March 30th, 2012

Mayo Clinic in News Weekly Highlights

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March 30, 2012

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.
Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations
oestreich.karl@mayo.edu

USA Today
Women turn to social media for support after pregnancy loss

by Maureen Linke

Ashley Webber and her husband Lee of Holly Springs, N.C., were thrilled when they learned she was pregnant with their second child. “Since I am a sharer, I posted the great news to my Facebook at four weeks — pretty much the minute we found out,”  Webber says. Two weeks later, she miscarried. “Again, I posted it to my Facebook and again was flooded with stories, encouragement, prayers and love," Webber says. “It was a blessing that I shared my good news so early.”… “There is an abundance of change in American culture, and I've always been bothered why people don't tell their loved ones about their loss,” says physician Roger Harms, chair of Obstetrics & Gynecology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. “Miscarriage is a terrible misnomer, suggesting that something happened. Guilt is built in with the words that we use.”

Circulation: USA TODAY  has a circulation of 1.8 million and a readership of 3.1 million. USA TODAY websites have 26.3 million unique visitors a month.

Context: The reporter reached out to Mayo Clinic to talk with an expert on miscarriages. Ginger Plumbo made quick work to connect the reporter with Dr. Roger Harms, a Mayo Clinic obstetrics and gynecology expert.

Public Affairs Contact: plumbo.ginger@mayo.edu

Reuters, Quality of life tied to lung cancer survival: study

The way lung cancer patients feel around the time they're diagnosed may be related to how long they survive - even after taking into account objective measures of the disease, according to a U.S. study…Objective measures such as age, the stage and aggressiveness of the cancer and other health conditions, did not fully explain the connection, said the team led by Jeff Sloan, a professor of oncology and biostatistics at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Additional coverage: Baltimore Sun, Yahoo! Canada

Circulation: Thomson Reuters is the world's largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world news, business news, technology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile, and interactive television platforms.

Context: This study was published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology and found that newly-diagnosed lung cancer patients who rated their quality of life higher generally lived longer with the disease, typically surviving nearly six years, versus less than two years among patients who'd reported a poor quality of life. Dr. Jeff Sloan, a Mayo Clinic expert who focuses his research on oncology patient quality of life (QOL). The general philosophy of this research is to ensure that alongside the investigation of medical treatments intended to prolong life, it is important to incorporate the relative quality of life for the patient over the additional time gained.

Public Affairs Contacts: nellis.robert@mayo.edu, dangor.yusuf@mayo.edu

Wall Street Journal
Boost for Surgery in Treating Diabetes
by Ron Winslow

Weight-loss surgery proved far more effective than medication in controlling blood sugar among obese patients in two new studies, strengthening the case that the stomach-shrinking procedures should be considered an important treatment option for Type 2 diabetes… “The biggest challenge we face is that we don't have good alternatives for the medical management of obesity that result in sufficient weight loss to have an impact on diabetes,” said Maria Collazo-Clavell, an endocrinologist who treats diabetes at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and who wasn't involved in the studies.

Circulation: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is tops in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 2 million copies on weekdays.

Context: Dr. Maria Collazo-Clavell, a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist, who was not involved in the study, often provides her expert perspective to journalists on topics related to obesity and diabetes.

Public Affairs Contact: klein.traci@mayo.edu

Bloomberg
Stomach Stapling Surgery Puts Diabetes on Hold, Studies Find
by Michelle Cortez

Diabetes runs in Heather Britton’s family. Her mother died of complications at age 63, and over a dozen other relatives have the disease. Until a few years ago, Britton says she was convinced it would kill her too…In the past, physicians who treat diabetics have been resistant to considering surgery as an option for patients uncontrolled on multiple medicines, said Maria Collazo-Clavell, an endocrinologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

Circulation: Bloomberg has 2,300 media professionals in 146 bureaus across 72 countries. Bloomberg delivers its content across more than 400 publications, over 310 million households worldwide through Bloomberg Television and 500,000 in the New York metro area and 18.5 million subscribers through satellite radio.

Context: Dr. Maria Collazo-Clavell, a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist, who was not involved in the study, often provides her expert perspective to journalists on topics related to obesity and diabetes.

Public Affairs Contacts: klein.traci@mayo.edu, theimer.sharon@mayo.edu

ABC News, Pregnancy Increases Heart Attack Risks

Heart attacks are often linked to high blood pressure, diabetes and smoking. But a new study suggests pregnancy can also increase the risk. “There are significant hormonal changes that occur during pregnancy that affect the coronary arteries,” said study author Dr. Uri Elkayam, professor of medicine, cardiology, and obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Southern California…Seventy percent of spontaneous coronary dissections occur in women and 30 percent of those occur during pregnancy or immediately after, according to Dr. Sharon Hayes, a cardiologist at the Mayo clinic in Rochester, Minn. who was not involved in the study.” We have known for decades that young women with heart attack have higher mortality than men at the same age and also have very different cardiovascular disease risk factors,” she said.

Circulation:  ABCNews.com is the official website for ABC News.

Context: Dr. Sharrone Hayes, a Mayo Clinic cardiologist, is often sought out for her expert perspective.

Public Affairs Contact: klein.traci@mayo.edu

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Tags: ABC News, Bloomberg, Cancer, Cardiology, Dr. Jeff Sloan, Dr. Mario Collazo-Clavell, Dr. Roger Harms, Dr. Sharon Hayes, Dr. Uri Elkayam, Endocrinology / Diabetes, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Mayo Clinic Health System, Mayo Clinic in the News, Mayo Clinic Rochester, Obesity, ObGyn, Research, Reuters, Social Media, USA Today, Wall Street Journal, Women's Health

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