May 11th, 2012

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

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May 11, 2012

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations
oestreich.karl@mayo.edu

TIME
Is Obesity Causing a Rise in Rheumatoid Arthritis Among Women?
by Alexandra Sifferlin

Rheumatoid arthritis may soon be added to the growing list of health risks associated with obesity. According to a recent Mayo Clinic study, women with a history of obesity are at a higher risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis... “The data suggests a significant portion of rheumatoid arthritis cases could be due to obesity,” says study author Dr. John Davis, a rheumatology consultant at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. “Unless we are able to change the course of the obesity epidemic, we can expect to see a rise in the incidence of rheumatoid arthritis.”

Circulation: Time magazine has a weekly circulation of 3.3 million. Time, Inc. engages more than 138 million U.S. consumers in print, online and via mobile devices each month.

Context: A news release was distributed by Mayo Clinic - April 25 about study results related to a potential link between obesity and the painful autoimmune disorder rheumatoid arthritis. For women, it appears there is a link, Mayo Clinic researchers say. They studied hundreds of patients and found a history of obesity puts women at significant risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis. Their findings are published online in the American College of Rheumatology journal Arthritis Care & Research.  John Davis, M.D., a Mayo Clinic rheumatologist, also participated in a web chat as part of Arthritis Action Month on the American College of Rheumatology’s Facebook page. Additional coverage: Arthritis Today

Public Affairs Contact: theimer.sharon@mayo.edu

Slate Magazine
Computer Use Combined With Exercise May Protect Memory
by Ankita Rao

A new study suggests that using a computer may help stave off memory loss in old age…That was the conclusion of Mayo Clinic researchers who took a look at the relative cognitive health of subjects between the ages of 70 and 93. …"The mental stimulation may be polishing the communication lines and giving good connections between neurons," lead researcher Dr. Yonas Geda told the magazine.

Reach: Slate is a daily magazine on the Web. Founded in 1996, Slate is a general-interest publication offering analysis and commentary about politics, news, business, technology, and culture. The site is owned by The Washington Post Company.

Context: Mayo Clinic in Arizona issued a news release on May 1 which indicated that combining mentally- stimulating activities, such as using a computer, with moderate exercise decreases your odds of having memory loss more than computer use or exercise alone, a Mayo Clinic study shows. Previous studies have shown that exercising your body and your mind will help your memory but the new study, published in the May 2012 issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings, reports a synergistic interaction between computer activities and moderate exercise in “protecting” the brain function in people better than 70 years old. Previous coverage is noted here. Additional coverage: Healthcare Global, DoctorsLounge, TopNews AE

Public Affairs Contact: mcveigh.jim@mayo.edu

Reuters
Device might spark memories in some with Alzheimer's
by Andrew Seaman

A small safety trial suggests a pacemaker-like device implanted into the brains of Alzheimer's patients may stimulate beneficial brain activity in some. The results do not signal the device could someday cure the disease, but that it may restore some measure of activity in areas of the brain whose decline is linked to Alzheimer's symptoms like memory loss, depression and agitation…Although the new research is only in its beginning stages, it's a promising avenue to explore since available Alzheimer's treatments "aren't that great," said Dr. Bryan Klassen, a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, who was not involved in the study. Additional coverage: Baltimore Sun, Chicago Tribune,

Circulation: Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world news, business news, technology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile, and interactive television platforms.

Context: Bryan Klassen, M.D., a Mayo clinic neurologist and movement disorders expert, provided his third party expertise for the story.

Public Affairs Contact: kilen.brian@mayo.edu

KARE 11
Twin Cities Race for the Cure celebrates 20 years
by Renee Tessman

This year the Twin Cities Race for the Cure will mark its 20th year. One 20-year breast cancer survivor has walked the race every year…Mayo Clinic breast cancer researcher, Dr. Tufia Haddad, said since 1993, “Fewer women are being diagnosed with breast cancer and fewer women are losing their lives to breast cancer as well.”

Reach: KARE has won the demographic of viewers 25 to 54 years-old in almost every Nielsen ratings sweeps period since the late 1980s, while placing second overall in households at 5, 6, and 10 p.m. since May 2006, trailing rival CBS affiliate WCCO.

Context: Tufia Haddad,M.D, a Mayo Clinic oncologist, gave her expert perspective on breast cancer research.

Public Affairs Contacts: dangor.yusuf@mayo.edu, hanson.nicholas@mayo.edu

KARE 11
Mayo Clinic device helping some with Parkinson's walk more easily

The Mayo Clinic has developed a device that some Parkinson's patients say is helping them walk more easily. It's essentially a highly adjustable laser light. Most of us never give turning a corner a second thought, but diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease, it's often the first thing on Doug Merfeld's mind. Turns cause him to freeze. Movement disorders neurologist, Dr. Bryan Klaussen with the Mayo Clinic said, "It makes a line appear on the floor as they're using their walker so they can see that and step toward it as they're moving it's really as simple as that."

Reach: KARE has won the demographic of viewers 25 to 54 years-old in almost every Nielsen ratings sweeps period since the late 1980s, while placing second overall in households at 5, 6, and 10 p.m. since May 2006, trailing rival CBS affiliate WCCO.

Context: Bryan Klassen, M.D., a Mayo clinic neurologist and movement disorders expert, was interviewed for the story.

Public Affairs Contacts: hanson.nicholas@mayo.edu, weiss.cynthia@mayo.edu

KARE 11
Mayo Clinic joins with Guthrie to explore topic of depression

Dr. Mark Frye, Professor of Psychiatry at the Mayo Clinic joined KARE 11 News @ 4 to preview a special event on May 12 at the Guthrie Theater that opens up a discussion on mood disorders as they relate to depression.

Reach: KARE has won the demographic of viewers 25 to 54 years-old in almost every Nielsen ratings sweeps period since the late 1980s, while placing second overall in households at 5, 6, and 10 p.m. since May 2006, trailing rival CBS affiliate WCCO.

Context: Mark Frye, M.D., Chair, Psychiatry and Psychology at Mayo Clinic, is Director of the Mayo Mood Clinic and Research Program. His clinical interests are in bipolar disorder, depression, and alcoholism with a research focus on genomics, brain imaging, and neuroendocrinology of mood disorders and alcoholism.  Mayo Clinic is putting the spotlight on often misunderstood illnesses: depression & madness - at the Guthrie Theatre on May 12:  “Taking Madness Out of the Closet.” This public event (combined with a medical education seminar) is designed to help patients, families and physicians better understand illnesses as common as depression — 1 in 5 Americans suffer from depression at sometimes in their lives — to more rare disorders, such as bipolar disorder, which affects 1 in 100 Americans. Dr. Frye is leading the day-long event, which aims to take the mystery out of mental illness and features two well-known successful women, who have made the decision to not only go public, but to celebrate their struggles in works of art. The event costs $50 for the day for members of the public and is free for high school and college students. Here is a link to the schedule. More background on Dr. Frye’s research can be found here, including a link to a feature on his research in Mayo Clinic’s Discovery’s Edge.

Public Affairs Contact: hanson.nicholas@mayo.edu

Star Tribune
Injuries can leave you weak in the knees
by Jeff Strickler

In praise of knees: Some people who face chronic problems grumble that knees are the weak link in the chain. Doctors disagree. “The knee is actually very strong,” said Dr. Ed Laskowski, co-director of the Mayo Clinic's Sports Medicine Center. “It can handle most physical extremes. We're all playing sports at a higher level than we used to. We're bigger, faster and stronger. All things considered, it's a very strong and stable joint.”

Circulation: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 514,457 copies and weekday circulation is 300,330. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Ed Laskowski,M.D., is co-director of Mayo Clinic’s Sports Medicine Center. The research mission of the Sports Medicine Center is to investigate aspects of sports injury evaluation, treatment, and prevention in order to provide optimal treatment to those involved in sports- or fitness-related activities. Recent work has addressed such subjects as facial protection for hockey players, shock absorption in running shoes, and shoulder stability.

Public Affairs Contact: anderson.bryan@mayo.edu

For more coverage of Mayo Clinic in the News, please link to our news clip blog here. 

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Tags: alzheimer's disease, Arthritis Care & Research, Breast Cancer, Dr. Bryan Klassen, Dr. Ed Laskowski, Dr. John Davis, Dr. Mark Frye, Dr. Tufia Haddad, Dr. Yonas Geda, Guthrie Theater, KARE11, Mayo Clinic in the News, Mayo Clinic Rochester, Neurology, Obesity, Parkinson's, Psychology and Psychiatry, Race for the Cure, Research, Reuters, rheumatoid arthritis, Rheumatology, Slate Magazine, Sports Medicine, Sports Medicine Center, Technology, TIME, Wellness, Women's Health

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