Fri, Jul 24

Mayo Clinic In the News

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

 

The Wall Street Journal
Doctors Object to High Cancer-Drug Prices

by Jeanne Whalen —More than 100 oncologists from top cancer hospitals around the U.S. have issued a harsh rebuke over soaring cancer-drug prices and called for new regulations to control them.…In an editorial published in the Mayo Clinic’s WSJ Bannermedical journal, the doctors focus attention on the financial burden to patients, saying the out-of-pocket costs are bankrupting many just as they’re fighting a deadly illness.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Additional coverage:

Reuters, Experts support call for lower cancer drug prices

NPR, Doctors Press For Action To Lower 'Unsustainable' Prices For Cancer Drugs

New Hampshire Public Radio, Doctors Speak Out Against 'Unsustainable' Rise In Cancer Drug Prices,

The New York Times, Drug Prices Soar, Prompting Calls for Justification

Kansas City Star (The New York Times), As drug prices soar, calls for justification intensify

Forbes, 155 Doctors Say This Is The Solution To Terrifying Drug Prices

Fortune, Doctors say cancer drug costs are out of control

Newsweek — The High Cost of Cancer Care: Your Money or Your Life? 

The Washington Post — Cancer experts call for curbs on rising drug prices

POLITICO Pro, Top cancer docs want patients to join pushback on drug costs 

NBC News, Can Cancer Drugs Be Made Affordable? More Than 100 Experts Weigh In

Time, Top Cancer Doctors Call for Lower Drug Costs

CBS News, Rising cancer costs pit doctors against drugmakers

FOX News (Reuters), Experts support call for lower cancer drug prices

Yahoo! (Reuters) Over 100 Doctors Call for Lower Cancer Drug Prices

HealthDay, U.S. Oncologists Decry High Cost of Cancer Drugs,

OncLive, Cancer Care Leaders Demand Drug Pricing Reforms

CNBC, Eli Lilly CEO: Obamacare out-of-pocket costs high

UPI.com, Experts: Cancer drug costs 'not sustainable'

ThinkProgress, More Than 100 Doctors Tell Big Pharma To Stop Making Cancer Drugs So Expensive

Times Gazette, Doctors Agree That Cancer Drug Prices Must be Decreased

American Pharmacists Association, More than 100 doctors object to high cancer drug prices

Tech Times, 118 Experts Support Calls To Lower Prices Of Cancer Meds

Youth Health Magazine, Are Cancer Drugs Getting Too Expensive? A Group of Oncologists Says So

Valley News (AP), Cancer Experts Say Curb Drug Costs

fox4kc.com, Doctors urge action on cancer drug costs

The Fiscal Times, As Drug Prices Soar, Doctors Voice Outrage

 

Context: A group of 118 of the nation's leading cancer experts have drafted a prescription for reducing the high cost of cancer drugs and voiced support for a patient-based grassroots movement demanding action on the issue. Their recommendations and support are outlined in a commentary, co-authored by the group, in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.  "High cancer drug prices are affecting the care of patients with cancer and our health care system," says lead author Ayalew Tefferi, M.D., a hematologist at Mayo Clinic. "The average gross household income in the U.S. is about $52,000 per year. For an insured patient with cancer who needs a drug that costs $120,000 per year, the out-of-pocket expenses could be as much as $25,000 to $30,000 – more than half their average household income." More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

The Florida Times-Union
Money from Ice Bucket Challenge helps pay for ongoing research into ALS at Jacksonville's Clinic
by Charlie Patton

Last summer, according to the ALS Association, the Ice Bucket Challenge raised $115 million to help find treatments and a cure for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the disease that killed Hall of Fame baseball player Lou Gehrig. Of thatFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo money, $77 million was allocated for research. The ALS Association announced last week 58 new research grants totaling $11,621,638. About $1 million of that is going to the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville in three grants.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:

Augustine Record — Money from Ice Bucket Challenge helps pay for ongoing research into ALS at Jacksonville's Clinic 

Context: Leonard Petrucelli, Ph.D.'s research team research is investigating the cellular mechanisms that cause neurodegeneration in diseases characterized by abnormal protein aggregation, such as Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In expanding upon his commitment to understanding the causes of such diseases, Dr. Petrucelli is now emphasizing translational research geared toward identifying and developing therapies for treatment and prevention.

Contact: Kevin Punksy

 

Washington Post
Alzheimer’s scientists to meet in D.C. amid signs of progress for treatment
by Fredrick Kunkle

…Dean Hartley, director of science initiatives at the Alzheimer’s Association, said Congress is debating the possibility of increasing the annual Washington Post newspaper logoresearch budget of about $600 million by an additional $300 million to $350 million a year, beginning in fiscal 2016. But he said that’s still less than what is currently spent on cancer, heart disease or HIV research, and well below the estimated $2 billion that the scientific community has said would be necessary to try to find a cure or effective treatments by 2025. “We’ve got to ramp up now,” said Ronald C. Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center and chairman of the national Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post averages 518,700, and Sunday circulation averages 736,800.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contacts: Duska Anastasijevic, Sharon Theimer

 

Reuters
Ahead of Alzheimer’s meeting, researchers seize on signs of progress
by Bill Berkrot

After decades of Alzheimer’s research that led to dead ends, including 123 drugs that failed, top researchers in the field sayReuters Logo they are far more confident now of producing an effective treatment...Dr. Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, agrees with Sperling that a multi-prong approach will be required to keep the disease at bay.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world newsbusiness newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile and interactive television platforms.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contacts: Duska Anastasijevic, Sharon Theimer

 

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic ranked nation's second best hospital
by John Scott

After a year at the top of the U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals list, Mayo Clinic has traded places with last year's number two, Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperMassachusetts General Hospital. Rounding out the top five spots, Johns Hopkins Hospital tied with UCLA Medical Center for number three, and the Cleveland Clinic came in fourth..."We're extremely pleased to be honored by U.S. News & World Report because it is used by so many health consumers to help guide their care," said Dr. John Wald, medical director for public affairs and marketing for Mayo Clinic Enterprise. "To be ranked No. 1 in eight of those specialties, and to be ranked one, two and three in all data-driven specialties ... it really speaks to the breadth of our practice and not to one specialty. The reason we are Mayo Clinic is because patients come here to get seamless, integrated care. I think this ranking really defines that for us," Wald said.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Additional Coverage:

Healio — Mayo Clinic named best hospital for pulmonology care

Healio — US. News & World Report ranks Mayo Clinic best hospital for gastroenterology, GI surgery 

Healio — US. News & World Report ranks top hospitals for diabetes, endocrinology care 

Medscape — The Roanoke Times, Crain’s Detroit Business, KTTC,  The Boston Globe, Detroit Free Press, WXOW News 19 La Crosse, MinnPost, The Hub at Johns Hopkins, KROC AM 1340, KTIV 4 Sioux City, WQOW, WSJV, WDSI, Yahoo!, ABC15 Arizona, Medscape, boston.com, Minneapolis/ St. Paul Business Journal, ConsumerAffairs, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Newsmax, KXLT- FOX 47, KWWK, The Denver Post, Chicago Tribune

Context: Mayo Clinic has been named one of the best hospitals nationwide by U.S. News and World Report. Mayo Clinic earned more No. 1 rankings in individual specialties than any other provider based on reputation, services and volumes, safety and clinical outcomes. “This ranking underscores our long-standing commitment to provide the highest-quality care that best meets our patients’ needs,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic. “Mayo Clinic is fortunate to be ranked No. 1 in more specialties than any other hospital in the nation. We owe our success to staff members who dedicate themselves daily to this shared mission.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Madson

 

Phoenix Business Journal
U.S. News & World Report' unveils Phoenix hospital rankings

U.S. News & World Report has released its 2015-16 list of the country's best hospitals, but none of Arizona's hospitals made the national Honor Roll. Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, which was No. 2 last year, claimed the No. 1 spot on the Honor Roll, which highlights hospitalsPhoenix Business Journal that are exceptional in numerous specialties. The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, ranked No. 2 on the Honor Roll, while Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore and UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles tied for third...Dr. Wyatt Decker, CEO at Mayo Clinic in Arizona and vice president of Mayo Clinic, said the Mayo staff takes great pride in developing the most innovative treatments and care delivery models in an effort to best service its patients. "Examples include the proton beam and new cancer center facility now under construction on our Phoenix campus, as well as our telemedicine programs, which are bringing much-needed specialty expertise to rural parts of our state," Decker said.

Reach: The Phoenix Business Journal is published by American City Business Journals which owns more than 40 other local business newspapers.

Context: Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix is ranked No. 1 in Arizona and the Phoenix metro area in the annual U.S. News & World ReportAmerica’s Best Hospital List released today. Hospitals included in the U.S. News Report such as the Mayo Clinic, are part of an elite group recognized for “breadth of excellence,” according to the magazine. Mayo Clinic in Arizona ranked nationally in 12 specialties including Cancer; Cardiology and Heart Surgery; Diabetes and Endocrinology; Ear, Nose and Throat; Gastroenterology and Gastroenterologic Surgery; Geriatrics; Gynecology; Nephrology; Neurology and Neurosurgery; Orthopedics; Pulmonology and Urology. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
These three Jacksonville facilities made U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Hospitals” list

U.S. News & World Report has named Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus, UF Health Jacksonville and St. Vincent's Medical Center to its annual list of Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logo“America’s Best Hospitals” published online today. Mayo Clinic is ranked No. 1 in the Jacksonville metro area, No. 4 in Florida and among the top 50 hospitals nationally in cancer, gastroenterology and GI surgery, geriatrics, and neurology and neurosurgery.

Reach:  The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals

Context: U.S. News & World Report again has named Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus to its annual list of “America’s Best Hospitals” published online today. Mayo Clinic is ranked No. 1 in the Jacksonville metro area, No. 4 in Florida and among the top 50 hospitals nationally in cancer,gastroenterology (GI) and GI surgery, geriatrics, and neurology and neurosurgery. The Florida campus also was recognized as high performing in diabetes and endocrinology, ear, nose and throat, gynecology, nephrology, orthopedicspulmonology and urology. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

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Tags: 50 leaders in health IT, AARP, ABC15 Arizona, aging of the baby-boom generation, Akron Beacon Journal, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimer's disease, American Pharmacists Association, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Arizona, artificial liver device


Fri, Jul 17

Mayo Clinic In the News

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Wall Street Journal
How Quickly Are You Growing Old?
by Sumathi Reddy

Feel like you’re 40 years old going on 60? Or maybe, 40 going on 21? Age may be just a number, but medical experts increasingly are saying it might not always be the right number to gauge your health… Measuring the pace of aging inWSJ Banner young people could prove useful to study lifestyle interventions, such as diet and exercise, but are less likely to prompt drug interventions, said James Kirkland, director of the Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging at Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minn.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: The Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging at Mayo Clinic is an innovative center where education, research and medical practice come together to improve the quality of life from birth through the sunset years. The goal of the Kogod Center on Aging is to discover and develop interventions to increase health span — the healthy, productive time in life — and improve the quality of life for older adults. James Kirkland, M.D., Ph.D., is the executive director of the Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging.

Contacts: Traci Klein, Duska Anastasijevic

 

USA Today
Minnesota boy who got brain infection after swimming dies
by Mary Bowerman

A 14-year-old Minnesota teen infected with a rare brain infection while swimming in a lake died Thursday, his family said in a statement… The organism enters the brain through the nasal cavity, typically from jumping or diving into water, accordUSA Today newspaper logoing to Jessica Sheehy, a physician assistant and infectious diseases specialist at Mayo Clinic Health System.

Reach: USA TODAY  has an average daily circulation of 4.1 million which includes print, various digital editions and other papers that use their branded content.

Additional coverage: 

Mankato Free Press, Health officials offer precautions on deadly lake infection

Context: Jessica Sheehy, P.A.-C. is a physician assistant and infectious diseases specialist at Mayo Clinic Health System in Mankato.

Contact: Micah Dorfner

 

WEAU Eau Claire
From A to Z-- how to stay tick free

It’s July – the month when 40 percent of tick bites occur in the upper Midwest. But fans of the great outdoors can fully enjoy all their favorite activities without fear if they take the proper steps to protect themselves. To help, Mayo Clinic hasWEAU Eau Claire Logo developed “The ABCs of Ticks” flash cards. "People are always asking questions about ticks, how do I avoid them, how can I avoid tick-borne diseases," Dr. Bobbi Pritt with Mayo Clinic's Clinical Parasitology Laboratory said. "So we wanted to create easy-to-follow ABCs about ticks."

Reach: WEAU-TV is the NBC affiliate for much of western Wisconsin, including Eau Claire and La Crosse.

Context: Mayo Clinic reports that in the summer months, its physicians see an increase in patients being treated, and even hospitalized, for tick-borne illnesses. In the upper Midwest, 40 percent of tick bites occur in July. However, even avid fans of the great outdoors can fully enjoy all their favorite activities without fear if they take the proper steps to protect themselves. To protect you against tick-borne diseases, the Mayo Clinic Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology and its reference laboratory Mayo Medical Laboratories have developed “The ABCs of Ticks” flash cards. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Gina Chiri-Osmond, Susan Barber Lindquist

 

News4Jax
Exercise in the summer

The extreme heat can put a strain on your heart, cause heat exhaustion, or heat stroke. Here to tell us what we need to News Jax 4 Logoknow is a cardiologist from Mayo Clinic, Dr. Amy Pollak.

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville.

Context: Amy Pollak, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

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Tags: ABC15 Arizona, ABCs about ticks, aging in young people, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Antidepressants Linked To Birth Defects, Anxiety Coach mobile phone app, aortic stenosis, aquatic exercise, Aspen Ideas Festival, Australian Broadcast Corporation, Beat the Blues, Big Blue Dragon Boat Festival


Fri, Jul 10

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editors: Carmen Zwicker, Emily Blahnik

 

Star Tribune
Mayo makes case for Medicare reimbursement for telemedicine
by Jim Spencer

Nurses Jennifer Meindel and Chad Ditlevson stand in front of monitors in a small room at the Mayo Clinic reading vital signs and occasionally calling up video images of patients lying in beds. All of the 40-some patients cycling across theStar Tribune newspaper logo screens are in intensive care in the Mayo Clinic Health System. But none of them are actually at Mayo. The clinic’s electronic intensive care unit, known as eICU, is one of the frontiers of telemedicine. Backed by Dr. Daniel Brown, Mayo’s chief of critical care, and nurse manager Sarah Bell, Meindel and Ditlevson direct the care of very vulnerable patients from afar.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: Insurance News Net

Context: Each year, Mayo Clinic physicians see people from all 50 states. Advances in technology are helping patients who may be faced with long-distance travel and logistical hurdles connect with Mayo Clinic’s specialized health care providers easier and faster. However, the patchwork of state-by-state medical licensing rules presents a costly and time-consuming barrier to telehealth care delivery. Steve Ommen, M.D. is medical director of Center for Connected Care, Mayo Clinic.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Wall Street Journal
Seeking Better Ways to Treat the Lows of Bipolar Disorder
by Melinda Beck

Distinguishing between regular depression and bipolar disorder is one of the toughest calls psychiatrists face. The WSJ Bannersymptoms are often similar, but medications that ease depression can make bipolar patients worse by triggering manic episodes. The dilemma is fueling new research efforts to understand how the two conditions differ and how to predict which patients will respond to which drugs. Scientists at the Mayo Clinic, which treats some 3,000 patients a year with bipolar disorder, are collecting DNA samples, blood tests, brain scans and clinical information in hopes of identifying genetic risk factors, or biomarkers, that can lead to earlier diagnoses and individualized treatments.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has the largest print circulation in America with 1.4 million (60 percent) of a total of 2.3 million. Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: The Individualized Medicine Biobank for Bipolar Disorder is intended to serve as a resource for the bipolar research community. This biobank will be open to collaborations after a three-year infrastructure development. Researchers are establishing a large-scale biobank of Bipolar Type I and II Disorder, collecting both biologic samples and clinical data from 2,000 individuals ages 18-80. This is a multi-site endeavor, with Mayo Clinic Minnesota serving as the primary project site. Researchers at Mayo Clinic will collaborate with other researchers at the University of Minnesota, Lindner Center of Hope (Cincinnati, Ohio) as well as the Mayo Clinic sites of Arizona and Florida. Mark Frye, M.D., is chair of psychiatry and psychology at Mayo Clinic.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

MPR
How hospitals are improving heart attack care, survival
by Emily Kaiser

"We've been advocating for getting our act together and moving quickly for literally two decades," said Dr. Sharonne Hayes, a cardiologist at Mayo Clinic. "What has really happened is we put the systems in place to achieve this and whenMPR News logo you have a little success it makes everybody get on board." The time for care dropped when all sides of the system coordinated: from recognition and speed on first contact with a paramedic or emergency room to transfer to hospitals with the technology required for proper care, said Dr. Chet Rihal an interventionalist and the chairperson of the Cardiology Department at Mayo Clinic.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Charanjit "Chet"Rihal, M.D., is an academic interventional cardiologist and an expert in the field of coronary and valve and structural cardiology. As the principal investigator on multiple research grants, Dr. Rihal oversees studies focusing on valvular and structural heart disease (for example, percutaneous aortic valve therapies), clinical trials in coronary artery disease, and developing novel genetic approaches to anti-thrombotic therapy. Sharrone Hayes, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Her research focuses on cardiovascular disease and prevention, with a focus on sex and gender differences and conditions that uniquely or predominantly affect women.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Post-Bulletin
Good Health: Doctors belong in the social media conversation

Next fall, Mayo hosts the first ever global meeting for its social media health network, a gathering planned to be in Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperAustralia."Mayo encourages physicians to understand how to use these tools appropriately," said Dr. Farris Timimi, medical director of Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media. "Most patients make their decisions based on a reference network. More and more often that includes online communications. We check our phones an average of 14 times a day."

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: Farris Timimi, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist and also serves as the medical director for the Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media.

Contact: Lee Aase

 

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Tags: $11 million grant from NCI, Abu Dhabi, Advance Directives, agoraphobia, airlifted to Mayo Clinic Hospital in Rochester, AOL, Apervita Inc., Arrhythmias, B2M protein, benign tumors, biomarker discovery program, bipolar disorder


Fri, Jul 3

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editors: Carmen Zwicker, Emily Blahnik

 

Boston Globe
Destination for reluctant but hopeful travelers

They arrive in all seasons and from every corner of the earth: the chronically ill, the suddenly stricken, the worried well. They come seeking answers, guidance, and healing at this medical oasis in the Minnesota cornfields. Monica Robles, a copy center supervisorBoston Globe Logo from Arrada, Colo., was referred to Mayo Clinic to be treated by a top specialist in her rare heart condition. Vicky Wright, who organizes marriage workshops in Austin, Texas, flew in for a complicated biopsy. Kuwaiti aviation official Abdullah Al Obaid is spending four or five months in this small city south of Minneapolis so Mayo neurologists can adjust and monitor his multiple sclerosis treatments.

Reach: The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Context: For more than a century, people from all walks of life have found answers at Mayo Clinic.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Arizona Horizon (PBS)
Nationwide Melanoma Clinical Trials

A Stand Up to Cancer (SU2C) Melanoma Dream Team, led by TGen President Dr. Jeffrey Trent of Phoenix, is launching a set of nationwide Arizona PBSclinical trials on a form of melanoma skin cancer that affects about half of all people who get the disease. Mayo Clinic in Arizona is the only clinical trial location in our state. Dr. Trent and Dr. Alex Sekulic of Mayo Clinic will discuss the melanoma clinical trials.

Reach: Eight, Arizona PBS is a PBS station that has focused on educating children, reporting in-depth on public affairs, fostering lifelong learning and celebrating arts and culture. Its signal reaches 86 percent of the homes in Arizona. With more than 1 million viewers weekly, Eight consistently ranks among the most-viewed public television stations per capita in the country. Eight is a member-supported service of Arizona State University.

Additional coverage: San Angelo Standard-Times, Frederick News-Post Online

Previous Coverage in June 26, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Mayo Clinic and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) are helping launch a national clinical trial that will apply the latest in precision medicine to treat advanced melanoma skin cancer. The study leverages advances in genomics, informatics, and health information technology, yielding more precise medical treatments for patients with this devastating disease. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

KTTC
Mayo Clinic's first proton beam therapy patient receives treatment
by Kimberly Davis

The first patient to receive proton beam radiation therapy allowed KTTC to sit in on her session at Mayo Clinic Thursday morning. Thursday was Jessie Brentholt's fourth proton beam treatment of her six week process. Her mother tells News Center's Kimberly Davis she will come to theKTTC TV logo Jacobson building every day to receive treatment until August 3.

Reach: KTTC is an NBC affiliate that serves the Rochester, Minn. area including the towns of Austin, Mason City, Albert Lea and Winona. Its website receives more than 73,300 unique visitors each month.

Previous Coverage in June 26, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage in June 12, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage in June 4, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context:  Mayo Clinic introduces its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota beginning this June and Arizona in spring 2016. Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients — especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures — proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

WCCO-AM
MAYO CLINIC SQUARE-The WCCO Morning News with Dave Lee.

Dr. John Noseworthy is interviewed (see 6-17-15 segment)

WCCO-AM Dave LeeReach: WCCO radio, a CBS owned and operated affiliate in Minneapolis, boasts one of the largest coverage areas in the country as it reaches into portions of North and South Dakota during the day. At night, the station’s signal typically reaches across many U.S. states and Canadian provinces.

Previous Coverage in Jun 18, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Dignitaries from the worlds of medicine, sports, business and politics hit the court June 17 to dedicate Mayo Clinic Square in downtown Minneapolis. The event was the first in a series of grand-opening events marking the strategic collaboration of Mayo Clinic, the Minnesota Timberwolves and Minnesota Lynx. "At Mayo Clinic we pride ourselves in teamwork," said John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO of Mayo Clinic. "We are proud to be part of the team that made this day possible." More information about Mayo Clinic Square can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

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Tags: Addie Sylvester, Affordable care act, Albuquerque Journal, All4Women, alzheimer's disease, American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, anorexia, Arizona Daily Star, Arizona Horizon, Arizona Republic, Asian Age, assisted living facilities


Fri, Jun 26

Mayo Clinic In the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editors, Carmen Zwicker, Emily Blahnik

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic harnesses proton power
by Jeremy Olson

Until this week, Mayo Clinic had tested its $180 million proton beam accelerator only on water, a cadaver and cuts of meat donated by Ye Olde Butcher Shoppe in Rochester. But Monday, with a turn of a safety key and a press of a “beam on” button, radiation therapist Rebecca Keller sentStar Tribune newspaper logo positively charged protons through a series of powerful magnets, accelerating them to 60 percent of the speed of light, and focused them straight at the bottle cap-sized tumor in the brain of ­Ashley Sullivan. Physicists and cancer specialists crowded over Keller’s computer in the control room of Mayo’s new proton beam center to watch protons pepper the tumor.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Related Coverage:

KAAL, Mayo Treats First Patient Using Proton Therapy 

KSTP, Mayo Clinic Introduces Treatment to More Effectively Target Tumors 

Previous Coverage in June 12, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage in June 4, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context:  Mayo Clinic introduces its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota beginning this June and Arizona in spring 2016. Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients — especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures — proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Arizona Republic
Melanoma trial begins as new cancer drugs show promise
by Ken Alltucker

…While the number of melanoma cases has increased dramatically, doctors who treat the deadliest form of the disease say more treatment Arizona Republic newspaper logooptions have emerged in recent years. "The revolution in melanoma (treatment) over the past five years has been dramatic," said Dr. Alan Bryce, a Mayo Clinic oncologist who has treated Spatt. "There have been more advances in melanoma than any other cancer."

Reach: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday and has an average daily circulation of more than 261,000 readers. The newspaper’s website Arizona Republic - Online, averages more than 5.4 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: USA Today, Phoenix Business Journal

Context: Mayo Clinic and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) are helping launch a national clinical trial that will apply the latest in precision medicine to treat advanced melanoma skin cancer. The study leverages advances in genomics, informatics, and health information technology, yielding more precise medical treatments for patients with this devastating disease. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

Wall Street Journal
For CFOs, Signs of a Stronger Economy
by John Bussey

U.S. economic growth may be listless, but there are signs that could change in the coming months. That, at least, was the conclusion one could draw at this year’s gathering of global chief financial officers at The Wall Street Journal’s CFO Network conference. The CFOs clearly see aWSJ Banner tightening labor market—a sign of economic momentum. “We’re seeing increased competition for talented employees,” Kedrick Adkins Jr., CFO of the Mayo Clinic, said at the gathering in Washington, D.C., last week. “It’s across the organization.”

Additional coverage: Wall Street Journal

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has the largest print circulation in America with 1.4 million (60 percent) of a total of 2.3 million. Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Kedrick Adkins, Jr. is CFO of Mayo Clinic.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Wall Street Journal
Noseworthy, Tyson on Balancing Care and Cost

It’s a question at the heart of arguments about health care: How can the industry put a lid on soaring costs and still deliver quality, innovation WSJ Bannerand choice to patients? For insights, The Wall Street Journal’s Laura Landro spoke with two health-care executives whose organizations are renowned for innovative practices: John H. Noseworthy, president and chief executive of the Mayo Clinic, and Bernard J. Tyson, chairman and CEO of Kaiser Permanente. Here are edited excerpts of their conversation.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has the largest print circulation in America with 1.4 million (60 percent) of a total of 2.3 million. Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. 

Contact: Traci Klein

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Thu, Jun 18

Mayo Clinic In The News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

 

MSNBC Morning Joe
Mayo clinic offers patient care to Walmart employees

Dr. John Noseworthy talks about the Mayo Clinic's relationship with Walmart and why they will offer patient care to theMorning Joe MSNBC company's employees.

Reach: MSNBC provides in-depth analysis of daily headlines, political commentary and informed perspectives. MSNBC’s home on the Internet is tv.msnbc.com. Joe Scarborough hosts “Morning Joe,” with co-hosts Mika Brzezinski and Willie Geist, featuring interviews with top politicians and newsmakers, as well as in-depth analysis of the day’s biggest stories. Morning Joe has about 375,000 viewers daily.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. 

Contact: Traci Klein

 

FOX News
Sunday Morning Futures, Joining me now is Dr. John Noseworthy

He is president and CEO of the Mayo Clinic. And he is with us on set. Good to see you, John. Thanks so much for joining Sunday Morning Futures Fox Newsus…So I want to get your take, really, on a couple of things. I want to talk about the subsidies issue and this pending Obamacare care ruling. But I also want to ask you about innovation, what you're doing at Mayo and, really, what's happening in health care today.

Reach:  Fox News Channel (FNC) is a cable and satellite television news channel owned by the Fox Entertainment Group, a subsidiary of News Corporation. Maria Bartiromo has covered business and the economy for more than 25 years and was one of the building blocks of business cable network CNBC. During her 20-year tenure as the face of CNBC, she launched the network’s morning program, Squawk Box; anchored The Closing Bell with Maria Bartiromo; and was the anchor and managing editor of the nationally syndicated On the Money with Maria Bartiromo, formerly The Wall Street Journal Report with Maria Bartiromo. Bartiromo joined FOX Business Network (FBN) as Global Markets Editor in January 2014.  She is the anchor of Opening Bell with Maria Bartiromo on FBN (weekdays from 9-11 AM/ET) and Sunday Morning Futures with Maria Bartiromo (Sundays at 10 AM/ET) on FOX News Channel (FNC).

Additional Coverage:
Wall Street Journal
How Mayo, Kaiser Permanente Keep Health Costs Down

At WSJ's CFO Conference, Wall Street Journal Video logoPresident and CEO of Mayo Clinic John H. Noseworthy, M.D. and Chairman and CEO of Kaiser Permanente Bernard J. Tyson discussed their cost-saving health care systems.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. 

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville to create lung restoration center
by Charlie Patton

In 2014, the number of people on the waiting list for a lung transplant in the U.S. outnumbered the number of donor lungs available by about 650. The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville and United Therapeutics Corp., a biotechnology company, are collaborating now on the creation of a lungFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo restoration center on Mayo’s Jacksonville campus that should ultimately double the number of lungs available for transplant in the U.S. “This is a big deal,” said Gianrico Farrugia, chief executive officer of Mayo in Jacksonville. “… This is not Mayo or United Therapeutics benefiting. This is the whole country benefiting.” Additional coverage: Jacksonville Business Journal, Jacksonville Post, MyInforms.com, Jacksonville City and Press, Phys.Org

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, and United Therapeutics Corporation (NASDAQ: UTHR) announced recently a collaboration to build and operate a lung restoration center on the Mayo campus. The goal is to significantly increase the volume of lungs for transplantation by preserving and restoring selected marginal donor lungs, making them viable for transplantation. The restored lungs will be made available to patients at Mayo Clinic and other transplant centers throughout the United States. Construction of the center is expected to be completed in late 2017. Financial details of the agreement were not disclosed. “This collaboration is exciting because it allows Mayo Clinic to bring the latest advances in life-saving technology to transplant patients,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., chief executive officer of Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida. “Ultimately, this relationship will help Mayo Clinic expand its reach to patients who could benefit from this innovation. Increasing the number of lungs available for transplantation provides more options for patients suffering from pulmonary disease.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

ABC 15 Arizona
Mayo Clinic has heart failure treatment options

David Fortuin, M.D., Mayo Clinic Cardiologist, joined the hosts of ABC affiliate, channel 15 in ArizonaSonoran Living Live to discuss treatment options for patients with heart failure.   Surgery is an excellent option for heart failure patients -- if they can tolerate it.

Reach:  KNXV-TV, ABC 15, is the ABC television station affiliate in Phoenix, Arizona.

Context: F. David Fortiun, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Mayo Clinic's top-ranked team of cardiologists diagnoses and treats many heart conditions, including many rare and complex disorders. Mayo Clinic's Division of Cardiovascular Diseases is one of the largest and most integrated in the United States, with locations in Arizona, Florida, Minnesota and several communities throughout Mayo Clinic Health System. Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota include more than 200 cardiologists and 1,100 allied health staff trained in caring for heart patients.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Star Tribune
NBA commissioner calls Minneapolis practice site a catalyst

It had been a busy few hours for NBA commissioner Adam Silver. Tuesday night he had presented the Golden State Warriors the Larry O'Brien trophy after their series-deciding victory in Cleveland. Wednesday morning he was at TheStar Tribune newspaper logo Courts at Mayo Square, the  new 107,000-square-foot Taj Mahal-like practice facility for the Timberwolves and Lynx. The grand opening was attended by Silver, WNBA president Laurel Richie, Wolves and Lynx owner Glen Taylor and Mayo CEO Dr. John Noseworthy. Afterward, Silver called the facility — which he said was the most impressive he had seen — a catalyst for better things to come for a Wolves franchise that hasn’t seen the playoffs since 2004, but is set to pick first in next week’s draft.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:
NBA.com, Three Questions With Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine

Star TribuneHartman: NBA chief Silver impressed by where Wolves stand

Star Tribune (AP), Timberwolves hope new practice center marks the end of decade-long doldrums; teaming with Mayo

Star TribuneGallery: Wolves, with partner Mayo Clinic, open Mayo Clinic Square

Star Tribune, Wolves and Lynx open new Mayo Clinic practice facility

USA Today, KTTC, KTTC, KAAL, The Herald S.C., Washington Post, Pioneer Press, FOX9, FOX Sports, Sun Times Minneapolis, NBA.com, BringMeTheNews, KARE11, Canis Hoopus

Context: DigniMayo Clinic Square Courts logotaries from the worlds of medicine, sports, business and politics hit the court today, Wednesday, June 17, to dedicate Mayo Clinic Square in downtown Minneapolis. The event was the first in a series of grand-opening events marking the strategic collaboration of Mayo Clinic, the Minnesota Timberwolves and Minnesota Lynx. "At Mayo Clinic we pride ourselves in teamwork," said John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO of Mayo Clinic. "We are proud to be part of the team that made this day possible." More information about Mayo Clinic Square can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

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Fri, Jun 12

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

 

Boston Globe
In the future, treatments tailored to patients
by Robert Weisman

Holly Boehle came to the Mayo Clinic in 2013 with an aggressive breast cancer, preparedBoston Globe Logo for almost anything. Still, she was surprised when doctors wanted to remove cells from her tumor and transplant them into “avatar mice.” Researchers then injected different cancer drugs into the mice to test which shrank the tumors, helping doctors select the best treatment for Boehle. Ultimately, Boehle, a 44-year-old school administrator in Zeeland, Mich., underwent surgery and received a combination of drug infusions based partly on the responses of the mice. Her cancer has been in remission for the past year.

Reach: The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Context: Individualized medicine, also known as personalized medicine or precision medicine, means tailoring diagnosis and treatment to each patient to optimize care. Patients have experienced this kind of care for a century and a half at Mayo Clinic, where teams of specialists have always worked together to find answers. More information on Mayo's Center for Individualized Medicine can be found here.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

HealthDay
Falls Are Leading Cause of Childhood Injuries, Expert Says
by Mary Dallas

Falls are the leading cause of childhood injuries, and most of them occur in the home, a pediatricHealth Day Logo trauma expert said. Many people associate falls with playgrounds, but kids can tumble off changing tables. They can also fall out of infant seats, shopping carts and windows, resulting in serious injuries, according to Dr. Christopher Moir, a pediatric surgeon at the Mayo Clinic Children Center in Rochester, Minn. Falling from windows often results in more serious injuries, according to Moir.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: US News & World Report, Duluth News Tribune, The News Tribune Wash., Rehab Management, KLKN Neb., Sioux City Journal, Gulf Times Qatar, Arizona Daily Sun, Doctors Lounge

Context:  When people think of kids and trauma, they often think about car accidents. “However, in reality, falls are the leading cause of childhood injury and most of them happen around the home,” says Christopher Moir, M.D., pediatric surgeon at Mayo Clinic Children's Center, who has cared for a wide variety of injuries related to falls. There are approximately 8,000 children treated in emergency rooms for falls every day, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. At Mayo Clinic’s Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center, 35 percent of the children cared for in 2014 were the result of a fall. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Moir, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

KESQ Calif.
Miracle walk down the aisle
by Alexandra Pierce

Walking their daughter down the isle is something many fathers dream about. But for one heart failure patient from Omaha, Nebraska, it looked like he wasn't going to be able to do that on his little girl's big day. In March, Andre PearsonKESQ-2 Palm Springs went to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota where he was treated for severe heart failure. His heart wasn't pumping blood… After being reevaluated, his medical team at the Mayo Clinic decided he was well enough to make the trip to Desert Ridge Estate in Indio, where his daughter was getting married. "They told me they had a meeting earlier that morning and said that they came up with something so I could see my daughter's wedding. They told me they were going to fly me out here to California to see the wedding," Pearson said.

Reach: KESQ-TV is the ABC affiliate for the Palm Springs, CA market.

Additional Coverage: FOX News, Mayo Clinic News Network: Heart failure patient surprises daughter at wedding; CNN, FOX4News, MyFOXHouston, MPRWOWT Omaha, BuzzFeed, Mirror UK, WISH TV Ind., WPXI Pittsburgh, co New Zealand, KMTV

Context: Andre Pearson, a heart failure patient who has been at Mayo Clinic since March, initially was too ill to leave the Rochester, Minn., hospital to go to his daughter’s wedding in California. He had resigned himself to watching it online. But a few days before the Saturday evening ceremony, with Mr. Pearson doing well, his care team decided to explore whether it might be possible for him to make the trip after all. With the right game plan in place, they determined that it was possible. A Mayo staff member accompanied him; and Mr. Pearson surprised his daughter, Alexandra, by arriving the evening before the wedding in Indio, Calif., and promising to walk her down the aisle."I can't help but cry, but it's tears of joy," Mr. Pearson said Thursday, after learning that he had received medical clearance to leave the hospital for the wedding and his travel plans were under way. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Arizona Horizon
ASU/Mayo Medical School

There have bArizona PBSeen some important recent advances in the plan for a medical school at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona. ASU president Michael Crow and Dr. Wyatt Decker, vice president of the Mayo Clinic and Chief Executive Officer for Arizona, will give us an update.

Reach: Eight, Arizona PBS is a PBS station that has focused on educating children, reporting in-depth on public affairs, fostering lifelong learning and celebrating arts and culture. Its signal reaches 86 percent of the homes in Arizona. With more than 1 million viewers weekly, Eight consistently ranks among the most-viewed public television stations per capita in the country. Eight is a member-supported service of Arizona State University.

Additional coverage: Arizona Public Media

Context: Mayo Medical School announced that its planned expansion in Scottsdale, Arizona has received licensure by the Arizona State Board for Private Postsecondary Education, the group responsible for regulating private postsecondary degree-granting institutions within the state of Arizona. “This is a major milestone in our journey to open a full four-year branch campus of Mayo Medical School in Scottsdale,” says Wyatt Decker, M.D., CEO of Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Earlier this month, Mayo Medical School leaders announced they had also received endorsement for the expansion from the Liaison Committee for Medical Education (LCME), the accrediting body for medical education. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Arizona Republic
Phoenix Mayo Clinic's $180 million cancer-fighting center set to open in March
by Ken Alltucker

…Mayo Clinic's $180 million-plus proton facility will be the latest addition to a metro region teeming with cancer-Arizona Republic newspaper logocare options, and the facility will be closely watched by doctors, patients and health insurers because of its sheer size, unique treatment and cost… Mayo Clinic officials said they expect that more families like the Greens will be able to stay in metro Phoenix for proton treatment rather than travel out of state. Dr. Sameer Keole, who will head Mayo Clinic's proton center, said Mayo Clinic and Phoenix Children's Hospital last year recommended about 10 children get proton therapy out of state, which can be costly.

Reach: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday and has an average daily circulation of more than 261,000 readers. The newspaper’s website Arizona Republic - Online, averages more than 5.4 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: The Town Talk La., Des Moines Register, DOTmed, Coloradoan, News-Messenger Ohio

Context:  Mayo Clinic introduces its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota beginning this June and Arizona in spring 2016. Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients — especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures — proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Jim McVeigh, Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

FOX9 Mpls./St. Paul
Juicy J stuffed turkey burger

Chef Jen from the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program cooked for us a healthy Juicy J Stuffed Turkey Burger. The My Fox KMSP TCprogram emphasizes how combining nutrition, physical activity and resiliency can have a powerful effect on improving health.

Reach:  FOX 9 News broadcasts in Minneapolis-St.Paul, the 16th largest television market in the United States with 1.7 million TV homes.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program was developed by passionate health and wellness professionals. The program is grounded in science and research. More information about the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Cathy Kennedy

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic joins move to get new drugs to market faster
by Lee Schafer

The Mayo Clinic has jumped into an interesting little experiment in drug development that might best be called micro pharma. Mayo is one of the partners in a new company calledStar Tribune Business section logo Vitesse Biologics, which is more or less just a virtual umbrella company that will itself give birth to at least five new companies. Each one of these micro pharma companies will consist mostly of a single drug development research project.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context:  Baxter Ventures, the venture arm of Baxter International Inc. (NYSE:BAX), Mayo Clinic and Velocity Pharmaceutical Development, LLC (“VPD”) today announced the formation of Vitesse Biologics, LLC, (“Vitesse”). Vitesse is a unique collaboration model initiated by Baxter Ventures to focus on the development of antibody and protein-based therapeutics in the areas of immunology, hematology, and oncology. Following the spin-off of Baxter BioScience as Baxalta Incorporated, anticipated to take place by mid-2015, the Vitesse relationship will be managed by the planned venture arm, Baxalta Ventures, for the new company.  The collaboration model, which represents a new method of drug development, was designed to incent each partner to advance promising therapies quickly through the development process. Each partner will provide its recognized expertise to enhance the target selection, target optimization, expression and product development process. Baxter BioScience will provide global commercialization, antibody and protein development and manufacturing capabilities; Mayo Clinic researchers will execute the early stage clinical trials; VPD will be responsible for target identification, selection of early stage drug candidates and will lead the design and execution of pre-clinical and clinical protocols. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Brian Kilen

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Thu, Jun 4

Mayo Clinic In The News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

AP
Study: Many Cancer Patients Could Be Spared Brain Radiation
by Marilynn Marchione

A major study could change care for many of the hundreds of thousands of people each year who have cancer that spreads to the brain from other sites. Contrary to conventional wisdom, radiation therapy to the whole brain did not improve survival, and it harmed memory, speech andAssociated Press Wire Service Logo thinking skills, doctors found. "This is the classic question: Which is worse, the disease or the treatment?" said one study leader, Dr. Jan Buckner of the Mayo Clinic. Radiation helped control the cancer, "but at the cost of cognitive decline."

Reach: The Associated Press is a not-for-profit news cooperative, owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members. News collected by the AP is published and republished by newspaper and broadcast outlets worldwide.

Additional coverageAguas Digital, MedBroadcast, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Huffington Post, Yahoo! Canada, Houston Chronicle, Medscape, US News & World Report, Voice of America, OncLive, MedPage TodayNBC News, Brain Radiation: The Treatment is Worse Than the Illness, Study Finds

Context: A new study presented at the 2015 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology suggests that the practice should be reconsidered. More than 650,000 patients a year in the U.S. are diagnosed and treated for cancers that spread to the brain. For about 200,000 of these patients, those with 1-3 small brain metastases, a combination of whole brain radiation therapy and radiosurgery, a highly focused form of radiation therapy, have been the standard of care. While whole brain radiation therapy improves tumor control it did not improve survival and it was shown to have deleterious effects on patients cognitive abilities. “This is the classic question: Which is worse, the disease or the treatment,?” said Jan Buckner, M.D., an oncologist at Mayo Clinic and senior author of the study. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Today.com
17 exceptionally easy ways to relax — from people who know how to chill

Send out good vibes…"I pause and think of a few people who love me and trust my intentions," says Dr. Amit Sood, a professor of medicine at the Today Show HealthMayo Clinic. "I send silent good wishes to the person in front of me."


Reach:  
NBC News Digital reaches an audience of more than 58 million unique visitors.

Context: In The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living, Mayo Clinic stress management and resiliency expert Amit Sood, M.D., draws on decades of groundbreaking research to offer readers a scientifically proven, structured and practical approach to reducing stress. He explains the brain’s two modes — focused mode and default mode — and how an imbalance between the two produces unwanted stress, and he shares new insights about how the mind works, including its natural tendency to wander. In this easy-to-follow guide, Dr. Sood provides actionable steps to cultivate emotional and mental strength, find greater fulfillment and nurture a kind disposition.  You can learn more about Dr. Sood at Resilient Living.

Contact: Brian Kilen

 

Wall Street Journal
Medicine Shows Growing Potential to Repair and Regenerate Body Parts
by Diane Cole

The idea of the body healing itself may be close to making a huge leap forward. Much closer than we think. The rapidly evolving field of regenerative medicine—including stem cells, 3-D printing and bioengineering, among other technologies—is helping rScreen Shot 2015-06-04 at 12.30.23 AMepair, and even regenerate,
body parts and tissues damaged by disease, trauma or age. “Regenerative medicine is not trying to create the bionic man but to harness the healing powers of the human body and buttress them,” says Andre Terzic, director of the Mayo Clinic’s Center for Regenerative Medicine in Rochester, Minn. That means treating chronic or degenerative ailments and replacing failing organs. In the U.S. alone, more than 120,000 people are on organ-transplant waiting lists.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has the largest print circulation in America with 1.4 million (60 percent) of a total of 2.3 million. Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: A unique aspect of the Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine is that its activities are not just laboratory based or clinic based. They're both — and everything in between. Efforts in each of the center's programs, which build on Mayo's extensive research resources and clinical practice, span the full spectrum of discovery science, translational research and clinical application. Andre Terzic, M.D., Ph.D., has pioneered regenerative medicine at Mayo Clinic. He has authored more than 450 publications, advancing diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for heart failure. His works include team-science efforts in the discovery of genes for dilated cardiomyopathy and atrial fibrillation. He led efforts in the development of next-generation regenerative solutions, including first-in-class products for heart repair. His scientific manuscripts have been cited more than 10,000 times.

Contact: Jennifer Schutz

 

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic's proton beam pricing wins praise
by Paul Scott

…So it comes as some surprise to learn, as reported last week in the Wall Street Journal, that Mayo Clinic plans to charge insurers no more for Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperproton therapy than it charges for IMRT. The policy, while established within Mayo since 2010, appears to have gone largely unstated in the reporting on plans for proton beam therapy centers at Mayo. In a 2012 response to the Emanuel piece, Mayo Clinic CEO John Noseworthy did not mention the policy.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Previous Coverage on Proton Beam Therapy

Context: Mayo Clinic hosted a grand opening event for the Richard O. Jacobson Building, home to the Mayo Clinic proton beam therapy program on May 9. The new facility will begin treating patients in late June. More information can be found onMayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

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Thu, May 28

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

Wall Street Journal
Big Bets on Proton Therapy Face Uncertain Future

Six new proton-beam centers are set to start delivering state-of-the-art radiation to cancer patients around the country by year’s end. Ten more are expected by 2018, bringing the U.S. total to 30—many the size of a football field and costing between $100 million and $200 million to build.The Wall Street Journal newspaper logoThe projects, long in the works, will enter an uncertain market. Proton-beam therapy, a highly precise form of radiation, has been dogged by a lack of evidence that it is better than traditional radiation despite costing significantly more… Some hospitals have turned to private donations, rather than private equity, to finance proton operations. Next month, the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., plans to start treating patients at its $180 million proton center, one of two built with the help of a $100 million gift.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has the largest print circulation in America with 1.4 million (60 percent) of a total of 2.3 million. Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Mayo Clinic hosted a grand opening event for the Richard O. Jacobson Building, home to the Mayo Clinic proton beam therapy program on May 9. The new facility will begin treating patients in late June. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Joe Dangor, Jim McVeigh, Traci Klein

 

Health Leaders Media
Shriners Hospitals joins Mayo Clinic network to enhance physician collaboration

Mayo Clinic expertise will now be available to patients and providers at Shriners Hospitals for Children as part of a new network relationship HealthLeadersbetween the health care systems. Shriners Hospitals, with 22 locations throughout North America, announced Tuesday that it has joined the national Mayo Clinic Care Network.

Reach: HealthLeaders magazine focuses on the healthcare industry and has a monthly circulation of more than 40,000. HealthLeaders Online receives more than 43,000 unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional coverage: Tampa Bay Business Journal, Shriners Hospitals joins Mayo Clinic network; Tampa Tribune, Tampa Bay Times, Benzinga

Context: Mayo Clinic and Shriners Hospitals for Children today announced Shriners Hospitals for Children as a member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a national network of organizations committed to better serving patients and their families through physician collaboration. The network will allow Shriners Hospitals for Children, a national health care system, to offer providers and patients convenient access to additional expertise from Mayo Clinic. The closer relationship will enhance the delivery of local care and promote peace of mind as providers and patients make health care decisions. “With Mayo Clinic’s similar mission of providing the best care to every patient through integrated clinical practice, education and research, a relationship will give Shriners Hospitals the opportunity to further transform children’s lives,” said Dale W. Stauss, Chairman of the Board of Directors for Shriners Hospitals for Children. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Fast Company
The $6.5 Billion, 20-Year Plan To Transform An American City
by Neal Ungerleider

The Mayo Clinic is located in the small city of Rochester (pop. 111,000), about a two-hour drive from Minneapolis, Minnesota. And it is, right this minute, competing fiercely for a small-but-extremely-lucrative slice of the global medical tourism industry. The wealthy American, European,Fast Company east Asian, and Gulf Arab patients who have been the clinic’s bread and butter have been instead choosing to get treatment abroad or at domestic rivals like Baltimore’s Johns Hopkins University or the Cleveland Clinic. But that may be changing—and the reason, if not the construction, is simple: the Destination Medical Center.

Reach: Fast Company's editorial focus is on innovation in technology, ethonomics (ethical economics), leadership, and design. Written for, by, and about the most progressive business leaders, Fast Company and FastCompany.com inspire readers and users to think beyond traditional boundaries, lead conversations, and create the future of business.

Additional coverage:  Builder Magazine

Context: Destination Medical Center (DMC) is an innovative economic development initiative to secure Minnesota's status as a global medical destination now and in the future. The latest updates on DMC can be found on the DMC blog.

Contact: Jamie Rothe

 

Star Tribune
Doctor burnout is a rising problem in Minnesota medicine
by Jeremy Olson

… Mayo Clinic researchers, however, found that doctors can shield patients for only so long, and that left undetected burnout can lead to Star Tribune newspaper logomedication errors and other mistakes. “By the time you start seeing effects on patients, physicians have gotten so rundown that they’re just not able to buffer patients from what they’re feeling anymore,” said Dr. Colin West, a Mayo internist who has co-written several burnout studies.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Burnout is a common problem among U.S. doctors and studies suggest it adversely impacts quality of care and patient satisfaction. Many factors impact how physicians perceive their career. A new study suggests there’s an interesting correlation between physician burnout and the effectiveness of their supervisors. That’s what researchers found at Mayo Clinic when they undertook a large internal study on the satisfaction of physicians and the leadership qualities of their supervisors. The findings appear in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

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Wed, May 20

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

Florida Times-Union
Jacksonville's Mayo has breakthrough in treating ALS, dementia
by Charlie Patton

In what they call a major breakthrough, researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville replicated a genetic mutation Florida Times-Union newspaper logoassociated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease) and frontotemporal dementia in a mouse. Their findings, which were published online Thursday on http://www.sciencemag.org/ and will be in the next issue of the journal Science, will provide a model researchers can use to test drug therapies, said Leonard Petrucelli, chairman of the Department of Neuroscience at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville and the lead author of the study.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:
Science Times, Mayo Clinic Breakthrough With ALS Treatment In Mice 

NIH, Scientists create mice with a major genetic cause of ALS and FTD

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic in Florida have developed a mouse model that exhibits the neuropathological and behavioral features associated with the most common genetic form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), which are caused by a mutation in theC9ORF72 gene. They say their findings, reported today in Science, will speed further research into the molecular mechanism behind these disorders and that the animal model will offer a way to test potential therapeutic agents to halt the death of neurons in the brain and spinal cord. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
How clinical trials help Mayo — and its patients — be on the forefront of medicine
by Colleen Jones

Mayo Clinic has a multipronged mission: patient care, research and education. Its clinical trials program touches on all three. Mayo is one of a Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logoselect group of research-focused institutions across the country qualified to offer government-sponsored or privately funded clinical trials at each of its three campuses, including Jacksonville.

Reach:  The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Context: At Mayo Clinic, the needs of the patient come first. Part of this commitment involves conducting medical research with the goal of helping patients live longer, healthier lives. Through clinical studies, which involve people who volunteer to participate in them, researchers can better understand how to diagnose, treat and prevent diseases or conditions.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Phoenix Business Journal
Mayo Medical School gets state approval for $150M Arizona branch campus
by Angela Gonzales

Mayo Medical School has received licensure by the Arizona State Board for Private Postsecondary Education for its $150 million Arizona branch campus…Dr. Michele Halyard, a radiation oncologist at Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix, said the Mayo Medical School will take 50Phoenix Business Journal students each year, which is the same number as on its Rochester, Minnesota campus. Mayo's Jacksonville campus only allows for students in their third and fourth years of medical school.

Reach: The Phoenix Business Journal is published by American City Business Journals which owns more than 40 other local business newspapers.

Additional coverage:

Post-Bulletin, Heard on the Street: Mayo Medical School in Arizona advances 

Context: Mayo Medical School announced that its planned expansion in Scottsdale, has received licensure by theArizona State Board for Private Postsecondary Education, the group responsible for regulating private postsecondary degree-granting institutions within the state of Arizona. “This is a major milestone in our journey to open a full four-year branch campus of Mayo Medical School in Scottsdale,” says Wyatt Decker, M.D., CEO of Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Earlier this month, Mayo Medical School leaders announced they had also received endorsement for the expansion from the Liaison Committee for Medical Education (LCME), the accrediting body for medical education. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Everyday Health
6 Ways Quitting Smoking Is Good for Your Heart by Sara Altshul

Finding the Help You Need to Quit for Good “The evidence is clear: the most effective way to quit smoking is to Everyday Healthcombine behavioral support with medication,” says J. Taylor Hays, MD, professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and director of the Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center. People who use this multi-treatment approach are three times more likely to become successful quitters than smokers who try going cold turkey, he says.

Reach: Everyday Health Media, LLC is a provider of online consumer health content across a broad portfolio of over 25 websites that span the health spectrum — from lifestyle offerings in pregnancy, diet and fitness to in-depth medical content for condition prevention and management.

Context: J. Taylor Hays, M.D. is director of the  Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center.  The NDC was one of the first centers in the country to focus exclusively on treatments for tobacco dependence. The NDC's model of care has now become the standard in many medical centers around the United States. The treatment team at the center offers you support and works with you to help develop the motivation and skills needed to stop using tobacco.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

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Tags: ABC15 Phoenix, adult vaccinations, American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE), American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), AP, ArcaMax, Arizona Republic, Artificial pancreas, autism, autoimmune diseases, bacterial infections



Thu, May 7

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

CBS News
Some jobs may protect against memory decline
by Amy Kraft

Although education is a well-known faCBS News Logoctor that influences a person's risk of dementia, this new study shows that an individual's job is also important. "Those occupations that were more intellectually tasking really showed bigger effects on protection than did just education," Dr. Ronald C. Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center in Rochester, Minnesota, told CBS News. The study, published in the journal Neurology, mirrors similar findings by Petersen and colleagues at the Mayo Clinic that said creative hobbies such as pottery, painting and woodworking could help keep a person's brain sharp as they age.

Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contacts: Duska Anastasijevic, Joe Dangor

 

USA Today
NFL: Concussions have been decreasing
by Jeff Miller

Studies of the long-term health of football players echo this news. According to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, NFLUSA Today Newspaper Logoplayers enjoy longer lives than the similarly aged population in society at large. The Mayo Clinic conducted the most reliable investigation on the long-term effects of football when it studied more than 400 high school players for decades, and found no increased risk of neuro­degenerative diseases compared with their classmates.

Reach: USA TODAY  has the highest daily circulation of any U.S. newspaper with a daily average circulation of 4.1 million, which includes print, various digital editions and other  papers that use their branded content.

Context: High School Football and Risk of Neurodegeneration: A Community-Based Study, appeared in the April 2012 issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Mayo Clinic Proceedings is a monthly peer-reviewed medical journal that publishes original articles and reviews dealing with clinical and laboratory medicine, clinical research, basic science research and clinical epidemiology. Proceedings is sponsored by the Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research as part of its commitment to physician education. It publishes submissions from authors worldwide. The journal has been published for more than 80 years and has a circulation of 130,000. Articles are available online at http://www.mayoclinicproceedings.org.

Contacts: Sharon TheimerDuska Anastasijevic

 

Arizona Daily Star
TMC embracing its status as last locally owned hospital
by Stephanie Innes

Tucson Medical Center is not afraid of the health-care Goliaths. Officials with the 70-year-old nonprofit hospital said Friday theyArizona Daily Star Newspaper Logo will ally with the world-renowned Mayo Clinic by joining its network of hospitals…Like TMC, the Mayo Clinic decided to buck the trend of mergers and acquisitions. The Mayo Clinic Care Network was the alternative, Mayo Clinic in Arizona CEO Dr. Wyatt Decker said Friday as he celebrated the new alliance with TMC.

Additional coverage:
Tucson News Now, TMC partnering with Mayo Clinic
Arizona Daily Star, Tucson Medical Center to announce Mayo alliance
KPLC La., KFVS Mo., WAFB La., WBRC Al., WMFB S.C., Yuma News Now, HealthLeaders Media

Context: Mayo Clinic officials today announced Tucson Medical Center as a member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a national network of organizations committed to better serving patients and their families through collaboration. Members of the network have access to Mayo Clinic knowledge and expertise to give their patients additional peace of mind when making health care decisions, while continuing to offer the highest quality and value of care close to home. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

HealthDay
Little Risk of Vitamin D Toxicity, Study Says

The risk for developing vitamin D toxicity is rare, researchers have found. With vitamin D supplementation on the rise, investigators set out to Health Day Logoassess the odds of developing dangerously high blood calcium levels…"We found that even in those with high levels of vitamin D over 50 ng/mL, there was not an increased risk of hypercalcemia, or elevated serum calcium, with increasing levels of vitamin D," study co-author Dr. Thomas Thacher, a family medicine expert at the Mayo Clinic, said in a journal news release. 

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: US News & World ReportHealio Endocrine Today,  MedPage Today

Context: Over the past decade, numerous studies have shown that many Americans have low vitamin D levels and as a result, vitamin D supplement use has climbed in recent years. Vitamin D has been shown to boost bone health and it may play a role in preventing diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease and other illnesses. In light of the increased use of vitamin D supplements, Mayo Clinic researchers set out to learn more about the health of those with high vitamin D levels.  They found that toxic levels are actually rare. Their study appears in the May issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

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Tags: "coregasms", #StrongArmSelfie campaign, 1000th liver transplant, ABC 6 News, acupuncture, AL.com, Alpha Magazine UAE, Arizona Cancer Coalition, Arizona Daily Star, Australian Broadcast Corporation, Basal Cell Cancer, Bellville News-Democrat (AP)


Fri, May 1

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

C-SPAN
New Medicare Law and the Future of U.S. Healthcare

Dr. John Noseworthy talked about a law that eliminated the Medicare sustainable growth rate (SGR) formula and reformed the way Medicare payments were made to physicians. He also spoke about how the change was affecting the Mayo Clinic. Dr. Noseworthy spoke via video linkC-Span from Rochester, Minnesota.

Reach: C-SPAN (Cable-Satellite Public Affairs Network), created in 1979 as a private, non-profit service of the cable industry, is a network dedicated to 24-hour a day public affairs programming. C-SPAN provides coverage of a variety of public affairs events. Speeches, news conferences, forums, seminars, government committee meetings and hearings in Washington, D.C. and beyond are some of the events covered by the network. C-SPAN has more than 86.2 million viewers.

Previous Coverage in April 24, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Mayo Clinic has been a strong advocate of modernizing Medicare and repealing the Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) and replacing it with a reimbursement system that truly rewards quality and efficiency not simply volume. The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act strengthens Medicare, extends the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and makes numerous other improvements to the health care system.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Huffington Post
This Is What Happiness Really Means by Lindsay Holmes

An excited puppy. The company of your loved ones. A rewarding volunteer experience. No matter how you define joy, chances are it boils down to Huff Post Healthy Living Logoprinciples over, well, stuff. As described in the video above by Amit Sood, M.D., a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, happiness is more about our circumstances than our possessions. Joy can be found in the present moment. It can also be discovered in your overall experiences. But most importantly, it can appear when we're creating, connecting and caring.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique visitors.

Context: Amit Sood, M.D., Mayo Clinic General Internal Medicine, has helped tens of thousands of patients and students with scientifically-validated programs which offer useful insights into human stress, well-being, resiliency, and happiness. His life’s mission is to share this scientific and practical approach with as many as he can so we can live peaceful, content and happier lives.

Contact: Brian Kilen

 

Arizona Republic
4 Arizona hospitals get top ratings in patient survey
by Ken Alltucker

…. "Most patients don't have the data or technical skills to judge quality and safety, so they fall back on service," said Dr. Wyatt Decker, CEO of Mayo Clinic in Arizona. "If the service is good, they equate that to good care." Though much of Mayo Clinic's focus is on quality and how well aArizona Republic newspaper logo patient fares, Decker said the hospital has paid attention to things like how courteous doctors, nurses and other employees can be and whether the hospital is clean and appealing. Mayo hired an executive who oversees such patient experiences and also contracts with a vendor who surveys Mayo patients.

Reach: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday and has an average daily circulation of more than 261,000 readers. The newspaper’s website Arizona Republic - Online, averages more than 5.4 million unique visitors each month.

Context: On April 16, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) added “star ratings” to its Hospital Compare website. Hospitals received ratings of one to five stars – with five stars being the highest score – based on data from the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) patient experience survey. This represents a change in how information is displayed, not the addition of questions to be answered or data to be collected. Thirteen of Mayo Clinic's 21 hospitals received star ratings – all 3 or above. 

Contacts:  Jim McVeigh, Ann Schauer

 

Florida Trend
The business of cancer therapy
by Andrew Corty

Unfortunately, cancer has touched us all. Sometimes it strikes family members, friends or colleagues -- and once in a while ourselves. There’s Florida Trendsimply no escaping it. Doctors diagnose about 114,000 cases of various cancers each year in Florida, so cancer has become a big business, both in medical care and in research… Our major hospitals are keeping pace. While Moffitt is the only NIH-designated cancer center based in Florida, there are other heavy hitters. Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville has a cancer specialty (and its own NIH designation, albeit from Minnesota), and the Cleveland Clinic has just opened a cancer center in Weston.

Reach: Florida Trend magazine and its website offer regionally-based stories and reporting. The magazine has a readership of more than 250,000 readers and its website receives 85,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center is a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center with a multisite presence. Its three campuses — in Scottsdale, Ariz., Jacksonville, Fla., and Rochester, Minn. — give the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center a broad geographic reach, enabling it to serve diverse patient populations around the world.

Contact: Paul Scotti

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Tags: 4 Arizona hospitals get top ratings, AARP, Aducanumab, Albany Democrat-Herald, alzheimers, Ames Tribune, anaphylactic shock, AP, Argus Leader, Arizona Public Media (PBS/NPR), Arizona Republic, Asthma discovery


Fri, Apr 24

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

USA Today
Best memory advice? Exercise, stimulating hobbies

…A study by researchers at the Mayo Clinic published this month in Neurology found that adults who engaged in activities such as arts and crafts, book clubs and travel were half as likely to develop mild cognitive impairment in their 80s as those who did not pursue brain-stimulatingUSA Today Newspaper Logo hobbies.

Reach: USA TODAY  has the highest daily circulation of any U.S. newspaper with a daily average circulation of 4.1 million, which includes print, various digital editions and other  papers that use their branded content.

Additional coverage: Boston Globe

Previous Coverage in April 9, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: People who participate in arts and craft activities and who socialize in middle and old age may delay the development in very old age of the thinking and memory problems that often lead to dementia, according to a new study published in the April 8, 2015, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.  “As millions of older US adults are reaching the age where they may experience these memory and thinking problem called Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), it is important we look to find lifestyle changes that may stave off the condition,” said study author Rosebud Roberts, MB, ChB, MS, of Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. and a member of the American Academy of Neurology. “Our study supports the idea that engaging the mind may protect neurons, or the building blocks of the brain, from dying, stimulate growth of new neurons, or may help recruit new neurons to maintain cognitive activities in old age.” More information about the study can be found here.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

TPT
Almanac

Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy talks about Medicare payment reform with Almanac hosts Cathy Wurzer and Eric Eskola.

Reach:  Twin Cities Public Television's "Almanac" program is a Minnesota institution. It has occupied the 7 o'clock time slot on Friday nights for more than a quarter of a century. It is the longest-running prime time TV program ever in the region. "Almanac" is a time capsule, a program of TPTrecord that details our region's history and culture during the past twenty five years. The hour-long mix of news, politics and culture is seen live statewide on the six stations of the Minnesota Public Television Association. Almanac was the first Minnesota TV show that virtually everyone in the state could watch together. The program's unusual format has been copied by numerous PBS stations around the country and it has led to Almanac being honored with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting's award for Best Public Affairs Program. Almanac has also earned six regional Emmy awards.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Mayo Clinic has been a strong advocate of modernizing Medicare and repealing the Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) and replacing it with a reimbursement system that truly rewards quality and efficiency not simply volume. The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act strengthens Medicare, extends the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and makes numerous other improvements to the health care system.

Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Karl Oestreich

 

News4Jax
Dangers of e-cigarette use

Dr. Vandana Bhide, an internal medicine doctor with the Mayo Clinic, discusses the dangers of e-cigarette use and rising News Jax 4 Logonumber of teen users.

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville.

Context: Vanda Bhide, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in Hospital Internal Medicine in Florida.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

HealthDay
Migraines Often Undiagnosed, Doctor Says

If you don't know whether or not your headache is just a headache, or if it's actually a migraine, you may be missing out on effective treatments, Health Day Logosuggests an expert at the American Migraine Foundation. "Migraine is not just a headache, but a neurological disorder that has a wide variety of symptoms and specific treatments," foundation chair Dr. David Dodick, who's also a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Scottsdale, Ariz., said in a foundation news release.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: FOX10Phoenix, ABC FOX Montana

Context: David Dodick, M.D. is a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona and an expert in concussion care and director of the Mayo Clinic Concussion Program.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

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Tags: 1to1 Media, 3-T MRI advancing on ultrasound for fetal abnormalities, a rare side-effect of certain chemotherapy, ABC FOX Montana, ABC News, AFRO, allergies, Almanac, Ames Tribune, Argus Leader, Ariz., Arizona Daily Star


Fri, Apr 17

Mayo Clinic In the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

 

Yahoo! Health
Herpes From a Tanning Bed? It's Possible
by Amanda Chan

A whopping number of people still use tanning beds (about one in three U.S. adults say they’ve used one before, according to 2014 data), despite the fact that they’re known to cause skin cancer. But if the prospect of melanoma isn’t enough to turnYahoo Health you off to indoor tanning, maybe this will: You could risk getting an infection. Dermatologist Dawn Marie Davis, MD, an associate professor of dermatology and pediatrics at the Mayo Clinic, tells Yahoo Health that bacteria and virus can survive in tanning beds, despite the heat.

Reach: Yahoo! reaches more than a half a billion across devices and around the globe. According to news sources roughly 700 million people visit Yahoo websites every month.

Additional coverage: Daily MailGlamour magazine, Independent UK, The Debrief UK, Huffington Post

Context: Mayo Clinic dermatologist Dawn Marie Davis, M.D., says there have been documented reports of infections from tanning bed use. More information, including a video with Dr. Davis, is available on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Dana Sparks, Sharon Theimer


MPR
Medicare bipartisan 'doc fix:' What you need to know
by Emily Kaiser

A bill to reform the way Medicare reimburses doctors has now overwhelmingly passed the U.S. House and Senate and is MPR News logonow on the way to the president. It's called the "doc fix," and the legislation would get rid of the physician payment formula that Congress has been patching for years… Two veteran reporters and the Mayo Clinic CEO joined MPR News' Tom Crann to discuss the long history of the Medicare fix, and how a gridlocked Congress got to a solution.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Additional coverage: Post-Bulletin, RevCycle Intelligence, Health IT Analytics

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic taps UnitedHealth to help with managing hospital revenue
by Christopher Snowbeck

Mayo Clinic and a division of UnitedHealth Group Inc. are partnering on a new system for managing hospital revenue in Rochester, including everything from price estimates before people get care to collecting payment from patientsStar Tribune Business section logo afterward… The work on hospital revenue is distinct from the two-year-old partnership between Mayo and Optum on a high-profile health care research project called OptumLabs, said Dr. Sankhya Pruthi, medical director for patient experience for the Mayo Clinic in Rochester.

Reach: 
The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: HIT ConsultantHealthLeaders Media

Context: Optum360 and Mayo Clinic announced this week that they are collaborating to develop new revenue management services capabilities aimed at improving patient experiences and satisfaction while reducing administrative costs for health care providers. Optum360 and Mayo Clinic will collaborate on enhancing and redesigning specific elements of the revenue cycle to increase efficiency while creating a convenient, accurate, transparent and personal experience for patients. A key focus is improving the interaction between the provider and payer by opening channels of communication early in the care process. The agreement includes a next-generation patient cost estimator, streamlining prior authorization/pre-certification, enhanced claims editing functions and administrative simplification of billing activities associated with pre-care packaged pricing. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Brian Kilen

 

KTTC
New Mayo Clinic technology tests genes for heart disorders
by Devin Bartolotta

A new type of genetic testing at Mayo Clinic is making it easier to diagnose and properly treat heart disorders. This new technology is allowing KTTC TV logodoctors to search your genes for heart disorders that could be hard to detect…Linnea Baudhuin, Ph.D., who helped develop the panels, says this kind of innovative testing could save lives. "A physician may have difficulty giving the exact diagnosis of what the patient has because there's so much overlap with how these disorders present, even though they're due to different genetic causes. But with this testing, we're able to really specify which disorder the patient has,” said Dr. Baudhuin.

Reach: KTTC is an NBC affiliate that serves the Rochester, Minn. area including the towns of Austin, Mason City, Albert Lea and Winona. Its website receives more than 73,300 unique visitors each month.

Context: Mayo Clinic’s launch of eight new next-generation sequencing (NGS) panels is intended to improve the lives of patients and families living with inherited cardiac conditions by aiding in the diagnosis and management of these complex disorders. These disorders include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, Noonan syndrome, Marfan syndrome, long QT syndrome, and Brugada syndrome. The tests, which identify inherited variants across numerous genes associated with cardiac disorders, are now available to Mayo Clinic patients and to providers worldwide through Mayo Clinic via Mayo Medical Laboratories. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Brent Westra

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Tags: "The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer, 20 Minutos Mexico, ABC News, ABC15 Arizona, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimers, an overuse injury, Anticonvulsant may exacerbate eating disorders, Antipsychotic medications, Apple HealthKit integration, Apple Watch apps for physicians, Arab News Daily


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