Mayo Clinic In The News

May 1st, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

C-SPAN
New Medicare Law and the Future of U.S. Healthcare

Dr. John Noseworthy talked about a law that eliminated the Medicare sustainable growth rate (SGR) formula and reformed the way Medicare payments were made to physicians. He also spoke about how the change was affecting the Mayo Clinic. Dr. Noseworthy spoke via video linkC-Span from Rochester, Minnesota.

Reach: C-SPAN (Cable-Satellite Public Affairs Network), created in 1979 as a private, non-profit service of the cable industry, is a network dedicated to 24-hour a day public affairs programming. C-SPAN provides coverage of a variety of public affairs events. Speeches, news conferences, forums, seminars, government committee meetings and hearings in Washington, D.C. and beyond are some of the events covered by the network. C-SPAN has more than 86.2 million viewers.

Previous Coverage in April 24, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Mayo Clinic has been a strong advocate of modernizing Medicare and repealing the Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) and replacing it with a reimbursement system that truly rewards quality and efficiency not simply volume. The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act strengthens Medicare, extends the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and makes numerous other improvements to the health care system.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Huffington Post
This Is What Happiness Really Means by Lindsay Holmes

An excited puppy. The company of your loved ones. A rewarding volunteer experience. No matter how you define joy, chances are it boils down to Huff Post Healthy Living Logoprinciples over, well, stuff. As described in the video above by Amit Sood, M.D., a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, happiness is more about our circumstances than our possessions. Joy can be found in the present moment. It can also be discovered in your overall experiences. But most importantly, it can appear when we're creating, connecting and caring.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique visitors.

Context: Amit Sood, M.D., Mayo Clinic General Internal Medicine, has helped tens of thousands of patients and students with scientifically-validated programs which offer useful insights into human stress, well-being, resiliency, and happiness. His life’s mission is to share this scientific and practical approach with as many as he can so we can live peaceful, content and happier lives.

Contact: Brian Kilen

 

Arizona Republic
4 Arizona hospitals get top ratings in patient survey
by Ken Alltucker

…. "Most patients don't have the data or technical skills to judge quality and safety, so they fall back on service," said Dr. Wyatt Decker, CEO of Mayo Clinic in Arizona. "If the service is good, they equate that to good care." Though much of Mayo Clinic's focus is on quality and how well aArizona Republic newspaper logo patient fares, Decker said the hospital has paid attention to things like how courteous doctors, nurses and other employees can be and whether the hospital is clean and appealing. Mayo hired an executive who oversees such patient experiences and also contracts with a vendor who surveys Mayo patients.

Reach: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday and has an average daily circulation of more than 261,000 readers. The newspaper’s website Arizona Republic - Online, averages more than 5.4 million unique visitors each month.

Context: On April 16, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) added “star ratings” to its Hospital Compare website. Hospitals received ratings of one to five stars – with five stars being the highest score – based on data from the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) patient experience survey. This represents a change in how information is displayed, not the addition of questions to be answered or data to be collected. Thirteen of Mayo Clinic's 21 hospitals received star ratings – all 3 or above. 

Contacts:  Jim McVeigh, Ann Schauer

 

Florida Trend
The business of cancer therapy
by Andrew Corty

Unfortunately, cancer has touched us all. Sometimes it strikes family members, friends or colleagues -- and once in a while ourselves. There’s Florida Trendsimply no escaping it. Doctors diagnose about 114,000 cases of various cancers each year in Florida, so cancer has become a big business, both in medical care and in research… Our major hospitals are keeping pace. While Moffitt is the only NIH-designated cancer center based in Florida, there are other heavy hitters. Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville has a cancer specialty (and its own NIH designation, albeit from Minnesota), and the Cleveland Clinic has just opened a cancer center in Weston.

Reach: Florida Trend magazine and its website offer regionally-based stories and reporting. The magazine has a readership of more than 250,000 readers and its website receives 85,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center is a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center with a multisite presence. Its three campuses — in Scottsdale, Ariz., Jacksonville, Fla., and Rochester, Minn. — give the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center a broad geographic reach, enabling it to serve diverse patient populations around the world.

Contact: Paul Scotti

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Tags: 4 Arizona hospitals get top ratings, AARP, Aducanumab, Albany Democrat-Herald, alzheimers, Ames Tribune, anaphylactic shock, AP, Argus Leader, Arizona Public Media (PBS/NPR), Arizona Republic, Asthma discovery


April 24th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

USA Today
Best memory advice? Exercise, stimulating hobbies

…A study by researchers at the Mayo Clinic published this month in Neurology found that adults who engaged in activities such as arts and crafts, book clubs and travel were half as likely to develop mild cognitive impairment in their 80s as those who did not pursue brain-stimulatingUSA Today Newspaper Logo hobbies.

Reach: USA TODAY  has the highest daily circulation of any U.S. newspaper with a daily average circulation of 4.1 million, which includes print, various digital editions and other  papers that use their branded content.

Additional coverage: Boston Globe

Previous Coverage in April 9, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: People who participate in arts and craft activities and who socialize in middle and old age may delay the development in very old age of the thinking and memory problems that often lead to dementia, according to a new study published in the April 8, 2015, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.  “As millions of older US adults are reaching the age where they may experience these memory and thinking problem called Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), it is important we look to find lifestyle changes that may stave off the condition,” said study author Rosebud Roberts, MB, ChB, MS, of Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. and a member of the American Academy of Neurology. “Our study supports the idea that engaging the mind may protect neurons, or the building blocks of the brain, from dying, stimulate growth of new neurons, or may help recruit new neurons to maintain cognitive activities in old age.” More information about the study can be found here.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

TPT
Almanac

Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy talks about Medicare payment reform with Almanac hosts Cathy Wurzer and Eric Eskola.

Reach:  Twin Cities Public Television's "Almanac" program is a Minnesota institution. It has occupied the 7 o'clock time slot on Friday nights for more than a quarter of a century. It is the longest-running prime time TV program ever in the region. "Almanac" is a time capsule, a program of TPTrecord that details our region's history and culture during the past twenty five years. The hour-long mix of news, politics and culture is seen live statewide on the six stations of the Minnesota Public Television Association. Almanac was the first Minnesota TV show that virtually everyone in the state could watch together. The program's unusual format has been copied by numerous PBS stations around the country and it has led to Almanac being honored with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting's award for Best Public Affairs Program. Almanac has also earned six regional Emmy awards.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Mayo Clinic has been a strong advocate of modernizing Medicare and repealing the Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) and replacing it with a reimbursement system that truly rewards quality and efficiency not simply volume. The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act strengthens Medicare, extends the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and makes numerous other improvements to the health care system.

Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Karl Oestreich

 

News4Jax
Dangers of e-cigarette use

Dr. Vandana Bhide, an internal medicine doctor with the Mayo Clinic, discusses the dangers of e-cigarette use and rising News Jax 4 Logonumber of teen users.

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville.

Context: Vanda Bhide, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in Hospital Internal Medicine in Florida.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

HealthDay
Migraines Often Undiagnosed, Doctor Says

If you don't know whether or not your headache is just a headache, or if it's actually a migraine, you may be missing out on effective treatments, Health Day Logosuggests an expert at the American Migraine Foundation. "Migraine is not just a headache, but a neurological disorder that has a wide variety of symptoms and specific treatments," foundation chair Dr. David Dodick, who's also a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Scottsdale, Ariz., said in a foundation news release.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: FOX10Phoenix, ABC FOX Montana

Context: David Dodick, M.D. is a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona and an expert in concussion care and director of the Mayo Clinic Concussion Program.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

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Tags: 1to1 Media, 3-T MRI advancing on ultrasound for fetal abnormalities, a rare side-effect of certain chemotherapy, ABC FOX Montana, ABC News, AFRO, allergies, Almanac, Ames Tribune, Argus Leader, Ariz., Arizona Daily Star


April 17th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

 

Yahoo! Health
Herpes From a Tanning Bed? It's Possible
by Amanda Chan

A whopping number of people still use tanning beds (about one in three U.S. adults say they’ve used one before, according to 2014 data), despite the fact that they’re known to cause skin cancer. But if the prospect of melanoma isn’t enough to turnYahoo Health you off to indoor tanning, maybe this will: You could risk getting an infection. Dermatologist Dawn Marie Davis, MD, an associate professor of dermatology and pediatrics at the Mayo Clinic, tells Yahoo Health that bacteria and virus can survive in tanning beds, despite the heat.

Reach: Yahoo! reaches more than a half a billion across devices and around the globe. According to news sources roughly 700 million people visit Yahoo websites every month.

Additional coverage: Daily MailGlamour magazine, Independent UK, The Debrief UK, Huffington Post

Context: Mayo Clinic dermatologist Dawn Marie Davis, M.D., says there have been documented reports of infections from tanning bed use. More information, including a video with Dr. Davis, is available on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Dana Sparks, Sharon Theimer


MPR
Medicare bipartisan 'doc fix:' What you need to know
by Emily Kaiser

A bill to reform the way Medicare reimburses doctors has now overwhelmingly passed the U.S. House and Senate and is MPR News logonow on the way to the president. It's called the "doc fix," and the legislation would get rid of the physician payment formula that Congress has been patching for years… Two veteran reporters and the Mayo Clinic CEO joined MPR News' Tom Crann to discuss the long history of the Medicare fix, and how a gridlocked Congress got to a solution.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Additional coverage: Post-Bulletin, RevCycle Intelligence, Health IT Analytics

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic taps UnitedHealth to help with managing hospital revenue
by Christopher Snowbeck

Mayo Clinic and a division of UnitedHealth Group Inc. are partnering on a new system for managing hospital revenue in Rochester, including everything from price estimates before people get care to collecting payment from patientsStar Tribune Business section logo afterward… The work on hospital revenue is distinct from the two-year-old partnership between Mayo and Optum on a high-profile health care research project called OptumLabs, said Dr. Sankhya Pruthi, medical director for patient experience for the Mayo Clinic in Rochester.

Reach: 
The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: HIT ConsultantHealthLeaders Media

Context: Optum360 and Mayo Clinic announced this week that they are collaborating to develop new revenue management services capabilities aimed at improving patient experiences and satisfaction while reducing administrative costs for health care providers. Optum360 and Mayo Clinic will collaborate on enhancing and redesigning specific elements of the revenue cycle to increase efficiency while creating a convenient, accurate, transparent and personal experience for patients. A key focus is improving the interaction between the provider and payer by opening channels of communication early in the care process. The agreement includes a next-generation patient cost estimator, streamlining prior authorization/pre-certification, enhanced claims editing functions and administrative simplification of billing activities associated with pre-care packaged pricing. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Brian Kilen

 

KTTC
New Mayo Clinic technology tests genes for heart disorders
by Devin Bartolotta

A new type of genetic testing at Mayo Clinic is making it easier to diagnose and properly treat heart disorders. This new technology is allowing KTTC TV logodoctors to search your genes for heart disorders that could be hard to detect…Linnea Baudhuin, Ph.D., who helped develop the panels, says this kind of innovative testing could save lives. "A physician may have difficulty giving the exact diagnosis of what the patient has because there's so much overlap with how these disorders present, even though they're due to different genetic causes. But with this testing, we're able to really specify which disorder the patient has,” said Dr. Baudhuin.

Reach: KTTC is an NBC affiliate that serves the Rochester, Minn. area including the towns of Austin, Mason City, Albert Lea and Winona. Its website receives more than 73,300 unique visitors each month.

Context: Mayo Clinic’s launch of eight new next-generation sequencing (NGS) panels is intended to improve the lives of patients and families living with inherited cardiac conditions by aiding in the diagnosis and management of these complex disorders. These disorders include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, Noonan syndrome, Marfan syndrome, long QT syndrome, and Brugada syndrome. The tests, which identify inherited variants across numerous genes associated with cardiac disorders, are now available to Mayo Clinic patients and to providers worldwide through Mayo Clinic via Mayo Medical Laboratories. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Brent Westra

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Tags: "The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer, 20 Minutos Mexico, ABC News, ABC15 Arizona, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimers, an overuse injury, Anticonvulsant may exacerbate eating disorders, Antipsychotic medications, Apple HealthKit integration, Apple Watch apps for physicians, Arab News Daily


April 9th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

 

Washington Post

Alzheimer’s warning signs
by Fredrick Kunkle
For people of a certain age, it’s not uncommon to seize on any forgetfulness as a symptom of Alzheimer’s disease. Lose the car keys, forget a name, read a Top 10 list of dementia’s warning signs and the worry begins…So in an attempt to offer some perspective,

Washington Post newspaper logo here’s another list. We interviewed three experts: Lipton, who also heads the division of cognitive aging and dementia at Montefiore Medical Center; Ronald C. Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center; and Heather M. Snyder, director of medical and scientific operations at the nonprofit Alzheimer’s Association… Sometimes it’s not even a retrieval problem. In today’s frenzied, multitasking world, people don’t always form memories in the first place. Petersen says focusing more attention on tasks at hand might be more helpful than obsessing over what you can’t remember.

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post averages 518,700, and Sunday circulation averages 736,800.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Duska Anastasijevic

 

Star Tribune
Head strong: 5 ways to boost your brain, from 'neurobics' to walnuts
by Allie Shah

…Advances in technology have enabled scientists to explore the brain as never before — and they’re making bold discoveries. The Star Tribune Health newspaper logonew thinking is that our brains are malleable and capable of building new connections between nerve cells, even as we grow older. “We had these assumptions for a long time that your brain was fully formed and shaped in late adolescence,” said Glenn Smith, a neuropsychologist at the Mayo Clinic who specializes in Alzheimer’s. “Then … it was all downhill from there.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Glenn Smith, Ph.D., L.P., is a Mayo Clinic neuropsychologist. Dr. Smith is a principal investigator for the Education Core, Mayo Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, and associate director for Education Resources, Mayo Clinic Center for Translational Science Activities. The research conducted by Dr. Smith and his colleagues has led to the development of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Action to Benefit Thinking and Independence (HABIT) program, a 10-day, 50-hour, intensive intervention program for people with mild cognitive impairment.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

 

KSTP
Mayo Medical School to Establish Branch Campuses in Arizona, Florida

Mayo Medical School announced Tuesday that it has received the endorsement of the national accrediting body for medical education to establish branch campuses in Scottsdale, Arizona, and Jacksonville, Florida…"This signifies an important step in ourKSTP-5 Twin Cities
transformation to a national medical school and our ability to deliver extraordinary medical education and highly diverse clinical experiences to our students across all campuses," said Sherine Gabriel, the dean of Mayo Medical School and professor of Epidemiology and Medicine.

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Context: Mayo Medical School announced that its expansion plan to establish branch campuses in Scottsdale, Arizona, and Jacksonville, Florida, has received the endorsement of the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME), the national accrediting body for medical education. “We are thrilled with the positive response from LCME,” says Sherine Gabriel, M.D., M.Sc.,(retiring) dean of Mayo Medical School and William J. and Charles H. Mayo Professor of Epidemiology and Medicine, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. “This signifies an important step in our transformation to a national medical school and our ability to deliver extraordinary medical education and highly diverse clinical experiences to our students across all campuses.” More information on the announcement can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Deborah Anderson

 

Women’s Health magazine
Are Tampons the New Pap Smear?

... So how soon will your tampon be able to diagnose cancer? Not so fast. First, researchers need to do more studies; a clinical trial is Womens Healthunderway right now, says lead study author Jamie Bakkum-Gamez, M.D., a gynecological oncologist at the Mayo Clinic. Currently, there’s no routine way to screen for endometrial cancer (aside from reporting vague symptoms to your doctor, such as irregular bleeding), which strikes more than 50,000 women each year, most of them post-menopausal, and is the most common gynecological cancer in the U.S., according to the study.

Reach: Women's Health magazine has a monthly circulation of 1.5 million readers and covers health and beauty, fitness and weight loss, career and stress, sex and relationships, nutrition and diet and technology. Women's Health - Online has more than 5.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic have shown that it is possible to detect endometrial cancer using tumor DNA picked up by ordinary tampons. The new approach specifically examines DNA samples from vaginal secretions for the presence of chemical “off” switches — known as methylation — that can disable genes that normally keep cancer in check. The finding is a critical step toward a convenient and effective screening test for endometrial cancer, which is the most common gynecologic malignancy in the United States. The results are published in the journal Gynecologic Oncology. More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Reuters
Midlife arts, crafts and socializing tied to better late-life cognition
by Kathryn Doyle

In a new study of people over age 85, those who said they engaged in things like painting, quilting or book clubs during middle age were less likely to develop memory impairments that may precede dementia. Based on these results, using your brain for cognitiveReuters Logo and social activities seems to preserve cognitive function or keep the neurons stimulated, said lead author Rosebud O. Roberts of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world newsbusiness newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile and interactive television platforms.

Additional coverage:
Pioneer Press, Yahoo! Canada, Daily Mail, WebMD, Express UK, Yahoo! UK & Ireland, Prevention magazine, CBS News, HealthDay, LA Times, KDKA CBS Pittsburgh, Science 2.0, Telegraph UK, KMBZ New York, US News & World Report, Pacific Standard, CNN

Context: People who participate in arts and craft activities and who socialize in middle and old age may delay the development in very old age of the thinking and memory problems that often lead to dementia, according to a new study published in the April 8, 2015, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.  “As millions of older US adults are reaching the age where they may experience these memory and thinking problem called Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), it is important we look to find lifestyle changes that may stave off the condition,” said study author Rosebud Roberts, MB, ChB, MS, of Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. and a member of the American Academy of Neurology. “Our study supports the idea that engaging the mind may protect neurons, or the building blocks of the brain, from dying, stimulate growth of new neurons, or may help recruit new neurons to maintain cognitive activities in old age.” More information about the study can be found here.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

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Tags: 'techno yoga' movement, 3D Carotid Ultrasound, ABC News, acetaminophen is not effective for pain, alzheimer's disease, Ambient Clinical Analytics, American Birkenbeiner or "Birkie, Arab News, Arizona Republic, Art heals, artificial intelligence technology, atherosclerosis


April 2nd, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

 

WCCO
Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s Disease Study Gives Researchers New Hope
by Angela Davis

It’s a disease with no cure and limited treatment, but this week the Mayo Clinic announced the findings of a major study that is giving Alzheimer’s researchers new hope. The study is published in the latest edition of the journal “Brain.” It describes what MayoCBS Minnesota researchers have learned about proteins in the brain that fuel the progression of Alzheimer’s Disease. WCCO’s Angela Davis talked with a neurologist about the significance of this breakthrough. For decades, doctors have known two proteins, amyloid and tau, that contribute to memory loss, but their relationship has been focus of debate. Dr. David Knopman is a part of a team of neurologists at Mayo Clinic’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center.

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

Previous Coverage in March 26, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: By examining more than 3,600 postmortem brains, researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campuses in Jacksonville, Florida, and Rochester, Minnesota, have found that the progression of dysfunctional tau protein drives the cognitive decline and memory loss seen in Alzheimer’s disease. Amyloid, the other toxic protein that characterizes Alzheimer’s, builds up as dementia progresses, but is not the primary culprit, they say. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Star Tribune
Health beat: Cancer drug costs are an ill lacking a cure
by Jeremy Olson

Dr. Vincent Rajkumar has little incentive to care about the skyrocketing cost of cancer drugs. Prescribing them like a drunken sailor won’t change his Mayo Clinic salary. Warning patients about sticker prices Star Tribune Health Varietywon’t change their demand for drugs that offer hope of survival. But after seeing cancer drug costs escalate 10- to 20-fold in the last 15 years, the hematologist decided enough is enough. Calling it a “moral obligation,” Dr. Rajkumar and a Houston colleague wrote an article in Mayo Clinic Proceedings challenging the rising costs and calling out drug companies for practices that extend patents and inflate profits.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Increasingly high prices for cancer drugs are affecting patient care in the U.S. and the American health care system overall, say the authors of a special article published online in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. “Americans with cancer pay 50 percent to 100 percent more for the same patented drug than patients in other countries,” says S. Vincent Rajkumar, M.D., of Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, who is one of the authors. “As oncologists we have a moral obligation to advocate for affordable cancer drugs for our patients.” More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Reuters
Building Pathways: How a Native Oncologist Makes a Difference With Cancer Care, Prevention

Judith Kaur first began to think of herself as a healer at five years old. She says her grandmother, Ada, introduced her to nature and medicine by listening to animals outside and picking plants in the yard…Today, Dr. Judith Salmon Kaur (Choctaw/Cherokee) is oneReuters of only two American Indian medical oncologists in the country. Now an oncology professor at the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center in Rochester, Minnesota, she also directs the clinic's Native American outreach programs.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world newsbusiness newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile and interactive television platforms.

Context: Judith Kaur, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic oncologist who is affiliated with Mayo Clinic's Breast Diagnostic Clinic. Dr. Kaur is the medical director for the Native American Programs of the Mayo Comprehensive Cancer Center. All three Mayo sites are involved in outreach to American Indians and Alaska Natives through these programs. More information on Dr. Kaur's research can be found here.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon TheimerJoe Dangor

 

FOX News Latino
Opinion: Angelina Jolie’s transparency sheds light on standard but unknown procedure for high-risk women
by Jamie Bakkum-Gamez gynecologic oncologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

On Tuesday, Angelina Jolie Pitt publicly announced that she had her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed to decrease her risk of developing ovarian cancer, a highly Fox News Latinolethal cancer that at present has no screening test to detect it at an early, curable stage. Jolie Pitt has shared that she inherited a mutation in the BRCA1 gene. Women with a BRCA1 gene mutation have a remarkably high lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer of 40-50 percent as well as a nearly 80 percent lifetime risk of breast cancer.

Reach: Fox News Latino is a news website for Latinos in the United States. The website receives more than 207,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional Coverage:

Nature, Gene counsellors expect resurgence of 'Jolie effect' 

KTTC, Plainview woman living with BRCA1 gene takes preventative action 

Context: Jamie Bakkum-Gamez, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic oncologist and gynecologic surgeon. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Bakkum-Gamez, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Joe Dangor

 

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Tags: "Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies", "Mayo Clinic: Going Gluten Free" by Joseph A. Murray, 'Normal' Memory Loss, 5 The Fox, 5 WIN (Mich.), 5-2-1-0 For Healthy Kids, ABC 15 Arizona, ABC News, abnormal vaginal bleeding, access to personal medical records, Acute Kidney Injury (AKI), Al Dia Tx


March 26th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

 

Star Tribune
Mayo unravels a mystery disease for Minnesota attorney
by Dan Browning

Greg Widseth didn’t know what hit him. The Polk County attorney felt fine as he coached his son’s ninth-grade basketball workout last March. He remembers smiling at a young woman as he left the building. Now Widseth, who once had a photographic memory,Star Tribune Health newspaper logo is struggling to reconstruct the events that put him in the hospital and led his wife, a former emergency room nurse, to seek help from the Mayo Clinic… When it became clear that her husband wasn’t getting better, she called her sister in Rochester, whose neighbor happened to be Dr. Jeffrey Britton, a Mayo neurologist specializing in autoimmune encephalitis. Britton and his colleague, Dr. Andrew McKeon, a neuroimmunologist, agreed to see Widseth within a few days.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Andrew McKeon, M.B., B.Ch., M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician with appointments in Laboratory Medicine and Pathology and Neurology. His research focuses in autoimmune neurological disorders, paraneoplastic neurological disorders and movement disorders. Jeffrey Britton, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist. His research focuses on clinical epilepsy, stimulation treatment in epilepsy and cortical stimulation mapping and seizure localization. Sean Pittock, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist. Dr. Pittock is Co-director of the Neuroimmunology Laboratory at Mayo Clinic. Mayo Clinic's top-ranked team of neurologists diagnoses and treats more than 500 neurological conditions, including many rare or complex disorders. The Mayo Clinic Department of Neurology is one of the largest in the world. It includes more than 100 subspecialized experts trained in epilepsy, movement disordersdementias and other cognitive conditions, stroke and cerebrovascular diseases, neuro-oncology, multiple sclerosis and demyelinating disorders, autoimmune neurology, pediatric neurology, neurophysiology, headache, neuromuscular diseases, peripheral nerve, sleep neurology, and speech pathology. These care providers work together to evaluate and treat people utilizing the most advanced techniques and technologies.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Bloomberg
New Alzheimer's Research Throws Cold Water on Biogen's Recent Breakthrough
by Cynthia Koons

Just days after Biogen Inc. revealed promising early data from an experimental Alzheimer’s treatment, new research from the Mayo Bloomberg news logoClinic may revive a long-running debate over whether the drug industry is focusing on the right target in developing therapies to treat the disease… “Amyloid has a relationship with cognitive decline, but if you’re looking at both of them together, tau is the bad guy,” Melissa Murray, a neuroscientist at the Mayo Clinic campus in Jacksonville, Florida, said in a telephone interview. The majority of research into the disease has focused on beta amyloid over the past 25 years, she said.

Reach: Bloomberg has 2,300 media professionals in 146 bureaus across 72 countries. Bloomberg delivers its content across more than 400 publications, over 310 million households worldwide through Bloomberg Television and 500,000 in the New York metro area and 18.5 million subscribers through satellite radio.

Additional coverage: Florida Times-Union, Yahoo! News, Science Codex, Science 2.0, News-Medical, Medical Xpress, Health Canal

Context: By examining more than 3,600 postmortem brains, researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campuses in Jacksonville, Florida and Rochester, Minnesota have found that the progression of dysfunctional tau protein drives the cognitive decline and memory loss seen in Alzheimer’s disease. Amyloid, the other toxic protein that characterizes Alzheimer’s, builds up as dementia progresses, but is not the primary culprit, they say. The findings, published in Brain, offer new and valuable information in the long and ongoing debate about the relative contribution of amyloid and tau to the development and progression of cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer’s, says the study’s lead author, Melissa Murray, Ph.D., a neuroscientist at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

LA Times
Migraine studies yield fresh approaches to ward off pain
by Lisa Mulcahy

If you suffer from migraine headaches, you're not alone. More than 10% of the population is hurting right along with you, including 18% of women. Migraines are most common from the ages of 25 to 55. The good news: New research can help change yourLogo for Los Angeles Times newspaper approach to managing your migraines. Here are five strategies to try… If you experience a strong smell like perfume, flickering or flashing lights, less sleep and you eat a cold-cut sub with nitrates all in one day, yes, you may get a migraine, but if you ate that sub on a day when you didn't experience those other triggers, you might be just fine," said Dr. Fred Cutrer, a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., in an interview.

Reach:  The Los Angeles Times has a daily readership of 1.9 million and 2.9 million on Sunday, more than 8 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.5 million. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 128 years.

Context: Fred (Michael) Cutrer, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist. The study of migraine, particularly its pathophysiology and the optimal delivery of treatment, has been the research focus of Dr. Cutrer.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Reuters
Uncommon form of heart attack likely runs in family – study
by Sharon Begley

… In the new study, in JAMA Internal Medicine, researchers at the Mayo Clinic combed a registry of patients who had suffered Reutersspontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD), in which one layer of a coronary artery splits off from another like cheap laminate. Blood seeps out between the arterial layers, starving the heart of oxygen and causing chest pain. If not treated quickly, it can cause heart attack and sometimes death…That is a problem because treatment for common heart attack - clearing arterial blockages - can worsen SCAD. Some 30 percent to 40 percent of SCADs should be left to heal on their own, said Mayo's Dr. Sharonne Hayes, who led the study.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world newsbusiness newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile and interactive television platforms.

Additional coverage: Huffington Post, FOX News

Context:  A Mayo Clinic study has identified a familial association in spontaneous coronary artery dissection, a type of heart attack that most commonly affects younger women, suggesting a genetic predisposition to the condition, researchers say. The results are published in the March 23 issue of JAMA Internal Medicine. Researchers used the Mayo Clinic SCAD Registry of 412 enrollees to identify five familial cases of SCAD, comprised of three pairs of first-degree relatives (mother-daughter, identical twin sisters, sisters) and two pairs of second-degree relatives (aunt and niece, and first cousins). Researchers believe this is the first study to identify SCAD as an inherited disorder. More information, including a video interview with Sharonne Hayes, M.D., the study's senior author and a cardiologist can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

 

Everyday Health
The Man Without a Heart
by Dr. Sanjay Gupta

“You can feel it,” Charles Okeke says. “It’s pounding. If I opened my mouth, it was very audible.” Okeke is remembering the days when his blood was pumped by a massive 400-pound machine. It was one stage in a remarkable journey that has finally broughtEveryday Health him where he is today — a healthy man with a healthy heart once again beating in his chest…“Charles was very sick when he showed up at our hospital,” remembers Eric Steidley, MD, a cardiologist at Mayo Clinic. “Charles was going to die unless we did something.”

Reach: Everyday Health Media, LLC is a provider of online consumer health content across a broad portfolio of over 25 websites that span the health spectrum — from lifestyle offerings in pregnancy, diet and fitness to in-depth medical content for condition prevention and management.

Context: For almost two years, Charles Okeke lived in a Mayo Clinic hospital tethered to a machine. He had just turned 30 when a blood clot destroyed his heart.

Public Affairs Contact: Lynn Closway

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
How Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville makes its reach global
by Colleen Jones

Most international patients seen at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville come from Latin America, the Caribbean, Mexico and Canada. To Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logofacilitate inbound medical travel, Mayo offers coordination services at information offices in Quito, Ecuador; Bogotá, Colombia; Guatemala City; Mexico City; and Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada.

Reach:  The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Context: Thousands of people come to Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville, Fla., annually for diagnosis or treatment of a medical condition. In Florida, Mayo Clinic primarily treats adults, although some specialists see teenagers and children. Doctors in the Primary Care centers treat people of all ages. Many people make their own appointments and some are referred by a doctor. Mayo Clinic doctors can work closely with your hometown doctor to coordinate your care.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

Star Tribune
Mayo researcher appeals for increased Alzheimer's funding
by Jim Spencer

Dr. Ronald Petersen did not promise the Senate Special Committee on Aging a cure for Alzheimer’s disease in 10 years. But on Wednesday, the Mayo Clinic’s director of Alzheimer’s research held out hope for highly effective treatments in a decade if theStar Tribune National government significantly increases its investment in research. Last year, Alzheimer’s, the disease that has become the curse of 5.3 million Americans and the fear of tens of millions more, received less than $600 million in research funding. That compares with $5.3 billion for cancer, $3 billion for HIV/AIDS and $2 billion for heart disease.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: CSPAN, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services. Dr. Petersen testifed this week at the Senate Special Committee on Aging.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

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Tags: A Woman’s Health, A.L.S., AARP, AARP En Espanol, ABC Montana, ABC News, Al Pueblo Pan y Circo, Alzheimer's funding, Alzheimer's Research, Alzheimer's test, Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at the Mayo Clinic, Ambient


March 20th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

 

Wall Street Journal
Scientists’ New Goal: Growing Old Without Disease
by Sumathi Reddy

…Research has found that metformin targets the chemicals produced by age-related senescent cells—normal cells that stop dividing and produce toxic substancesWall Street Journal Life and Culture logo damaging to the cells around them, said James Kirkland, director of the Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and part of the TAME planning team. Senescent cells usually develop as people age or at sites of age-related chronic diseases, such as the brain in Alzheimer’s patients or around the plaques that lead to heart attacks and strokes, he said.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has the largest print circulation in America with 1.4 million (60 percent) of a total of 2.3 million. Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Additional Coverage:

Forbes, A True Fountain-Of-Youth Drug Combo?

Previous Coverage in March 12, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: A new class of drugs identified and validated by Mayo Clinic researchers along with collaborators at Scripps Research Institute and others, clearly reduces health problems in mice by limiting the effect of senescent cells — cells that contribute to frailty and diseases associated with age. The researchers say this is a first step toward developing similar treatments for aging patients. Their findings appear  in the journal Aging Cell. “If translatable to humans — which makes sense as we were using human cells in many of the tests – this type of therapy could keep the effects of aging at bay and significantly extend the healthspan of patients,” says James Kirkland, M.D., Ph.D., head of the Mayo Clinic Kogod Center on Aging and senior author of the study.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Huffington Post
Struggling With High Blood Pressure? Your Sleep May Be To Blame
by Alena Hall

Looking to lower your blood pressure? Fix your poor sleep habits first, suggests a new study. Mayo Clinic researchers recently set out to find how reduced sleep quantity and Huffington Post Healthy Living Logoquality could affect a person's blood pressure. After monitoring their eight participants for 16 days, they found that when their subjects experienced prolonged periods of shorter sleep, they also registered substantially higher blood pressure numbers at night. While the size of the study was small, they presented their findings at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session in San Diego, California, on March 15.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique viewers.

Context: Healthy young adults who don’t consume caffeine regularly experienced greater rise in resting blood pressure after consumption of a commercially available energy drink — compared to a placebo drink — thus raising the concern that energy drinks may increase the risk of cardiac events, Mayo Clinic researchers found. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

 

MPR
Bill seeks simpler path to multistate M.D. licenses
by Lorna Benson

Doctors and hospitals urged support Friday for a bill that would make it simpler and faster for physicians to become licensed in multiple states…Dr. Steve Ommen, medical director of the Center for Connected Care at Mayo Clinic, said specialists are often calledMPR News logo upon to advise doctors treating critically ill patients in other states. But the collaboration hinges on whether the specialist on duty has a license to practice in that state, Ommen said.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Steve Ommen, M.D., medical director of Center for Connected Care, Mayo Clinic, testified to the Minnesota House Health and Human Services Reform Committee regarding the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact and Minnesota Telemedicine Act on March 13. Each year, Mayo Clinic physicians see people from all 50 states. Advances in technology are helping patients who may be faced with long-distance travel and logistical hurdles connect with Mayo Clinic’s specialized health care providers easier and faster. However, the patchwork of state-by-state medical licensing rules presents a costly and time-consuming barrier to telehealth care delivery.

Public Affairs Contact: Rebecca Eisenman

 

KAAL
Mayo Clinic Using 3D Printer To Help Cure Patients

It is impressive to see and hear about what 3D printers can create. Some printers create toys or machine parts, and some duplicate human body parts for Mayo Clinic. "I've never been a patient before; I've been healthy my entire life,” said Michael Slag, who despite KAAL TV logonever smoking, was diagnosed with lung cancer. The body part being made by the printer is Michael Slag’s right chest plate. It shows his tumor that was attached to his lung and ribs. This model helped Michael better understand what was to come…"So the model actually shows us very clearly where the tumor may be and where the tumor is not," Shanda Blackmon told me as I held the three-dimensional model. Blackmon is a thoracic surgeon for Mayo Clinic and is one of Michael's doctors.

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Additional coverage: KSTP

Context: Shanda Blockmon, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic thoracic surgeon.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

ABC 15 Arizona
Mayo Clinic experts explain when cardiac testing is needed before surgery and when it is unnecessary

John Lynch, M.D., Mayo Clinic Cardiologist, joined the cast of Sonoran Living Live to discuss pre-surgical cardiac evaluations. ABC affiliate, channel 15 in ArizonaWhen are cardiac evaluations necessary? When are they not necessary? Find out about pre-surgical cardiac evaluations and heart disease and treatment by joining ABC15's Rally for Red, and from Mayo Clinic staff members each month on Sonoran Living Live.

Reach: ABC15, KNXV-TV, is the ABC affiliate in Phoenix.

Context: John Lynch, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

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Tags: #StrongArmSelfi, $61M lobbying Legislature, 'Stronger Than That' music video, 3D Printer To Help Cure Patients, 9 News Colorado, ABC15 Arizona, ABC15's Rally for Red, Active lifestyle pays off, affordable cancer drugs, age-related senescent cells, Air Medical Journal, Al Jazeera America


March 12th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

Star Tribune
Mayo's record financial results run counter to health care trends
by Christopher Snowbeck

To financial analysts, the outlook for hospitals has been tilting negative. Demand for inpatient care is soft. Insurers and the government want to pay less for each service. New payment arrangements ask hospitals to take a degree of financial risk that patientStar Tribune Business section logo costs exceed expectations. Against that backdrop, the record-setting financial results the Mayo Clinic released last week stand out…But the average length of stay for a Mayo Clinic hospital patient increased from 4.6 days in 2013 to 4.8 days last year. The change was significant because it signified that patients were sicker last year, and needed more revenue-producing services, said Jeff Bolton, the clinic’s chief administrative officer.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Previous Coverage in March 5, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Mayo Clinic reports a strong 2014 performance, including providing direct care for more than 1.3 million people, contributions of $410 million to its pension plan as a commitment to employees, and plans for a $1.5 billion investment to fund information technology infrastructure. “Whether viewed through the lens of quality, patient outcomes, research advances, operational performance or sharing our knowledge with the world — by all measures, we had an extraordinary year,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic. “That success allowed us to reinvest in our people, our infrastructure and our mission so we can better serve our patients.” More information about Mayo's 2014 performance can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

 

The Independent UK
Senolytics: Scientists identify new drug that slows the aging process and could dramatically increase our life expectancy
by Christopher Hooton

A new class of drugs has been identified that slow the aging process in mice, alleviating symptoms of frailty and extending a healthy lifespan. If their effect on humans is as marked as it is on animal models, their benefit could be enormous. The research was carried The Independentout by a team from Mayo Clinic, The Scripps Institute and other institutions and published in the journal Aging Cell yesterday…"The prototypes of these senolytic agents have more than proven their ability to alleviate multiple characteristics associated with aging," added Mayo Clinic Professor James Kirkland, MD, who also worked on the study.

Reach: The Independent is a United Kingdom-based newspaper with a daily circulation of more than 61,000.

Additional coverage: Fierce Biotech Research, Gizmag, Nature World News, HealthCanal, U-T San Diego, NewsMax, Health Canal, NDTV, Business Standard, Times Live, The Telegraph, The Independent, R&D Mag Failed Messiah, BioScience Technology

Context: A new class of drugs identified and validated by Mayo Clinic researchers along with collaborators at Scripps Research Institute and others, clearly reduces health problems in mice by limiting the effect of senescent cells — cells that contribute to frailty and diseases associated with age. The researchers say this is a first step toward developing similar treatments for aging patients. Their findings appear today in the journal Aging Cell. “If translatable to humans — which makes sense as we were using human cells in many of the tests – this type of therapy could keep the effects of aging at bay and significantly extend the healthspan of patients,” says James Kirkland, M.D., Ph.D., head of the Mayo Clinic Kogod Center on Aging and senior author of the study. More information about the study, including a video interview with Dr. Kirkland, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Financial Times London (subscription required)
The teleconference that saves lives
by Aaron Stanley

Larry Lee came close to death when a bloodclot lodged in his brain last year while walking his dog in rural Minnesota. Since his local hospital lacked the expertise to deal with the problem, it turned to the renowned Mayo Clinic. From a computer console at Mayo’sFinancial Times Newspaper Logo campus 65 miles away, a neurologist appeared via teleconference, took control of a robotic camera to examine Mr. Lee and shepherded the local team’s efforts to bust the clot…“We could see 10 years ago that healthcare was going to go through a period of great change,” says John Noseworthy, chief executive of Mayo. “So we said: ‘Let’s digitize our knowledge, digitize our work, knit together like-minded institutions and connect with them electronically’.”

The Reach: The Financial Times has a combined paid print and digital circulation of 690,000.

Context: Mayo’s Stroke Telemedicine Program allows stroke specialists to remotely evaluate people who’ve had acute strokes and make diagnoses and treatment recommendations working with emergency medicine doctors at other sites. Having a prompt neurological evaluation increases the possibility that a patient will receive clot-dissolving therapies or other interventions in time to reduce disability and death from stroke. The program began in Arizona, and now is represented nationally, with hubs in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota that serve more than 20 health care institutions in seven states. To read more about Larry Lee's story and the role his dog had in saving his life, go to Mayo Clinic's In the Loop.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Twin Cities Business
Fortune: Mayo Clinic Among Top 25 Cos. With Most Openings

Job seekers looking to find employment with a top-notch company need not look very far: the Rochester-based Mayo Clinic is Twin Cities Business Magazine Logoamong the nation’s best places to work—and they’re hiring—according to Fortune. The state’s largest private employer, based out of Rochester, was named among the 25 best companies hiring (it ranked 73rd overall on Fortune’s “2015 Best Companies” list) and has nearly 2,000 openings available across southeast and southern Minnesota.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Context: Fortune magazine named Mayo Clinic to its list of the “100 Best Companies  to Work For” in 2015. This is Mayo’s 12th consecutive year on the magazine’s annual compilation of companies that rate high with employees. The list ranks Mayo Clinic 73 overall among the top 100 companies. “We congratulate our employees for earning Mayo Clinic this distinction,” says John H. Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO of Mayo Clinic. “We hope they take great pride in this ‘100 Best’ national recognition.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein


Star Tribune
Risks, benefits weighed in JAMA study on valve replacement
By Joe Carlson

In the first analysis of mass commercial use of a new minimally invasive therapy for a narrowed heart valve, researchers reported Tuesday that nearly 24 percent of patients died within a year of treatment...
“Transcatheter aortic valve replacement has becomeStar Tribune Health newspaper logo transformational for patients who need a new valve and are at high risk for surgery or inoperable. But we have been lacking long-term data for this group of patients who are considering this procedure,” said a statement from Dr. David Holmes Jr., the interventional cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic who was lead author of the study in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional Coverage: Forbes

Context: Study results of one-year data for more than 12,000 patients who had transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in the United States show an overall one-year death rate of 23.7 percent and a stroke rate of 4.1 percent, according to a study published in the March 10 issue of JAMA. “Transcatheter aortic valve replacement has become transformational for patients who need a new valve and are at high-risk for surgery or inoperable. But we have been lacking long-term data for this group of patients who are considering this procedure,” says study lead authorDavid R. Holmes, Jr., M.D., a Mayo Clinic interventional cardiologist. “Before this study, we only had 30-day information. This is a milestone and will help us better guide patients and learn as physicians.” More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

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Tags: 4Hoteliers, a scheduling tool for doctors, Aging Cell, aging patients, Albert Lea Tribune, alternative to traditional fertility preservation techniques, Anti-aging drugs, AP, Arizona Family, autoimmune arthritis, Autopsies Can Teach, benefits of sustainability


March 5th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

 

 

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

Health magazine
Watch a Blind Grandfather ‘See’ His Wife and Family Again Thanks to a Bionic Eye
by Rachel Swalin

After losing his vision to a degenerative eye disease, a 68-year-old Minnesota grandfather of 10 can now make out the forms of his wife and family for the first time Healthin a decade, NBC News reported. And it’s all thanks to one fascinating piece of technology…Raymond Iezzi Jr., MD, a Mayo Clinic researcher and ophthalmologist, had been treating Zderad’s grandson, who’s in the early stages of the disease, which is caused by genetic defects and is often passed on through families. Knowing Zderad’s eyesight had been lost to the disease, Dr. Iezzi suggested that the grandfather take part in a clinical trial for a device called the Second Sight Argus II, better known as a bionic eye. “Tell your grandfather I’d like to see him,” Dr. Iezzi told the boy, according to a Mayo Clinic release.

Reach: Health magazine has a monthly circulation of 1.3 million and Health.com delivers information that puts health into context in peoples' lives.

Additional coverage: Huffington Post, Tienes Que Verlo. La Tercera Tendencias

Previous Coverage in February 26, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: It’s a medical story, a science and technology advancement and a romance wrapped into one moment: when a man who is blind sees his wife again for the first time in a decade. Allen Zderad began to have serious vision problems about 20 years ago due to retinitis pigmentosa, a degenerative eye disease affecting the retina. There is no effective treatment or cure. It ended his professional career and after a decade he was effectively blind, unable to see anything other than very bright light. He adjusted, even continuing woodworking by developing his sense of touch and spatial relationships. But he was unable to see his family, including ten grandchildren or his wife, Carmen. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nelllis

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
A vision for improving quality, driving down costs: Meet the new leader of Mayo Clinic Jacksonville
by Colleen Michele Jones

It's easy to see why Dr. Gianrico Farrugia was chosen to lead Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logoJacksonville, replacing Dr. Bill Rupp who retired last December. By turns warm and personable, intense and passionate, Farrugia practically lights up when talking about the future of the renowned institution, particularly here in Northeast Florida.

Reach:  The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Context: Gianrico Farrugia, M.D. was named Mayo Clinic vice president and chief executive officer (CEO) ofMayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville, Florida, in August 2014.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

WBUR Here & Now
View From The Top: CEO Of The Mayo Clinic

U.S. News & World Report recently named the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, the number one hospital in the country this year, a first for the hospital. The Mayo WBURClinic is world famous for a model that pays doctors salaries instead of fees, to head off the possibility of physicians ordering unnecessary tests to pad their incomes. Physicians also work on teams for better communication, and to keep costs down. The Mayo Clinic has been center stage in the debate over the Affordable Care Act and “bending the curve” on the high cost of healthcare in the U.S. Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with Dr. John Noseworthy, president and CEO of the Mayo Clinic, who says “it’s that team-based, patient-centeredness that drives us forward.”

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Reach: A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Public Affairs Contact: Brian Kilen

 

Wall Street Journal
A Fast Track to Treatment for Stroke Patients
by Laura Landro

…Bart Demaerschalk, a neurologist and medical director of Mayo Clinic’s Center for Connected Care in Phoenix, says remote consultations are “the next best thing toWall Street Journal Life and Culture logo having a live stroke team, and in terms of time we are just as fast.” The Mayo Clinic Telestroke Network has three hubs in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota which serve 38 “spoke” hospitals in nine states.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has the largest print circulation in America with 1.4 million (60 percent) of a total of 2.3 million. Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Bart Demaerschalk, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist. In stroke telemedicine, also called telestroke, doctors who have advanced training in the nervous system (neurologists) remotely evaluate people who've had acute strokes and make diagnoses and treatment recommendations to emergency medicine doctors at other sites. Doctors communicate using digital video cameras, Internet telecommunications, robotic telepresence, smartphones and other technology.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic reports 36 percent rise in operating income for 2014
by Christopher Snowbeck

Operating income jumped by more than one-third last year at Mayo Clinic, as the Star Tribune Business section logoRochester-based hospital and clinic system posted its strongest performance in more than 25 years. The volume of patients seeking care from Mayo Clinic was strong, including sicker patients who stayed longer than anticipated, said Chief Financial Officer Kedrick Adkins Jr. At the same time, tight control on expenses meant that Mayo Clinic provided the care without a significant increase in labor costs, Adkins said.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: KTTC, Modern Healthcare, HealthLeaders Media, Post-Bulletin, BringMeTheNews, La Crosse Tribune Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal

Context: Mayo Clinic reports a strong 2014 performance, including providing direct care for more than 1.3 million people, contributions of $410 million to its pension plan as a commitment to employees, and plans for a $1.5 billion investment to fund information technology infrastructure. “Whether viewed through the lens of quality, patient outcomes, research advances, operational performance or sharing our knowledge with the world — by all measures, we had an extraordinary year,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic. “That success allowed us to reinvest in our people, our infrastructure and our mission so we can better serve our patients.” More information about Mayo's 2014 performance can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

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Tags: 2015 Minnesota Adverse Health Events, A Breaking News, a Chinese company, ABC News Good Morning America, airborne emergencies, alternative to bariatric surgery, American Layer magazine (PDF), anticoagulant reversal and [BP] control, appetite-modifying hormone peptide tyrosine tyrosine, Arizona Daily Star, Assurex Health, Austin Daily Herald


February 26th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

 

 

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

CBS News
Man gains sight with bionic eye

Man gains sight with bionic eye, Allen Zderad was recently able to see his wife of 45 years for the first time in a decade. The Minnesota man seemed to burst into simultaneous laughter and tears as he caught a glimpse of her with his new "bionic eye."… Now CBS News Logowith the help of a recently developed medical device, Zderad's vision of the world has changed. He's one of just a handful of people in the world to get the "bionic eye" device known as Second Sight Argus II retinal prosthesis system. Zderad's was implanted by Dr. Raymond Iezzi of the Mayo Clinic.

Reach:
CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

 

CNN Headline News
Blind Man Sees Wife

A Minnesota man who had a bionic eye implant is seeing his wife for the first time in ten years. So he can now make out forms and CNN Logoshapes and send a signal to his optic nerve. His sight began to fail just 20 years ago. Now Diane is commenting on the Mayo Clinic’s Facebook page, writing “you are really awesome, Mayo Clinic.” He said seeing the wife for the first time. First time in ten years.

Reach:
 CNN.com has 74.2 million unique visitors to its website each month.

 

ABC News Good Morning America
Bionic Eye Lets Blind Man See Wife For 1st Time In 10 Years
by Liz Neporent

ABC News logoIt was love again at first sight for a man who went blind 10 years ago. Allen Zderad, a 68-year-old retiree from Minnesota, saw his wife for the first time in more than a decade thanks to a bionic eye implanted by doctors at the Mayo Clinic earlier this month.

Reach:  ABCNews.com is the official website for ABC News. Its website receives more than 16.9 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: KARE11, NBC News, Post-Bulletin, Que! Espanol, The Telegraph, Business 2 Community, Telegraph UK, Daily Mail UK, International Business Times, GMA Network, The West Australian, My FOX Philly, Global News Canada, TIME, Mashable, RYOT, KTLA Calif., Independent UK, Metro UK, Gaming News, FOX News, Yahoo! News, My FOX Chicago, KELO Land S.D., NY Daily News, Daily Caller, Popular Mechanics, PopSugar US News & World Report, Irish Times, hln.com, The Guardian Nigeria, Herald Sun Australia, ABC15 Arizona, MindBodyGreen, Times Live, NewsMax, Cult of Mac, euronews.com, MedPage Today

Context: It’s a medical story, a science and technology advancement and a romance wrapped into one moment: when a man who is blind sees his wife again for the first time in a decade. Allen Zderad began to have serious vision problems about 20 years ago due to retinitis pigmentosa, a degenerative eye disease affecting the retina. There is no effective treatment or cure. It ended his professional career and after a decade he was effectively blind, unable to see anything other than very bright light. He adjusted, even continuing woodworking by developing his sense of touch and spatial relationships. But he was unable to see his family, including ten grandchildren or his wife, Carmen. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nelllis

 

Wall Street Journal
New Screening Tests for Hard-to-Spot Breast Cancers
by Melinda Beck

…Past versions of MBI exposed patients to too much radiation to use for regular screenings. A new version developed at the Mayo Wall Street Journal Life and Culture logoClinic in Rochester, Minn., uses a lower dose. In a study of 1,585 women with dense breasts published in the American Journal of Roentgenology this month, Deborah Rhodes, a Mayo Clinic internist, and colleagues found that MBI detected nearly four times as many invasive breast cancers as mammography, with fewer unnecessary biopsies. As of now, only about 100 hospitals offer the newest MBI technology, which is made by GE Healthcare and Gamma Medica Inc.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has the largest print circulation in America with 1.4 million (60 percent) of a total of 2.3 million. Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: A new breast imaging technique pioneered at Mayo Clinic nearly quadruples detection rates of invasive breast cancers in women with dense breast tissue, according to the results of a major study published recently in the American Journal of RoentgenologyMolecular Breast Imaging (MBI) is a supplemental imaging technology designed to find tumors that would otherwise be obscured by surrounding dense breast tissue on a mammogram. Tumors and dense breast tissue can both appear white on a mammogram, making tumors indistinguishable from background tissue in women with dense breasts. About half of all screening-aged women have dense breast tissue, according to Deborah Rhodes, M.D., a Mayo Clinic Breast Clinic physician and the senior author of this study. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sam Smith, Traci Klein, Joe Dangor
Florida Times-Union
Health notes: Mayo Clinic researchers have identified a possible cause of pancreatic cancer

A research team led by investigators from Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville and the University of Oslo in Norway have identified a molecule that pushes normal pancreatic cells to transform their shape, laying the groundwork for deFlorida Times-Union newspaper logovelopment of pancreatic cancer — one of the most difficult tumors to treat.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context:  A research team led by investigators from Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville, Florida, and the University of Oslo, Norway, have identified a molecule that pushes normal pancreatic cells to transform their shape, laying the groundwork for development of pancreatic cancer — one of the most difficult tumors to treat. Their findings, reported in Nature Communications, suggest that inhibiting the gene, protein kinase D1 (PKD1), and its protein could halt progression and spread of this form of pancreatic cancer, and possibly even reverse the transformation. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

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February 19th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

 

 

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

USA Today
Man gets bionic eye, sees wife for first time in a decade

A technological breakthrough is allowing a grandfather who's been blind for 10 years to see again. USA Today Newspaper Logo

Reach: USA TODAY  has the highest daily circulation of any U.S. newspaper with a daily average circulation of 4.1 million, which includes print, various digital editions and other  papers that use their branded content.

Additional Coverage:

KARE
Man gets bionic eye, sees wife for first time in decade

A blind Forest Lake man's sight is restored after he became the first person in Minnesota, and 15th person in the country, to receive KARE-11 TV, Minneapolis-St. Paula bionic eye…Allen Zderad, 68, hadn't seen his wife or grandchildren in more than a decade, until the new device was turned on at Mayo Clinic earlier this month. “Yeah," Zderad exclaimed, as his wife of 45 years slowly came into focus. He then could find no more words, embracing her. "It's crude, but it's significant. It works," he rejoiced, through tears.

WXOW, WIXA, News 10, KTTC

Context: Raymond Iezzi, Jr., M.D., is a Mayo Clinic ophthalmologist. Mayo Clinic eye experts provide comprehensive care for people who seek answers about conditions and diseases of their eyes. Each year doctors in the Mayo Clinic Department of Ophthalmology help nearly 80,000 people who need healing. Dr. Iezzi's clinical interests include retinal degenerative diseases as well as all aspects of vitreoretinal surgery, with a special interest in complex retinal detachment repair associated with diabetes, trauma and proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Wall Street Journal
Innovation Is Sweeping Through U.S. Medical Schools

Wall Street Journal Life and Culture logoCritics have long faulted U.S. medical education for being hidebound, imperious and out of touch with modern health-care needs. The core structure of medical school—two years of basic science followed by two years of clinical work—has been in place since 1910. Now a wave of innovation is sweeping through medical schools, much of it aimed at producing young doctors who are better prepared to meet the demands of the nation’s changing health-care system…. “The reality is that most medical schools are teaching the same way they did one hundred years ago,” says Wyatt Decker, chief executive of the Mayo Clinic’s operations in Arizona, which include a medical school in Scottsdale, Ariz., that is scheduled to enroll its first class in 2017. “It’s time to blow up that model and ask, ‘How do we want to train tomorrow’s doctors?’ ”

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has the largest print circulation in America with 1.4 million (60 percent) of a total of 2.3 million. Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Mayo Clinic College of Medicine is developing leaders in medical and biomedical research careers.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Jim McVeigh

 

Wall Street Journal
Can 3-D Printing of Living Tissue Speed Up Drug Development?

Every year, the pharmaceutical industry spends more than $50 billion on research and Wall Street Journal Life and Culture logodevelopment. But the path to drug approval by the Food and Drug Administration is laden with abrupt failures in late-phase testing. Only one in 5,000 drugs will make it to market, according to one estimate…Christopher Moir, a professor of pediatric surgery at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., says he has used 3-D printing to produce plastic models of organs used to prepare for surgeries. “Bioprinting is going to be a huge aspect in terms of implants and surgeries,” Dr. Moir says.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has the largest print circulation in America with 1.4 million (60 percent) of a total of 2.3 million. Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Kelley Luckstein

 

Wall Street Journal
How to Make Surgery Safer

Hospitals are trying to make it safer for patients to go under the knife. Surgery can beWall Street Journal Life and Culture logo risky by its very nature, and the possibility of error or negligence makes it even more so. According to an analysis last year in the journal Patient Safety in Surgery, 46% to 65% of adverse events in hospitals are related to surgery, especially complex procedures... Two studies published in early February in the Journal of the American Medical Association appeared to challenge the approach, finding that outcomes have improved in hospitals generally in recent years whether they participated in NSQIP or not. One, by researchers at the Mayo Clinic, compared billing claims data between participating and nonparticipating hospitals and found no statistically significant differences in the likelihood of complications, or death.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has the largest print circulation in America with 1.4 million (60 percent) of a total of 2.3 million. Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Mayo Clinic is one of the largest and most experienced surgical practices in the world. Mayo has more than 300 surgeons and 122 operating rooms among its three locations in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. Mayo surgeons perform high volumes of complex operations. In 2005, Mayo Clinic surgeons treated nearly 73,000 patients using the latest technology and innovative procedures. Mayo Clinic evaluates quality by looking at outcome measures, process measures, patient satisfaction and quality rankings.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Sharon Theimer

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February 12th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

US News & World Report
Avatar Mice: How These Rodents Are Advancing Cancer Therapies

…The trial Boehle enrolled in is called BEAUTY, which stands for "breast cancer genome guided therapy." Launched in 2013​, it's ​​​​based at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Using avatar mice – mice with patients’ tumor samples growing inside of US News Health Logo
them – researchers are able to study various treatments and determine which might be best tailored to each patient. “When we treat the mice with drugs, that is very much a mirror of what happens in patients,” says Judy Boughey, ​a breast surgeon at the Mayo Clinic. Boughey is a co-director of the study, which enrolled 140 breast cancer patients.

Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Context: The Breast Cancer Genome-Guided Therapy (BEAUTY) study is designed to help researchers better understand why standard chemotherapy eradicates breast cancer in some women but fails in others. The long-term goal is to enable individualized treatment for each woman with breast cancer by using the genetic information found in blood samples and tumor biopsies to predict the most effective therapies. Judy Boughey, M.D. and Matthew Goetz, M.D. are co-chairs of the study.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Sam Smith

 

Huffington Post
Why Some Vaccines Require More Than One Dose
by Sarah Klein

Despite being declared beaten in 2000, measles is back, due largely to deHuffington Post Healthy Living Logoclining
vaccination rates in parts of the United States. "We should not be in this boat," Dr. Pritish Tosh, an infectious diseases physician and researcher at the Mayo Clinic, told The Huffington Post. "This is a completely preventable disease."

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique viewers.

Context:  Pritish Tosh, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious disease expert.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Globe and Mail
Could we stop the anti-vaxxers if we said measles contains gluten?

... An infectious-disease specialist armed with meticulous resGlobe and Mail Logoearch makes a sober presentation. She quotes Roberto Cattaneo, a molecular biologist at the Mayo Clinic who has spent 30 years studying measles, which he calls “the most transmissible virus we know.” She leans authoritatively on the chair’s desk, and speaks to him directly. “Let me make my case to parents,” she pleads.

Circulation: The Globe and Mail is Canada’s national newspaper and has a daily circulation of more than 306,000. The Globe and Mail Online has more than 840,000 unique visitors to its website each month.

Context: Roberto Cattaneo, Ph.D. studies measles and other small enveloped RNA viruses with the primary goal of generating new knowledge.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Forbes
Measles Outbreak in Dollars and Cents: It Costs Taxpayers Bigtime

“These outbreaks have economic costs. They are disruptive,” said Gregory Poland, Forbes magazine logohead of the Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. “The smaller ones have cost a couple hundred dollars in public resources, and one cost nearly a million dollars. It’s on the lesser side – health is more important – but it consumes public health resources that could be applied to the other pressing problems we face.”

Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Gregory Poland, M.D., studies the immunogenetics of vaccine response in adults and children. Dr. Poland and his team within the Vaccine Research Group aim to improve the health of individuals across the world by pursuing challenges posed by infectious diseases and bioterrorism through clinical, laboratory and epidemiologic vaccine research.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob Nellis, Traci Klein

 

MPR
Measles outbreak sparks call to limit vaccination exemptions

"We actually suffer from this liberal exemption rule," said Dr. Robert Jacobson, a pediatrician at Mayo Clinic. "We could be doing better with our vaccination rates."MPR News logo

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Robert Jacobson, M.D. is a pediatrician with the Mayo Clinic Children's Center and also leads the Employee and Community Health (ECH) Research Initiative at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Jacobson says measles is a horrific disease and up to 40 percent of patients may need hospitalization. More information about measles can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Kelley LucksteinBob Nellis

 

WJXT
Measles Outbreak

News Jax 4 LogoThe latest on the growing measles outbreak. Dr. Vandana Bhide, Mayo Clinic is on the show.


Reach:
WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville.

Context: Vanda Bhide, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in Hospital Internal Medicine in Florida.

Additional Measles Coverage:

INFORUM, Measles outbreak sparks call to limit vaccination exemptions

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

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Tags: ABC15 Arizona, ALS research, Alzheimer's Complex Genetic Networks, American Board of Medical Specialties, American Journal of Roentgenology, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Android Authority, anorexia, Apple's HealthKit, Arab News, Ariz., Asperger’s syndrome


February 6th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, director, media relations

 

AP
Obama Proposes 'Precision Medicine' To End One-Size-Fits-All
by Lauran Neergaard

President Barack Obama is calling for an investment to move away from one-size-fits-all-medicine, toward an approach that tailors treatment to your genes…People with aAssociated Press Wire Service Logo rare form of cystic fibrosis now can choose a drug designed specifically to target the genetic defect causing their illness. Some medical centers, such as the Mayo Clinic, have opened "individualized medicine clinics."

Additional coverage: NY Times, WAVY Va., Star Tribune, KTTC, KMSP, ABC News, Bloomberg, Politico, Daily Mail UK

 

Florida Times-Union
New approach enables Mayo Clinic neurologist to diagnose a rare genetic condition
by Charlie Patton

When Dustin Bennett was 18 months old, his mother realized there was something wrong with him, that he was suddenly having a hard time keeping his balance when he stood upright…Finally, at the suggestion of one of the many physicians she consulted, the Bennetts made the trip from their home in Pearson, Ga., Florida Times-Union newspaper logoto Jacksonville so they could consult with Mayo Clinic neurologist Zbigniew Wszolek.

Additional coverage on this topic: Medical Xpress

Reach: 
The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Florida Times-Union
Guest column: Precision medicine is future of health care
by Physician Gianrico Farrugia, CEO of Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville

Florida Times UnionMayo Clinic has built a national research program and a national referral medical clinic to advance the benefits of these discoveries, which already are beginning to benefit patients on our Jacksonville campus. We consider precision medicine a priority and an essential part of the future of medical practice.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

 

Bloomberg
Obama Plans $215 Million Precision Medicine Effort for Cures
by Caroline Chen

Obama’s proposed funding may not be enough to support the project. “I think the polite way to say it is that it’s a good start,” said Gianrico Farrugia, chief executive Bloomberg news logoofficer of Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus and former director of Mayo’s Center for Individualized Medicine. “It is certainly really encouraging that there is alignment between the NIH and the White House, and it kick starts the thing we need to do, but it’s an initial investment just to start things,” Farrugia said by telephone.

Reach: Bloomberg has 2,300 media professionals in 146 bureaus across 72 countries. Bloomberg delivers its content across more than 400 publications, over 310 million households worldwide through Bloomberg Television and 500,000 in the New York metro area and 18.5 million subscribers through satellite radio.

Additional coverage: International Business Times, com, HealthData Management, HealthDay, FOX News, ABC News, KAAL, KMSP, Star Tribune, Chicago Tribune, Al Jazeera America

 

Star Tribune
Mayo genetic data bank could boost Obama's new 'precision medicine initiative'
by Jim Spencer

…“If we have a big data set, a big pool of people that’s varied, then that allows us to really map out not only the genome of one person, but now we can start seeing Star Tribune newspaper logoconnections and patterns and correlations that helps us refine exactly what it is that we’re trying to do with respect to treatment,” the president said at a White House ceremony, attended by Mayo Vice President Dr. Gianrico Farrugia.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Individualized medicine, also known as personalized medicine or precision medicine, means tailoring diagnosis and treatment to each patient to optimize care. Patients have experienced this kind of care for 150 years at Mayo Clinic, where teams of specialists have always worked together to find answers. More information about the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Mayo Clinic's response to President Obama's precision medicine initiative can be found here.

Previous Coverage on Precision Medicine in January, 22, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Bob Nellis, Sam Smith, Kevin Punsky

 

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Tags: 9News Colo., ABC News, ABC7News Calif., Action News Jacksonville, Affordable care act, Al Jazeera America, All Access, alzheimers, American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM), American Heart Month, antibiotic-resistant infections, AP


January 30th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

FOX Business
Mayo Clinic CEO on state of health care

Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy discusses his priorities for 2015, patient care and technology in the U.S. and the development and cost of Hepatitis C therapies.

Opening Bell Fox BusinessReach: FoxNews.com has more than 13 million unique visitors each month. Fox Business Network is headquartered in News Corporation's studios in midtown Manhattan with bureaus in Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco (Silicon Valley), Washington, D.C. and London.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

MPR
At Mayo, brain device offers hope for toughest epilepsy cases
by Liz Baier

After nine years of epileptic seizures and no success stopping them, Sheri Finstad was
MPR News logoready to try an experiment. In October, she came to Rochester, where Mayo Clinic doctors implanted a device in her brain designed to deliver mild electrical pulses and record the brain's reaction… "We can see exactly what our stimulation does to the ongoing activity in the brain," said Finstad's neurologist, Dr. Matt Stead. "That will allow us ... hopefully to understand better what patterns and types of stimulation are most likely to suppress their propensity toward seizures."

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Matt Stead., M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

The Atlantic
Attention: A Muscle to Strengthen
by James Hamblin

"Today is Thursday, the day of Meaning." That's the message at the very top of the page. And from there down, almost everything about Amit Sood's website,The Atlantic Magazine Logo stressfree.org, is couched in the self-help jargon that scientists instinctively dismiss. So it's especially interesting that Sood is a physician, a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic, no less.

Reach: The Atlantic was founded in 1857, produces 10 issues a year and has 1.2 million readers each month. The magazine also has a number of platforms on the web including The Atlantic, TheAtantic.com, AtlanticLIVE, Atlantic Mobile, The Atlantic Wire and The Atlantic Cities

Additional coverage: Government Executive

Context: In The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living, Mayo Clinic stress management and resiliency expert Amit Sood, M.D., draws on decades of groundbreaking research to offer readers a scientifically proven, structured and practical approach to reducing stress. He explains the brain’s two modes — focused mode and default mode — and how an imbalance between the two produces unwanted stress, and he shares new insights about how the mind works, including its natural tendency to wander. In this easy-to-follow guide, Dr. Sood provides actionable steps to cultivate emotional and mental strength, find greater fulfillment and nurture a kind disposition. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Sood, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts:
Ginger Plumbo, Brian Kilen

 

USA Today
The simple concussion test the NFL does not use
by Nancy Armour

… The Mayo Clinic weighed in on Tuesday, throwing its support behind the King-USA Today Football Helmet LogoDevick with a first-of-its-kind licensing agreement. "Mayo Clinic certainly wouldn't endorse, support or be associated with something they didn't thoroughly vet, and this was thoroughly vetted. The data speaks for itself," said Dr. David Dodick, a neurologist who heads Mayo's Concussion Program. "Is it perfect? No, nothing is perfect," Dodick said. "But is it a valuable tool that can be used pitchside, rinkside and on the sideline to report the suspicion of a concussion? Absolutely."

Reach: USA TODAY  has the highest daily circulation of any U.S. newspaper with a daily average circulation of 4.1 million, which includes print, various digital editions and other  papers that use their branded content.

Additional coverage: Quad-City Times, KARE11, Post-Bulletin, KEYC Mankato, PT Products, Rock Hill Herald, KIMT

Context: Concussions are in the national spotlight for the damage being done to student and professional athletes. Determining when an athlete should be removed from play is a major challenge in preventing injury. Athletes routinely deny symptoms.

King-Devick test logoThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that between 1.6 and 3.8 million students have concussions every year. In an effort to bring awareness and increase concussion screening, Mayo Clinic has agreed to a licensing agreement withKing-Devick Test Inc., which has developed a proven indicator of ocular motor, visual and cognitive function for concussion detection and evaluation on the sidelines of sporting events to help with the decision to sideline athletes to prevent injury. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

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Tags: 2015 Great Minds Gala, 3-D technology, Abigail Van Buren Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, alcoholic, Alibaba unit, alternative behavioral therapies, Altru Health System & Clinics, alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer's Disease Awareness and Dementia-Care Programs, American Journal of Roentgenology, Amit Sood, Amyloidosis


January 22nd, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Star Tribune
Mayo fights stricter oversight of lab tests
by Jim Spencer

Proposed federal rules to require new government approval of certain tests developed in medical schools and private business laboratories have drawn cries of protest from the Mayo Clinic… Mayo says it already goes through a certification process with otherStar Tribune Business section logo federal agencies and monitors its so-called adverse events. The clinic recently sent the chairman of its laboratory medicine and pathology department to Washington to testify against the rules as the government considers tweaking them. “These rules have the potential to get in the way of effective patient care and really disrupt the whole patient-physician-laboratory relationship,” Dr. Curtis Hanson told the Star Tribune after his testimony to the FDA.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional Coverage:

Post-Bulletin, Proposed lab regulation worries Mayo Clinic officials

Context: Curtis Hanson, M.D. is chair of Mayo Clinic laboratory medicine and pathology, one of the largest clinical laboratories in the world. It is composed of more than 3,200 people working in numerous specialty laboratories performing more than 20 million tests a year.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Huffington Post
How To Train Your Brain For Happiness
by Sarah Klein

Broody, a very unhappy brain, is plagued by fear and self-doubt. "Seeing otHuffington Post Healthy Living Logohers in pain, physical or emotional, fires his own pain network," says Amit Sood, M.D., professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic and chair of the Mayo Mind Body Initiative, in a new video "starring" Broody. "His imaginary fears cause him real damage."

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique visitors.

Context: In The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free LivingMayo Clinic stress management and resiliency expert Amit Sood, M.D., draws on decades of groundbreaking research to offer readers a scientifically proven, structured and practical approach to reducing stress. He explains the brain’s two modes — focused mode and default mode — and how an imbalance between the two produces unwanted stress, and he shares new insights about how the mind works, including its natural tendency to wander. In this easy-to-follow guide, Dr. Sood provides actionable steps to cultivate emotional and mental strength, find greater fulfillment and nurture a kind disposition. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Sood, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

NBC Nightly News
New Study Finds Lack of Exercise Is Deadlier Than Obesity

Walking for 20 minutes every day can reduce a person's risk of death by up to 30 percent, according to a new University of Cambridge study. Dr. Edward Laskowski, NBC Nightly News LogoMayo Clinic, is interviewed by Dr. Nancy Snyderman, NBC Medical Correspondent.

Reach: NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams continues to be the top rated evening newscast with more than 7.9 million viewers each night.

Context: Edward Laskowski, M.D., co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bryan Anderson, Traci Klein

 

Washington Post
What is President Obama’s ‘precision medicine’ plan, and how might it help you?
by Lenny Bernstein

In his hour-long State of the Union address Tuesday night, President Obama spent a Washington Post newspaper logofew seconds announcing a "Precision Medicine Initiative," but did little to explain what he has in mind…What is precision medicine? Clinically, experts don't even agree on a single term for it. But "individualized," "personalized," and "precision," medicine are all used to convey the same idea, according to Gianrico Farrugia, former director of the Mayo Clinic's Center for Individualized Medicine: "rather than treating a person as [part of] a group, treat the person as an individual, based on [his or her] own genetic material, to enable us to provide individualized, personalized and precise care."

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post averages 518,700, and Sunday circulation averages 736,800.

Additional coverage:
FOX 9 Twin Cities
Minnesota shout out minutes into State of the Union Address…. Federal funding for individualized medicine
Health IT Outcomes, Austin Daily Herald, MedCity News, Pharma Times

Context: Individualized medicine, also known as personalized medicine or precision medicine, means tailoring diagnosis and treatment to each patient to optimize care. Patients have experienced this kind of care for 150 years at Mayo Clinic, where teams of specialists have always worked together to find answers. More information about the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Mayo Clinic's response to President Obama's precision medicine initiative can be found here.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Bob Nellis, Sam Smith

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Tags: Abatacept Dose, ABC 15 Arizona, ABC News, ABC15's Rally for Red, ACR's Dose Index Registry, aeromedical exam, Al Vogt, Alice Howland, Alternative Methods of Telehealth, AMD, America Cooks with Chefs, American College of Surgeons’ Commission


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