Fri, Dec 2

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

NBC News
Study: 1 in 6 Breast Cancer Patients Have Symptoms Other Than Lumps

A new study of more than 2,300 women in England showed 1 IN 6 patients have symptoms other than lumps — some symptoms far more subtle than others. Interview with Dr. Deborah Rhodes.NBC News Logo

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Context: Deborah Rhodes, M.D., is a physician with Mayo Clinic's Breast Diagnostic Clinic. Dr. Rhodes studies the application of a new breast imaging device, molecular breast imaging, to breast cancer screening. The long-term goal of Dr. Rhodes' research is to develop an individualized approach to breast cancer screening that incorporates breast density, age, and other factors that impact breast cancer risk and mammography sensitivity.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

KARE11
Mayo chef shares healthier holiday recipes
by Pat Evans

Chef Jen Welpert, Executive Wellness Chef for Mayo Clinic’s Healthy Living Program joined us on KARE11 News@4 to serve up some recipes. She showed some ways to use less fat, sugar and other rich ingredients KARE-11 Logomaking dishes lighter and healthier.

Reach: KARE-TV is the NBC affiliate serving the Minneapolis-Saint Paul market.

Related coverage of Mayo Clinic's Healthly Living Program:

WGN Radio, Healthy Thanksgiving Leftovers  Executive Wellness Chef at The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program Jen Welper talks about the healthy things you can make with Thanksgiving leftovers.

KAAL, Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program: Nutrition

KAAL, Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program: Fitness 

KAAL, Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program: Elements of Movement 

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Arizona Horizon (PBS)
Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University Alliance for Health Care

Arizona State University and Mayo Clinic are joining forces to improve health care delivery, increase research and open up a Mayo Clinic School of Medicine in Arizona. ASU president Michael Crow and Dr. Wyatt Decker, Mayo Clinic Chief Executive Officer, Arizona, will discuss the Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University Alliance for Health Care.

Reach: Eight, Arizona PBS is a PBS station that has focused on educating children, reporting in-depth on public affairs, fostering lifelong learning and celebrating arts and culture. Its signal reaches 86 percent ofArizona PBS the homes in Arizona. With more than 1 million viewers weekly, Eight consistently ranks among the most-viewed public television stations per capita in the country. Eight is a member-supported service of Arizona State University.

Previous coverage in October 28, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context:  Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University have announced the launch of a comprehensive new model for health care education and research: the Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University Alliance for Health Care. The goal of the alliance is to innovate health care delivery to improve patient care, accelerate cutting-edge research discoveries, and transform medical education. The alliance further links two of the Phoenix area’s most recognizable institutions. ASU recently was named the nation’s No. 1 “most innovative” university by U.S. News & World Report.Mayo Clinic earned the No. 1 top ranking nationally on 2016 U.S. News & World Report's Honor Roll of America's Best Hospitals, as well as the No. 1 spots for top hospitals in Arizona and Phoenix, Minnesota and Florida. The formalized alliance provides cohesion to a collection of joint projects, which have evolved over the past decade and sets the stage for many more. This expansion promises growing impact and scale. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic New Network and on Mayo Medical School's website.

Contact:  Jim McVeigh

 

News4Jax
Doctors warn of extremely contagious virus this holiday season
by Francesca Amiker

Many doctors have been seeing patients with an extremely contagious virus this holiday season, causing appointments to book up at after-hours clinics across Jacksonville. The virus, which can include symptoms News Jax 4 Logosimilar to the stomach flu, usually lasts two to three days, but doctors said it's lasting much longer than that this year. Vandana Bhide at Mayo Clinic said the outbreak has already spread to many of her patients. She said it's a virus that can be one of two types. "It's usually the norovirus or rotavirus," Bhide said. "Both of them can cause watery diarrhea and it can be in adults and kids."

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville. This Week in Jacksonville is a weekly public affairs program on WJXT.

Context: Vandana Bhide, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic internist and pediatrician.

Contact: Kevin Punksy

 

WCCO
Mayo Clinic Nurse Recounts 100-Foot Fall

Six months after surviving a huge fall down an Arizona canyon, a Rochester woman is heading back to work, reports Jennifer Mayerle.

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

CBS Minnesota

Context: Amber Kohnhorst loves animals and adventure. The trip she'd planned to Best Friends Animal Sanctuary in Utah promised both. She'd spend time volunteering at the shelter and do some hiking in nearby Cane Beds, Arizona. But what sounded like a perfect vacation quickly became a nightmare when the 25-year-old Mayo Clinic nurse fell 100 feet down a cliff during what was supposed to be a short hike. You can read more about Amber's story on Mayo Clinic In the Loop.

Contact:  Ginger Plumbo

 

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Tags: 3D printing, active shooter situation, adenomyosis, Alzforum, alzheimers, Amy Davis, Arizona Horizon (PBS), ayo Family Clinic in Kasson, Breast Cancer, Business Insider, Business Standard, calcium


Wed, Nov 23

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

STAT
Mayo leaders: A nine-fold path to preventing burnout

We’ve talked about burnout before, and it seems like lots of hospitals have ideas to combat it. Well, Mayo Clinic has some more ideas – nine of them, to be precise. In the issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings released today, Dr. Tait Shanafelt, director of Mayo’s Program on Physician Well-STAT Logo of Boston Globebeing, and Dr. John Noseworthy, Mayo’s CEO, say administrators can’t force doctors to fight this battle on their own. “Burnout is a system issue, and addressing it is the shared responsibility of both the individuals and health care organizations,” Shanafelt writes.

Reach: STAT covers the frontiers of health and medicine including science labs, hospitals, biotechnology board rooms, and political back rooms. Hosted by The Boston Globe, STAT launched on November 5, 2015. The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Additional coverage: News-Medical.net, Cardiovascular Business, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, FierceHealthcare

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic have been documenting the rise and costs of physician burnout for more than a decade. Now, they are proposing nine strategies that health care organizations can use to reverse the trend and limit the risk to patients and their medical staff. Tait Shanafelt, M.D., director of Mayo Clinic’s Program on Physician Well-being, and John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic, offer the nine-point plan in the current issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings“Research has shown that more than half of U.S. physicians are experiencing symptoms of burnout, and the rate is increasing,” says Dr. Shanafelt, first author of the article. “Unfortunately, many organizations see burnout as a personal problem to be addressed by the individual physician. It is clear, however, that burnout is a system issue, and addressing it is the shared responsibility of both the individuals and health care organizations.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Washington Post
A non-pill treatment for many chronic illnesses: Exercise

Exercise isn’t good only for building muscle and losing weight. “If a pill could give you all benefits of exercise, it would be the best pill around,” Washington Post newspaper logosays Edward Laskowski, co-director of Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine and a specialist in physical medicine and rehabilitation. Yet doctors underprescribe exercise, even though research shows that it can deliver comparable benefits to drugs and surgery with fewer side effects, according to a recent review in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. Here’s how to safely get the disease-fighting benefits of exercise…

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Edward Laskowski, M.D., co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center, a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, sports performance optimization, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Huffington Post
Why You Might Be Losing Your Sense of Taste As You Age
by Bill Ward

Our mouths perceive just five elements — sweet, sour, bitter, salt and umami (glutamate). They also can tell if there’s fat in food, said Dr. Erin O’Brien, a rhinologist in the Mayo Clinic’s Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Rochester, Minn. “As you chew food, the flavor is released andHuffington Post Logo you smell it through the back of the nose,” O’Brien said. “If you’re eating strawberry ice cream, your tongue will tell you it’s sweet, but it won’t know the flavor. The nose tells you it’s strawberry. That’s the difference between taste and flavor.”

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique viewers.

Context: Erin O'Brien, M.D, is a Mayo Clinic otorhinolaryngology (ENT). The Department of Otorhinolaryngology (ear, nose and throat or ENT) at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota provides a full range of medical and surgical services for pediatric and adult patients with head and neck disorders and diseases.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

FirstCoastNews
A day in the life of a cancer survivor; Judi Zitiello
by Keitha Nelson-Williams

Eighty-five percent of people diagnosed with pancreatic cancer will die with-in six months. Judi Zitiello was diagnosed in 2014, and she's still First Coast News Logoliving to this day. But every three months, as she goes to the Mayo Clinic for a CT scan, life stands still for the mother of four and grandmother of seven with one on the way…FCN sat down with Dr. Pashtoon Kasi, M.D. Assistant Professor, GI Oncology at the Mayo Clinic to discuss the lethal cancer and why there are so few survivors. "The tumor itself it's a pretty unforgiving disease," said Kasi. "Unlike some of the other tumors this causes a lot of dense fibrous tissue around it. So a lot of the drugs are not able to get to it."

Reach: First Coast News refers to two television stations in Jacksonville, Florida. WJXX, the ABC affiliate and WTLV, the NBC affiliate.

Context: Pashtoon Kasi, M.B.B.S. is a Mayo Clinic oncologist and hematologist. An avid runner, Judi Zitiello, 66, was forced into a six-week hiatus when she developed a meniscus tear in early 2014. The retired financial executive was always active – exercising, hosting dinner parties, and volunteering to run the JT Townsend Foundation, a Jacksonville, Florida, philanthropic organization. Judi wasn’t too concerned about the downtime at first. She knew her body would take time to heal. But the pain lingered. Then Judi began losing weight and her energy waned. "I didn't have the energy to get off the couch. I didn’t feel well. I was just not myself," Judi recalls. Still, she thought it must be related to her knee injury. But when she began experiencing severe itching on her arms and torso, and her stool turned a clay color, Judi knew it was time to see someone other than the physical therapist. Little did she realize she would be starting a fight against pancreatic cancer. You can read more about Judi's story on Sharing Mayo Clinic and Mayo Clinic in the Loop.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

Arizona Republic
Ask a Doc: Making surgery safer for high-risk bleeders

Question: What research is underway to help those at high risk for bleeding during medical procedures? Answer: As Arizona Republic newspaper logoa vascular interventional radiologist at Mayo Clinic, I treat patients with a wide range of vascular diseases and disorders. When I’m not performing procedures, I’m in the lab researching ways to improve current therapies, making the experience even safer and more effective for our patients, especially those who are at high risk for bleeding… — Dr. Rahmi Oklu

Reach: The Arizona Republic has daily circulation of more than 180,000 and its website azcentral.com has more than 2.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic, Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are developing a biomaterial that has potential to protect patients at high risk for bleeding in surgery. The Nov. 16 cover article, “An Injectable Shear-Thinning Biomaterial for Endovascular Embolization,” in the journal Science Translational Medicine reports on a universal shear-thinning biomaterial that may provide an alternative for treating vascular bleeding. The study’s lead co-author Rahmi Oklu, M.D., Ph.D., a vascular interventional radiologist at Mayo Clinic’s Arizona campus, explains shear-thinning biomaterial offers many advantages over metallic coils, the current gold standard. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

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Tags: ABC15 Arizona, acupuncture, Affordable care act, aging, alcohol, Alzforum, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers, Aneurysm, Arizona Republic, Becker’s Hospital Review, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine


Fri, Nov 18

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Washington Post
The one thing missing from the debate over Obamacare, according to a top doctor
by Carolyn Y. Johnson

President-elect Donald Trump’s promise to repeal the Affordable Care Act while preserving some key elements has triggered rampant speculation about the future of American health care — and plunged millions of patients who benefit from the law into deep uncertainty aboutWashington Post newspaper logo the future of their coverage. Little is known about the replacement plan that will ultimately emerge. But one voice angling to shape future policy is the leader of the Mayo Clinic, neurologist John Noseworthy. “Patients are getting frustrated and fearful and anxious that they can’t have access to the care that’s best suited for them,” Noseworthy said. “How can you have a great country if our citizens can’t get access to world class health care? It’s actually not a bad time to reassess.”

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Albuquerque Journal, The Journal

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Forbes
Are Naproxen and Ibuprofen Sometimes Risky? A Controversial Study Of Celebrex Raises Concerns
by Matthew Herper

A study released today may mean that the painkiller celecoxib, once sold under the brand name Celebrex, is safer than prescription doses of Forbes Pharma and Healthcare logoibuprofen or naproxen. That is if the study, which is already controversial, means anything at all. … “It’s fascinating that Celebrex is not worse, and may have a small trend to being better,” says Rekha Mankad, director of the cardio-rheumatology clinic at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester. “I as a cardiologist I would prefer that nobody take any of these drugs on a long-term basis ever.” Still she says, it’s better for patients to get non-steroidal drugs like these than opioids, which are often the next option.

Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: CBS News

Context: Rekha Mankad, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Mankad's interests include gender disparities that exist in regards to heart disease, the relationship between autoimmune diseases and coronary artery disease and gender differences in valvular heart disease.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

CNN
Crawling has some fitness experts going gaga
by Jacqueline Howard

On any given morning, as the sun peeks over the horizon, Danielle Johnson can be found crawling down the hallways of her Rochester, CNN LogoMinnesota, home. It may sound bizarre, but Johnson crawls every day to strengthen her core muscle groups. "You can crawl in many ways. You can crawl on your hands and knees. You can also prop up on your toes and just hover, one or two inches above the ground, which is really going to pull in those core muscles and work those muscles effectively," said Johnson, a physical therapist at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program.

Reach: Cable News Network (CNN) is a worldwide news and information network providing live, continuous coverage of news from around the globe, 24 hours a day. CNN online received more than 55 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Huffington Post
A Culture of Legacy
by Marcia McMullen

The recent passing of a cultural icon in health care revealed a rare glimpse into how a successful 150-year-old brand built on a clear mission and Huffington Post Logoexacting processes which ultimately became its culture. Dr. William J. Mayo’s clarity of mission, “The needs of the patient come first.” set into a motion a defining statement that would withstand not only time, but also cultural shifts and leadership changes. One of those change leaders, Sr. Generose Gervais, OSF, administrator and executive director emeritus, Saint Marys Campus-Mayo Clinic Hospital, recently passed away at the age of 97.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique visitors.

Previous coverage in the October 21, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Sister Generose Gervais, long-time administrator of Saint Marys Hospital and president of the Poverello Foundation, passed away peacefully recently in the hospital she served for many years. She was 97. Sister Generose will be remembered for her tireless work on behalf of patients and the staff of Saint Marys Hospital. Her hospital ministry focused on perpetuating the Franciscan legacy, specifically nurturing the values of respect, integrity, compassion, healing, teamwork, innovation, excellence and stewardship among all Mayo Clinic staff. “Sister Generose was known for her faith, her quiet leadership, her wise counsel, her dedication to patients and staff, her sense of humor and the example of service that she lived every day,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic. “Mayo Clinic was blessed by her presence for more than 60 years.” More information about Sister Generose can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network and Mayo Clinic in the Loop.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

New York Times
Q&A: A look at the cancer some believe linked to Vietnam War

…Bile duct cancer is unusual because it can be prevented in some cases. Pills can wipe out liver flukes early on, but the medicine is not effective in later stages after the worms have died and scarring has occurred. Surgery is possible in some cases, but the survivalThe New York Times newspaper logo rate is only about 30 percent for five years, said Dr. Gregory Gores, a gastroenterologist and executive dean of research at Mayo Clinic. Affected countries, such as Vietnam and Laos, have not conducted extensive research to determine the extent of the problem. The world’s highest rate of cholangiocarcinoma — about 84 new cases per 100,000 people — is found in northeastern Thailand where many people eat a popular raw fish dish.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Additional coverage: WTOP Washington, Star Tribune, Associated Press

Context: Gregory Gores, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist.  Dr. Gores research is focused on mechanisms of liver cell death, especially apoptosis. He employs disease-relevant models to unravel the fundamental cellular processes contributing to liver injury during cholestasis and fatty liver diseases. In addition, Dr. Gores' lab is also interested in the mechanisms by which cancer cells escape from cell death in order to undergo malignant transformation and metastases.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

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Tags: ABC News, Affordable care act, aging, Albuquerque Journal, AliveCor, alzheimer's disease, Angela Lunde, Arizona Daily Sun, Associated Press, Attn:, AZ Big Media, Baltimore Sun


Fri, Nov 11

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

WRVO Public Radio NY
The whole story on whole grains

The current diet trends to eat low-carb or go gluten-free have resulted in many people giving up a food group long believed to be part oWRVO NY NPRf a healthy diet — whole grains. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Donald Hensrud, medical director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program and editor of the bestseller, The Mayo Clinic Diet. Hensrud discusses the benefits of eating whole grains. More of this interview can be heard on "Take Care," WRVO's health and wellness show Saturday at 6:30 a.m. and Sunday at 6:30 p.m.

Reach: WRVO-FM is a non-commercial station owned by State University of New York and an affiliate member station of NPR.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life. Donald Hensrud, M.D. is the program’s medical director.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

KJZZ
Mayo Clinic Opening Medical School Campus In Valley
by Naomi Gingold

The Mayo Clinic medical school is opening a satellite campus here in the Valley. They are having their official ribbon-cutting ceremony this week KJZZ NPR -AZ Logoand reviewing applications for their first class of students. Dr. Michele Halyard is a radiation oncologist at Mayo and has become the dean of the medical school here. KJZZ asked her about the new school and its progress.

Reach: KJZZ-FM is a commercial station owned by Maricopa Community Colleges in Tempe, AZ. The format of the station is news and jazz. KJZZ-FM's target audience is news and jazz music listeners, ages 18 to 64, in the Tempe, AZ area.

Context: Mayo Clinic School of Medicine has a four-year campus in Minnesota and a four-year campus opening in Arizona in 2017. Mayo Clinic School of Medicine students acquire experiences across a spectrum of patient populations in multiple practice settings. Michele Halyard, M.D., a Mayo Clinic radiation oncologist, is dean of the medical school.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

NY Times
After a Suicide Attempt, the Risk of Another Try
by Jane Brody

My family is no stranger to suicide and suicide attempts, and we are not alone. To recount just two instances:The New York Times newspaper logo A 20-year-old nephew, after receiving a very caring letter from his sister-in-law explaining why she could not be his lover, went to his room, shot himself in the head and died … Now a new study reveals just how lethal suicide attempts, as a risk factor for completed suicide, are. The study, led by Dr. J. Michael Bostwick, a psychiatrist at the Mayo Clinic, tracked all first suicide attempts in one county in Minnesota that occurred between January 1986 and December 2007 and recorded all the deaths by suicide for up to 25 years thereafter. Eighty-one of the 1,490 people who attempted suicide, or 5.4 percent, died by suicide, 48 of them in their first attempt. The findings were reported in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: While a prior history of suicide attempt is one of the strongest predictors of completed suicide, a Mayo Clinic study finds it is more lethal than previously known. Researchers find that suicide risk was nearly 60 percent higher than previously reported when based on a population-based cohort focusing on individuals making first lifetime attempts and including those whose first attempts were fatal. This risk was dramatically higher for attempts using firearms. The population sample was identified through the Rochester Epidemiology Project. “We hoped to address the shortcomings of earlier studies by including two groups previously overlooked by other studies,” says J. Michael Bostwick, M.D., a psychiatrist on Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus and the lead author of the study published in the American Journal of Psychiatry. “Our study enrolled individuals whose first-ever suicide attempt presented to medical attention. Not only did we include those who survived this initial attempt, but we also included those who died on their first attempt rather than ending up in the emergency room. These are large groups that have been routinely ignored in calculation of risk.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

WCCO
‘Cancer Avatars’ Giving Hope To Patients
by Rachel Slavik

What if doctors could know the exact therapy needed to treat ovarian cancer? — It could save precious time and also help patients avoid the side CBS Minnesotaeffects of ineffective chemotherapy drugs. Researchers at Mayo Clinic in Rochester are testing that theory on reoccurring ovarian cancer…Dr. John Weroha, a clinical oncologist at the Mayo Clinic, is the lead researcher on a clinical trial for recurring ovarian cancer treatment. “The clinical trial we’re running is an attempt to help patients once they develop a platinum-resistant reoccurring cancer,” Dr. Weroha said.

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

Context: Saravut "John" Weroha, M.D., Ph.D. is a Mayo Clinic medical oncologist. Oncologists provide care for people with cancer. Mayo Clinic oncologists collaborate with experts in all other departments to provide coordinated and integrated, multidisciplinary care to people with cancer. Mayo Clinic oncologists actively contribute to care and research in the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, designated by the National Cancer Institute as a comprehensive cancer center.

Contact: Joe Dangor

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Tags: 3D imaging, Albany Herald, AliveCor, ALZ Forum, anti-aging, athlete’s heart, Augustine Record, BBC Mundo, biodegradable polymer bone grafts, Botox, brain scans, Breast Cancer


Fri, Nov 4

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik


Advisory Board
Mayo Clinic got 'five stars'—but its CEO still doesn't like how CMS rates hospitals

CMS' five-star rating system for overall hospital quality—and similar systems that purport to measure health care quality—are too reductionist and need to be changed, Mayo Clinic CEO John Noseworthy argues in a Modern Healthcare op-ed. You might think, given that CMS awardedAdvisory Board Mayo Clinic five stars, that Noseworthy would praise the ratings system. But Noseworthy argues that "many measurement programs currently in use ... do not differentiate complexity of patient conditions nor account for their settings of care, which results in inaccurate reports on value."

Reach: The Advisory Board Company is a global research, technology, and consulting firm partnering with more than 165,000 leaders in more than 4,100 organizations across health care and higher education.

Previous coverage in October 28, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Hospitals & Health Networks
Experts Take on the Big Picture of Value-Based Payment
by Brian Frankie

Value-based payment is coming to health care. And its complications are something we have to understand. That was the message of panelists Hospitals and Health NetworksWednesday during a session at the H&HN Executive Forum in Chicago on value-based payment and purchasing and what can make it successful…Much of the discussion, led by moderator Robert Nesse, M.D., senior medical adviser for payment reform to the Mayo Clinic Board of Governors and former Mayo Clinic Health System CEO, focused on leveraging data to track value.

Reach: Hospitals & Health Networks is a monthly magazine with a circulation of more than 77,000 that reports on and analyzes the social, political and economic forces that shape healthcare delivery. Its website has more than 21, 000 unique visitors each month. The publication targets health care executives and clinical leaders in hospitals and health systems.

Context: Robert Nesse, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic Health System family medicine physician in Lake City, Minn. and he also serves as senior medical director, Payment Reform at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Nesse is also former CEO of Mayo Clinic Health System, a network of clinics and hospitals serving more than 70 communities in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

TIME
You Asked: Should I Go Gluten Free?
by Markham Heid

Gluten is a type of elastic grain protein that helps wheat, rye and barley hold their shape. Because of its glue-like properties, gluten is often added to other food products—pasta, sauces, crackers, baked goods—to thicken or bind those products together. “These kinds of junk foods and refinedTime magazine logo carbohydrates promote weight gain and diabetes and disease,” says Dr. Joseph Murray, a professor of medicine and a gluten researcher at Mayo Clinic. So if you’re eating a lot of cookies, crackers and other grain-based snack foods, any diet that limits your intakes of them is bound to do your health some good. “But for those who don’t suffer from celiac disease, gluten isn’t inherently bad, and gluten-free foods aren’t inherently healthy,” he says.

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Joseph Murray, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist and hepatologist with the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. Dr. Murray's research interests focus in two distinct areas: celiac disease or gluten sensitivity and enteropathy; and esophageal disorders, particularly esophageal functional disorders, particularly reflux, and the detection of atypical reflux.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Florida Times-Union
Health Notes: Mayo Cancer Center at St. Vincent’s now open
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Cancer Center at St. Vincent’s has opened. The collaboration between Mayo Clinic’s Jacksonville campus and St. Vincent’s HealthCare Florida Times-Union newspaper logobrings Mayo Clinic’s cancer services to patients in a newly built 11,500-square-foot medical suite on the St. Vincent’s Medical Center Riverside campus. Mayo Clinic is staffing the facility with physicians from its Department of Hematology/Oncology. St. Vincent’s is assuming the remaining clinical and administrative responsibilities. The cancer services include medical oncology, an infusion center for chemotherapy, and multidisciplinary disease specialized care for various types of cancer. An official blessing and dedication ceremony will be held Monday.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Previous coverage in October 21, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: To deliver Mayo Clinic’s nationally ranked comprehensive cancer care to more people in Northeast Florida, the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center located at St. Vincent’s Riverside will open to patients on Oct. 17. The collaboration between Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus and St. Vincent’s HealthCare, a part ofAscension, the nation’s largest Catholic and non-profit health system, brings Mayo Clinic’s cancer services to patients in a newly built 11,500-square-foot medical suite on the campus of St. Vincent’s Riverside. “We are excited to launch this community collaboration and we look forward to further meeting the needs of cancer patients, right here in their own community,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., CEO, Mayo Clinic in Florida.  “This community collaboration will enable patients to receive cancer care at Mayo Clinic Cancer Center at St. Vincent’s and come to Mayo’s San Pablo Road campus when they need highly complex care, such as bone marrow transplants.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

Wall Street Journal
Boy’s Cardiac Death Led to Misuse of Genetic Test, Study Says
by Ron Winslow

A 13-year-old boy’s sudden cardiac death led doctors to wrongly diagnose more than 20 of his relatives with a potentially lethal heart disorder in a case that illustrates the potential for genetic testing to go wrong… The search for a genetic cause of the teenager’s death was done with “goodWSJ Banner intentions,” said Michael Ackerman, a cardiologist and director of the Windland Smith Rice Sudden Death Genomics Laboratory at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. But “the entire clinical evaluation was a train wreck, where wrong conclusions led to wrong turns and resulted in wrong therapies.”

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: The sudden death of a 13-year-old boy resulted in more than 20 relatives to be incorrectly diagnosed as having a potentially lethal heart rhythm condition. This erroneous diagnosis occurred as a result of inappropriate use of genetic testing and incorrect interpretation of genetic test results, according to Mayo Clinic research published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. This case highlights the potential danger of genetic testing when it is used incorrectly and the great need to not only use this powerful tool carefully and wisely but to scrutinize the results with great caution, says senior author Michael J. Ackerman, M.D., Ph.D., genetic cardiologist and director of Mayo Clinic’s Windland Smith Rice Sudden Death Genomics Laboratory. “While the technological advances in genetic sequencing have been exponential, our ability to interpret the results has not kept pace,” he says. More information cane be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Additional coverage: STAT, CNN, Immortal NewsKIMT, Raw Story, Science Daily, Cardiovascular Business, Healthcare Business News, GenomeWeb, FOX News, Motherboard, News4JaxBecker’s Health IT & CIO Review, The Scientist

Contact: Traci Klein

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Fri, Oct 28

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Modern Healthcare
Commentary: Why Mayo Clinic wants to rethink how hospital quality is graded
by Dr. John Noseworthy

You may have seen the news: Mayo Clinic was one of a small number of hospitals in the country awarded a five-star rating by the CMS on its Hospital Compare website when the ratings were released in July. Mayo was also named the top hospital in the country by U.S. News and World Report in its annual Best Hospitals Honor Roll. What may be surprising, in light of these accolades, is our concern about the wayModern Healthcare value is being measured.

Reach: Modern Healthcare is the industry's leading source of healthcare business and policy news, research and information. The magazine covers health care policy, Medicare/Medicaid, and health care from a business perspective. Modern Healthcare magazine is ranked No. 1 in readership among healthcare executives and deemed a "must-read" by the who's who in healthcare. Modern Healthcare has more than 72,0000 paid magazine subscribers and its website receives more than 568,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

KSTP
Targeted Therapy Means Lung Cancer Doesn’t Have to be a Death Sentence
by Kevin Doran

…Katherine Bensen has a charmed life. A wonderful marriage and four beautiful kids. But it all changed December 31, 2014. "And I was diagnosed with Adenocarcinoma of the lungs, which is stage 4, and a KSTP-5 Twin Citiesnonsmoking lung cancer."…Initially, Katherine was told her only option was chemo, and she had 6 to 12 months to live. But, then she discovered she was a candidate for targeted therapy, which she received at Mayo Clinic.

Reach: KSTP-TV is the ABC affiliate in Minneapolis that broadcasts on channel 5. KSTP-TV Online has more than 503,000 unique visitors each month. It is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., and is the only locally-owned and operated broadcasting company in the Twin Cities. KSTP-TV first broadcast in April 1948, and was the first television station to serve the upper Midwest.

Context: Julian Molina,M.D., Ph.D, is an oncologist with the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. Dr. Molina's research focuses on drug development/phase I clinical trials, lung cancer, and head and neck malignancies including thyroid cancer.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

MPR
Photos: A walk through Mayo Clinic's healing art
by Catharine Richert

Auguste Rodin, Andy Warhol and Alexander Calder never trained a doctor, performed surgery or cured a disease. But their timeless art, on display around Mayo Clinic, still offers a kind of medicine. "The arts do have a healing aspect. They improve the quality of experience for patients," Dr. Paul Scanlon, a specialist in pulmonary and critical care medicine, said as he walked a reporter and photographer recently aroundMPR News logo some of Mayo's most notable pieces.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Art is an important part of the Mayo Clinic healing environment. Mayo's history is also vital to the foundation of the clinic and an integral part of the patient-focused care model. Tour guides and greeters in these areas serve by sharing their love of history and art to enhance patients' care experience at Mayo Clinic. Mayo Clinic Center for Humanities in Medicine supports the primary value of Mayo Clinic, the needs of the patient come first, by integrating the arts and expressions of human culture into the healing environment. Paul Scanlon, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic specialist in pulmonary and critical care medicine. Dr. Scanlon also chairs Mayo's Humanities in Medicine Committee, which provides leadership for integrating the arts, history and ethics in the medical environment to support the Mayo Clinic ideal that the needs of the patient come first. The Center`s programs and research in the humanities serve patients, families, caregivers and the larger community, promoting the compassionate delivery of healthcare.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Arizona Republic
Our View: Mayo Clinic and ASU are rethinking the best doctor you've ever had

"Innovative" is one of those words that gets overused. But it fits when Arizona State University and the Mayo Clinic describe their new team effort. This partnership not only offers Arizona an innovative way to run Arizona Republic newspaper logoa medical school, it brings prestige to the Valley and the state. Most importantly, it focuses on preparing doctors for changes -- known and unknown -- that will affect their patients in the future.

Reach: The Arizona Republic has daily circulation of more than 180,000 and its website azcentral.com has more than 2.6 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:

Phoenix Business Journal, ASU, Mayo to build $200M innovation center in Phoenix

Arizona Republic, Mayo, ASU join forces on new medical school

Arizona Republic, Mayo, ASU team up on Scottsdale med school

Modern Healthcare, ASU, Mayo Clinic recruit students for new med school, training program

Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, 5 things to know about ASU, the Mayo Clinic partnership to transform healthcare education KJZZ

ABC15 Arizona, News-medical.net, KTAR-Radio, TriValley Central, Arizona Daily Star, FierceHealthcareKJZZ

Context:  Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University have announced the launch of a comprehensive new model for health care education and research: the Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University Alliance for Health Care. The goal of the alliance is to innovate health care delivery to improve patient care, accelerate cutting-edge research discoveries, and transform medical education. The alliance further links two of the Phoenix area’s most recognizable institutions. ASU recently was named the nation’s No. 1 “most innovative” university by U.S. News & World Report.Mayo Clinic earned the No. 1 top ranking nationally on 2016 U.S. News & World Report's Honor Roll of America's Best Hospitals, as well as the No. 1 spots for top hospitals in Arizona and Phoenix, Minnesota and Florida. The formalized alliance provides cohesion to a collection of joint projects, which have evolved over the past decade and sets the stage for many more. This expansion promises growing impact and scale. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic New Network and on Mayo Medical School's website.

Contact:  Jim McVeigh

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Fri, Oct 21

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Forbes
Mind Over Money: How To Balance Mental Well-being With Busy Careers From Mayo Clinic's Dr. Sood
by Jennifer Wang

… “The good people are very good at feeling bad about themselves,” Dr. Amit Sood advises on a panel at FORBES’ Under 30 Summit. “If you’re feeling bad, it means you’re a good person, it means that you’re sensitive and you care.” Sood, who founded the Mayo Clinic Resilience Program and chairs its Mind Body Initiative, says the keys to maintaining a positive state of mind are looking at things from a biggerForbes magazine logo perspective, finding meaning in what you’re doing, and focus on the journey instead of obsessing over outcomes.

Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Amit Sood, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in General Internal Medicine and the Cancer Center. Dr. Sood is editor of the  Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness and The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living. Dr. Sood was a panel member at the Forbes 30 Under 30 Summit recently in Boston where his panel addressed 6,000 participants on “How to win in the markets without losing their minds.”

Contact: Traci Klein

 

MPR
How significant is the latest Alzheimer's research
by Cathy Wurzer

A new insight into how a natural enzyme affects memory-loss in mice is getting a lot of attention for what it might mean for humans with Alzheimer's disease. World-renowned Alzheimer's researcher Karen Ashe at MPR News logothe University of Minnesota recently published her findings in the journal Nature Medicine. She found she was able to reverse memory loss in mice by lowering an enzyme called caspase-2. She'll be partnering with researchers at the Mayo Clinic to work on advancing this discovery. Morning Edition host Cathy Wurzer spoke with Ron Petersen, the director of the Mayo's Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, for more on the subject.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

KTTC
Mayo Clinic researchers develop way to detect prostate cancer recurrence sooner
by Chris Yu

For the first time, Mayo Clinic researchers mapped patterns of prostate cancer recurrence using the latest imaging technology, allowing doctors to detect recurrence sooner… According to urological surgeon Dr. Jeffrey Karnes, conventional bone and CT scans cannot identify sites of recurrence when the PSA level is lower than 10 … "Potentially find it sooner,  intervene sooner, and hopefully, that translates into betterKTTC TV logo outcomes for our patients," said Dr. Karnes.

Reach: KTTC is an NBC affiliate that serves the Rochester, Minn. area including the towns of Austin, Mason City, Albert Lea and Winona. Its website receives more than 73,300 unique visitors each month.

Context: R. Jeffrey Karnes, M.D. is a Mayo clinic urologist. Dr. Karnes research interests include: prostate cancer outcomes following radical prostatectomy, staging and surgery for advanced prostate cancer (special interest), prostate cancer biomarker discovery and implementation, bladder cancer urine markers, prostate and bladder cancer clinical trials and active surveillance in prostate cancer.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
Vincent's patients now have access to Mayo Clinic's cancer care
by Alexa Epitropoulos

The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center – a collaboration between St. Vincent's and Mayo – is now open to patients at St. Vincent's Riverside campus. The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, which is housed in a 11,500-square-Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logofoot medical suite on the same grounds as St. Vincent's, will offer cancer services to patients visiting the hospital starting on Oct. 17.

Reach:  The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals

Additional coverage: News4Jax broadcast, News4Jax, WJCT

Context: To deliver Mayo Clinic’s nationally ranked comprehensive cancer care to more people in Northeast Florida, the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center located at St. Vincent’s Riverside will open to patients on Oct. 17. The collaboration between Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus and St. Vincent’s HealthCare, a part ofAscension, the nation’s largest Catholic and non-profit health system, brings Mayo Clinic’s cancer services to patients in a newly built 11,500-square-foot medical suite on the campus of St. Vincent’s Riverside. “We are excited to launch this community collaboration and we look forward to further meeting the needs of cancer patients, right here in their own community,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., CEO, Mayo Clinic in Florida.  “This community collaboration will enable patients to receive cancer care at Mayo Clinic Cancer Center at St. Vincent’s and come to Mayo’s San Pablo Road campus when they need highly complex care, such as bone marrow transplants.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

KAAL
Remembering a Treasure: Rochester Honors the Life and Legacy of Sister Generose
by Ben Henry

Rochester spent Tuesday remembering and honoring one of Mayo Clinic’s strongest pillars of success, Sister Generose Gervais. Sister Generose died October 8 peacefully in the hospital she served for many years. She was 97-years-old. "It's been her life of service for me that has touched so many by the thousands day after day and night after night,” said former Mayo Clinic president and CEO Dr. Robert Waller. “She caredKAAL 6 News Rochester Logo
for patients and their families in ways beyond what medicine was able to provide.” … "Mayo Clinic has been richly blessed by this strong woman of faith. We are grateful for her selfless presence and her steady guidance. We know that her spirt lives on in the work that we do every day to serve patients," said current Mayo Clinic President and CEO Dr. John Noseworthy.

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Additional coverage:

KTTC, Plummer Building doors close for 10th time in 88 years to honor Sister Generose
KTTC, Community writes tributes to Sister Generose in memory books
Post-Bulletin, Mayo to close Plummer doors for Sister Generose
KTTC,  'Every day is a gift from God': Wisdom of Sister Generose shared during moving memorial
KTIV Sioux City'Every day is a gift from God': Wisdom of Sister Generose shared during moving memorial

Context: Sister Generose Gervais, long-time administrator of Saint Marys Hospital and president of the Poverello Foundation, passed away peacefully recently in the hospital she served for many years. She was 97. Sister Generose will be remembered for her tireless work on behalf of patients and the staff of Saint Marys Hospital. Her hospital ministry focused on perpetuating the Franciscan legacy, specifically nurturing the values of respect, integrity, compassion, healing, teamwork, innovation, excellence and stewardship among all Mayo Clinic staff. “Sister Generose was known for her faith, her quiet leadership, her wise counsel, her dedication to patients and staff, her sense of humor and the example of service that she lived every day,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic. “Mayo Clinic was blessed by her presence for more than 60 years.” More information about Sister Generose can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network and Mayo Clinic in the Loop.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

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Fri, Oct 14

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

MPR
Your genes can affect how medications work in your body

Doctors are learning about a new tool that can help them determine what the best treatment option is for each individual patient. It's called individualized medicine and it's the topic of a conference happening this week at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester. MPR's Phil Picardi spoke with Dr.MPR News logo Keith Stewart, who is the director of the Mayo Clinic's Center for Individualized Medicine.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Keith Stewart, M.B., Ch.B is a Mayo Clinic hematologist and director of Mayo's Center for Individualized Medicine.  Individualized medicine, also known as personalized medicine or precision medicine, means tailoring diagnosis and treatment to each patient to optimize care. Patients have experienced this kind of care for a century and a half at Mayo Clinic, where teams of specialists have always worked together to find answers.

Contact: Susan Buckles

 

TIME
The Case for Being Messy
by Tim Harford

Messy disruptions will be most powerful when combined with creative skill. The disruption puts an artist, scientist or engineer in unpromising Time magazine logoterritory—a deep valley rather than a familiar hilltop…We’re often told that good work comes from the ability to focus, to shut out distractions. To choose from a plethora of self-help tips along these lines, a Mayo Clinic psychologist, Dr Amit Sood, advises us to focus more effectively by turning off the TV, logging out of email and taking up “attention training” to “train your brain.”

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Amit Sood, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in General Internal Medicine and the Cancer Center. Dr. Sood is editor of the  Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness and The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Wall Street Journal
Can New Smartphone Apps Help Migraine Sufferers?
by Laura Johannes

David Dodick, a professor of neurology and director of headache medicine at Mayo Clinic, in Phoenix, says some migraine sufferers may not need the apps if they have obvious triggers, such as alcohol use or menstruation. More likely to benefit are people whose migraine attacks occur whenWSJ Banner several triggers “stack” on top of each other. “For example, you’re an accountant and it’s tax time, you’re stressed, sleep-deprived and you have a glass of wine to unwind. All those factors together have pushed you over the edge,” suggests Dr. Dodick, who is president of the International Headache Society.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: David Dodick, M.D. is a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Huffington Post
What Your Body Type Can Reveal About Your Health
by Deborah Long

It’s important to know which body type you are, because your health risks vary accordingly. A quick look in the mirror should tell you whether you’re an apple or a pear, but if you’re not sure, you can ask your doctor next time you have a physical. Michael Jensen, M.D., an endocrinologist Huffington Post Logowith the Mayo Clinic, is an expert on the health risks associated with excess weight. He has spent fully three decades studying the risks overweight patients face and is considered a pioneer of correlating how body type – or where excess weight is carried – relates to the likelihood of developing various diseases. His research has led him to conclude that there is no question that one body type is especially at risk for life-threatening conditions.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique visitors.

Context:  Michael Jensen, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Jensen and his lab study the effects of obesity and how body fat (adipose tissue) and body fat distribution influence health. The regulated uptake, storage and release of fatty acids from adipose tissue play a major role in determining its health effects.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic hits 30th year in Jacksonville by Mayo Clinic hits 30th year in Jacksonville
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville opened to patients 30 years ago, including 2,700 people from 30 states who already made appointments. By today’s standards, the facility was a small scale operation: One medical building, 37 physicians, 158 other employees. Contrast that to what MayoFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo is today — a medical center today that sprawls over 18 buildings and a parking garage on the campus located off San Pablo Road. Four-hundred-ninety-five physicians and scientists — many researchers with doctorates — and 4,664 other employees work there.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida is celebrating 30 years of providing high-quality medical care in Northeast Florida. Since the clinic opened in 1986, more than 600,000 unique patients from all 50 states and 143 countries have come to the Florida campus for Mayo’s unique, patient-centered approach to medical care. “Innovation is in our DNA at Mayo Clinic,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., CEO, Mayo Clinic in Florida. “Through three decades of growth, Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida has invested in people, space and technology to carry forward the vision of our founders and meet the needs of patients, today and into the future.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

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Fri, Oct 7

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

New York Times
Men Get Osteoporosis, Too
by Jane E. Brody

Men remain inadequately tested and treated after low-trauma fractures “even though their risk of a subsequent fracture is markedly increased,” said Dr. Sundeep Khosla, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, echoing Dr. Adler’s concerns. In fact, Dr. Khosla said, thereThe New York Times newspaper logo is now evidence that even following a “high-trauma fracture,” as might happen in a car accident, they should have the strength of their bones checked. “Just because men escape the sudden bone loss women experience at menopause, that doesn’t mean men don’t lose bone as they get older,” he said.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: Sundeep Khosla, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Khosla's research focuses on the mechanisms of age-related bone loss, sex steroid regulation of bone metabolism and the detrimental effects of diabetes mellitus on bone. Dr. Khosla's research group in his Osteoporosis and Bone Biology Laboratory is examining how fundamental aging mechanisms in bone lead to increased skeletal fragility.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

KIMT
Public granted rare access to the Historic Plummer Building
by DeeDee Stiepan

This weekend, the public will be granted access to areas of Mayo Clinic that few people have seen. On Saturday, an open house at the Historic Plummer Building will bKIMT LOGOe held from 10:00am-2:00pm.“We have an amazing library, we have the room named in honor of Dr. Plummer filled with beautiful paneling, plastered ceilings, oil paintings of the founders,” explains Matthew Dacy, the Director of Heritage Hall the Museum at Mayo Clinic. “These are things never before open to the public and so we want everyone to come in and enjoy the beauty and significance of this wonderful building.”

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Additional coverage:
KIMTPlummer’s political past

Context: Mayo Clinic’s annual Heritage Days took place Oct. 1-7. The festivities were held across all Mayo Clinic locations. This year’s theme, “Defining Innovation,” places special emphasis on the career and life of Henry Plummer, M.D. Heritage Days’ mission is to thank all members of the Mayo Clinic community for their tireless efforts in offering the best care and service to patients. The week is also a time to reflect on Mayo’s history and values. More information about Heritage Days can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

HealthDay
Certain Parents More Likely to Skip Kids' Flu Shot
by Amy Norton

Researchers found that of nearly 9,000 U.S. kids, those who'd received certain alternative therapies were one-quarter to 39 percent less likely to have gotten a flu shot in the past year. The findings do not prove a cause-and-effect connection, however. No one knows whether any alternativeHealth Day Logo medicine providers advised parents against having their kids vaccinated, said Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious disease expert who was not involved in the study. But, he added, some alternative-therapy practitioners do tend to "reject certain aspects of evidence-based medicine." So it's possible they sometimes influence parents' decisions on flu vaccination, said Poland, a spokesperson for the Infectious Diseases Society of America and a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minn.

Additional coverage: CBS News, KTTC

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: Gregory Poland, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious disease expert. Dr. Poland and his team within the Vaccine Research Group aim to improve the health of individuals across the world by pursuing challenges posed by infectious diseases and bioterrorism through clinical, laboratory and epidemiologic vaccine research.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Reader’s Digest
7 Silent Signs You Could Have Endometriosis
by Colette House

During retrograde menstruation, endometrial cells get out of the uterus through the fallopian tubes and implant on tissues inside the abdomen, says Gretchen Glaser, MD, a physician in gynecologic surgery at Reader's Digest LogoMayo Clinic in Minnesota. Pay attention to these endometriosis symptoms and talk to your doctor if you’re concerned. “When women find that they have to stay home from school or they have to stay home from work, they’re vomiting, or that they can’t function essentially during their period, that’s a good time to get checked out,” says Glaser. These are other unusual menstrual cycle symptoms to watch for.

Reach Reader's Digest has more than three million readers each month and its website has more than 2.4 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Gretchen Glaser, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic gynecologic surgeon.

Contact: Kelly Reller

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Fri, Sep 30

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

ABC News
9-Year-Old Twin Sisters Dance With Bone Marrow Donor Who Saved Them
by Nicole Pelletiere

A pair of identical twin sisters from Minnesota were able to thank the man whose life-saving donation gave them the ability to be kids again.  “They fell in love with him right away,” mom Michelle Girtler, 43, of Minnesota City told ABC News today. “They took to him like they knew him their entire life. It was emotional, all of us were emotional. Lots of tears, a lot of gratitude."… This year, Elizabeth and Kathryn's doctor,ABC News logo Dr. Shakila Khan of the Mayo Clinic, submitted their story to Be the Match in hopes of setting up a meeting between them and their then anonymous donor.  The man, Ingo Gruda of Munster, Germany, was flown to Minnesota to meet with the girls over four after their transplants, Be the Match confirmed to ABC News.

Reach: ABC News Online has more than 28.8 million unique visitors to its site each month. ABC’s World News Tonight with David Muir averages about 9.2 million viewers each night.

Additional coverage: Inside Edition, KVNU-AM

Previous coverage in September 23, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Last year, after receiving care at "numerous hospitals" and from "dozens of doctors," the Kordiaks were told nothing else could be done for their daughter. Then, "with fingers crossed, Jen reached out to Mayo Clinic," where a team led by Uldis Bite, M.D., came up with a new plan for Amber Rose. Dr. Bite used "a 3-D model, made on the Mayo campus" to help plan out the extensive facial reconstruction surgery. And last July — nearly three years to the day after the accident — Amber Rose underwent the 15-hour procedure. Six weeks later, at a follow-up appointment, Dr. Bite was pleased with the results. As was Amber Rose. "My nose looks way better," she said. "Nobody will stare at me." You can read more about Amber Rose's story at In the Loop.

Contact:  Sharon Theimer

 

Wall Street Journal
Trying to Break Unhealthy Habits? There’s a Coach for That
by Barbara Sadick

Changing unhealthy habits is hard, doctors say. But with Americans suffering from chronic disease in epidemic proportions, a big push is under way to get more individuals to do just that. … A Mayo Clinic study of WSJ Banner100 participants who worked with a wellness coach found that a majority had lost weight, improved nutritional habits and increased their physical activity by the end of the 12-week program. While there was some slippage in healthy behaviors at a three-month follow-up, the participants were still in better shape than before the coaching started, the study found. “Many people can implement positive lifestyle changes, but maintaining change over time is extremely difficult,” says Matthew M. Clark, a clinical psychologist at Mayo Clinic and the lead author of the study.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Several national surveys have found that approximately 15 to 20 percent of adults in the U.S. will report high levels of stress. A new study by Mayo Clinic researchers identified stress and burnout as a major problem employees face within the medical industry, leading to negative health behaviors. With rising stress levels in the workplace for employees, many companies are looking to integrate, engage and enroll employees into wellness programs. “It’s important to teach individuals to monitor their stress levels over time and practice effective, ongoing stress-reduction strategies, such as getting involved in wellness programs, this will in-turn help health care employees live a happy and health life,” says Matthew Clark, Ph.D., lead author of the study and resiliency expert at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Wall Street Journal
The Revolution in EMS Care
by Laura Landro

Much of the best equipment—including a helicopter equipped as a mobile emergency room or intensive-care unit—can be found at the Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minn. Regarded as a leader in sophisticated onboard equipment and communications, Mayo often consults with other medical transport systems to share best patient care strategies, and works with U.S. military physicians to share expertise on WSJ Bannerhow treatment of battlefield wounds might apply to civilian medicine. Mayo provides increasingly advanced pre-hospital treatment, says Scott Zietlow, a trauma surgeon and medical director of the Mayo One trauma helicopter program.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Emergency Medicine specialists work at all three Mayo Clinic locations to treat life-threatening illnesses. Teams of board-certified physicians, registered nurses, and other specially trained staff are available at all times to treat anyone seeking emergency medical care. Each year Mayo emergency care physicians see more than 80,000 patients in the emergency care setting.  Mayo Clinic Medical Transport provides ground and air medical transport services from its base in Rochester:

Contact: Glenn Lyden

 

Modern Healthcare
Q&A: ‘If Mayo was a high-cost provider, we would be cut out of many of these networks’
by Bob Herman

Mayo Clinic, which has a 150-year history as a medical practice, now operates 22 hospitals and draws patients with complex needs from all over the world to its 1,243-bed flagship facility in Rochester, Minn. The Modern Healthcareorganization has also garnered praise for insulating clinical decisions from financial incentives by paying physicians under a salary model with no productivity bonuses. … Bob Herman, Modern Healthcare's Midwest bureau chief, interviewed Mayo President and CEO Dr. John Noseworthy while he was in Chicago as co-chair of a consortium of 12 health system CEOs convened with the American Medical Association to address physician burnout.

Reach: Modern Healthcare is the industry's leading source of healthcare business and policy news, research and information. The magazine covers health care policy, Medicare/Medicaid, and health care from a business perspective. Modern Healthcare magazine is ranked No. 1 in readership among healthcare executives and deemed a "must-read" by the who's who in healthcare. Modern Healthcare has more than 72,0000 paid magazine subscribers and its website receives more than 568,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Modern Healthcare (video)Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy on physician burnout and value-based care

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Mayo Clinic has taken a leadership role in identifying solutions to address the physician burnout issue. This research has been led by  Tait Shanaflet, M.D., a Mayo Clinic hematologist. He is the director of the Mayo Clinic Department of Medicine Program on Physician Well-being, a clinical laboratory evaluating personal and organizational factors that contribute to physician satisfaction. His research in this area has involved physicians at all stages of their career from medical school to practice had has include several multi-center and national studies. This research is intended to identify personal and organizational factors that can be modified in order to promote physician well-being and enhance the quality of care physicians deliver. More information on his physician burnout research can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: DuskaAnastasijevic, Karl Oestreich

 

Arizona Republic
Many people have expressed interest in wanting to learn what is their risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease
by Dr. Richard Caselli
— Question: What is Alzheimer’s disease and is it wise to get tested for risk? Answer: Alzheimer’s disease is a degenerative disease; brain cells slowly dying. We don’t fully understand why. To some degree, degeneration is a natural process, but this accelerates that process to a pathological degree. Many people have expressed interest in wanting to learn what is their risk for developing Alzheimer’s, and that’s whereArizona Republic newspaper logo the idea of predictive testing comes in, somebody who isn’t ill today but who wants to know am I going to get this in the future.…Dr. Richard Caselli is a neurologist specializing in behavioral disorders and serves as associate director of the Alzheimer’s Disease Center at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Reach: The Arizona Republic has daily circulation of more than 180,000 and its website azcentral.com has more than 2.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Richard Caselli, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist. Dr. Caselli's research focuses on cognitive aging and the changes that can be detected before the symptomatic onset of memory loss and related symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.

Contact:  Jim McVeigh

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Tags: ABC News, ABC2 News, Alzhheimer's, Angie Murad, Arnold Palmer, artificial sweetener, Athletic Business, Attn:, Austin Daily Herald, awake brain surgery, Be the Match, Becker's Hospital News


Fri, Sep 23

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Buzzfeed
27 College Health Tips They Won’t Teach You At Orientation
by Caroline Kee

Spoiler alert: it’s probably mono. BuzzFeed Health spoke to Dr. Pritish Tosh, infectious disease specialist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and germ expert Kelly Reynolds, PhD, director of environmental health sciences at the University of Arizona, about how collegeBuzzFeed Logo students can stay healthy when the odds (and germs) are against them.

Reach: BuzzFeed receives more than 15.7 million unique visitors each month to its website and targets pop culture and social media enthusiasts.

Context: Pritish Tosh, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist. Dr. Tosh is interested in emerging infections and preparedness activities related to them, ranging from collaborating with the Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group in basic science vaccine development to hospital systems research related to pandemic preparedness.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
Mayo Clinic sets schedule for $100M expansion — with work starting soon
by Alexa Epitropoulos

Mayo Clinic is beginning construction on the first building within its $100 million three-building expansion project in October – and it's setting its sights on more expansion in the future. The CEO of Mayo Clinic's Jacksonville campus, Dr. Gianrico Farrugia, said work on the 150,000-Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logosquare-foot destination medical center will have just under a two-year timeline, with the projected completion being summer 2018. That building has a number of unique features, including specialized care for patients with neurological problems, as well as patients who require neurosurgery, hematology and oncology. It will also have a chemotherapy section, which Farrugia says will be private and include an outdoor patio.

Additional coverage:
Becker’s Hospital Review, Jacksonville Mayo Clinic sets schedule for $100M expansion

Context: Gianrico Farrugia, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vice president and CEO of Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida. Earlier this year, Mayo Clinic announced that it will invest $100 million in major construction projects building on its 150-year history of transforming health care and the patient experience as the premier medical destination center for health care in the Southeast. 

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

WJCT Jacksonville
First Coast Connect: From Illegal Immigrant To Brain Surgeon
by Kevin Meerschaert

He jumped a California border fence in 1987, one day after his 19th birthday. Speaking no English and having no money, Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa spent the first years in this country working migrant jobs while raising the money for tuition at Joaquin Delta Community College. … screen-shot-2016-09-22-at-8-48-16-pmRecently Dr. Q joined the staff at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville as Chairman of Neurologic Surgery.

Reach: WJCT-FM is the NPR affiliate for the Jacksonville market. WJCT-FM Online has more than 259,000 unique visitors each month.

Previous coverage in April 22, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, prominent neurosurgeon, researcher and educator, recently joined Mayo Clinic as chair of the Department of Neurosurgery on the Florida campus, along with several members of his research team from Johns Hopkins Medicine. Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa is renown nationally and internationally as a surgeon, researcher, humanitarian and author. His laboratory has published many manuscripts and articles, submitted a number of patents and obtained three NIH grants. Students and fellows who worked with Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa have gone on to join leading neuroscience programs throughout the world. Mayo Clinic's world-renowned neurosurgeons perform more than 7,000 complex surgical procedures every year at campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

KSTP
10-Year-Old Minn. Girl Undergoes Facial Reconstructive Surgery after Near-Fatal Farm Accident

Doctor Uldis Bite, a plastic surgeon, took Amber Rose’s case. Now 10 years old, Amber Rose was about to embark on yet another journey; one her
KSTP-5 Twin Citiesfamily wanted to share and they invited 5 EYEWITNESS NEWS to come along. A 3-D model, made on the Mayo campus, helped Dr. Bite plan out the extensive facial reconstruction surgery Amber Rose was about to have. On an early July morning, almost exactly three years to the date of her accident, Amber Rose walked nervously into Mayo Clinic, her entire family by her side.

Reach: KSTP-TV is the ABC affiliate in Minneapolis that broadcasts on channel 5. KSTP-TV Online has more than 503,000 unique visitors each month. It is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., and is the only locally-owned and operated broadcasting company in the Twin Cities. KSTP-TV first broadcast in April 1948, and was the first television station to serve the upper Midwest.

Context: Last year, after receiving care at "numerous hospitals" and from "dozens of doctors," the Kordiaks were told nothing else could be done for their daughter. Then, "with fingers crossed, Jen reached out to Mayo Clinic," where a team led by Uldis Bite, M.D., came up with a new plan for Amber Rose. Dr. Bite used "a 3-D model, made on the Mayo campus" to help plan out the extensive facial reconstruction surgery. And last July — nearly three years to the day after the accident — Amber Rose underwent the 15-hour procedure. Six weeks later, at a follow-up appointment, Dr. Bite was pleased with the results. As was Amber Rose. "My nose looks way better," she said. "Nobody will stare at me." You can read more about Amber Rose's story at In the Loop.

Contact:  Sharon Theimer

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Tags: 873 AM, ABC15 Arizona, advisory board, aging, AIN Online, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers, American Trucker, Angie Murad, artificial Intelligence, AsiaOne, awake brain surgery


Fri, Sep 16

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

CNN
The health condition that concerns Americans most
by Jacqueline Howard

What health condition concerns Americans the most? Cancer -- more so than obesity, neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's and even infectious diseases, such as Zika, Ebola and HIV/AIDS. That's just one of many findings about Americans' opinions on health that emerged in the latest Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup survey results, released Tuesday. The idea behind the survey was to simply "listen to ourCNN Logo patients," said Dr. John Wald, medical director for public affairs at the Mayo Clinic, who helped conduct the survey. "This survey allows us to extend this same principle beyond the walls of our campuses to assess the current state of the American health consumer and to begin to define gaps and opportunities to better interact and educate these same consumers," he said. "It is only through effective listening that you begin to define the best solutions."

Reach: Cable News Network (CNN) is a worldwide news and information network providing live, continuous coverage of news from around the globe, 24 hours a day. CNN online received more than 55 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional coverage: Science Daily, WPTZ Burlington, com, WJXT Jacksonville, AOL News, KTVI-FOX, KOMO-ABC, WPBF-ABCTwin Cities Business, WNAX-Radio, WBRC-FOX

Context:  While Zika remains a hot topic in the news, a new survey by Mayo Clinic reveals that Americans believe the country’s most significant health care challenge is cancer. In fact, the survey findings report “infectious diseases, such as Zika and Ebola,” are tied with HIV/AIDS as the least important health care challenges listed by respondents following cancer; obesity; neurological diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; diabetes and heart disease. These findings were uncovered as part of the Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup, which first launched in January 2016 and provides a quick pulse on consumer health opinions and behaviors several times throughout the year. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

NBC News
New Breast Cancer Test Could Become Lifesaver For Some Women — There's exciting new hope in the fight against breast cancer: a new test performed in addition to mammograms that's showing it can be up to four times better at finding cancer.

Reach:
NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.NBC News Logo

Context: Deborah Rhodes, M.D., is a physician with Mayo Clinic's Breast Diagnostic Clinic. Dr. Rhodes studies the application of a new breast imaging device, molecular breast imaging, to breast cancer screening. The long-term goal of Dr. Rhodes' research is to develop an individualized approach to breast cancer screening that incorporates breast density, age, and other factors that impact breast cancer risk and mammography sensitivity.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Wall Street Journal
The Office Walk-and-Talk Really Works
by Rachel Bachman

They don’t require yoga pants or a shower, but the research is clear: Walking meetings count as exercise. “If corporations were to adopt this ubiquitously, you just start to think of those health benefits adding up,” says James Levine, co-director of obesity solutions at the Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University. “It’s an amazingly simple thing and it costs nothing.”

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.WSJ Banner

Context: Having trained in clinical nutrition as a scholar at the University of Cambridge, James A. Levine, M.D., Ph.D., has dedicated his scientific career to promoting health in adults and children through education and innovation. Dr. Levine currently serves as a principal investigator for National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded studies focused on improving health for immigrant families through increased activity and better nutrition, interactions between sleep and obesity, and multilevel approaches to reduce obesity in working mothers and their children.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

WTTW-PBS
Head of Mayo Clinic on ‘Epidemic of Burnout’ Among Doctors

It is estimated by the Centers for Disease Control that more than a quarter of a million Americans die each year because of medical errors. Many of those mistakes happen because doctors and other medical staff WTTW-Chicagoare often burned out and consequently more prone to error. Dr. John Noseworthy, president and CEO of the Mayo Clinic, joins host Carol Marin in discussion.

Reach: Chicago Tonight airs on WTTW, Chicago's PBS affiliate at 7 pm weekdays. The program reviews the past week's biggest business, political, and social stories and issues in the city of Chicago.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Mayo Clinic has taken a leadership role in identifying solutions to address the physician burnout issue. This research has been led by  Tait Shanaflet, M.D., a Mayo Clinic hematologist. He is the director of the Mayo Clinic Department of Medicine Program on Physician Well-being, a clinical laboratory evaluating personal and organizational factors that contribute to physician satisfaction. His research in this area has involved physicians at all stages of their career from medical school to practice had has include several multi-center and national studies. This research is intended to identify personal and organizational factors that can be modified in order to promote physician well-being and enhance the quality of care physicians deliver. More information on his physician burnout research can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: DuskaAnastasijevicJoe Dangor

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Tags: alzheimers, AOL News, ATRI, autism, Becker’s Hospital Review, Big Think, biobank, BioSpace, Breast Cancer, Broadly, burnout, Cancer


Fri, Sep 9

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

 

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Star Tribune
Mortenson picked for Destination Medical Center's Discovery Square
By Nicole Norfleet

M.A. Mortenson Co. has been chosen as the developer for the research campus of Mayo Clinic’s Destination Medical Center (DMC) in downtown Rochester. The six-block subdistrict which will be called Discovery Square is supposed to “serve as a point where physicians and scientists willStar Tribune newspaper logo come together with businesses and entrepreneurs to accelerate advancements in medical research and technology for critical advances in patient care,” according to an announcement.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: Twin Cities Business, Post-Bulletin, KAAL-TV, Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal, KIMTConstruction DiveHealthcare DesignFinance & CommerceTwin Cities Business, Post-Bulletin, KAAL-TV, Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal, KIMT

Context: Mayo Clinic announced recently that it will collaborate with M.A. Mortenson Company, a real estate development firm for Destination Medical Center’s (DMC) Discovery Square. Discovery Square will serve as a point where physicians and scientists will come together with businesses and entrepreneurs to accelerate advancements in medical research and technology for critical advances in patient care. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

US News & World Report
At Mayo Clinic, Researchers Burrow Into Burnout
by Steve Sternberg

If the Mayo Clinic – widely regarded as one of the most enlightened health systems in the world – struggles with high rates of physician burnout, US News Logono health system is immune of its physicians suffer from burnout because they have created a team, led by Dr. Tait Shanafelt, that studies professional satisfaction among physicians and other health workers…Shanafelt's residency included a month devoted to a research topic of his choice. He described his observations to his research adviser, who theorized that the residents were suffering from burnout and said, "Let's put together a team and explore it." Their resulting study of residents at University of Washington-affiliated hospitals appeared in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine in 2002.

Reach: U.S. News & World Report is a multi-platform publisher of news and information, which includes http://www.usnews.com and http://www.rankingsandreviews.com.

Context: Tait Shanaflet, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic hematologist. He is the director of the Mayo Clinic Department of Medicine Program on Physician Well-being, a clinical laboratory evaluating personal and organizational factors that contribute to physician satisfaction. His research in this area has involved physicians at all stages of their career from medical school to practice had has include several multi-center and national studies. This research is intended to identify personal and organizational factors that can be modified in order to promote physician well-being and enhance the quality of care physicians deliver. More information on his physician burnout research can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Current
MPR and Mayo Clinic team up to offer classical soundtrack
by April Simpson

Minnesota Public Radio and the Mayo Clinic are promoting health and healing through a unique partnership that launched Thursday. Research has shown that the benefits of listening to music include improved pain control and lowered anxiety and blood pressure. So MPR will curate aCurrent news logo playlist of classical compositions for the listening pleasure of patients at Mayo Clinic hospitals in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota.

Reach: Current is the nonprofit news service for and about public media in the U.S. Current publishes online daily and in print - 16 issues in 2016.

Additional coverage: Malaysia SunTwin Cities Business

Context: Patients at Mayo Clinic hospitals in Rochester; Jacksonville, Florida; and Phoenix will be able to relax to a custom blend of classical music provided by Minnesota Public Radio (MPR), beginning Sept. 1. A new agreement calls for MPR’s national programming division, American Public Media (APM) — the largest provider of classical music programming in North America — to supply up to 17 hours of streaming classical music that Mayo Clinic can distribute at no charge to patients and visitors in patient rooms. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Deb Anderson

 

WJXT Jacksonville
Pediatricians say ‘no’ to FluMist
by Ashley Harding

Since it became available several years ago, the FluMist nasal spray was a big relief. But parents, be prepared for that dreaded trip to the doctor now because it's not an option this season. "It's believed that the shot News Jax 4 Logois actually more effective," said Dr. Vandana Bhide with Mayo Clinic. She says the reason why the FluMist isn't working as well is hard to explain. "I don't think we know exactly why. I think because the injectable one is seen by the entire body in the bloodstream, perhaps the immune system responds better," said Dr. Bhide.

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville. This Week in Jacksonville is a weekly public affairs program on WJXT.

Context: Vandana Bhide, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic internist and pediatrician.

Contact: Kevin Punksy

 

STAT
Raising an alarm, doctors fight to yank hospital ICUs into the modern era
by Usha Lee McFarling

In a modern ICU, a single patient can generate 2,000 data points per day, said Dr. Brian Pickering, an anesthesiologist and critical care physician at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. In a 24-bed ICU like his, that’s 50,000 data points a day. Important information is easily lost, or forgotten. Pickering joined the Mayo Clinic nine years ago from Ireland, where patient data was still logged on a paper chart at the end of theSTAT Logo of Boston Globe bed. He was overwhelmed, he said, by electronic records in the United States that had too many tabs and screens and were difficult to navigate. “Point. Click. Point. Click. Point. Click. Back and forth,” he said. “That may work if you’ve only got one patient. But I’ve got 24 in the ICU, and any one of them could be in crisis at any minute.” With colleagues, Pickering created an “electronic intern,” called AWARE, that identifies the most important information a physician needs and highlights it, organizing it around organ systems.

Reach: STAT covers the frontiers of health and medicine including science labs, hospitals, biotechnology board rooms, and political back rooms. Hosted by The Boston Globe, STAT launched on November 5, 2015. The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Context:  Brian Pickering, M.B., B.Ch., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist. Dr. Pickering has been involved in the development of novel electronic interfaces for use in the intensive care unit (ICU) that facilitate reduced cognitive load, medical errors and resource utilization. He has extensive experience in evaluating systems of health care delivery and in the delivery of quality improvements to those systems.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

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Tags: ABC News, alcohol, alzheimers, Arcadia, Becker’s Hospital Review, blood pressure, Bloomberg, Camp Oz, Constructive Dive, Consumer Reports, Current, destination medical center


Fri, Sep 2

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

 

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

WESA Pittsburgh
St. Clair Hospital Brings A Virtual Mayo Clinic To Its Patients
by Mark Nootbaar

The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. is known for employing doctors with highly refined subspecialties, and now St. Clair Hospital doctors can tap into that expertise. An agreement between the two hospitals, finalized this week, will allow St. Clair doctors to access eTumor Boards – a virtual version of tumor board reviews, in which multiple doctors brainstorm ways to treat an individual patient.  “There are certainlyPittsburgh NPR station cancers that affect millions of people in the United States but there are also cancers like sarcoma, which might be more on the order of a couple thousand a year,” said Mayo Clinic Medical Director of Provider Relations Ryan Uitti.

Reach:  WESA is a southwestern Pennsylvania’s only independent public radio news and information station. The station targets listeners, ages 18 to 64 and its website receives more than 171,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Post BulletinKROC AMMSN, Pittsburgh Business Times, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Tribune-Review, Observer-Reporter, seattlepi.com, KDKA Pittsburgh, Washington Times

Context:  St. Clair Hospital is the newest member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a growing national network of independent health care providers committed to serving patients and their families through clinical collaboration. St. Clair Hospital remains independent and locally governed. Under this formal agreement, St. Clair Hospital has access to the latest Mayo Clinic knowledge and promotes clinical collaboration between physicians to benefit patients. The goal of St. Clair Hospital and Mayo Clinic is to help patients get answers to complex medical questions while staying close to home. “St. Clair is proud to be selected as the newest member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network,” says James M. Collins, president and CEO of St. Clair Hospital. “This clinical collaboration with Mayo – unique in western Pennsylvania – is rooted in our common philosophy. It will provide our physicians the expertise of Mayo Clinic to assist them as they treat challenging medical cases – at no additional cost to patients and insurers.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Huffington Post

Why Aren’t More Parents Vaccinating Their Kids Against Cancer?
by Erin Schumaker

The HPV vaccine got off to a rough start. For starters, the vaccine was originally only tested on and approved for girls and women. The vaccine wasn’t approved for boys until 2009, three years after it was Huffington Post Logointroduced, and wasn’t recommended for boys until 2011, according to NPR. “That was a terrible mistake,” Dr. Gregory Poland, who heads up Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group and serves as editor-in-chief of the journal Vaccine, told The Huffington Post. “It pretends that only women get or acquire the disease and that simply isn’t true.”

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique viewers.

Context: Gregory Poland, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious disease expert. Dr. Poland and his team within the Vaccine Research Group aim to improve the health of individuals across the world by pursuing challenges posed by infectious diseases and bioterrorism through clinical, laboratory and epidemiologic vaccine research.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Twin Cities Business
Mayo’s Kogod Center On Aging Spawning Spinoffs, Breakthrough Research
by Don Jacobson

The same Mayo Clinic lab that earlier this year spawned a buzzworthy anti-aging startup firm has recorded another research breakthrough connecting “senescent” human cells to age-related maladies—in this case, osteoarthritis. The Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging at Mayo Clinic is the home of researchers Jan van Deursen and Dr. James Kirkland (its director). They and colleagues have been investigating the roleTwin Cities Business Magazine Logo played in the aging process by senescent cells—living cells that have stopped reproducing due to age or damage.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Context:  Researchers at Mayo Clinic have shown that senescent cells – cells that no longer divide and accumulate with age – negatively impact health and shorten lifespan by as much as 35 percent in normal mice. The results, which appear today in Nature, demonstrate that clearance of senescent cells delays tumor formation, preserves tissue and organ function, and extends lifespan without observed adverse effects. “Cellular senescence is a biological mechanism that functions as an ‘emergency brake’ used by damaged cells to stop dividing,” says Jan van Deursen, Ph.D., Chair of Biochemistry and Molecular biology at Mayo Clinic, and senior author of the paper. “While halting cell division of these cells is important for cancer prevention, it has been theorized that once the ‘emergency brake’ has been pulled, these cells are no longer necessary.” More information on Mayo Clinic's aging research can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Megan Forliti

 

News4Jax
Father with ALS hopes 'Ice Bucket Challenge' continues
by Joy Purdy

The millions of people who helped participate in the 2014 "Ice Bucket Challenge" helped raise more than a $100 million to fund ALS research. Since that summer of 2014, two major discoveries have brought News Jax 4 Logoresearchers like Mayo Clinic's local Neurogeneticist Dr. Rosa Rademakers closer to understanding how the disease attacks the body. The more dollars donated will allow for more extensive the research, like ways to predict the disease before it strikes. "Identify individuals who are at risk of developing the disease, even before they have any symptoms," explained Rademakers. "Or, it will allow us to be able to say who will have a fast disease progression or slow disease progression. These are very important things that we're still working on."

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville. This Week in Jacksonville is a weekly public affairs program on WJXT.

Context: Rosa Rademakers, Ph.D., a neurogeneticist on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus,  receiveed one of the highest honors in neuroscience: the 2016 Potamkin Prize for Research in Pick’s, Alzheimer’s and Related Diseases. The $100,000 prize is an internationally recognized tribute for advancing dementia research. It recognizes major contributions to the understanding of the causes, prevention, treatment and cure for Pick's, Alzheimer's and related diseases. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Wall Street Journal
Don’t Wait Until You’re Older to Fight Getting Old
by Sumathi Reddy

One of the hallmarks of aging is sarcopenia, which is the progressive loss of skeletal muscle that starts in the 30s, says Nathan LeBrasseur, associate professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.  It becomes noticeable in the late 30s and early 40s, when losing weight often becomes more difficult, he says. The loss of muscle mass happens at a rate of about 10% per decade, he says, whileWSJ Banner muscle strength and power—the ability to generate force over time—declines even more dramatically. Dr. LeBrasseur says this may go beyond muscle loss, and be related to impaired brain signals and changes to the circulatory system.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Nathan LeBrasseur, Ph.D. is a Mayo Clinic researcher and is affiliated with Mayo Clinic's Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging and Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. More information about his work can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

WCCO CBS
Good Question: Why Are Knee Injuries So Common?
By Heather Brown

The Minnesota Vikings announced Tuesday that starting quarterback Teddy Bridgewater has a complete tear in his ACL— the anterior cruciate ligament. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons says it is WCCO logothe most common kind of knee injury, with more than 200,000 of them reported every year. “The knee is particularly vulnerable because it transmits all of the forces from the ground up to the body,” said Dr. Nancy Cummings, an orthopedic surgeon at the Mayo Clinic.

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

Additional Coverage:

KARE11, What is the anterior cruciate ligament, ACL? by Adrienne Broaddus — Dr. Nancy Cummings,  Mayo Clinic's Orthopedic surgeon and head physician for the Minnesota Lynx says the , restrains the knee from going into an abnormal position where other structures can get injured in the knee. "The ACL's purpose is to prevent your lower leg from moving forward on your upper leg when you do motion with your knee," she said. "A tear to your ACL is pretty serious. What it does is it puts other structures in knee at risk. It increases your risk of arthritis down the line."

Context: Nancy Cummings, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine physician.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

MPR
Mayo Clinic surgeon: Vikings' Bridgewater faces long recovery from knee injury

The Minnesota Vikings play the Los Angeles Rams Thursday night in a preseason game. It will be the team's first game since starting quarterback Teddy Bridgewater was injured during practice this week. Bridgewater dislocated his left knee and tore his ACL during non-contact drills on Tuesday. He'll have surgery soon and is expected to miss the remainder of the season. To find out more about the injury andMPR News logo how an athlete recovers from it, MPR's Cathy Wurzer spoke with Dr. Michael Stuart. He's an orthopedic surgeon specializing in knee injuries at the Mayo Clinic and the co-director of their sports medicine.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context:  Michael Stuart, M.D. is co-director, Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center, a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, sports performance optimization, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Star Tribune
NFL players with ACL injuries face uncertain recovery, shortened careers
by Jeremy Olson

Medical advances have made it possible for injured athletes such as Vikings quarterback Teddy Bridgewater to return from dislocated knees and ligament tears, according to physicians interviewed Wednesday, but Star Tribune Logothey nonetheless face long and uncertain roads to recovery… Improvements in surgical techniques and post-surgery rehab have turned a surefire career-ending injury into something that athletes such as Bridgewater can overcome, said Timothy Hewett, who directs the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Research Center. “Twenty-five years ago, they would have cast him and he would have come back with a bunch of scarring, and it would have taken months to decrease the stiffness in the joint. We know now that you immediately move it.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Tim Hewett, Ph.D. is Mayo Clinic sports medicine director of research, biomechanics. Dr. Hewett's research optimizes sports performance through a three-prong model he has developed. He expects to refine it at Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center so that it can be applied across the life span, from grade-school children to pro athletes to senior citizens.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

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Tags: Ability Learning Center, ACL, actigraphy, aging, Alzforum, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers, American Journal of Managed Care, AZ Big Media, back to school, Becker’s Hospital Review, body donation


Fri, Aug 26

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

 

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 


AP
Pros to Joes: Elite Athlete Training for the Corporate World
 by Dave Campbell

Kyle Rudolph's two most productive seasons for the Minnesota Vikings were also those in which he played every game, not coincidentally. After all the surgeries, crutches and rehab, Rudolph has found a training program to supplement team-supervised workouts that has contributed to theAssociated Press Wire Service Logo durability he's long sought to establish. The sturdiness of his body at age 26 has become equally important as the agility and strength needed to thrive as an NFL tight end in the prime of his career. "It's all about playing 16 games," said Rudolph, who found his happy place in downtown Minneapolis at the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center through a joint venture with the specialized performance training firm EXOS … "The elite athlete is the beacon that gets all the attention, but those same principles trickle down to how we treat every athlete," said Dr. Ed Laskowski, the co-director of Mayo's sports medicine operation.

Reach: The Associated Press is a not-for-profit news cooperative, owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members. News collected by the AP is published and republished by newspaper and broadcast outlets worldwide.

Additional coverage: FOX Sports, ABC News, USA Today, NY Times, Star Tribune, Washington Post, Salon, Centre Daily Times, Kansas City Star, Charlotte Observer, The Daily Progress

Context: Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center is a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, sports performance optimization, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries. Edward Laskowski, M.D. is co-director of Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Buzzfeed
How Katie Ledecky Stacks Up Against Male Swimmers
by Peter Aldhous

Katie Ledecky blew away the competition in Rio de Janeiro, and was the standout racer of the 2016 Olympics. She won three individual golds, BuzzFeed Logoplus another gold and a silver in the relays. But it was her world records, and the margins of her victories, that really got people talking. Ledecky set world-best times in the 400- and 800-meter freestyle finals — winning that second race by more than 11 seconds. As she cuts through the water, Ledecky’s form is close to perfection. “I think her stroke is just really, really good,” Michael Joyner, an exercise physiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, told BuzzFeed News. “Watch her hands: There are very few bubbles.”

Reach: BuzzFeed receives more than 15.7 million unique visitors each month to its website and targets pop culture and social media enthusiasts.

Additional coverage:

Business Insider, 8 of the most impressive Olympic feats of all time

Previous coverage in August 19, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in August 12, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist.  Dr. Joyner's research team is interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

 

12News Arizona
US swimmer ignites interest in unusual chest condition
by Pete Scholz

It was June 2016, right after Cody Miller, 24, qualified for the Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro. It was then he shared with the world what he had been dealing with for the past 10 years or so.   The pictures he posted showed his noticeably sunken sternum -- the telltale symptom of a!2 News Arizona Logo condition known as pectus excavatum --"pectus" for short. From an operating theater at Mayo Clinic in north Phoenix, Dr. Dawn Jaroszewski pointed to a screen with two CT scans. "If you look at the normal chest, you have this rounded curvature," she indicated, "and on the pectus patient, you can see how the front of the chest collapses down," she added.

Reach: 12 News is KPNX, Phoenix, an NBC affiliate in the 12th-largest market in the country. The newscasts reach about 2 million viewers each day.

Context: Dawn Jaroszewski, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiac surgeon. Pectus excavatum is a condition in which a person's breastbone is sunken into his or her chest. In severe cases, pectus excavatum can look as if the center of the chest has been scooped out, leaving a deep dent. Pectus excavatum can be surgically repaired, but surgery is usually reserved for people who have moderate to severe signs and symptoms. People who have mild signs and symptoms may be helped by physical therapy. Certain exercises can improve posture and increase the degree to which the chest can expand.

Contact:  Jim McVeigh

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Tags: 12News Arizona, ABC News, antibiotic resistance, AP, Assurex Health, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, back to school, blood sugar, Bradenton Herald, Business Insider, BuzzFeed, Cancer


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