encourage workers to move

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob NellisJim McVeigh

 

MPR
Glen Campbell's public decline with Alzheimer's documented in new film

…MPR's Cathy Wurzer spoke with Kim Campbell and Dr. Ronald Petersen, Director of the Mayo Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. He was one of MPR News logoGlen Campbell's doctors.  A new documentary about the life and career of music icon Glen Campbell opens in theaters  nationwide. "I'll Be Me" is not an ordinary music biopic because Campbell was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in 2011 and decided to deal with it publicly. The film documents his emotional "Goodbye Tour" and how his wife Kim became his caregiver.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Additional Coverage:

Post-Bulletin, Glen Campbell film called touching

KTTC, Country star Glen Campbell's family and doctor talk about Mayo's role in fight with Alzheimer's

Pioneer Press'Glen Campbell: I'll Be Me' is moving, funny portrait of country star's struggle with Alzheimer's

Context: This film will increase awareness of Alzheimer’s impact on patients and their caregivers and is a call to action for our nation to find a cure for this disease.  Our future depends on us pushing the boundaries of knowledge and discovery of cures for this and other devastating diseases,” says John Noseworthy, MD, president and CEO of Mayo Clinic. Dr. Ronald Petersen is director of the Mayo Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. The Mayo Alzheimer's Disease Research Center is part of a network of 28 centers around the country sponsored by the National Institute on Aging.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Prevention
8 Things Your Sleep Habits Say About You

by Jordan Davidson…The symptom: You slept your way through 3 ham sandwiches and an entire pound cPrevention logoake. What it might mean: Parasomnia and REM Behavior Disorder (RBD). Erik St. Louis, a Mayo Clinic sleep physician, recently ended up with a patient who spread jelly on his Nook and left it in the fridge. Sleepwalkers may make a snack, take a walk, and then return to bed with no idea they ever left. The really scary ones drive.

Reach: Prevention is published monthly with a circulation of 2.8 million.  Prevention - Online has more than 1.1 million unique visitors each month and has 9.3 million average page views each month.

Context: Erik St. Louis, M.D. is a physician with the Mayo Clinic Center for Sleep Medicine. Mayo Clinic doctors trained in sleep disorders evaluate and treat adults and children in the Center for Sleep Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. The Center for Sleep Medicine is one of the largest sleep medicine facilities in the United States. Staff in the center treat about 6,500 new people who have sleep disorders each year. The Center for Sleep Medicine is accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Public Affairs Contact: Alyson Gonzalez

 

Wall Street Journal
Just How Fast a Marathoner Could Wozniacki Be?
By Matthew Futterman

Tennis star Caroline Wozniacki stunned the endurance world Sunday when she finished the New York City Marathon in 3 hours 26 minutes 33 The Wall Street Journal Logoseconds. It was her first marathon. She never did a training run longer than 13 miles, and she played in the WTA Tour Finals in Singapore the previous weekend. How fast would Woz be if she tried? Pretty darn fast. Michael Joyner, a physician at the Mayo Clinic aWSJ Daily Fixnd veteran marathoner who specializes in time extrapolations, posited that at 5 feet 10, Wozniacki would most likely be better suited to swimming or rowing. Still, Joyner added, Wozniacki could get 10% better from training and another 10% better by getting super-skinny. Or, “if she was a closet aerobic animal you might get 25%,” he wrote in an email.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist. Dr. Joyner and his lab team are interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

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October 30th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

USA TODAY
Could a robot do your job?

... And doctors, long thought immune to being automated, now face competition, including a machine that replaces an anesthesiologist in lowUSA Today Newspaper Logo -risk colonoscopy procedures.... Starting next year, The Mayo Clinic in Minnesota will use Watson to sort through 8,000 Mayo studies and approximately 170,000 ongoing studies worldwide to match patients to clinical trials.

Reach: USA TODAY  has the highest daily circulation of any U.S. newspaper with a daily average circulation of 4.1 million, which includes print, various digital editions and other  papers that use their branded content.

Previous Coverage in Sept. 11, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Mayo Clinic and IBM  are using  Watson, the IBM cognitive computer, to match patients more quickly with appropriate clinical trials, beginning with research studies in cancer. A proof-of-concept phase is currently underway. “In an area like cancer —where time is of the essence — the speed and accuracy that Watson offers will allow us to develop an individualized treatment plan more efficiently so we can deliver exactly the care that the patient needs,” says Steven Alberts, M.D., chair of medical oncology at Mayo Clinic. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Star Tribune
Mayo scores major dementia grants
by Dan Browning

After more than a decade of work on what’s been called “the most common disease no one has ever heard of” — frontotemporal dementia — Mayo Clinic Star Tribune newspaper logohas been chosen to participate in a set of federal research projects that could help unlock a broad set of related brain disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease...“What is really striking is that four major grants have now been funded in [this] area, which is tens of millions of dollars [over five years],” said Dr. Brad Boeve of Mayo Clinic, one of the nation’s leading FTD researchers and principal investigator for one of the new grants.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional Coverage:

Florida Times-Union
Mayo researchers getting funds for ALS, dementia research
by Steve Patterson

Researchers at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville are getting about $6 million in new grants to study a genetic breakdown tied to bothFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo Lou Gehrig’s disease and a form of dementia, clinic officials said Thursday. The work could lead to new testing and treatment approaches to the affliction based around a particular gene, called C9ORF72.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

KIMT, Mayo Clinic awarded grant for dementia research by DeeDee Stiepan…“We really want to eradicate these genes from the devastating effects that can occur in people who are already known to have these mutations, as well as those families who may, through obviously no fault of their own, pass it on to their children,” explains Dr. Bradley Boeve, a Professor of Neurology at Mayo Clinic.

Augustine Record, Mayo researchers getting funds for ALS, dementia research by Steve Patterson. Researchers at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville are getting about $6 million in new grants to study a genetic breakdown tied to both Lou Gehrig’s disease and a form of dementia, clinic officials said Thursday…The research will build on earlier work by another Mayo scientist, Leonard Petrucelli, who last year focused attention on buildups of proteins where the C9ORF72 mutation is found.

KTTC, WQOW Eau Claire, Post-BulletinKansas City Star, Miami Herald, The Telegraph Ga., Post-Bulletin, Daily Journal

Context: Mayo Clinic has been awarded two grants for large, five-year projects on frontotemporal dementia (FTD), characterized by degeneration of the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain. While rare, it may strike people in their twenties, even in their teens. The projects are funded by the NIH’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS). The grants, allocated to the research teams at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota and Jacksonville, Florida, cover a wide spectrum of FTD research, to advance their studies aimed at improving the diagnosis and treatment of patients suffering from this disorder. More information on the grants can be found here and here on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Duska Anastasijevic  (Minnesota) and Kevin Punsky (Florida)

 

Star Tribune
Schafer: Mayo Clinic surgeon, scientist team up as entrepreneurs
by Lee Schafer

Rakesh Suri and Jordan Miller are the kind of entrepreneurs who are easy to cheer for. Suri is a heart surgeon at the Mayo Clinic, and Miller is a Star Tribune Business section logoscientist who arrived in Rochester 5 ½ years ago to help with a research program into cardiac valve disease. Admittedly they are not typical business underdogs, not as top-of-the-profession staff at the renowned Mayo Clinic. What’s to like is how they want to take something out of the lab to help people live longer. And starting a company seems to be the only practical way to get that done.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Rakesh Suri, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic cardiac surgeon and is also affiliated with Mayo Clinic Transplant Center.  Jordan Miller, PhD, is an in the Division cardiovascular surgery researcher with an academic appointment of Assistant Professor in the Departments of Surgery and Physiology. His research program focuses on three main areas: 1) understanding mechanisms contributing to aortic valve and atherosclerotic plaque calcification, 2) identification of reciprocal regulators of skeletal and cardiovascular calcification, and 3) understanding mechanisms contributing to vasomotor dysfunction in health and disease.

Public Affairs Contacts:  Sharon Theimer, Traci Klein

 

New Yorker
Breaking Away
by David Gendelman

…They also likely thought about the advantages gained by staying with the main pack, like protection from the wind provided by the runners in front. There’s also The New Yorker magazine logo“a psychic edge,” Michael Joyner, a physiologist at the Mayo Clinic, said. “People get in a rhythm. You’re feeding off other people. All of the signals that the average person would describe as painful, the élite is using as a red line. They’re running right on the edge. When you’re with somebody else, your perception of the effort you require, your perception of fatigue, might be less. You might be able to stay in the zone longer.”

Reach: The New Yorker is a weekly magazine with a circulation of more than one million readers. The magazine covers culture, art, fiction, business, politics, science and technology. It reports on current ideas and evolving issues, often with a touch of humor. Launched in 1925, it is published by Condé Nast Publications. Its mission is to report and reflect on the world at large with wit, sophistication and originality. The New Yorker's website has more than 722,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist. Dr. Joyner and his lab team are interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

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October 24th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

NY Times
Is It Really Dementia?
By Paula Span

…Perhaps another 25 percent of patients actually have other types of dementia, like Lewy body or frontotemporal — scarcely happy news, but because these diseases have different trajectories The New York Times newspaper logoand can be exacerbated by the wrong drugs, the distinction matters…In trying to tell the difference — not a job for amateurs — one key consideration is age, said Dr. Ronald C. Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic’s Alzheimer’s center. Dementia is highly age-related, he pointed out.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field and chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Duska Anastasijevic

 

HealthDay
Two-Pronged Program Looks Best for Helping Smokers Quit

…Taking a prescription medication with brief advice was also more effective than unaided attempts to quit. However, smokers who used over-the-counter nicotine replacement therapy with no counseling had a reduced Health Day Logosuccess rate, according to the study in the October issue of the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings…Smoking cessation is one of the most important health behavior changes that physicians can encourage in their patients, Dr. J. Taylor Hays, director of the Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center in Rochester, Minn., said in the news release.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center (NDC) was one of the first centers in the country to focus exclusively on treatments for tobacco dependence. The NDC's model of care has now become the standard in many medical centers around the United States. The treatment team at the center offers you support and works with you to help develop the motivation and skills needed to stop using tobacco.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein


Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic extends telemedicine tests to Austin kiosks

by Matt McKinney

If an employee at the Mayo Clinic Health System’s Austin campus feels ill, help is just a few steps away, thanks to an experiment underway this month. A kiosk outfitted with basic medical instruments and a high-definition video link has started taking patients for a new telemedicine project known as “Mayo Connected Care.” The kiosks, manufactured by HealthSpot of Dublin, Ohio, have been undergoing tests at Mayo since February, said Star Tribune newspaper logoMark Ciota, the CEO for Mayo Clinic Health System sites in Austin and Albert Lea.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Mayo Clinic is committed to reducing health care expenses and improving access to medical services through a new telemedicine pilot project called Mayo Clinic Health Connection, now available at Mayo Clinic Health System in Austin. The Mayo Clinic Health Connection trials a telehealth delivery system to meet patient’s needs through the HealthSpot® platform, which combines robust cloud-based software and a private walk-in kiosk that offer solutions to care for patients in their place of work. The system will be piloted with Mayo Clinic Health System employees in Albert Lea and Austin before potentially being deployed to other local employers. More information can be found  in the news release: Mayo Clinic Health Connection News Release FINAL 10 2 14.

Public Affairs Contact: Tami Yokiel


Star Tribune
Health care providers readying for a wave of nurse retirees

by Lee Schafer

Star Tribune Business section logoThese days, even the renowned Mayo Clinic in Rochester is scrambling to fill holes in its nursing staff as baby boomers continue to retire. Not that the folks at Mayo are particularly worried. “We’ve seen this before,” said Pam Johnson, Mayo Clinic’s chief nursing officer. “It ebbs and flows. Some years we’ve hired 40 or 50 and some we’ve had up to 500. This year ago it will probably be somewhere in between.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Every year, more than 1 million patients from all 50 states and nearly 150 countries choose Mayo Clinic for their medical care. Mayo Clinic has a legacy of inspiring hope and contributing to health and well-being by providing the best care to every patient through integrated clinical practice, education and research. Mayo Clinic nurses practice in 60 specialties across a variety of locations, including Phoenix/Scottsdale, Ariz.; Jacksonville, Fla.; Rochester, Minn.; and Mayo Clinic Health System in Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin and Georgia. Career opportunities include positions in perioperative (surgical) nursing, hospital (inpatient) nursing and ambulatory (outpatient) nursing. Join a team where the potential for personal growth is unlimited and colleagues inspire you to stretch and grow beyond your boundaries. More information on Mayo Clinic nursing careers can be found here.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bryan Anderson, Alyson Gonzalez

 

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October 16th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Wall Street Journal
Exercise, Diet and Sleep Can Improve MS Symptoms
by Laura Landro

Exercise, sleep and a low-salt diet may be part of the solution for multiple sclerosis patients. Researchers are increasingly looking to lifestyle, diet and exercise, including salsa dancing, to help mitigate the often-debilitating effects of MS, which include problems with muscle control, balance, visionThe Wall Street Journal newspaper logo and thinking.…While quitting smoking, getting more sleep and reducing excess salt “are general health strategies that are good for us anyway, they are actually making a difference with respect to the behavior of the disease,” says Dean Wingerchuk, a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Phoenix.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Dean Wingerchuk, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Star Tribune (Post-Bulletin)
Mayo's airborne blood bank celebrates 30 years

On May 20, 2012, Nels Gunderson hung in the balance between life and death. His survival depended on access to first responders, rapid medical Star Tribune newspaper logostabilization and an airborne blood bank carried by the Mayo One medical helicopter. It also depended on the helicopter conveying him quickly from his back yard in Osseo, Wis., to the Mayo Clinic Hospital, Saint Marys Campus, about 90 miles away, where a surgical team was working on him less than two hours after his son dialed 911. Thirty years ago this month, Mayo One flew its first patient. To celebrate its anniversary, the airborne service offered a glimpse inside the flying hospital.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional Coverage:

Post-Bulletin, Medical helicopter safety remains Mayo One priority by Jeff Hansel… In fact, many of the safety features recommended in 2009 by Mayo One medical-helicopter experts after a spate of fate crashes around the country have been instituted. For example, said Glenn Lyden, spokesman for Mayo Clinic Medical Transport, the use of night-vision goggles has increased among providers of medical-helicopter services.

Context: Mayo Clinic Medical Transport provides ground and air medical transport services from bases in Minnesota and Wisconsin.

Public Affairs Contact: Glenn Lyden

 

Forbes
Customer Service Beyond Coupling: From Four Seasons' Hospitality To Mayo Clinic's Healthcare
by Micah Solomon

Mayo Clinic, the extraordinary Rochester, Minnesota based hospital and healthcare organization, provides what can be called “destination medicine,” as Leonard Berry terms it: the collaboration of experts from a range of specialties to provide diagnosis and treatment or a treatment plan for what are often very serious cases.Forbes magazine logo

Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 mllion unique visitors each month.

Additional Coverage:

FierceHealthcareMayo Clinic looks to changing demographics in customer service approach by Zack Budryk, A patient experience approach by the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota may represent a new front in healthcare customer service, according to Forbes. The clinic's approach, "destination medicine," brings together experts from a broad spectrum of specialties and, because entire families often visit the clinic, Mayo's room design keeps large groups of relatives and friends in mind. The design includes features like specially shaped sofas that can seat as many as a dozen visitors.

Context: Thousands of people come to Mayo Clinic each day for diagnosis and treatment of a medical problem. Many people make their own appointments and some are referred by a doctor. Most people are treated on an outpatient basis, meaning their evaluation, tests and treatments are done in the clinic, and they return to their home or lodging at the end of the day.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

 

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October 9th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Reuters TV
Scrambling away pain for cancer patients

Researchers are testing a device called the Scrambler which ''re-trains'' the brain to alleviate chronic pain caused by chemotherapy Reuters VIdeo logotreatment… Dr. Charles Loprinzi of the Mayo Clinic says peripheral neuropathy occurs when the brain sends pain signals to damaged nerves in a constant cycle.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world news, business newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile, and interactive television platforms.

Context: Charles Loprinzi, M.D., is the Regis Professor of Breast Cancer Research and a Mayo Clinic medical oncologist.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Huffington Post
Your Perpetually Stuffed Nose Is Just Your Body Fighting The Good Fight
by Sarah Klein

…When we're sick, our bodies get busy fighting off the infection -- and some of that fighting manifests as the very symptoms we associate witHuff Post Health and Fitness Logoh our maladies. "Some part of why we feel sick when we have an infection is actually the body's immune response," says Mayo Clinic infectious diseases physician and researcher Pritish Tosh, M.D.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique viewers.

Context: Pritish Tosh, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases expert.

Public Affairs Contact: Alyson Gonzalez

 

Star Tribune
Medica makes MNsure play in Rochester
by Christopher Snowbeck

Medica is launching a new health insurance plan in the Rochester area that offers lower premiums if people primarily get their health care from the Mayo Clinic. For years, insurers have blamed high costs at Mayo for above-average insurance premiums across southeastern Minnesota, but Medica says good care Star Tribune Business section logocoordination by Mayo doctors will let the insurer charge less for the new product, called “Medica With Mayo Clinic.” “Premiums long have been higher in the Rochester area, and that’s really been driven by the providers in that area,” said Dannette Coleman, a senior vice president with Medica.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

Modern Healthcare, Narrow network plan with Mayo to debut on Minnesota exchange by Bob Herman, Health insurer Medica is rolling out a new narrow-network plan in Minnesota, an increasingly common option, and Mayo Clinic will be the enticement to draw in potential enrollees. The plan, which will be offered both off and on Minnesota's exchange established by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, will include only specific providers in southern Minnesota. But the insurer said monthly premiums and copayments will be affordable for those who choose the plan.

MinnPost, Northfield News, Post-Bulletin, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal, Republican EagleCNBC, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal, KTTC, MPR 

Context: Medica and Mayo Clinic today announced a new health plan for individuals and families in southern Minnesota that comes at a lower cost than other available options. The plan, Medica with Mayo Clinic, is available for a January 1, 2015, effective date and can be purchased both on and off MNSure, Minnesota’s public health insurance exchange.  This health plan expands options for consumers seeking Mayo Clinic care in Rochester and throughout southern Minnesota at a lower cost than other available options and at the lowest price in southeast Minnesota on the MNsure exchange. More information can be found in the news release.

Public Affairs Contact: Adam Brase

 

KSTP
INTERVIEW: Making Strides Against Breast Cancer
by Cassie Hart

… Just two months ago a new law went into effect in Minnesota to bring those numbers down. Doctors are KSTP-TV Eyewitness News Lognow required to notify women if they have dense breast tissue. Mayo Clinic Dr. Sandhya Pruthi, a lead breast cancer researcher, stopped by KSTP to talk more about it. Meanwhile, this weekend more than 1,000 people will join together to walk in the fight against breast cancer.

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Context: October is Breast Cancer Awareness MonthSandhya Pruthi, M.D. is the principal investigator at Mayo Clinic for several nationwide multicenter breast cancer chemoprevention trials; these are interdisciplinary efforts with the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. She is also actively involved in cancer education for both patients and health care providers.

Public Affairs Contact: Joe Dangor

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October 2nd, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

HealthDay
Herceptin Best for Certain Breast Cancer Patients, Study Says

Herceptin is the best drug treatment for a type of breast cancer called HER2-positive and should remain the standard of care for that type of tumor, according to new findings from a long-term clinical trial. HER2-positive breast cancers tend to be more aggressive than other types of breast cancer, according to theHealth Day Logo Mayo Clinic… Heart safety was rated good for both groups of patients. And there was no difference in the rate of cancer spreading from the breast to the brain, study co-chair Dr. Edith Perez, director of the Breast Cancer Translational Genomics Program at the Mayo Clinic in Florida, said in a Mayo news release.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: US News & World Report

Context: Analysis of more than 8,000 women who participated in the world’s largest study of two treatments for HER2-positive breast cancer reinforces other findings from the clinical trial showing that trastuzumab (Herceptin) should remain the standard of care for this cancer, says a Mayo Clinic researcher. This study, being presented at the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) 2014 Congress in Madrid, reveals that when used as a single HER2-targeted therapy in addition to standard chemotherapy, trastuzumab offers a better outcome than does lapatinib (Tykerb), says Edith A. Perez, M.D., deputy director at large, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center and director of the Breast Cancer Translational Genomics Program at Mayo Clinic in Florida. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Paul Scotti

 

KAAL TV
Mayo Opens Spa Focusing on Overall Wellness
by Jenna Lohse

Mayo Clinic is internationally known for medical breakthroughs and lifesaving procedures, but now it's taken a new step into prevention. Doctors say it all comes down to a person's overall wellness. Mayo's new spa program called Rejuvenate just opened.  Step into a new part of Mayo Clinic's Healthy Living Program and KAAL-TV-6 logoleave the stresses in life behind for a bit. "I had my first facial today, so I’m a new believer,” said Dr. Brent Bauer, Medical Director of Rejuvenate. He says overall wellness is key. "I think it's time to ask that question how do we keep people from getting sick in the first point,” said Bauer… "A spa service such as message can lead to better outcomes, people who have had cardiac surgery for example, we've been doing some of those things in the hospital and the clinic setting for quite some time,” said Dr. Donald Hensrud, Medical Director of Mayo’s Healthy Living Program.

Reach:  KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Additional coverage:

Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic adds services at Healthy Living Program by Jeff Hansel, Mayo Clinic plans to open a spa and weight-loss program at its downtown Rochester Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center. "We are excited about taking wellness to the next level," Dr. Donald Hensrud, medical director of the Healthy Weight and Rejuvenate at Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program, said in a statement from the clinic. 

FOX 47 News, KTTC, WN.com

Context:  The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program, which launched earlier this year, is expanding its wellness offerings to include a weight management plan and spa services. The Healthy Weight Plan andRejuvenate at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program will open this fall and enhance the already popular wellness plans available for guests.  “We are excited about taking wellness to the next level,” says Donald Hensrud, M.D., the program’s medical director. “Our expanded services embrace the idea of involving the entire body and mind. No matter your age or health needs, if you’re looking to better manage stress, lose weight, get active, or eat and cook healthfully, our program offers a diverse selection of wellness options for anyone seeking whole-body wellness.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Star Tribune
Mayo opens downtown sports center
by Jeremy Olson

In the years to come, Mayo Clinic’s new sports medicine center in downtown Minneapolis will no doubt treat NBA stars, heal MLB sluggers and help promising athletes reach their potential.Star Tribune Health newspaper logo

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

Post-Bulletin, Answer Man: Mayo Clinic's Block E center opens Wednesday… What used to be called Block E, on Hennepin between Sixth and Seventh streets, has been peeled open and is covered with plastic while they work on the facade. On the third floor, the 15-screen cineplex has been gutted, and that's where the 22,000-square-foot Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center has been installed.

Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal, Mayo Clinic’s downtown Minneapolis clinic opens Wednesday by Katharine Grayson, Mayo Clinic will offer services ranging from regenerative-medicine treatments to golf-swing assessments at its downtown Minneapolis sports medicine facility opening Wednesday. The 22,000-square-foot clinic, part of a $50 million redevelopment of the Block E building, will employ about 30 people, said Medical Director Jon Finnoff in an interview.

KAAL, KARE11, WCCO, KTTC, KSTP, BringMeTheNews, Finance & Commerce

Context: Mayo Clinic announced this week the opening of Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center at Mayo Clinic Square in downtown Minneapolis. Services in the new 22,000-square-foot facility include health and well-being programs, injury prevention, EXOS (formerly Athletes’ Performance) performance solutions, physical rehabilitation and sport-specific skills programs, and diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic sports injuries for athletes of all ages. The facility will be staffed by orthopedic and physical medicine & rehabilitation physicians, physical therapists, athletic trainers, and strength and conditioning specialists, as well as EXOS performance specialists and dietitians.

sports 2

“For more than two decades, the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center has provided care for professional and international sports teams, premier athletes and weekend warriors from virtually every sport,” says Jonathan Finnoff, D.O., medical director, Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center at Mayo Clinic Square. “Our approach to integrated, multidisciplinary care to optimize performance, minimize risk and treat injury is truly a differentiator.” More information about Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center at Mayo Clinic Square in downtown Minneapolis can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

MPR
Focus on concussions transforms high school football in Minnesota
by Trisha Volpe

…"If athletes and parents and coaches and healthcare providers and administrators are aware of the problem, they understand the symptoms and signs, they're able to recognize them and maybe they're compelled to refer to a healthcare provider because of the law, then we are seeing more folks, which is a good thing," saidMPR News logo Dr. Michael Stuart, an orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine expert at Mayo Clinic.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context:  Michael Stuart, M.D. is co-director, Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

Other Mayo News on MPR:

MPR
Rat heart cells could offer clues to treating hypothermia
by Liz Baier

In a dark corner of a lab inside Mayo Clinic Hospital St. Mary's Campus, Niccole Schaible peers through a microscope into the cardiomyoctes, or muscle cells of a MPR News Logorat's heart. They're on a glass slide, nearly invisible to the naked eye. "It's kind of a cool procedure when you actually see it contracting," she said. "When you look through the microscope and actually see this thing beating."

Additional Coverage:

Brainerd Dispatch (MPR), Rat heart cells could offer clues to treating hypothermia by Liz Baier, In a dark corner of a lab inside Mayo Clinic Hospital St. Mary's Campus, Niccole Schaible peers through a microscope into the cardiomyoctes, or muscle cells of a rat's heart. They're on a glass slide, nearly invisible to the naked eye… Schaible is a graduate student of biomedical engineering and physiology at Mayo Clinic. She's using the rat's muscle cells to understand why heart failure often occurs when patients are warmed after severe hypothermia.

Austin Daily Herald, Fergus Falls Journal

MPR, Eleven years after cancer diagnosis, the bad news by Bob Collins, There’s more to define Jenna (Langer) Vancura’s life than her battle with cancer. But her illness has consumed a lot of it. The 27-year-old New Ulm, Minnesota, native spent much of her senior year in high school at the Mayo Clinic… On Tuesday, 11 years to the day since we first found my cancer, my doctors bravely told me that my body was finally succumbing to the disease. It’s that realization nobody wants to have, but most need to have at some point. My mom thanked my doctors for their honesty; it’s hard to come by.

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Tags: ABC 15 Phoenix, alzheimer's disease, anaplastic astrocytoma, Angela Lunde, Argus Leader, Arizona Daily Star, Arizona Republic, arthritis, Austin Daily Herald, Baltimore Sun, Becker’s Hospital Review, BioProcess


September 25th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

FOX Business
Opening Bell: Mayo Clinic CEO: Possible Ebola could come to the U.S.

Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy breaks down what we need to know about Ebola in wake of the CDC forecasting as many as 1.4M cases of the deadly virusOpening Bell Fox Business
by January if efforts to contain it aren’t ramped up.

Reach: FoxNews.com has more than 13 million unique visitors each month. Fox Business Network is headquartered in News Corporation's studios in midtown Manhattan with bureaus in Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco (Silicon Valley), Washington, D.C. and London.

Context: John NosewortFox Businesshy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Dr. Noseworthy recently joined Fox Business’s “Opening Bell” to discuss a variety of health care-related topics.

Additional mentions:
FOX Business, Cut in: I’m Maria Bartiromo…then the Mayo Clinic’s, Dr. John Noseworthy on the Ebola crisis. All coming up tomorrow opening bell 9:00 am eastern.
FOX Business The Willis Report and FOX Business After the Bell

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Bryan Anderson

 

Reuters TV
New test to 'eradicate' colon cancer

A new diagnostic tool that targets genetic markers in human stools could significantly reduce deaths due to Reuters VIdeo logocolon cancer. Ben Gruber reports…But Dr. David Alquist of the Mayo Clinic says there's now a new option for colon cancer screening - it's called Cologuard - and it identifies genetic markers for cancer in stool samples with 94 percent accuracy.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world news, business newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile, and interactive television platforms.

Previous Coverage of Colon Cancer Screening Test in August 29, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Exact Sciences Corp. (NASDAQ: EXAS) today announced that Mayo Clinic will be the first health system to offer Cologuard®, the first and only Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved, noninvasive stool DNA screening test for colorectal cancer. Cologuard will be available to patients through their primary care physicians at Mayo Clinic.

cologuardAvailable by prescription only, Cologuard offers people 50 years and older, who are at average risk for colorectal cancer, an easy to use screening test which they can do in the privacy of their own home. It is the first noninvasive screening test for colorectal cancer that analyzes both stool-based DNA and blood biomarkers to detect cancer and precancer. The Cologuard technology platform was co-developed by Exact Sciences Corp. and Mayo Clinic as part of a broad, exclusive collaboration. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Brian Kilen

 

Additional Reuters TV Coverage of Mayo Clinic

Reuters TV
Inside-out stomach shrinkage a new option for the obese

Researchers in the United States have developed a new procedure that shrinks the stomach by as much as 80 percent without major surgery. Using a specialized endoscope, doctors re-shape the stomach byReuters VIdeo logo stitching it smaller from the inside out…Dr. Christopher Gostout, Gastroenterologist, Mayo Clinic, saying: "If you look at the mass of people in the United States and outside the United States who are obese now, we can't operate on everybody. But maybe if we can catch them before they get too bad with a pretty safe reliable technique, this would be a good fit."

Reuters TV
Round 2: Measles vs. Cancer

Scientists at the Mayo Clinic are starting a second round of human clinical trials to test if an engineered Reuters VIdeo logostrain of measles virus is an effective cancer treatment. The trial follows a successful first round of tests where a woman went into complete remission after a massive dose of the virus eradicated cancer in her body. Ben Gruber reports.

 

Eau Claire Leader-Telegram
MedEx program provides medical experience
by Christena O’Brien

Katie Benson stood behind Dr. Karen Myhre in an exam room last month and watched as the Mayo Clinic Health System pediatrician examined 15-month-oldLeader Telegram logo Celeste Raa…The experience was part of the MedEx program at Mayo Clinic Health System, which provides high school juniors considering a career in medicine to spend one-on-one time job shadowing physicians who practice in a variety of specialties.

Circulation: The Leader-Telegram is the largest daily newspaper in west-central Wisconsin. It covers 12 counties with circulations of 23,500 weekdays and 29,800 Sundays.

Context: The MedEx program at Mayo Clinic Health System provides high school juniors the opportunity to spend one-on-one time job shadowing doctors who practice in a variety of specialties. To be considered for the program, students must be entering their junior year of high school, at least 16 years old and seriously considering a career as a physician. Before applying for the program, students must first become volunteers at Mayo Clinic Health System and complete 30 required volunteer hours. Once they have completed 20 of the 30 hours, they can apply to the program. This involves completing an application form, writing an essay and submitting letters of reference. Students who are accepted into the program will spend eight, four-hour shifts job shadowing a physician during a normal work day the summer after completing their junior year of high school. For more information about the MedEx program, contact becky.bieno@mayo.edu.

Public Affairs Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist 

 

Florida Times-Union
Health Notes: Mayo Clinic researchers believe many liver transplant patients can be 'fast-tracked' and avoid ICU
by Charlie Patton

The liver transplant team at Mayo Clinic in Florida has found, based on 12 years of experience, that more than half of patients receiving a new liver can be “fast-Florida Times-Union newspaper logotracked” to return to a surgical ward following their transplant, bypassing a one- or two-day stay in the Intensive Care Unit…Amanda Chaney, a nurse practitioner with the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, has been selected to participate in the Future Leaders Program by The American Association of Nurse Practitioners, the largest professional membership organization for nurse practitioners.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: The liver transplant team at Mayo Clinic in Florida has found, based on 12 years of experience, that more than half of patients receiving a new liver can be “fast-tracked” to return to a surgical ward room following their transplant, bypassing a one- or two-day stay in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). “To the best of my knowledge, our program has been the only liver transplant program in the United States, and perhaps in the world, with this unique fast-track patient care model consistently practiced,” says the study’s senior investigator, C. Burçin Taner, M.D., chair of Transplant Surgery at Mayo Clinic, Florida. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Paul Scotti

 

Wall Street Journal
A Less-Invasive Procedure to Treat Fibroids
by Laura Johannes

Many women with fibroids have a hysterectomy, a complete removal of the uterus, or a myomectomy, a removal of just the fibroids. Laparoscopic power The Wall Street Journal newspaper logomorcellation is a common technique to break up tissue so those surgeries can be performed through tiny incisions but it has come under intense scrutiny… Long-term data published in recent years "shows that women have good relief of their symptoms," adds Mayo Clinic researcher Elizabeth A. Stewart. Dr. Stewart is co-author of a 2008 guideline by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, which called the procedure "safe and effective."

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Related Coverage:

Wall Street Journal, DEADLY MEDICINE by Jennifer Levitz and Jon Kamp…After Dr. Amy Reed had surgery to remove uterine fibroids, involving a procedure known as power morcellation, she learned that it had worsened her prognosis by spreading a cancer she and her doctors didn't know she had..."I don’t think there is an acceptable safe morcellator out there,” Bobbie Gostout, the Mayo Clinic’s chairwoman of obstetrics and gynecology, said at the Florida conference, responding to the Korean study. “I think it is time to go back to our industry partners and say we need a new alternative. We need a contained system.” Dr. Gostout now says her practice has almost eliminated power morcellators since at least 2011 and would use them only for the rare patient, such as one more prone to bleeding or infection, in dire need of a quicker recovery time, or with limited pain-relief options. 

Context:  Elizabeth A. Stewart, M.D. is a  gynecologic surgeon at Mayo ClinicUterine fibroids cause significant fear and morbidity and can compromise workplace performance, according to a published survey of nearly 1,000 women in the U.S. The results were published this month in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Journal of Women's Health. The findings shed new light on the impact, prevalence and treatment concerns related to uterine leiomyomas (fibroids), which affect up to 80 percent of women by age 50. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Dana Sparks

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September 18th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Reuters
Experimental Virus Being Tested as Cancer Treatment

Scientists at the Mayo Clinic are starting a second round of human clinical trials to test if an engineered strain of measles virus is an effective cancer treatment. The trial follows a successful first round of testsReuters logo where a woman went into complete remission after a massive dose of the virus eradicated cancer in her body. Ben Gruber reports.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world news, business news, technology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile, and interactive television platforms.

Additional coverage:

NBC News (KTTC), IBM Takes On Cancer, A new collaboration between the Mayo Clinic and IBM brings the Watson supercomputer to best match cancer patients with the estimated 178,000 ongoing medical trials, suited to their needs. KTTC's Devin Bartolotta reports.

ABC News, Cancer Survivor Saved by Measles Virus Raises Funds for Expanded Trial, After battling blood cancer for 10 years, Stacy Erholtz has no signs of the disease, thanks to an experimental treatment that used an engineered version of the measles virus. Now, a year after finishing her treatment, the 50-year-old mother of three is transitioning from patient to advocate, working with the Rochester, Minnesota-based Mayo Clinic to expand the tiny trial that saved her life.

AOL News, WPXI, Thanhnien News, The Northwestern, WTSP, Post Crescent, WSB Radio, Statesman, Courier-Journal, MSN UK, Bing, Yahoo! News, Yahoo! Finance, Yahoo! Canada

Previous Coverage in May 15, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage in Sept. 4, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: In a proof of principle clinical trial, Mayo Clinic researchers have demonstrated that virotherapy — destroying cancer with a virus that infects and kills cancer cells but spares normal tissues — can be effective against the deadly cancer multiple myeloma. The findings appear in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Two patients in the study received a single intravenous dose of an engineered measles virus (MV-NIS) that is selectively toxic to myeloma plasma cells. Both patients responded, showing reduction of both bone marrow cancer and myeloma protein. One patient, a 49-year-old woman, experienced complete remission of myeloma and has been clear of the disease for over six months. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
Jacksonville health care facilities collaborate to save bone marrow patients' lives
by Colleen Jones

Nearly every day in Jacksonville, there is a patient going through some part of the bone marrow transplant process: diagnosis, match-making or implantation. Three health care providers recently teamed up for a Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logocommunitywide bone marrow donor drive to benefit the Bone Marrow Transplant program of Mayo Clinic in Florida, Wolfson Children’s Hospital and Nemours Children’s Clinic…“Moments usually aren’t critical, but days are,” said Dr. Vivek Roy, medical director for Mayo’s adult bone marrow transplant program. “If we pool our resources, we find it works for us all.”

Reach: The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Context: The Blood and Marrow Transplantation Program of Mayo Clinic, Nemours Children's Clinic, Jacksonville, and Wolfson Children's Hospital has been awarded a three-year accreditation renewal by the Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (FACT). The foundation awarded the accreditation renewal after thorough site visits at all collection, transplantation and laboratory facilities at the three locations. More information about the program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Paul Scotti

 

Huffington Post
The Shrinking Middle Class of Physical Activity
by Brad Stulberg

…In other words, the vast majority of the country's economic growth is going to those who are already wealthy, the middle class is shrinking, and the gap between rich and poor is widening. There is evidenceHuffington Post Healthy Living that people who are of a higher socioeconomic status have a greater likelihood of adhering to health guidelines than those who are not. Note: This article was co-authored by Dr. Michael Joyner, who is an anesthesiologist and physiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique viewers.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist. Dr. Joyner and his lab team are interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Alyson Gonzalez

 

Washington Post
Treadmill desk to counteract the sedentary lifestyle of sitting all day
by Christie Aschwanden

As an avid runner, cyclist and skier, I get plenty of exercise, but the research shows that a five-mile run at Washington Post newspaper logothe end of the day won’t erase the health risks — such as an increased risk of diabetes, hypertension and obesity — wrought by eight hours of sedentary time, says Mayo Clinic physician and researcher James Levine, popularizer of the treadmill desk.

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post averages 518,700, and Sunday circulation averages 736,800.

Previous Coverage in Sept. 4, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage in May 15, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob NellisJim McVeigh

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September 11th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich


Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Featured

KARE11
KARE 11 Investigates: High school football helmet safety

How the football helmets your school uses measure up…A recent study from a neurology professor at Florida State University found Virginia Tech's 'not recommended' helmet was actually the best atKARE-11 TV, Minneapolis-St. Paul preventing concussions and a University of Wisconsin study found no difference among helmets. So is the helmet enough? "When I think about concussion, it's not just about the equipment although that's very important," says Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Michael Stuart who is leading new football research at Mayo Clinic.

Reach: KARE is a an NBC affiliate in the Minneapolis-St.Paul market.

Additional helmet/safety coverage: MPR

Context:  Michael Stuart, M.D. is co-director, Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

Dallas Morning News
Methodist becomes the first Texas member of Mayo’s Care Network
By Gary Jacobson

Operating for a century and a half, the Mayo Clinic is probably the strongest health care provider brand in the country. Last year, about 4,500 Texans, including 1,000 patients from the Dallas area, went to Dallas Morning News logoMayo for treatment, said Stephen Mansfield, CEO of Dallas-based Methodist Health System…“This is not an acquisition or a merger,” Mansfield said at a news conference formally announcing the alliance. “It’s a clinical collaboration.” Mansfield and David Hayes, medical director of Mayo’s Care Network, said the alliance allows Methodist physicians to consult with Mayo specialists and share treatment protocols and other best practices as they collaborate on patient care.

Reach: Dallas Morning News has a daily circulation of more than 257,000 and more than 1.4 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional Coverage: Dallas Regional Chamber blog, Becker’s Hospital Review, Dallas Business Journal, News Medical, D Healthcare Magazine, Biz Beat Blog, KDFW Dallas, KTVT Dallas

Related Coverage:

Dallas Morning News, Big-name hospitals, retailers, clinics collaborate for cost control by Gary Jacobson, Never has more change come more rapidly to the health care industry. In North Texas, not-for-profit providers are collaborating with retailers on walk-in clinics at neighborhood drugstores and aligning with elite national providers. This week, Dallas-based Methodist Health System said it was becoming part of the Mayo Clinic’s nationwide Care Network. Similarly, Baylor Scott & White Health is working on an agreement to become part of the Cleveland Clinic’s national cardiology network.  Additional coverage: Post-Bulletin

Context: Mayo Clinic and Methodist Health System (Methodist) officials announced Sept. 9 that Methodist has joined the Mayo Clinic Care Network. Methodist, one of North Texas’ oldest nonprofit health systems, was selected following a comprehensive evaluation that ranged from its clinical and business practices to quality, safety and service efforts and patient satisfaction. More information about the announcement can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

Star Tribune
At Apple's product unveiling, Mayo takes a big role
By Evan Ramstad

When Apple Inc. unveils new products Tuesday, one of the tech industry’s most anticipated events of the year, it will have Mayo Clinic at its side to encourage people to use smartphones, and possibly aStar Tribune Business section logo smartwatch, to monitor health. The combination of Rochester-based Mayo, one of the best-known names in health care, and Apple could be a major boost to the practice of routinely tracking health conditions and fitness performance.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional Coverage:

KARE11, Apple's big reveal has Minnesota connection, The Mayo Clinic has found a new high-tech partner in Apple. On Tuesday, the tech giant introduced the new iPhone 6, which will come in two sizes that are both bigger than the current iPhone 5. The much anticipated Apple Watch was also introduced with a starting price of $349. With the announcement, we learned the Mayo Clinic has been working for two years to help develop software called HealthKit for the new devices…"By interacting with patients and their data at an earlier stage in their state of wellness or their state of illness, you can effect change so those patients potentially wouldn't have to present to the emergency department," said Mayo Clinic Dr. John Wald.

Modern Healthcare, Mayo eyes Apple collaboration to expand consumer outreach by Darius Tahir, The Mayo Clinic has decided to be involved with Apple as it rolls out its new iWatch Tuesday because it hopes the iWatch, along with Apple's HealthKit app, will allow it to better reach patients remotely.  Another major provider, Memorial Sloan-Kettering in New York, also reportedly an Apple partner, did not respond to requests for comment on its plans.

More coverage on Apple/Mayo:  NY Times, Star Tribune, ABC News, Forbes, AppAdvice, Geeky Gadgets, Good Morning America!, Tech 2, 9to5Mac, iDownloadBlog.com, Gadgest.esKAAL, Modern Healthcare, BringMeTheNews, Houston Chronicle, KTTC, WCCO, Apple Insider,The Advisory, RushLimbaugh.com, Post-Bulletin, Hospitals & Health Networks, iPhoneHacks.com, Bloomberg

Context: During the keynote address at the Worldwide Developers Conference 2014Apple, Inc., unveiled HealthKit, a digital repository for various types of health-fitness related data. Apple highlighted HealthKit through a new Mayo Clinic app under development that would offer users a more personalized experience and make their health data more actionable in supporting healthier lifestyles. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

KAAL
Mayo Clinic Partners With IBM's Watson
By Brianna Long

…For someone who has been a winner on Jeopardy and is featured at conferences nationwide, their resume must be pretty impressive. But in this case, it's not a someone at all, but rather a something. KAAL TV logoWatson is IBM's super-computer, and now, it got a new job at Mayo Clinic…"The clinical trials matching solution, that we're working with IBM on, based on the Watson technology, does would be to accelerate and streamline that, so that it will automatically show up on my computer, when I see a patient, which trials this patient might be eligible for," said Dr. Nick LaRusso, the Mayo physician who is the lead on the Watson collaboration.

Reach:  KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Additional Coverage:

Star Tribune, Mayo Clinic partners with IBM's Watson computer for matching patients, clinical trials by AP, The Mayo Clinic is partnering with IBM and its Watson supercomputer to pair cancer patients with the right clinical trials. The Rochester clinic announced Monday it's working with the Armonk, N.Y.-based computing company on trial matching starting in 2015. The Watson cognitive computing system will sort through 8,000 Mayo studies and approximately 170,000 ongoing studies worldwide to match patients. Watson rose to fame by defeating a pair of "Jeopardy!" champions in 2011. Dr. Nicholas LaRusso of Mayo is leading the collaboration and says Watson could "transform" how health care is delivered. He says the program could significantly increase the number of patients who enroll in trials, as well as the accuracy of the matching.

KTTC, Washington Post, Modern Healthcare, Post-Bulletin, HealthcareDIVE, WCCO, News Observer, CNN MoneyPolitico, MobiHealthNews, A Smarter Planet Blog, The Scientist, Vida en el Valle, KTTC

Context: Mayo Clinic and IBM announced plans this week to pilot Watson, the IBM cognitive computer, to match patients more quickly with appropriate clinical trials, beginning with research studies in cancer. A proof-of-concept phase is currently underway. “In an area like cancer —where time is of the essence — the speed and accuracy that Watson offers will allow us to develop an individualized treatment plan more efficiently so we can deliver exactly the care that the patient needs,” says Steven Alberts, M.D., chair of medical oncology at Mayo Clinic. More information about the announcement can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

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September 4th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich


Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

TIME
Sitting is Killing You

by Alice Park

You’ve already heard that sitting is the new smoking. Now, scientists reveal exactly how it hurts the body—and novel ways to undo the damage (without clocTime magazine logoking hours at the gym). You might want to stand up for this…All of which has doctors and health experts calling for a paradigm shift. “In the same way that standing up is an oddity now, sitting down should be,” says Dr. James Levine, director of the Mayo Clinic-Arizona State University Obesity Solutions Initiative and probably best known as the inventor of the first treadmill desk.

Reach: Time magazine has a weekly circulation of 3.3 million. Time Online receives mores than 4.6 million unique visitors to its website each month and its monthy page views are more than 32.8 million.

Additional Coverage:

Arizona Republic
Workplace treadmill desks beginning to make strides
by Ken Alltucker

Arizona Republic newspaper logo…Now entrepreneurs and exercise companies have pounced on the idea that sitting can be hazardous to your health. "It is a hidden killer if you like," said James Levine, a Mayo Clinic doctor who examined the topic in his book "Get Up! Why Your Chair is Killing You and What You Can Do About It."

ReachThe Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday. The newspaper’s website Arizona Central, averages 83 million pages views each month.

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob NellisJim McVeigh

 

KARE11
Measles shot helps eliminate woman's cancer
by Adrienne Broaddus

Stacy Erholtz battled cancer for 10 years. But now, she says her cancer is in remission after a massive dose of the measles vaccine. While her journey has been tough, her faith hasn't wavered. After returningKARE-11 TV, Minneapolis-St. Paul from a taping a segment in Los Angeles with "The Doctors," Erholtz stopped by KARE 11 to chat about her journey. She said the show will highlight her treatment…Erholtz, 49, of Pequot Lakes, was one of two patients in a Mayo Clinic clinical trial last year using virotherapy. As she sips on a diet Pepsi, she can't stop smiling as she talks about her medical miracle.

Reach: KARE is a an NBC affiliate in the Minneapolis-St.Paul market.

Additional coverage: BringMeTheNews, WTVM Ga., WFSB, KCTV Kansas CityKCBD

Previous Coverage in May 15, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: In a proof of principle clinical trial, Mayo Clinic researchers have demonstrated that virotherapy — destroying cancer with a virus that infects and kills cancer cells but spares normal tissues — can be effective against the deadly cancer multiple myeloma. The findings appear in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Two patients in the study received a single intravenous dose of an engineered measles virus (MV-NIS) that is selectively toxic to myeloma plasma cells. Both patients responded, showing reduction of both bone marrow cancer and myeloma protein. One patient, a 49-year-old woman, experienced complete remission of myeloma and has been clear of the disease for over six months. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

 

MPR
Mayo doctor's tips for stress-free living and better health

MPR News logoDr. Amit Sood, author of the "Mayo Clinic's Guide to Stress-Free Living," speaks at a Minnesota Public Radio "Healthy States" event about the ways to improve your health by alleviating stress. Gratitude, compassion, acceptance, forgiveness and focusing on the meaning of life are key.Book cover Mayo Clinic's Guide to Stress-Free Living, with female doing cartwheel

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: In The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living, Mayo Clinic stress management and resiliency expert Amit Sood, M.D., draws on decades of groundbreaking research to offer readers a scientifically proven, structured and practical approach to reducing stress. He explains the brain’s two modes — focused mode and default mode — and how an imbalance between the two produces unwanted stress, and he shares new insights about how the mind works, including its natural tendency to wander. In this easy-to-follow guide, Dr. Sood provides actionable steps to cultivate emotional and mental strength, find greater fulfillment and nurture a kind disposition. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Sood, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Ginger Plumbo, Brian Kilen

 

Chicago Defender
Black Women Move Past ‘Tuskegee Experiment’ Mistrust
by Oretha Winston

If a research survey of African American professional women is any indication, attitudes may be changing towards participation in medical research. Mayo Clinic and The Links, Incorporated Chicago Defender newspaper logoresearchers teamed up to survey members of the international women’s organization, and found that a majority of African American women surveyed are willing to or have taken part in medical research…“Our findings are highly encouraging,” says Sharonne Hayes, M.D., Mayo Clinic cardiologist, co-author of the study, and director of Mayo’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion.

Reach: The Chicago Defender covers local and national news of interest to its black readership, residing in the Chicago metropolitan area. The publication has a weekly circulation of more than 7,400 readers. The online version attracts more than 13,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Elev8

Context: If a research survey of African American professional women is any indication, attitudes may be changing towards participation in medical research. Mayo Clinic and The Links, Incorporated researchers teamed up to survey members of the international women’s organization, and found that a majority of African American women surveyed are willing to or have taken part in medical research. The results appear in the Journal of Women’s Health. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

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