Fri, Aug 26

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

 

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 


AP
Pros to Joes: Elite Athlete Training for the Corporate World
 by Dave Campbell

Kyle Rudolph's two most productive seasons for the Minnesota Vikings were also those in which he played every game, not coincidentally. After all the surgeries, crutches and rehab, Rudolph has found a training program to supplement team-supervised workouts that has contributed to theAssociated Press Wire Service Logo durability he's long sought to establish. The sturdiness of his body at age 26 has become equally important as the agility and strength needed to thrive as an NFL tight end in the prime of his career. "It's all about playing 16 games," said Rudolph, who found his happy place in downtown Minneapolis at the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center through a joint venture with the specialized performance training firm EXOS … "The elite athlete is the beacon that gets all the attention, but those same principles trickle down to how we treat every athlete," said Dr. Ed Laskowski, the co-director of Mayo's sports medicine operation.

Reach: The Associated Press is a not-for-profit news cooperative, owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members. News collected by the AP is published and republished by newspaper and broadcast outlets worldwide.

Additional coverage: FOX Sports, ABC News, USA Today, NY Times, Star Tribune, Washington Post, Salon, Centre Daily Times, Kansas City Star, Charlotte Observer, The Daily Progress

Context: Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center is a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, sports performance optimization, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries. Edward Laskowski, M.D. is co-director of Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Buzzfeed
How Katie Ledecky Stacks Up Against Male Swimmers
by Peter Aldhous

Katie Ledecky blew away the competition in Rio de Janeiro, and was the standout racer of the 2016 Olympics. She won three individual golds, BuzzFeed Logoplus another gold and a silver in the relays. But it was her world records, and the margins of her victories, that really got people talking. Ledecky set world-best times in the 400- and 800-meter freestyle finals — winning that second race by more than 11 seconds. As she cuts through the water, Ledecky’s form is close to perfection. “I think her stroke is just really, really good,” Michael Joyner, an exercise physiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, told BuzzFeed News. “Watch her hands: There are very few bubbles.”

Reach: BuzzFeed receives more than 15.7 million unique visitors each month to its website and targets pop culture and social media enthusiasts.

Additional coverage:

Business Insider, 8 of the most impressive Olympic feats of all time

Previous coverage in August 19, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in August 12, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist.  Dr. Joyner's research team is interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

 

12News Arizona
US swimmer ignites interest in unusual chest condition
by Pete Scholz

It was June 2016, right after Cody Miller, 24, qualified for the Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro. It was then he shared with the world what he had been dealing with for the past 10 years or so.   The pictures he posted showed his noticeably sunken sternum -- the telltale symptom of a!2 News Arizona Logo condition known as pectus excavatum --"pectus" for short. From an operating theater at Mayo Clinic in north Phoenix, Dr. Dawn Jaroszewski pointed to a screen with two CT scans. "If you look at the normal chest, you have this rounded curvature," she indicated, "and on the pectus patient, you can see how the front of the chest collapses down," she added.

Reach: 12 News is KPNX, Phoenix, an NBC affiliate in the 12th-largest market in the country. The newscasts reach about 2 million viewers each day.

Context: Dawn Jaroszewski, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiac surgeon. Pectus excavatum is a condition in which a person's breastbone is sunken into his or her chest. In severe cases, pectus excavatum can look as if the center of the chest has been scooped out, leaving a deep dent. Pectus excavatum can be surgically repaired, but surgery is usually reserved for people who have moderate to severe signs and symptoms. People who have mild signs and symptoms may be helped by physical therapy. Certain exercises can improve posture and increase the degree to which the chest can expand.

Contact:  Jim McVeigh

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Tags: 12News Arizona, ABC News, antibiotic resistance, AP, Assurex Health, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, back to school, blood sugar, Bradenton Herald, Business Insider, BuzzFeed, Cancer


Fri, Aug 19

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Reuters
Can season and place of birth influence celiac disease risk?
by Lisa Rapaport

Winter babies and people born in places with shorter days and less sunlight might have a lower risk of developing celiac disease than peers born in warmer regions or seasons, a Swedish study suggests … Among other things, global warming, variation in the type of spring weather and the timing of changing seasons could potentially explain some of the differences in risk found in the study, said Dr. Joseph Murray, directorReuters Logo of the celiac disease program at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

Reach: Reuters has 196 editorial bureaus in 130 countries and 2,400 editorial staff members and covers international news, regional news, politics, social issues, health, business, sports and media.

Additional coverage: KFGO Fargo

Context: Joseph Murray, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist. Dr. Murray's research focuses in two distinct areas:  celiac disease or gluten sensitivity and enteropathy and esophageal disorders.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Outside magazine
Are Olympians Really Getting Older?
By Nicholas Hung

No, it’s not just you. From Michael Phelps to Kristin Armstrong, the 43-year-old American cyclist who just won her third gold in three consecutive Games, Olympic athletes really are getting older…To start, there’s Outsidethe physiological component, says Michael J. Joyner, a physician and researcher at the Mayo Clinic specializing in exercise physiology. Athletes are staying healthier longer due to improvements in training and recovery techniques. It’s different now, and somebody like Phelps can really cash in,” says Joyner. If someone stays healthy and stays motivated, he or she “can really compete into a late age.”

Reach: Outside Magazine has a monthly circulation of more than 688,000 and is geared toward the enthusiast of various outdoor activities. Its website receives more than 690,000 unique visitors each month.

Related coverage with Dr. Joyner:
Business Insider, 4 athletes show the perfect body types for Olympic sports
NY Magazine, Olympic Champions’ Minds Are Quieter Than Yours
TIME, The 5 Key Factors for Breaking Olympic Records
Sports IllustratedWhat does it take to break a world record at the Olympics?
New York magazine, Britain’s 42-Year-Old Distance Runner Is a Sign of Athletics to Come

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist.  Dr. Joyner's research team is interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

ActionNewsJax
Expert says federal funding for Zika vaccine falls short of what's needed in long run
by Samantha Manning

Dr. Greg Poland, a Zika vaccine researcher at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, told Action News Jax the federal funding falls far short. “It is a step in the right direction but terribly inadequate,” Poland saidActionNewsJax. “There needs to be a substantial and sustained commitment to dealing with the problem that is directly affecting the health of Americans and for which they themselves can’t do much to protect themselves against. This is the role of a federal government.” Poland said the phases for developing vaccines can take years and estimates roughly $1 billion is needed to fund a vaccine for this kind of a virus.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Context: Gregory Poland, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious disease expert. Dr. Poland and his team within the Vaccine Research Group aim to improve the health of individuals across the world by pursuing challenges posed by infectious diseases and bioterrorism through clinical, laboratory and epidemiologic vaccine research.

Contacts: Kevin PunksyBob Nellis

 

ABC 15 Arizona
Mayo Clinic offers tips to prevent atrial fibrillation (A-fib)

Todd Hurst, M.D., Mayo Clinic Cardiologist, joined the hosts of Sonoran Living Live to discuss the increasing prevalence of atrial fibrillation, the most common form of arrhythmia, and the dramatic impact that ABC affiliate, channel 15 in Arizonamodest weight loss and exercise can have on patient outcomes. Find out about more about heart disease and treatment by joining ABC15's Rally for Red, and from Mayo Clinic staff members each month on Sonoran Living Live.

Reach:  KNXV-TV, ABC 15, is the ABC television station affiliate in Phoenix, Arizona.

Context: R. Todd Hurst, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

KIMT-TV
Mayo Clinic working to advance research on aging
by DeeDee Stiepan

Mayo Clinic is hoping to speed up the pace at which interventions that could delay or prevent these diseases are discovered. They’re doing so by collaborating with academic aging centers around the world, KIMTincluding the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and University of Alabama at Birmingham. “So far, we’ve been going organ system by organ system saying can we generate enough proof of concept in experimental models, in cells and in mice to say, “yeah, we think this might actually improve a multitude of conditions that are associated with aging,” explains Jordan Miller, Ph. D. with the Cardiovascular Disease and Aging Lab. Dr. Miller says the next big step, is figuring out how to show those are safe for humans.

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Additional coverage: Siasat Daily

Context: Mayo Clinic, along with other members of the Geroscience Network, has published six manuscripts that map strategies for taking new drugs that target processes underlying aging into clinical trials. Researchers believe that these agents hold promise for treating multiple age-related diseases and disabilities. The articles appear today in The Journals of Gerontology: Series A – Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences. The Geroscience Network, formed by James Kirkland, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging; Steve Austad, Ph.D., University of Alabama at Birmingham; and Nir Barzilai, M.D., Albert Einstein College of Medicine, consists of 18 academic aging centers, along with the participation of more than 100 investigators from across the U.S. and Europe. The network is funded by the National Institutes of Health. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Megan Forliti

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Tags: ABC 15 Arizona, ActionNewsJax, aging, Alternet, alzheimers, Assurex, ASU, atheter-associated urinary tract infections, atrial fibrillation, Bioresorbable Stent, blood donation, blood shortage


Fri, Aug 12

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Buzzfeed
What You Should Know About Zika If You’re Going To The Olympics
by Anthony Rivas

So much so that athletes from around the world — mostly golfers, but also basketball players and cyclists — have given up their chance at winning gold over concerns that they might get infected. Meanwhile, lots of other spectators getting ready to fly down are probably wondering,BuzzFeed Logo “Is it really worth the risk?” …For men and women who don’t plan on having kids anytime soon, “the impact of the Zika virus on you is probably going to be very minimal,” Tosh said. In fact, about 80% of people who become infected “have absolutely no symptoms whatsoever.”

Reach: BuzzFeed receives more than 15.7 million unique visitors each month to its website and targets pop culture and social media enthusiasts.

Additional coverage:
HealthDay, Zika Won't Pose Risks at the Olympics: Health Experts
Hospitals & Health Networks, Clinical Vaccine Trials Underway; Rio Olympics See Few Mosquitoes by Matt O’Connor

Context: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued an emergency travel advisory after health officials in Florida identified local transmission of Zika virus in a Miami neighborhood. The CDC advisory recommends pregnant women and their partners avoid nonessential travel to Lynwood, a neighborhood in Miami, Florida where the Zika virus is active. Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist Dr. Pritish Tosh says, "It is somewhat unprecedented for a travel advisory to be issued to a very specific neighborhood. That's a testament to the strength of the epidemiology that has been going on, and how well the CDC and other health authorities have been working at this." More information, including a video interview with Dr. Tosh, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Bob Nellis, Deb Balzer

 

Chicago Tribune
Dirty baby: Just how clean does your child need to be?
by Bill Daley

Cleanliness may be next to godliness, or so the old rhyme scolded us, but is it healthiest — particularly for babies and children? "People are very Chicago Tribune Logoconcerned, almost preoccupied, with their child touching a surface that is not clean," said Dr. Angela C. Mattke, a pediatrician at the Mayo Clinic Children's Center in Rochester, Minn. "Early exposure to their environment full of germs, bacteria and viruses is not a bad thing." "Not everything a child touches should be sterilized," she added. "You don't have to wash their hands every time."

Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 384,000 and a weekend circulation of more than 686,000.

Context: Angela Mattke, M.D. is a pediatrician with Mayo Children's Center which is rated in all US News & World Report pediatric specialty categories and is the only children’s hospital in the five-state region to rank in all 10 specialties.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Chicago Tribune
Crawling: The next best core workout?
by Alison Bowen

Your next best exercise doesn't involve equipment, running, jumping or even standing. "Make the floor your friend," says Danielle Johnson, a physical therapist at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program in Rochester, Minn. As a working mom, Johnson is always looking for ways toChicago Tribune Logo challenge exercise norms. "We're looking for things that are a little outside of the box sometimes," she said. Crawling is one of those things. She said it's an "amazing core exercise" that also benefits the legs, shoulders, arms and chest.

Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 384,000 and a weekend circulation of more than 686,000.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life. The program is research-driven around diet, exercise and resiliency, and, when all of these are connected, they encompass the power needed to make sustainable changes. For more information, visit https://healthyliving.mayoclinic.org/.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Wall Street Journal
At the Rio Olympics, Women Athletes Bump Against a Gold Ceiling
by Kevin Helliker and Matthew Futterman

Sports scientists say there is no physiological reason for shortening courses for female athletes or, for that matter, games such as tennis, where women play the best out of three sets versus best of five for men. In WSJ Bannerfact, some research suggests women are built to go farther than men, if at a slower pace. While that remains unproven, the notion that women have inferior endurance capacities has been debunked. “That’s totally anachronistic,” says Michael Joyner, a former competitive marathoner who studies sports science at the Mayo Clinic.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Related coverage:
ABC News, Olympic Swimmer Katie Ledecky Blows Competition Out of the Water
Business Insider, Why Katie Ledecky's Olympic world record Sunday night is even more amazing than you think
Business Insider, Here's an exact breakdown of why 6'4" Michael Phelps has the perfect body for swimming
Business Insider, The internet is driving athletes to do crazy things no one knew were possible
Tech Insider, People are stronger and faster than ever before, but the reason why isn’t what you think

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist.  Dr. Joyner's research team is interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

TIME
What Is Cupping? Here’s What You Need to Know
by Alexandra Sifferlin

…There is a difference between how cupping is practiced in traditional Chinese medicine and how it is used in Western medicine, says Dr. Brent Bauer, director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program. Bauer says a traditional Chinese medicine practitioner would likely offer cupping as part of a larger integrative health check, which might include recommendations around nutrition and otherTime magazine logo health things, and not just as a one-off therapy. “It’s kind of an American phenomena, I think, to consider cupping by itself,” he says.

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:
HealthDayDoes 'Cupping' = Success for Olympic Athletes?
Live ScienceMichael Phelps' Weird Bruises: Does Cupping Therapy Really Work?
Jakarta Post, Phelps puts spotlight on cupping
CCTV-AmericaIt works for Michael Phelps, so we tried “cupping” for the first time

Context:  Brent Bauer, M,D., is director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program. As director of the program, Dr. Bauer has broad and varied research interests. Since its founding in 2001, the program has promoted a collaborative spirit that enables researchers from both within and outside Mayo Clinic to share resources, ideas and expertise regarding research in this exciting realm.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

WCCO-Radio
Mayo Clinic ranks #1 in latest US News and World Report Rankings

Interview with Dr. John Noseworthy and Dave Lee.

WCCO-AM Dave LeeReach: WCCO radio, a CBS owned and operated affiliate in Minneapolis, boasts one of the largest coverage areas in the country as it reaches into portions of North and South Dakota during the day. At night, the station’s signal typically reaches across many U.S. states and Canadian provinces.

Additional coverage:
KTAR-TV, US News & World Report grades Phoenix’s Mayo Clinic top hospital in Arizona
Arizona Daily Star, U.S. News & World Report ranks Tucson hospital third in state
Healio, Mayo Clinic ranked as top hospital for neurology and neurosurgery
WIBW-TV, New ranking proves patients are in good hands at Stormont Vail Health 

Previous coverage in August 5, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Mayo Clinic was named the best hospital in the nation in U.S. News & World Report’s annual list of top hospitals published online today. In addition, Mayo Clinic is ranked No. 1 in more specialties than any other hospital in the country. Mayo Clinic took the No. 1 spot in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. It also ranked No. 1 in the Phoenix metro area and in the Jacksonville metro area. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Twin Cities Business
Mayo’s New Blood Test Could Predict Chances Of Experiencing A Heart Attack
by Sam Schaust

Mayo Clinic launched a new type of blood test on Wednesday that is the first-of-its-kind in the U.S. With the new test, measurements are taken from blood concentrations of plasma ceramides, a class of lipids highly linked to cardiovascular disease events, such as a heart attack. It’s believed the test could even predict the chance of a cardiovascular event as much as a year before it occurs. “Through our strongTwin Cities Business Magazine Logo collaboration with Zora Biosciences, we hope our new test will improve the evaluation of individuals at risk for cardiovascular disease,” said Jeff Meeusen, co-director of Mayo’s Cardiovascular Laboratory Medicine Group.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Additional coverage:
Clinical Lab Products, Mayo Clinic Launches Blood Test to Assess Heart Attack Risk

Context: Mayo Clinic has launched a new type of blood test that will be used to predict adverse cardiovascular events in patients with progressing coronary artery disease (CAD). The test measures blood concentrations of plasma ceramides, a class of lipids that are highly linked to cardiovascular disease processes. Researchers say this test is especially useful for patients with CAD when it does not improve with treatment or for young patients with premature CAD. The new test will help clinicians identify at-risk individuals and is available to Mayo Clinic patients and health care providers worldwide through Mayo Medical Laboratories (MML). MML is the reference laboratory of Mayo Clinic, offering advanced laboratory testing and pathology services to more than 5,000 health care organizations in more than 60 countries. MML collaborated on the test with Zora Biosciences Oy, a diagnostics discovery company based in Finland that specializes in cardiovascular disease. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Gina Chiri-Osmond

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Tags: ABC News, accupuncture, Addyson Cordes, AOL News, arthritis, Astrobiology, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, Best Hospitals, blood test, brain tumor, Breast Cancer, breast microbiome


Fri, Aug 5

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Washington Post
A “breathholding time” for Alzheimer’s research as trials focus on seeking a cure
by Tara Bahrampour

Despite the paucity of new drugs, researchers say this is an exciting time in the field. “It’s a breathholding time for the field; I think the field is in so much of a need of some kind of positive indication that we are on the right track,” said Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center and the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging. “I think we can have a little more optimism about drug trials that areWashington Post newspaper logo coming down the road.”

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Previous coverage in the July 29, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

US News & World Report
U.S. News & World Report Announces the 2016–17 Best Hospitals

U.S. News & World Report today released its 27th annual Best Hospitals rankings to help patients make more informed health care decisions. U.S. News compared nearly 5,000 medical centers nationwide in 25 US News Health Care Logospecialties, procedures and conditions. This year the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, is No. 1 on the Honor Roll, which has been expanded to highlight 20 hospitals delivering exceptional treatment across multiple areas of care. The Cleveland Clinic is No. 2, followed by Massachusetts General Hospital at No. 3. U.S. News also recognized 504 Best Regional Hospitals in states and metro areas.

Reach: U.S. News & World Report is a multi-platform publisher of news and information, which includes http://www.usnews.com and http://www.rankingsandreviews.com.

Additional coverage: KTTC-TV, Wisconsin State Journal, MassLive.com, WebMD, Post-Bulletin, Healio, STATMedscapeKIMT-TV, Pioneer Press, WXOW-TV LaCrosse, Twin Cities Business, KMSP-TV, Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal, Bring Me The News, Boston magazine, KAAL-TV, Denver Post, MedCity Beat, FOX NewsKNUJ-Radio, Nephrology News, Minnesota Monthly, WCCO-AM

Context: Mayo Clinic was named the best hospital in the nation in U.S. News & World Report’s annual list of top hospitals published online today. In addition, Mayo Clinic is ranked No. 1 in more specialties than any other hospital in the country. Mayo Clinic took the No. 1 spot in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. It also ranked No. 1 in the Phoenix metro area and in the Jacksonville metro area. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Florida Times-Union
U.S. News & World Report calls Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville the best hospital in Florida
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville is ranked the top hospital in Florida In U.S. News & World Report’s annual evaluation of top hospitals, released online Tuesday. Gianrico Farrugia, who became CEO of the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville in January 2015, called the rankings “remarkably gratifying news for us,” adding that it is “great news for Jacksonville and Northeast Florida.” He said Mayo has been investing heavily inFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo “people, space and technology” as it continues to establish itself as a destination regional hospital. In March Farrugia announced that Mayo in Jacksonville would begin $100 million in major construction projects this year.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Mayo Clinic is ranked No. 1 in Florida and the Jacksonville metro area in U.S. News & World Report’sannual list of top hospitals published online today. In addition to the Florida ranking, Mayo Clinic’s Rochester, Minnesota, campus was named the best hospital in the nation onU.S. News & World Report’s Honor Roll of America’s Best Hospitals. The Rochester campus also took the No. 1 spot in Minnesota, and Mayo Clinic’s campus in Arizona was ranked No. 1 in that state and in the Phoenix metro area. “The rankings reflect the dedication of our exceptional staff in providing outstanding care and service to our patients,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., CEO, Mayo Clinic in Florida. “Mayo Clinic is a special place because of our employees, and I congratulate each of them on this honor.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic New Network.

Additional coverage: WJCT-TVSouth Florida Business Journal, First Coast News, WOKV-Radio, News Talk Florida, Jacksonville Business Journal

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Phoenix Business Journal
U.S. News & World Report unveils Best Hospitals in Arizona
by Angela Gonzales

U.S. News & World Report released its 27th annual Best Hospitals rankings in an effort to help patients make more informed health care decisions. Nationally, Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, made the top Phoenix Business Journalspot on the Honor Roll, which has been expanded to highlight 20 hospitals delivering exceptional treatment across multiple areas of care. The Cleveland Clinic is No. 2, followed by Massachusetts General Hospital at No. 3, Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore at No. 4 and UCLA Medical Center at No. 5.

Reach: The Phoenix Business Journal is published by American City Business Journals which owns more than 40 other local business newspapers.

Additional coverage: tucson.com

Context: Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix is ranked No. 1 in Arizona and the Phoenix metro area in the annual U.S. News & World Report America’s Best Hospital List released today. Since opening a clinic in Scottsdale in 1987 and hospital in Phoenix in 1998, Mayo Clinic has grown to become a vital part of Arizona and the Southwest, bringing  many medical innovations to Arizona including:

  • Proton beam therapy – part of Mayo Clinic’s National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center, this therapy is a more precise radiological cancer treatment using specialized “pencil beam” technology to eradicate hard-to-reach tumors
  • Regenerative medicine – harnessing the potential to repair diseased, injured or congenitally defective tissues and organs
  • Individualized medicine – bringing forward the latest discoveries in genomics-based tests
  • And, soon, the expansion of the Mayo Medical School to Arizona - ushering new ideas to improve quality, outcomes and cost, and to prepare future doctors to not only deliver, but to administer care

More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Mankato Free Press
Mayo a high performer in heart, hip care
by Brian Arola

Mayo Clinic Health System in Mankato was honored for its heart failure and hip replacement care in new ratings released this week. The recognition came as part of the U.S. News & World Report’s annual honor roll of best hospitals. The report measures quality based on survival rates, re-admissions and volume. The Mankato Mayo didn’t have top marks in all the categories but managed a good enough showing to earn aMankato Free Press “high performing” distinction — defined as far better than the average hospital.

Reach:  The Mankato Free Press has a daily circulation of about 20,000 and has more than 139,000 unique visitors to its website each month.

Context: Mayo Clinic Health System in Mankato was rated High Performing in heart failure and hip replacement by U.S. News & World Report’s 2016-17 Best Hospitals for Procedures & Conditions, which was published online today. These ratings focus on how well hospitals performed in nine common inpatient procedures and conditions. “Mayo Clinic has a deep commitment to delivering high-value care to the patients of our region as a trusted community partner,” says James Hebl, M.D., regional vice president of Mayo Clinic Health System Southwest Minnesota Region. “While no single set of measures can perfectly represent health care quality, this tremendous recognition is something we are very proud of and highlights our primary value: the needs of the patient come first. We owe this success to our dedicated employees who provide outstanding care and the full range of health care needs for our patients and their families.” More information can be found in Mayo Clinic Health System's press room.

Additional coverage: Mankato TimesKEYC-TV

Contact:  Micah Dorfner

 

La Crosse Tribune
Gundersen, Mayo-Franciscan get US News' hospital kudos
by Mike Tighe

La Crosse isn’t a bad place to experience heart failure, with both Gundersen Health System and Mayo Clinic Health System-Franciscan Healthcare getting atta-boys for handling faulty tickers in U.S. News and La Crosse TribuneWorld Report’s annual list of the best hospitals in the country.

Reach: La Crosse Tribune is a daily newspaper in La Crosse, WI with a daily circulation of more than 20,000. Its website receives more than 154,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: WKBT-TV

Context: Mayo Clinic Health System in La Crosse was rated High Performing in heart failure by U.S. News & World Report’s 2016-17 Best Hospitals for Procedures & Conditions, which was published online today. These ratings focus on how well hospitals performed in nine common inpatient procedures and conditions. “Mayo Clinic has a deep commitment to delivering high-value care to the patients of our region as a trusted community partner,” says Amy Noel, regional vice president of surgical specialties at Mayo Clinic Health System Franciscan Healthcare. “While no single set of measures can perfectly represent health care quality, this tremendous recognition is something we are very proud of and highlights our primary value: the needs of the patient come first. We owe this success to our dedicated employees who provide outstanding care and the full range of health care needs for our patients and their families.” More information can be found in Mayo Clinic Health System's press room.

Contact:  Rick Thiese

 

Star Tribune
Why are women losing the battle of the bulge?
by Allie Shah

The nation as a whole continues to struggle with obesity, with 35 percent of men considered obese. But while men’s obesity rates appear to have stabilized, women’s are still rising, the CDC report shows. Dr. Maria Collazo-Clavell, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic who works with overweight and obese patients, has been working in the obesity research field for 20 years. She said the recent findings give her pause aboutStar Tribune Logo whether public health officials are taking the right approach to tackling obesity. “All of that makes you question: Are you on the right track?” she said. “The data would say no.” That so many women are obese is cause for alarm not only because of the increased health risks for them but also for those around them, Collazo-Clavell said.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Maria Collazo-Clavell, M.D, is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Collaz0-Clavell's research interests include the clinical study of obesity and its complications, particularly Type 2 diabetes Mellitus. The emphasis involves the outcomes of varied weight loss interventions in improving the established medical conditions as well as discovering and better defining the potential complications of these interventions. Interventions studied include dietary modification, behavioral therapy, medical therapies, and surgeries for weight loss.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Florida Times-Union
Health Notes: MayoClinic researcher receives major award for Alzheimer's research
by Charlie Patton

Guojun Bu, a neuroscientist at Mayo Clinic’s Jacksonville campus, last week received the 2016 MetLife Foundation Major Award for Medical Research in Alzheimer’s Disease, one of the most prestigious awards Florida Times-Union newspaper logogiven annually to a top scientist in this field of study. The award was presented to Bu at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Toronto. Over the past 20 years, Bu and his medical research lab have produced more than 220 peer-reviewed articles that have been cited more than 10,000 times.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Guojun Bu, Ph.D., a neuroscientist onMayo Clinic’s Florida campus, will receive the 2016 MetLife Foundation Major Award for Medical Research in Alzheimer’s Disease ─ one of the most prestigious awards given annually to the top scientist in this field of study. The award was presented to Dr. Bu recently at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Toronto. Over the past 20 years, Dr. Bu and his medical research lab have produced more than 220 peer-reviewed articles that have been cited more than 10,000 times. Colleagues and other Alzheimer’s researchers say his team’s contributions to Alzheimer’s research rank among the most significant in the field. “We are very proud of Dr. Bu and his outstanding research team,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., CEO, Mayo Clinic in Florida. “At Mayo Clinic, we are grounded in research, so that we can continually advance the science of healing. Our world-class physicians and scientists strive every day to work toward solving the most complex and deadly health issues, such as Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

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Tags: Albert Lea Tribune, Allentown Morning Call, alzheimer's disease, Arcadia, Best Hospitals, Boston Magazine, Breast Cancer, Bring Me the News, calorie intake, CBS News, Chippewa Herald, concussions


Fri, Jul 29

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Washington Post
Complex jobs and social ties appear to help ward off Alzheimer’s, new research shows
by Tara Bahrampour

The studies support previous findings that more stimulating lifestyles are associated with better cognitive outcomes later in life, and bolster the importance of intellectual engagement, said Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging and the Mayo Alzheimer’s Research Center. “Physical activity has been reasonably well-documented, but with intellectual activity the data get pretty soft…these two studies speakWashington Post newspaper logo to that,” he said. “What it may mean is the development of Alzheimer’s Disease or cognitive change with aging need not be a passive process; you can do something about it…staying intellectually active whether it be your job or other kinds of activities may actually be beneficial.”

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: NBC News

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

CBS News
Memory loss is not necessarily the first sign of dementia
by Ruslan Guzov

Memory loss may not always be the first warning sign that dementia is brewing -- changes in behavior or personality might be an early clue…"It's important for us to recognize that not everything's forgetfulness," CBS News Logosaid Dr. Ron Petersen, the Mayo Clinic's Alzheimer's research chief. He wasn't involved in developing the behavior checklist but said it could raise awareness of the neuropsychiatric link with dementia.

Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

Additional coverage: Associated Press

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

 

Washington Post
Men may get Alzheimer’s as much as women; we just haven’t known how to spot it
by Tara Bahrampour

Looking at the State of Florida’s brain bank, researchers at the Mayo Clinic found Alzheimer’s in 1,625 of 2,809 people who had donated their brains for autopsies. The donors were almost equally divided: 51 percent men and 49 percent women. But contrary to what has been seen in the general population, the Alzheimer’s cases in the brain bank were much more evenly divided: 54 percent of cases were women and 46Washington Post newspaper logo percent were men… It is hard to diagnose the disease in people under 70, according to Melissa Murray, an assistant professor at the Mayo Clinic’s department of neuroscience, who presented the study. “If you don’t know what the disease is then you can’t give even the modicum of treatment that we have available,” Murray said, noting that symptoms in men are often mistaken for cortico-basal syndrome, frontotemporal dementia, or other conditions.

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:

CBS News, 1 in 5 Alzheimer's cases may be misdiagnosed

Florida Times-Union, Mayo clinic study finds mens Alzheimer' misdiagnosed more often than women

ABC News, HealthDay, Neurology Today, Telegraph UK, Express UK, Daily MailActionNewsJax

Context: Mayo neuroscientist Melissa E. Murray, Ph.D., led the study, which suggests a high number of men are not accurately diagnosed during their lifetime. The Alzheimer’s Association issued a news release today about the research findings, which Dr. Murray is presenting at the 2016 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Toronto. “While it is well accepted that age is the strongest risk factor for Alzheimer’s, there is an enormous need to understand interacting factors that contribute to the development of the disease,” says Dr. Murray, assistant professor of Neuroscience on Mayo’s Jacksonville campus. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Star Tribune (Associated Press)
Behavior changes offer clues that dementia could be brewing
by Lauran Neergaard

If validated, the checklist could help doctors better identify people at risk of brewing Alzheimer's and study changes over time. "It's important for us to recognize that not everything's forgetfulness," said Dr. Ron Star Tribune LogoPetersen, the Mayo Clinic's Alzheimer's research chief. He wasn't involved in developing the behavior checklist but said it could raise awareness of the neuropsychiatric link with dementia.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: Chicago Daily Herald, Post-Bulletin, Kansas City Star

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber LindquistDuska Anastasijevic

 

STAT
Promising Alzheimer’s treatment flops in new trial, crushing hopes
by Damian Garde

A closely watched treatment for Alzheimer’s disease came up short in a late-stage trial, marking the latest setback in a field wracked by years of failure. The drug, from biotech company TauRx, did no better than a sugar pill at improving patients’ scores on tests of cognitive and physical function, according to data presented early Wednesday at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Toronto. The studySTAT Logo of Boston Globe looked at roughly 900 patients with mild to moderate forms of Alzheimer’s. “I must say I’m disappointed by the results,” said Dr. David Knopman, a Mayo Clinic neurologist not involved with the study.

Reach: STAT covers the frontiers of health and medicine including science labs, hospitals, biotechnology board rooms, and political back rooms. Hosted by The Boston Globe, STAT launched on November 5, 2015. The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Additional coverage:

CNN, Does it pass the 'smell test'? Seeking ways to diagnose Alzheimer's early

Reuters, TauRx Alzheimer's drug fails in large study; some benefit seen

New York Times, USA Today, MedPage TodayFOX News, Huffington Post, NBC News

Contacts: Susan Barber LindquistDuska Anastasijevic

 

 

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic researcher wins international award
by Brett Boese

A Mayo Clinic scientist received a prestigious international award Monday at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference that's being hosted in Canada. Dr. Guojun Bu, a neuroscientist at Mayo's Florida Logo for Post-Bulletin newspapercampus, received the 2016 MetLife Foundation Major Award for Medical Research in Alzheimer's Disease, which is given annually to the top scientist in this field of study. Bu and his research lab have produced more than 220 peer-reviewed articles on Alzheimer's over the past 20 years that have been cited more than 10,000 times. That work is widely recognized as being some of the most significant in the field.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context:  Guojun Bu, Ph.D., a neuroscientist onMayo Clinic’s Florida campus, will receive the 2016 MetLife Foundation Major Award for Medical Research in Alzheimer’s Disease ─ one of the most prestigious awards given annually to the top scientist in this field of study. The award was presented to Dr. Bu today at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Toronto. Over the past 20 years, Dr. Bu and his medical research lab have produced more than 220 peer-reviewed articles that have been cited more than 10,000 times. Colleagues and other Alzheimer’s researchers say his team’s contributions to Alzheimer’s research rank among the most significant in the field. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

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Tags: "liquid biopsies", 9&10 News (Michigan), Abby Bartz, ABC News, ActionNewsJax, Adult coloring, Allie Wergin, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers, Amber Kohnhorst, Andra Palmer, Anesthesiology News


Fri, Jul 22

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

New York Times
Fecal Transplants Can Be Life-Saving, but How?
by Carl Zimmer

Now scientists are testing fecal transplants against such diseases as ulcerative colitis, and even obesity and diabetes…The bacteria in stool seem to be particularly important. Dr. Sahil Khanna of the Mayo Clinic and his colleagues isolated the spores of about 50 different species of bacteriaThe New York Times newspaper logo found in stool samples donated by healthy people. They put the spores in pills, which they gave to 30 patients with C. difficile infections. As they reported in the July 15 issue of The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 29 of the patients recovered.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: Clostridium difficile (klos-TRID-e-um dif-uh-SEEL), often called C. difficile or C. diff, is a bacterium that can cause symptoms ranging from diarrhea to life-threatening inflammation of the colon. Mayo Clinic specializes in treating people with difficult cases of C. difficile who haven't responded to standard medical treatments or who have developed complications such as an inflamed colon. The Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, opened a C. difficile clinic that specializes in treating patients with C. difficile infection.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

New York Times
Pat Summitt’s Public Fight Spurs Research Support

Perhaps the most tangible evidence of the difference Summitt made is set to come in December with the opening of the Pat Summitt Alzheimer’s The New York Times newspaper logoClinic at the University of Tennessee Medical Center. “I think it’s going to become a real icon in the Southeastern part of the States for Alzheimer’s disease care and research,” said Ronald Petersen, the director of the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota…“People raved about her willingness to do this,” Petersen said. “She maintained a sense of humor as far into the disease as she could. She likened the battle to coaching basketball, and the way the players would react to a challenge on the court is the way she was reacting to dealing with this disease.”

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Post-Bulletin
Blue Cross honors Mayo's kidney donor program
by Brett Boese

An innovative Mayo Clinic program that pairs kidney donors with needy transplant patients was recognized Tuesday by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota's new Trailblazing Tour. It was one of 11 programs honored for its creative and forward-thinking methods, according to Blue Cross. Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperThe thought process behind Mayo's new donor program is simple, but it has drawn high praise while being hailed as revolutionary. "Mayo Clinic Living Donor Program's pioneering Paired Donation Program is evolving how patients receive transplants – in turn, proving how innovative trailblazers can accelerate the pace of improving health across Minnesota," said Garrett Black, senior vice president of health services at Blue Cross. "By recognizing the Mayo Clinic Living Donor Program, we hope to start a meaningful conversation and engage communities like Rochester throughout the state to reach their full potential and work together to transform health care."

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context: The Paired Donation Program came out of the knowledge that the current system simply wasn’t working as well as it could. Mayo Clinic – ranked number one in the nation for nephrology by US News & World Report –realized that by matching up people willing to donate a kidney with those in need of a transplant, they may be able to help someone else, if not their immediate friend or family member. A kidney from a living donor leads to better outcomes for the patients, and those that have had a friend or family member go through a kidney transplant tend to be more willing to be on the list to donate if a match arises. More information can be found here.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Chicago Tribune
How to shop for sunscreen
by Alison Bowen

Spray, stick or lotion? The Mayo Clinic lays out pros and cons. A stick might be easy to apply around the eye, or a gel might help with a hairy Chicago Tribune Logochest. Lotions are easy for large applications. And if you use a spray, stay away from the wind — spraying your limbs in the wind might not result in full coverage.

Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 384,000 and a weekend circulation of more than 686,000.

Context:  Mayo Clinic experts say the best sunscreen is one that you'll use generously and according to label directions. Here's help understanding sunscreen ingredients, types of sunscreen and more.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

ActionNewsJax
Expert weighs in possible Zika virus transmitted by mosquito in Miami
by Letisha Bereola

The first possible homegrown case of Zika transmitted by mosquito is being investigated in Miami. Action News Jax went to the Mayo Clinic to find out what health officials are zeroing in on. Dr. Vandana Bhide is an internist and pediatrician at the Mayo Clinic. She says a medical team will be examining the virus closely. “What are the DNA fingerprints of this particular infection? And we want to be sure it’s a recent infection ActionNewsJaxand not a similar infection like dengue fever,” she said.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Context: Vandana Bhide, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic internist and pediatrician.

Contact: Kevin Punksy

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Tags: ABC15 Arizona, AccuWeather, ActionNewsJax, ALS News Today, alzheimer's disease, anesthesia, back surgery, Becker’s Hospital Review, blood donation, blood donors, Blue Cross, Business Standard


Fri, Jul 15

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik


Today.com
12-year-old boy finally goes home — with a new heart
by Gabrielle Frank

For three years, the Panama native had suffered from dilated cardiomyopathy, a condition that affects the heart's ability to pump blood. Gonzalez-Salas received his new heart last July, but because transplant surgeries are not done in Panama, doctors at the Mayo Clinic requestedToday Show Health & Wellness Logo he and his parents stay in Rochester, Minnesota for a year…"Speaking for our surgeons, cardiologists, nurses, and the whole care team, it has been an honor to care for Joseph and his family over the last two years," said Dr. Jonathan Johnson, Gonzalez-Salas' pediatric cardiologist.

Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show.

Previous Coverage in July 8, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Jonathan Johnson, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic pediatric cardiologist and hear transplant surgeon. Dr. Johnson's research encompasses several different areas of pediatric cardiology. Dr. Johnson's primary focus is researching clinical outcomes in pediatric patients with congenital heart disease, as well as those with cardiomyopathy or heart failure, or those who have required heart transplantation or ventricular assist device (VAD) placement. Dr. Johnson is also interested in cardiac imaging, including fetal, transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, and studies how these imaging modalities can be used to improve patient outcomes.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

Huffington Post
Mayo Clinic Putting a Spin on the Typical Pitch Competition
by Jason Grill

It’s hard to imagine that any American has not heard of the Mayo Clinic. However, if you have not, it’s a nonprofit that is heavily Huffington Post Logoinvolved in clinical practice, education and research that works with individuals who need medical care or healing. The Mayo Clinic is based in Rochester, Minnesota. Now what many, if not all Americans, don’t know is the Mayo Clinic has a Center of Innovation and a Mayo Clinic Ventures operation that is turning pitch competitions upside down with the Think Big Challenge. Talk about flying under the radar.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique viewers.

Additional coverage: Twin Cities Business

Context: The Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation and Mayo Clinic Ventures today announced the second Mayo Clinic Think Big Challenge, a national competition for innovators and entrepreneurs. This year, one business or entrepreneur will earn the opportunity to license Mayo Clinic technology, lead a team and score a $50,000 cash prize. The 2016 Mayo Clinic Think Big Challenge opens today at transformconference.mayo.edu/thinkbig. Application deadline is Aug. 15. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Live Science
Everything You Need to Know About Flexibility Exercise
by Rachael Rettner

Flexibility exercises stretch your muscles and may improve your range of motion at your joints…Dynamic stretches are intended to get your muscles used to the types of movement you'll be doing during some other part of your workout, said Dr. Edward Laskowski, co-director of the LiveScience LogoMayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center in Rochester, Minnesota. For example, if you plan to do an aerobic activity such as running, warm up with some dynamic stretches for your legs (see some examples below).

 

Live Science
The 4 Types of Exercise You Need to Be Healthy
by Rachael Rettner

When you think of exercise, you may imagine strenuous activities such as running or biking — the ones that make you breathe hard, turn flush and drip with sweat. But aerobic activity is only one type of exercise, and although it is critical for boosting fitness, there are actually three other types of exercise that are also important: strength training, balance training and flexibility training. "While aerobic exercise is very important, it's not as effective for overall health" when done alone compared with when people include all four types of exercise in their routine, said Dr. Edward Laskowski, co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center in Rochester, Minnesota. "They all kind of go together" and complement each other, Laskowski said.

 

Live Science
Aerobic Exercise: Everything You Need to Know
by Rachel Rettner

Doing aerobic exercise can also have other long-term advantages. A recent study of 1.4 million people in the United States and Europe found that LiveScience Logohigh amounts of aerobic exercise were linked with a reduced risk of 13 types of cancer… Dr. Edward Laskowski, co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center in Rochester, Minnesota, recommended that people use the mantra, "start out low, and progress slow." This means starting with a level of activity that's fairly light, and gradually increasing the duration and intensity of your exercise sessions.

 

LiveScience
Strength Exercise: Everything You Need to Know
by Rachel Rettner

Strength exercise, or resistance training, works your muscles by using resistance, like a dumbbell or your own body weight. This type of exercise increases lean muscle mass, which is particularly important for weight loss, because lean muscle burns more calories than other types of tissue. … It's very important that you have the correct form and body position when you do resistance training. "If you do some of these exercises poorly, with bad technique, you can injure yourself," said Dr. Edward Laskowski, co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center in Rochester, Minnesota. You may need to work with a professional trainer, or watch exercise videos online, to make sure you use the correct technique.

 

LiveScience
Balance Exercise: Everything You Need to Know
by Rachel Rettner

…These exercises are also important for reducing injury risk. For example, if you sprain your ankle, you could be at risk for reinjury if you don't retrain your balance, said Dr. Edward Laskowski, co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center in Rochester, Minnesota. That's LiveScience Logobecause when you sprain your ankle, the muscles around the joint stop contracting in a coordinated fashion, and this destabilizes the joint, Laskowski said. If you do balance exercises after the injury, it retrains the muscles to contract together, which better stabilizes the joint during movements and prevents reinjury, he said.

Reach: LiveScience has more than 9.7 million unique visitors to its site each month. Geared toward a general consumer audience, LiveScience addresses the intellectually curious audience hungry for ideas, events, culture and things that cross the line from being merely academic to being cool, engaging and relevant in their lives.

Context: Edward Laskowski, M.D., co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center, a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, sports performance optimization, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

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Tags: aerobic exercise, Affordable care act, Aries Merr, Associated Press, balance, balance exercise, BCIndian.com, Boston Scientific, BuzzFeed, cancer moonshoot, Center for Individualized Medicine, Center of Innovation


Fri, Jul 8

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Wall Street Journal
Can Adults Grow Taller?
By Heidi Mitchell

Nearly everyone shrinks with age. But some people insist, often after an annual visit to their doctor, that they’ve added a half-inch or so. If they aren’t children or teens, they’re probably mistaken, says Todd Milbrandt, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.,WSJ Banner who explains the significance of physes and what makes 20 a special number. “There may be a 21-year-old patient that is young, in terms of his bone age, which is why he may still be growing in college, whereas others may have stopped when they are 13 or 14,” says Dr. Milbrandt, who does research on growth plates.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Todd Milbrandt, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon who is also affiliated with Mayo Clinic's Children's Center.  Dr. Milbrandt investigates pediatric muscle, tendon and bone dysfunction. Specifically, he is interested in re-creating naturally found tissue when that tissue is damaged. By using tissue-engineering techniques, Dr. Milbrandt looks to reform cartilage in growth arrest from childhood trauma, to prevent hip collapse in Legg-Calve-Perthes disease and to eradicate bone infections.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Twin Cities Business
Signature Mayo Heart Cell Regeneration Technique Passes Key European Trial
by Don Jacobson

A signature research project of the Mayo Clinic’s Center for Regenerative Medicine – using stem cells to treat ischemic heart failure – has proven effective on enough patients in a European clinical trial to prompt its corporate backer to accelerate commercialization efforts. The results, Twin Cities Business Magazine Logoannounced last week, heralded the first time heart cell regeneration has been shown effective in a large-scale trial and could represent a major win for the Mayo center, which began work on the concept a decade ago. The product, C-Cure, is being developed by the Belgian company Celyad S.A. under an exclusive license from Mayo. Touted as a potential paradigm-shifter in treating the dire condition, the technique was co-developed by Dr. Andre Terzic, director of the Rochester clinic’s regenerative medicine center, as one of its first big projects.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Context: Andre Terzic, M.D., Ph.D.  is director of Mayo Clinic's Center for Regenerative Medicine and a Mayo cardiologist. Mayo Clinic and center leaders believe that regenerative medicine, which makes it possible to actually repair diseased, injured or congenitally defective tissues and organs, will be a vital component of medical and surgical practice in the coming years. By harnessing the potential of regenerative medicine, Mayo Clinic is poised to create new models of health care and transform medicine and surgery.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Business Insider
USA Swimming director gave an astonishing quote about how Katie Ledecky is going to dominate and change the sport

Sheinin also spoke to Michael J. Joyner, a researcher for the Mayo Clinic, who fueled the notion that we haven’t seen an athlete like Ledecky before. Joyner illustrated what Ledecky’s dominance would look like for athletes in other sports. “She’s dominating by the widest margin inBusiness Insider international sport, winning by 1 or 2 percent,” Joyner said. “If [a runner] won the 10,000 meters by that wide a margin, they’d win by 100 meters. One or 2 percent in the Tour de France, over about 80 hours of racing, would be 30 or 40 minutes. It’s just absolutely remarkable.”

Reach: Business Insider has more than 11 million unique visitors each month. The on-line publication focuses on business news. The site provides and analyzes business news and acts as an aggregator of top news stories from around the web. Its content is sometimes cited by other, larger, publications such as The New York Times and domestic news outlets like National Public Radio.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist. His laboratory is interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss. Dr. Joyner and his team study how the nervous system regulates blood pressure, heart rate and metabolism in response to these forms of stress. They are also interested in how blood flow to muscle and skin responds to these stressors. These responses are studied in young healthy subjects, healthy older subjects and people with conditions such as heart failure.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

KIMT-TV
11-year-old heart transplant patient going home after 2 years
by DeeDee Stiepan

A young patient from Panama who has been receiving treatment following a heart transplant at Mayo Clinic will finally get to go home after living KIMTin Rochester for more than two years. But before he left, Mayo Clinic staff threw him and his family a surprise going away party on Thursday. “He’s done so much better than we could have ever imagined,” explains Jonathan Johnson, M.D., Joseph’s heart transplant surgeon. “He’s really done great and he keeps up with other kids his age and does everything we could have ever hoped — we’re really, really pleased.”

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Context: Jonathan Johnson, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic pediatric cardiologist and hear transplant surgeon. Dr. Johnson's research encompasses several different areas of pediatric cardiology. Dr. Johnson's primary focus is researching clinical outcomes in pediatric patients with congenital heart disease, as well as those with cardiomyopathy or heart failure, or those who have required heart transplantation or ventricular assist device (VAD) placement. Dr. Johnson is also interested in cardiac imaging, including fetal, transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, and studies how these imaging modalities can be used to improve patient outcomes.

Contact: Kelly Reller

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Tags: 24/7 Wall St., age-related shrinking, air ambulance, Aries Merritt, Arizona Republic, Aromatherapy, ASU Now, Becker’s Hospital Review, Billings Gazette, birth control, brain waves, brain-wave patterns


Fri, Jul 1

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

NBC News
Google Partners With Harvard, Mayo Clinic for Symptom Search Feature

Google is rolling out a new health feature called symptom search, which is designed to pinpoint a potential problem when you search symptoms — from your mobile device.nbcnews.com

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: KAAL-TV

Previous coverage in June 24, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: When people seek information on health-related symptoms, many turn to the internet, and Google in particular, as the first stop. Now, when consumers access Google’s mobile search for information about certain symptoms, they will get facts on relevant related medical conditions up front on their smartphone or other mobile device. For example, a symptom search — even one using common language free of medical terminology like “my tummy hurts” or “nose blocked” — will show a list of related conditions. For individual symptoms like “headache,” searchers will see overview information as well as have the ability to view self-treatment options and suggestions of when to seek help from a healthcare professional.  To ensure quality and accuracy, teams of doctors, including expert clinicians at Mayo Clinic, have written or reviewed individual symptom information and evaluated related conditions. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

WCCO-TV
Doctors At Mayo Clinic Using Viruses To Fight Cancer

Doctors at Mayo Clinic are using deadly viruses to fight a deadly disease. Just last month, the Food and Drug Administration gave breakthrough status to a cancer therapy that uses the polio virus to combat brain WCCO-TV 4tumors. “We do have one of the oldest programs, not just in this country, but in the world,” Dr. Eva Galanis said. Galanis leads the Mayo’s virus therapy program, which started in 1994. It uses a number of viruses to attack cancer cells.

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

Additional coverage: MSN.com

Context: Evanthia "Eva" Galanis, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic is an orthopedic oncologist with Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. Dr. Galanis has a long-standing interest in developing novel therapeutic approaches for cancer treatment. The focus of her laboratory is to develop and optimize novel virotherapy approaches with special emphasis on paramyxoviruses. A number of different strategies are tested, including use of therapeutic transgenes; trackable markers; combinations with small molecules, cytotoxic agents and radiation therapy; re-targeting of viral strains against tumor-specific antigens; development of novel viral delivery approaches; and exploration of immunomodulatory methods to modify humoral and innate immunity as a means of optimizing virotherapy efficacy.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Florida Times-Union
'Giving my kidney a send-off:' Jacksonville woman starts a kidney donation chain stretching to 9 people
by Matt Soergel

Jennifer Tamol was plenty nervous the evening before she went to the hospital to donate one of her kidneys to a complete stranger, someone in Minnesota who was awaiting his or her chance for a new, better life…She decided four years ago to donate a kidney, and reached out to Mayo Clinic. She took a week’s worth of vacation then to go through a battery of tests, and was tested periodically after that. There were a couple of Florida Times-Union newspaper logofalse alarms where she thought there was a suitable recipient, though something went awry each time.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Martin Mai, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic nephrologist and also chair of the division of transplant medicine at Mayo Clinic in Florida.  Mayo Clinic's kidney transplant doctors and surgeons use proven innovations to successfully treat people with kidney failure and complications of diabetes and other diseases. Their experience in using minimally invasive surgery, new medicines to prevent organ rejection and specialized procedures makes Mayo Clinic a leader in transplant outcomes. Mayo Clinic surgeons perform more than 600 kidney transplants a year, including for people with very challenging kidney conditions who need special solutions and surgeries. And Mayo Clinic kidney transplant teams in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota are leaders in living-donor kidney transplants. People who receive a kidney from a living donor usually have fewer complications than those who receive a kidney from a deceased donor.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

TIME
Electronic health records and digital clerical work are strongly linked to burnout
by Mandy Oaklander

Of all professionals in the U.S., doctors experience some of the highest rates of burnout: the feeling of being so emotionally exhausted from work that you start to feel indifferent about those you’re serving. Time magazine logoResearchers at the Mayo Clinic looked at several months of 2014 survey data from 6,560 U.S. physicians measuring features of work life, including burnout and electronic use. Even after controlling for factors like age, sex, specialty and the number of hours doctors work per week, the researchers found a strong link between burnout and time spent doing digital work.

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:
ReutersBecker’s Orthopedic & Spine, HealthLeaders Media, KAAL-TV, KIMT-TVKTTC-TV, HealthDay, Health Data Management, Deccan Chronicle, Science Daily, Headlines & Global NewsFOX News, Tech Times, Doctors Lounge

Context: The growth and evolution of the electronic environment in health care is taking a toll on U.S. physicians. That’s according to a national study of physicians led by Mayo Clinic which shows the use of electronic health records and computerized physician order entry leads to lower physician satisfaction and higher rates of professional burnout. The findings appear in Mayo Clinic Proceedings“Electronic health records hold great promise for enhancing coordination of care and improving quality of care,” says Tait Shanafelt, M.D., Mayo Clinic physician and lead author of the study. “In their current form and implementation, however, they have had a number of unintended negative consequences including reducing efficiency, increasing clerical burden and increasing the risk of burnout for physicians.” In collaboration with investigators from the American Medical Association (AMA), researchers from Mayo Clinic assembled a national sample of U.S. physicians using the AMA Physician Masterfile, a near complete record of alMl U.S. physicians. The survey included validated instruments to assess burnout, as well as items developed specifically for the study to evaluate the electronic practice environment of the participating physicians. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Wall Street Journal
How Telemedicine Is Transforming Health Care
by Melinda Beck

At the Mayo Clinic, doctors who treat out-of-state patients can follow up with them via phone, email or web chats when they return home, but they can only discuss the conditions they treated in person. “If the patient wants to talk about a new problem, the doctor has to be licensed in that state to discuss it. If not, the patient should talk to his primary-care physician about it,” says Steve Ommen, a cardiologist whoWSJ Banner runs Mayo’s Connected Care program.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Steve Ommen, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist and is also medical director of Connected Care. Telehealth is simply using digital information and communication technologies, such as computers and mobile devices, to manage your health and well-being. Telehealth, also called e-health or m-health (mobile health), includes a variety of health care services, including but not limited to:

  • Online support groups
  • Online health information and self-management tools
  • Email and online communication with health care providers
  • Electronic health records
  • Remote monitoring of vital signs, such as blood pressure, or symptoms
  • Video or online doctor visits

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Huffington Post
This Is What A Poop Transplant Actually Looks Like
by Anna Almendrala

The procedure might sound disgusting and messy, but as the video clip from VICE shows, the procedure typically takes place in an extremely well-controlled and sterile hospital environment, and takes less than 10 minutes to complete. In the clip, doctors from the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota inject a mix of healthy poop and saline into a patient suffering from C-diff, and you won’t feel like gagging even once.Huffington Post Logo

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique visitors.

Context: Stephanie Bennett chronicle's her story in an In the Loop feature and her physician Sahil Khanna, M.B.B.S., a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist, discusses fecal transplant treatment of C. difficile at Mayo.

Contact: Joe Dangor

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Fri, Jun 24

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Golf Channel
Struggle is real: Is there a cure for the yips?NBC Golf Logo

Dr. Charles Adler, Neurologist at the Mayo Clinic, explains what is behind the yips.

Reach: Golf Channel is a 24-hour cable television network available throughout the United States, Canada and Asia via cable, satellite and wireless television providers and is available in more than 200 million homes in 84 countries and 11 languages around the world.

Additional coverage:
KMTV-CBS Omaha; WGVU-NPR, KGUN-ABC 

Context: Charles Adler, M.D., Ph.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist. More information about his medical research can be found here.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

KFDX-TV
Health Cast: Proton Therapy for Cancer

Radiation treatment for cancer has become as precise as the tip of a pencil. With pencil beam proton therapy, doctors can pinpoint tumors more KFDX logoaccurately than ever before, while greatly reducing the number of treatments and the risk of damaging healthy cells. Interview with Dr. Sameer Keole, Director of Proton Therapy Center, Mayo Clinic, at link.

Reach: KFDX-TV is an NBC affiliate for the Wichita Falls, TX-Lawton, OK market.

Related coverage:
US News & World Report, The Promise (and Limits) of Pediatric Proton Radiation

Context:  Mayo Clinic introduced its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota in 2015 and in Arizona in 2016. Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients — especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures — proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

USA Today
Headache? Google to offer better symptom search results
by Jessica Guynn

Google is rolling out the new feature over the next few days in English in the U.S. to make it easier to get a more accurate list of health conditions that could be causing your symptoms. GoogleUSA Today newspaper logo created the list of symptoms by researching health conditions mentioned in Web results and then checking those conditions against information collected from doctors. A team of doctors reviewed the symptom information and experts at Harvard Medical School and Mayo Clinic evaluated related conditions for a representative sample of searches, said product manager Veronica Pinchin.

Reach: USA TODAY  has an average daily circulation of 4.1 million which includes print, various digital editions and other papers that use their branded content.

Additional coverage: Wall Street Journal, CNET, Telegraph UK, Shape magazine, eWeek, Daily Mail, PC WorldCBS News, Washington PostConsumer Affairs, WTOP, Healthcare IT News, Twin Cities Business, ABC News, NBC News, Huffington Post, Forbes, iTech Post

Context: When people seek information on health-related symptoms, many turn to the internet, and Google in particular, as the first stop. Now, when consumers access Google’s mobile search for information about certain symptoms, they will get facts on relevant related medical conditions up front on their smartphone or other mobile device. For example, a symptom search — even one using common language free of medical terminology like “my tummy hurts” or “nose blocked” — will show a list of related conditions. For individual symptoms like “headache,” searchers will see overview information as well as have the ability to view self-treatment options and suggestions of when to seek help from a healthcare professional.  To ensure quality and accuracy, teams of doctors, including expert clinicians at Mayo Clinic, have written or reviewed individual symptom information and evaluated related conditions. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

HealthDay
Parkinson's rates rising among American men

In the new study, a team led by the Mayo Clinic's Dr. Walter Rocca tracked long-term data on people living in Olmsted County, Minn. The Health Day Logoresearch showed that rates of Parkinson's disease nearly doubled for men between 1996 and 2005, and the increase was steepest for men aged 70 and older. Rates of a related condition called "parkinsonism" among men also rose sharply between 1996 and 2005.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: KTTC-TV, CBS News, Tech Times

Context: The incidence of Parkinson’s disease and parkinsonism increased significantly in 30 years from 1976 to 2005, Mayo Clinic researchers reported today in a study in JAMA Neurology. This trend was noted in particular for men age 70 and older. According to the researchers, this is the first study to suggest such an increasing trend. The study shows that men of all ages had a 17 percent higher risk of developing parkinsonism and 24 percent higher risk of developing Parkinson’s disease for every 10 calendar years. The study also showed that men 70 and older had an even greater increase — a 24 percent higher risk of developing parkinsonism and 35 percent higher risk of developing Parkinson’s disease for every 10 calendar years. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo's Thomas Gonwa receives Lifetime Achievement Award
by Charlie Patton

The American Society of Transplantation awarded its highest honor, the Lifetime Achievement Award, to Thomas Gonwa at the recent American Transplant Congress in Boston. The Lifetime Achievement Award honors a senior investigator whose work has advanced the field of Florida Times-Union newspaper logotransplantation. Gonwa helped bring the Baylor University Medical Center renal and liver transplant programs to prominence in the 1990s.  He then moved to the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville in 2001 where he has built the solid organ transplant program. He has also guided the Mayo system toward recognizing the need for a focus on regenerative medicine as the field advances.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Previous coverage in June 17, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Thomas Gonwa, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic nephrologist at Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida. His primary research interestshave been in the development of new immunosuppressive drug regimens in solid organ transplantation.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

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Fri, Jun 17

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Huffington Post
8 Reasons You Can’t Get Rid Of Your Belly Fat
by Emily Haak

A lot of medications have weight gain as a potential side effect, but corticosteroids like prednisone (used to treat arthritis, multiple sclerosis and more) and cortisone (used for arthritis, ulcerative colitis, among other conditions) lead to pounds in your stomach, specifically, says Michael
Huffington Post LogoJensen, MD, an endocrinologist and obesity expert at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. They’re often used to treat asthma too.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique visitors.

Context:  Michael Jensen, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Jensen and his lab study the effects of obesity and how body fat (adipose tissue) and body fat distribution influence health. The regulated uptake, storage and release of fatty acids from adipose tissue play a major role in determining its health effects.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

MPR
Mayo Clinic touts planned bio-research campus

The next big phase of Rochester's transformation is getting underway. A few years ago, Mayo Clinic initiated a 20-year plan called the MPR News logoDestination Medical Center... Wednesday, Mayo is starting the process of finding a developer to start building one of those districts. It's called Discovery Square. It will be a big bio-research campus that will more than double the footprint Mayo currently has in Rochester. Tom Weber talked with Dr. John Noseworthy, President and CEO of Mayo Clinic.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Additional coverage:
KTTC-TV, Mayo's Discovery Square to bring big changes to downtown
Twin Cities Business magazine, Mayo’s ‘Transformational Centers’ Could Be First Beneficiaries Of DMC Build-Out
Sioux Falls Argus LeaderWest Central Tribune, NuJournal

Previous Discovery Square coverage in June 10, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Contact: Karl Oestreich

 

Forbes
Why Aren't Women Told About New, Better Way To Detect Breast Cancer? A Real Scandal
by Steve Forbes

Mammograms aren’t very good at discovering early-stage cancers in women who have dense breast tissue, which accounts for about 45% of all women. But there is a major advance whose efficacy has been confirmed in a study conducted by the Mayo Clinic . It’s called molecular breastForbes magazine logo imaging (MBI), and it vastly improves the chances of early detection.

Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Deborah Rhodes, M.D., is a physician with Mayo Clinic's Breast Diagnostic Clinic. Dr. Rhodes studies the application of a new breast imaging device, molecular breast imaging, to breast cancer screening. The long-term goal of Dr. Rhodes' research is to develop an individualized approach to breast cancer screening that incorporates breast density, age, and other factors that impact breast cancer risk and mammography sensitivity. Dr. Rhodes recently spoke at Forbes Women's Summit 2016.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
Mayo Clinic transplantation leader wins top honor
by Alexa Epitropoulos

A pioneer in transplantation at the Mayo Clinic has been awarded one of the top honors in his field. The American Society of Transplantation Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logogave its Lifetime Achievement Award to Dr. Thomas Gonwa, who has been working at Mayo's Jacksonville campus since 2001. Gonwa has, during his time at Mayo, worked to advance its organ transplant program, particularly liver transplantation, where he has done significant research on transplant patients who suffer from chronic kidney disease. He has had a particular focus on promoting regenerative medicine.

Reach:  The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals

Context: Thomas Gonwa, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic nephrologist at Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida. His primary research interests have been in the development of new immunosuppressive drug regimens in solid organ transplantation.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

ABC15 Arizona
Mayo Clinic discusses cholesterol and the importance of your numbers

Reza Arsanjani, M.D., Mayo Clinic Cardiologist, joined the hosts of Sonoran Living Live to discuss cholesterol and how important it is to know your cholesterol numbers.ABC affiliate, channel 15 in Arizona

Reach:  KNXV-TV, ABC 15, is the ABC television station affiliate in Phoenix, Arizona.

Additional coverage on ABC15 Arizona:

ABC15 Arizona, Want to be heart healthy? Go to sleep!

Context: Reza Arsanjani, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Mayo Clinic's top-ranked team of cardiologists diagnoses and treats many heart conditions, including many rare and complex disorders. Mayo Clinic's Division of Cardiovascular Diseases is one of the largest and most integrated in the United States, with locations in Arizona, Florida, Minnesota and several communities throughout Mayo Clinic Health System. Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota include more than 200 cardiologists and 1,100 allied health staff trained in caring for heart patients.

Contact:  Jim McVeigh

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Fri, Jun 10

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Pioneer Press
John Noseworthy: Telemedicine will increase access to care, reduce costs

As the American Telemedicine Association convened in Minneapolis last month for its annual conference, it was inSt. Paul Pioneer Pressteresting to recall that a little more than 20 years ago, another ATA conference was held in Minnesota. It was in Rochester and featured a Mayo Clinic-trained physician and astronaut conducting the first telemedicine conference from space. Since that time, telemedicine – the remote delivery of health care through a secure video or computer link – has experienced profound progress, increasing access to care while also lowering the cost of care.

Reach: The St. Paul Pioneer Press has a daily circulation of more than 194,000 Its TwinCities.com website receives moire than 1.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contacts: Duska Anastasijevic, Karl Oestreich

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic wins a key building block for medicine's future

About a week ago, the federally funded NIH announced a five-year, $142 million grant to Mayo Clinic to establish the “world’s largest research-Star Tribune newspaper logocohort biobank for the Precision Medicine Initiative Cohort Program.” This difficult-to-understand appellation likely limited celebration in the state over this welcome news. But here’s a helpful translation from Mayo’s Dr. Stephen Thibodeau, who will oversee the biobank: This, he said during an interview, is a “big deal.’’

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Previous coverage in June 3, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Mayo Clinic will be awarded $142 million in funding over five years by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to serve as the national Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) Cohort Program biobank. The biobank will hold a research repository of biologic samples, known as biospecimens, for this longitudinal program that aims to enroll 1 million or more U.S. participants to better understand individual differences that contribute to health and disease to advance precision medicine. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Colette Gallagher

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic unveils plans for expanded research space
by Matt McKinney

The Mayo Clinic will add 2 million square feet of research space in downtown Rochester in less than 20 years, a key piece of its Destination Medical Center (DMC) plan. The plan, announced Tuesday by the clinic, will create an urban bioresearch campus to drive the quest for new curesStar Tribune newspaper logo as private researchers collaborate with Mayo doctors on the frontiers of medicine, said Mayo CEO John Noseworthy.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: Post-Bulletin, KIMT-TV, Washington Times, KTTC-TV, BloombergFinance & Commerce, Capitol ReportDuluth News Tribune, Austin Herald, KIMT-TV, Pioneer Press, Bemidji Pioneer, NH Voice, MPR, KAAL-TVBoston Globe

Context: Mayo Clinic announced the next major step in realizing Destination Medical Center’s (DMC) vision of creating Discovery Square, a first-of-its-kind urban bioresearch campus that brings together renowned physicians, researchers, scientists and entrepreneurs to address unmet patient needs in an ultramodern setting for science innovation. Mayo Clinic is initiating a process to identify a strategic real estate development firm to expand its Rochester, Minnesota, campus by building more than 2 million square feet on Mayo Clinic-owned land as research, commercial and product development space over the next 20 years. This is in addition to Mayo’s current research footprint in Rochester of 1.3 million square feet. Discovery Square, which will include Mayo and other private businesses, is a key milestone for DMC, the largest public-private partnership in Minnesota state history, and one of the largest economic development initiatives in the U.S. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Karl Oestreich


SELF magazine
10 Signs Of Skin Cancer You Shouldn’t Ignore
by Amy Marturana

Along with outdoor happy hours and weekends at the beach, summertime calls for an important reminder of skin cancer risk. Since you’re Self Magazine Logoprobably spending more time in the sun wearing less clothes, it’s important to take note of any new or different growths on your skin. “Most skin cancers really are not symptomatic,” Aleksandar Sekulic, M.D., principal for Stand Up To Cancer’s Melanoma Research Alliance Dream Team and Mayo Clinic dermatologist, tells SELF. That means a cancerous spot won’t hurt, or even itch most of the time. “Occasionally people will say a red and scaly spot has become more red and tender, but most true cancers are asymptomatic.”

Reach:  Self magazine has a monthly circulation of more than 1.4 million readers and is geared toward active, educated women who are interested in health, fitness, career issues and relationship balance.

Context: Aleksandar Sekulic, M.D., Ph.D. is a Mayo Clinic dermatologist. Dr. Sekulic is also affiliated with Mayo Clinic Cancer Center.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

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Fri, Jun 3

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

NBC News
Too Fat to Fight: Is the Obesity Crisis a National Security Risk?
by Andrea King Collier

For more than 20 years, Poland has also served as an unpaid consultant to the Defense Health Board, a federal advisory committee to the Secretary of Defense that provides recommendations on health policy, research and requirements for the treatment and prevention of diseasenbcnews.com and injury. According to Poland, "In fact, obesity and overweight is the No. 1 cause of ineligibility in the armed services," he says. "By the year 2020, only two out of every 10 recruits will be able to meet the weight-fitness qualifications to serve."

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Context: Gregory Poland, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious disease expert. Dr. Poland and his team within the Vaccine Research Group aim to improve the health of individuals across the world by pursuing challenges posed by infectious diseases and bioterrorism through clinical, laboratory and epidemiologic vaccine research.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

New York Times
You Know You Should Use Sunscreen. But Are You Using It Right?
by Daniel Victor

Depending on your body size, experts recommend using enough lotion to fill a shot glass, or an ounce, when you’re at the beach. Even if people The New York Times newspaper logoare smart enough to apply sunscreen, they may not use enough, said Dr. Jerry Brewer, a dermatologic surgeon at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. Even if the bottle says the lotion is waterproof, beachgoers should reapply after swimming.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: Jerry Brewer, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic dermatologist.  The Department of Dermatology at Mayo Clinic Rochester offers a full range of dermatologic care for both common and rare problems of skin, hair, nails and mucous membranes. Dr. Brewer's studies skin cancer in the setting of lymphoma. His studies have included all the common forms of skin cancer and their behavior in patients with either chronic lymphocytic leukemia or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic tests self-help prenatal care as a solution
by Jeremy Olson

A new Mayo Clinic program cuts the number of prenatal visits for women with uncomplicated pregnancies from around 12 to eight, and trains them to monitor their blood pressure and babies’ heartbeats. Doctors discouraged the use of take-home fetal monitoring kits when they first hitStar Tribune newspaper logo the market, because they worried that user error would cause expecting mothers to panic if they couldn’t find their babies’ heartbeats. But now the monitors are key to a Mayo Clinic effort to streamline prenatal care.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context:  “OB Nest”: Just the name may bring warm feelings to parents and prospective parents. However, at Mayo Clinic, it’s much more than a name. It’s a new way that Mayo Clinic is providing prenatal care. And, families say they are thrilled with the process. Current prenatal care for a pregnancy consists of 12-14 visits with an obstetrician. However, often these visits are just brief check-ins to make sure a pregnancy is progressing well. Previous research has looked at ways to give providers more time for high-risk patients, and save time and office visits for women with low-risk pregnancies. While these studies have shown that less visits are safe, patients reported less satisfaction overall. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Elizabeth Zimmerman Young

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville part of a national biobank of genetic samples for the Precision Medicine Initiative
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Clinic has been chosen by the National Institutes of Health to receive $142 million in funding over the next five years to establish a Florida Times-Union newspaper logonational genetic biobank as part of the Precision Medicine Initiative Cohort program…While the largest part of the biobank will be located at Mayo’s campus in Rochester, Minn., about 20 to 25 percent of the genetic samples collected will be housed in Jacksonville. Because each donor to the biobank provides multiple genetic samples, there will be 8 to 10 million samples stored in Jacksonville. The genetic samples will be available to researchers nationwide.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage: Modern Healthcare, Healthcare Dive, Politico

Context: Mayo Clinic will be awarded $142 million in funding over five years by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to serve as the national Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) Cohort Program biobank. The biobank will hold a research repository of biologic samples, known as biospecimens, for this longitudinal program that aims to enroll 1 million or more U.S. participants to better understand individual differences that contribute to health and disease to advance precision medicine. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Colette Gallagher, Kevin Punsky

 

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Fri, May 27

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Wall Street Journal
Shoulder Surgery Is the New Testing Ground for Painkiller Alternatives
by Laura Landro

Some of the techniques to control pain have been around in some form for years. But their use in combination, known as multimodal management, is gaining popularity amid mounting concern about an epidemic of opioid addiction. A July 2015 study in Mayo Clinic ProceedingsWSJ Banner found one in four people who were prescribed a narcotic painkiller for the first time progressed to long-term prescriptions, putting them at risk for dependence and dangerous side effects.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Opioid painkiller addiction and accidental overdoses have become far too common across the United States. To try to identify who is most at risk, Mayo Clinic researchers studied how many patients prescribed an opioid painkiller for the first time progressed to long-term prescriptions. The answer: 1 in 4. People with histories of tobacco use and substance abuse were likeliest to use opioid painkillers long-term. More information about the Mayo Clinic Proceedings study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

NBC News
At-Home Test Could Help in Colon Cancer Battle

Millions of Americans who have avoided colonoscopies in the past can now get a home test to screen for colon cancer, the second leading cause of nbcnews.comcancer-related deaths in the U.S.

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Context: An endoscopist’s knowledge of a positive Cologuard test improves colonoscopy performance, according to a poster presentation at last week’s Digestive Disease Week conference. Cologuard is an at-home, stool-DNA colorectal cancer screening test that has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. This test, available by prescription only, is reimbursed by Medicare and covered by an increasing number of commercial health care plans. Researchers from Mayo Clinic compared results of colonoscopies following a positive result from Cologuard (unblinded) with colonoscopies performed by those who were not aware of the Cologuard result (blinded).  Unblinded endoscopists found polyps or hemorrhagic lesions 83 percent of the time and precancerous polyps in 70 percent of patients, compared to 68 and 53 percent of blinded endoscopists, respectively. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

CBS News
What is altitude sickness and why is it so dangerous?
by Mary Brophy Marcus

Altitude sickness is actually a constellation of different conditions that occur when the body doesn't have enough time to adapt to the lower air pressure and lower oxygen level at high altitudes, explains Dr. Clayton Cowl, chair of the division of preventive, occupational and aerospaceCBS News Logo medicine at the Mayo Clinic. "The body doesn't like things to be out of kilter," Cowl, who's also a pulmonologist, told CBS News.

Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

Context:  Clayton Cowl, M.D. heads Mayo Clinic's preventive, occupational and aerospace medicine. The division consists of 22 physicians who have specialty training in internal medicine or family practice and a team of trained occupational health nurses. Several of our physicians are board-certified in preventive, occupational and/or aerospace medicine. Mayo Clinic's integrated group practice model makes consultation with any other medical specialists readily available.

Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

News4Jax
This Week In Jacksonville: Mayo Clinic

Interview with Dr. Gianrico Farrugia.

News Jax 4 LogoReach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville. This Week in Jacksonville is a weekly public affairs program on WJXT.

Context: Gianrico Farrugia, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vice president and CEO of Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
The big problems with obesity
by Jill Daly

There’s been a steep increase in the prevalence of obesity in the United States since 2011, according to Ursula Bauer, director of the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, speaking before journalists in a National Press Foundation program earlier thisPittsburgh Post-Gazette Logo year. Treating people who are obese for pneumonia and the flu has been challenging, according to vaccine researcher Gregory Poland of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who also spoke at the journalists program this year. He said people who are obese often develop low-grade chronic inflammation, so their immune system cannot respond well to antibiotics and vaccines. Normal immune responses are interfered with, on a cellular level.

Reach: The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette has a daily circulation of more than 140,00 readers. It's website has more than 1 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Gregory Poland, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious disease expert. Dr. Poland and his team within the Vaccine Research Group aim to improve the health of individuals across the world by pursuing challenges posed by infectious diseases and bioterrorism through clinical, laboratory and epidemiologic vaccine research.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

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Tags: AccuWeather, advisory board, aging, AJMC.com, altitude sickness, Amber Kohnhorst, Angie Puffer, Baxalta, Beacon Health System, Becker's Hospital News, Becker’s Hospital Review, Biostage Inc.


Fri, May 20

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Forbes
How Women Are Leading The Charge In Changing Healthcare
by Sarah Hedgecock

“We’re transforming from a passive patient to an empowered patient,” MedImmune head Bahija Jallal said by way of introduction. And in the new world of patient empowerment, that could mean anything from finding your own doctor to taking on decades of standard healthcareForbes Pharma and Healthcare logo practice. Deborah Rhodes, an associate medical professor at Mayo Clinic, is undertaking the latter. She is disturbed by the fact that mammograms are not an effective way to find tumors in dense breasts, despite the fact that about half of all women have dense breasts. “Trying to find a tumor in a dense breast on a mammogram is like looking through a periscope trying to find enemy ships in dense water,” she said. “The problem is you don’t know how many enemy ships you’re failing to see until you use a better tool to spot them.”

Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Deborah Rhodes, M.D., is a physician with Mayo Clinic's Breast Diagnostic Clinic. Dr. Rhodes studies the application of a new breast imaging device, molecular breast imaging, to breast cancer screening. The long-term goal of Dr. Rhodes' research is to develop an individualized approach to breast cancer screening that incorporates breast density, age, and other factors that impact breast cancer risk and mammography sensitivity. Dr. Rhodes recently spoke at Forbes Women's Summit 2016.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

NBC News
White House Goes With Its Gut, Backs New Microbiome Project
by Maggie Fox

Anyone who watched "The Martian" learned that crops cannot grow without partner organisms in the soil. Now the White House wants to NBCNewsComencourage research into the microbiome: the microbes living in and on animals, the dirt, oceans and the atmosphere...The Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine says it will open a $1.4 million Microbiome Clinic offering whole-genome sequencing, checking patients to see if their bodies harbor antibiotic-resistant "superbugs, and offering fecal transplants — the experimental new way of cleaning out killer Clostridium infections with transplants of "healthy" poop from donors.

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:

STAT, Obama administration to launch microbiome initiative, heeding scientists’ calls
KAAL-TV, Mayo Clinic Creating New "Microbiome Clinic"
KTTC-TVFederal government to back microbiome research

Context: The Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine joined the National Microbiome Initiative sponsored by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). More than 100 institutions committed to advance microbiome research in areas such as health care, food safety and security, environmental protection, and bioenergy production. In support of the National Microbiome Initiative Mayo Clinic is committed to establishing a Microbiome Clinic, offering clinical services, diagnostics and patient education. “The new clinic will focus on improving the care of the individual patient through knowledge of the human microbiome,” says Purna Kashyap, M.B.B.S. , consultant in gastroenterology, associate director of the Mayo Clinic Microbiome Program. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Colette Gallagher

 

Chicago Tribune
Looking beyond the obvious superfoods
by Bill Daley

Dr. Donald Hensrud, medical director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program in Rochester, Minn., said people should Chicago Tribune Logotry to focus on "patterns of eating" rather than specific foods themselves. To focus on the blueberry — as one of his patients did, going so far as to ask how many to eat each day — means excluding the benefits of other berries out there. Variety means obtaining different nutrients, as each food has its own nutritional profile, Hensrud says.

Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of nearly 385,000 and its website has more than 13.5 million unique visitors each month.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life. Donald Hensrud, M.D. is the program’s medical director.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Prevention magazine
"I Got Lung Cancer Even Though I Never Smoked"
by Hallie Levine

Linda Wortman was perfectly healthy, athletic, and enjoying her work as a flight attendant when she found out she had lung cancer….The next Prevention logofew weeks were agony. So when I got a call from the Mayo Clinic asking if I wanted to join a research study on meditation and paced breathing, I agreed. I would have done anything at that point to feel better. Dr. Amit Sood sent me a DVD with instructions to do 15 minutes of breathing exercises in the morning and another 15 at night, but I ended up doing them for hours at a time. Meditating calmed my mind and body; I really feel like it saved me.

Reach:  Prevention magazine has a monthly circulation of more than 1.5 million readers and covers practical health information and ideas on healthy living. Its website has nearly 1.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Amit Sood, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in General Internal Medicine and the Cancer Center. Dr. Sood is editor of the  Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness and The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

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Tags: ABC15 Arizona, aging, air purifiers, alzheimers, Arkansas Online, Attn:, B12, birth control, bladder cancer, carotid-artery stenosis, Center for Individualized Medicine, chest pain


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