January 25th, 2012

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

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January 25, 2012

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Whitney Benedett with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations
oestreich.karl@mayo.edu

 

USA TODAY Allergic to cold? It's a real condition, experts say
by Kim Painter

Grant Schlager sounds like a typical Minnesota kid: He loves to play outside, no matter how cold it gets, and he's pretty excited that a slow-to-start snow season is finally underway. But Grant, who turns 12 this week, has a problem: He is literally allergic to cold. It makes him break out in hives and could cause more serious reactions if he's not careful. …Martha Hartz, a pediatric allergist and immunologist at Mayo, says most cold urticaria patients she sees are like Grant: They don't test positive for any other known disorder. But that doesn't mean their condition isn't serious.

Circulation: USA TODAY has a circulation of 1.8 million and a readership of 3.1 million. USA TODAY websites have 26.3 million unique visitors a month.

Context: This story is a great example of collaboration that occurs every day across Mayo Clinic public affairs. Thanks to a tip from Jason Howland and Annie Burt of Mayo Clinic Health System, their media relations’ colleagues became aware of a fascinating story about a Minnesota boy who is allergic to cold. Sharon Theimer, enterprise media relations, suggested that USA Today would be a good place for this story. Nick Hanson, enterprise media relations, approached USA Today about the story and then connected Dr. Martha Hartz, a pediatric allergist and immunologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester and the members of the family with the reporter.  The resulting piece appeared on the front page of the Your Life section.

Mayo Clinic Public Affairs Contacts: Nick Hanson 

 

USA TODAY Costly concussions continue to confound NHL
by Kevin Allen

When New York Islanders veteran forward Brian Rolston had his “bell rung” earlier this season, he didn't know he had a concussion until he realized he didn't have answers for simple questions…Michael Stuart of the Mayo Clinic, USA Hockey’s chief medical officer, believes the strides in treating concussion have been made “in communicating better to our athletes that you don't play through a traumatic brain injury or concussion.”

Circulation: USA TODAY has a circulation of 1.8 million and a readership of 3.1 million. USA TODAY websites have 26.3 million unique visitors a month.

Context: Dr. Michael Stuart, with an appointment in orthopedic surgery at Mayo Clinic, is a sports medicine expert.  He serves as Chief Medical Officer for USA Hockey, a consultant to the National Hockey League Players Association and is a member of the education committee of the International Ice Hockey Association. Dr. Stuart is routinely sought out by reporters for his expertise.

Mayo Clinic Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

MPR The burden of diabetes, the hope for a cure

The worldwide diabetes epidemic is taking a huge toll in Minnesota. One-third of all adults in the state either have diabetes or are pre-diabetic, with blood glucose levels that are higher than normal. This week, MPR News has been running a series about the effects of diabetes on our state and the potential for a cure. As part of our coverage, Midmorning invited researchers from the University of Minnesota and the Mayo Clinic to join Marianne Combs to discuss the scope of the disease, it's impact, and the most promising avenues of researchDr. Robert Rizza, endocrinologist, diabetes researcher, and executive dean for research at the Mayo.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: This MPR Midmorning focus on diabetes was part of a week-long series on diabetes. Midmorning invited researchers from the University of Minnesota and Mayo Clinic to join Marianne Combs to discuss the scope of the disease, it's impact, and the most promising avenues of research. Dr. Elizabeth Seaquist, the director of the Center for Diabetes Research at the University of Minnesota, and Dr. Robert Rizza, endocrinologist, diabetes researcher, and executive dean for research at the Mayo, spent the hour talking with listeners about diabetes.

Mayo Clinic Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson 

 

Nature Fleshing out the US Alzheimer’s strategy
by Meredith Wadman

In December 2010, the US Congress passed the National Alzheimer’s Project Act. The law instructs the US government to develop its first-ever strategic plan for battling Alzheimer’s disease, the dementia-inducing brain disorder that is expected to afflict at least 11 million US citizens by 2050…After the committee's quarterly meeting yesterday, Ronald Petersen, chairman of the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services, tells Nature how his panel is helping to shape the fight against Alzheimer’s.

Circulation: Nature is a weekly international journal publishing peer-reviewed research in all fields of science. Nature reports a readership of about 424,000 total readers. The journal has a circulation of around 53,000 but studies have concluded that on average a single copy is shared by as many as 8 people. Nature is the world's most highly cited interdisciplinary science journal, according to the 2010 Journal Citation Reports Science Edition (Thomson Reuters, 2011). Its Impact Factor is 36.101. The impact factor of a journal is calculated by dividing the number of citations in a calendar year to the source items published in that journal during the previous two years. It is an independent measure calculated by Thomson Reuters, Philadelphia, USA.

Context: Dr. Ron Petersen is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen conducted an interview with Nature about the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services. Dr. Petersen chairs the committee.

Mayo Clinic Public Affairs Contacts: Brian Kilen

 

Eau Claire Leader-Telegram Healthy lifestyles can help fight winter depression by Jennifer Schmidt

For a lot of people, winter can be a tough time of year. The days are shorter – and colder – leaving many with decreased energy and increased sadness. But one local dietitian says eating right and exercising can help combat the winter blues. “It’s all part of that balanced, healthy diet,” said Diane Dressel of Mayo Clinic Health System. “It’s focusing on eating healthy, but I think sometimes getting out of the four walls, so to speak, and getting outside can be very helpful. Exercise is so important for those winter blues and blahs.”

Circulation: The Leader-Telegram is the largest daily newspaper in west-central Wisconsin. It covers 12 counties with circulations of 23,500 weekdays and 29,800 Sundays.

Context: Registered dietitian Diane Dressel gives diet, exercise advice for fighting winter depression. She also was featured in a weight loss article that ran in the Rochester (Minn.) Post-Bulletin. Diane was included in a media experts’ alert that was issued by Mayo Clinic enterprise media relations in late December.

Mayo Clinic Public Affairs Contact: Paul Meznarich

For more coverage of Mayo Clinic in the News, please link to our news clip blog here. 

Tags: alzheimer's disease, Brian Rolston, concussions, Diane Dressel, Dr. Elizabeth Seaquist, Dr. Martha Hartz, Dr. Michael Stuart, Dr. Robert Rizza, Eau Claire Leader-Telegram, Endocrinology / Diabetes, Immunology, Mayo Clinic Health System, Mayo Clinic in the News, Mayo Clinic in the News, Mayo Clinic Rochester, MPR, National Alzheimer's Project Act, Nature, Pediatrics, Psychology and Psychiatry, Research, Ronald Petersen, Sports Medicine, USA Hockey, USA Today, Wellness

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