Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Posted on May 25th, 2012 by Admin

May 25, 2012

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations
oestreich.karl@mayo.edu

NY Times Well Blog
A Richer Life by Seeing the Glass Half Full
by Jane Brody

A more classical definition from the Mayo Clinic: “Optimism is the belief that good things will happen to you and that negative events are temporary setbacks to be overcome.”… It’s important not to neglect the power of positive thinking. Both Dr. Segerstrom and the Mayo researchers recommend taking a few minutes at the end of each day to write down three positive things that happened that day, ending the day on an upbeat note. The Mayo researchers offered these additional suggestions…

Circulation: The New York Times has the third highest circulation nationally, behind USA Today (2nd) and The Wall Street Journal (1st) with 1,150,589 weekday copies circulated and 1,645,152 circulated on Sundays.

Context: Jane Brody frequently quotes Mayo Clinic experts, refers to Mayo Clinic studies and cites other Mayo Clinic references in her writing.

Public Affairs Contact: klein.traci@mayo.edu

FOX News
Rate of C. difficile infection increasing dramatically among children
by Alex Crees

Mayo Clinic researchers found the incidence of C. difficile infection in children was more than 12 times higher between 2004 and 2009, compared to the rates between 1991 and 1997. The number of infections rose from 2.6 cases per every 100,000 children to 32.6 cases per 100,000 in the selected time periods…“These were expected results with some surprising elements,” lead study author Dr. Sahil Khanna, from the Mayo Clinic Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, told FoxNews.com.

Reach: FoxNews.com has more than 13 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Mayo Clinic issued a news release May 17 about the study which was presented by Mayo Clinic researchers during Digestive Disease Week 2012. The study provides clear evidence that the number of people contracting the hard-to-control and treat bacterial infection Clostridium difficile (C. difficile or C. diff) is increasing, and that the infection is commonly contracted outside of the hospital.

Public Affairs Contact: kilen.brian@mayo.edu

NPR Shots Blog
Dangerous Gut Bacteria Move Outside Hospitals, Infect Kids
by Ted Burnham
Mayo Clinic researcher Sahil Khanna and his colleagues have found that children are contracting the disease at ever-higher rates, too. And most of them are being infected outside of hospitals. He presented the findings at the annual Digestive Disease Week medical conference ending today. Although C. diff infections were first documented in the late 1970s, Khanna tells Shots, "there haven't been any studies of children in and outside the hospital." So he and fellow researchers examined data from Olmsted County, Minn., where they had access to detailed records for the entire community, going back decades. Additional coverage: Environmental Expert, Huffington Post, WebMD, News Medical, Medical Xpress, Georgia Public Broadcasting, North Country Public Radio (NY), Capital Public Radio (Calif)

Reach: The NPR Shots Blog covers news about health and medicine. It is written and reported by NPR’s Science Desk.

Context: Mayo Clinic issued a news release May 17 about the study which was presented by Mayo Clinic researchers during Digestive Disease Week 2012. The study provides clear evidence that the number of people contracting the hard-to-control and treat bacterial infection Clostridium difficile (C. difficile or C. diff) is increasing, and that the infection is commonly contracted outside of the hospital.

Public Affairs Contact: kilen.brian@mayo.edu

ABC News
Sleep Apnea Treatment May Prevent Hypertension

Sleep apnea may prove to be a treatable cause of high blood pressure, according to research released today that suggests wearing a special breathing mask at night may protect apnea patients from the hypertension. Most people think of obstructive sleep apnea as a snoring disorder. Although many sufferers snore, apnea is characterized by short episodes in which the patient's upper airway narrows or closes, reducing the flow of oxygen to the body and brain. …Dr. Virend Somers, a sleep apnea and heart disease researcher at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., cautioned that the results of the two studies are suggestive "but not definitive that CPAP is protective of the cardiovascular system."

Circulation: ABCNews.com is the official website for ABC News.

Context: Virend Somers, M.D., Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic phsyician with joint appointments in cardivascular diseases and hypertension, is often sought out for his expert persepective.

Public Affairs Contacts: hanson.nicholas@mayo.edu, klein.traci@mayo.edu

MPR
Should young athletes be screened for heart conditions?

University of Minnesota football player Gary Tinsley was found dead April 6 of a heart condition at the age of 22. The Hennepin County Medical Examiner said he died of an enlarged heart.  Sudden cardiac arrest is the leading cause of death in young athletes, but what factors contribute to this heightened risk in otherwise healthy individuals? Some physicians believe that mandatory EKG screening for young athletes is the key to saving lives, while others believe the screening is too costly and would do more harm than good....Mike Ackerman, cardiologist and professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic, will also join the discussion.  "HCM [hypertrophic cardiomyopathy] is a death sentence to athletics," he said. "Right now guidelines say if you have this disease you're disqualified from all sports... It's a one-size-fits-all approach, we just say, 'you're disqualified.' We need to individualize the athlete, the risk, the disease."

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Mike Ackerman, M.D, a Mayo Clinic cardiologist, appeared as a guest on the Daily Circuit May 21 to talk about sudden cardiac arrest.

Public Affairs Contacts: klein.traci@mayo.edu, hanson.nicholas@mayo.edu

Phoenix Business Journal
ASU Health Services to join Mayo Clinic Care Network
by Angela Gonzales

ASU Health Services will join the Mayo Clinic Care Network that allows ASU to tap into Mayo Clinic’s services and tools, including AskMayoExpert, a tool that provides disease management and treatment recommendations, and eConsults, which will allow ASU doctors to electronically connect with Mayo experts on specific questions. Additional coverage: ASU News, Toronto Telegraph, Ahwatukee Foothills News

Reach: The Phoenix Business Journal is one of 63 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Context: Mayo Clinic in Arizona issued a news release May 18 announcing that Arizona State University Health Services will join the Mayo Clinic Care Network to bring enhanced services to ASU students. Through this collaboration, ASU Health Services will have access to the latest Mayo Clinic expertise to help care for their patients and improve their health.

Public Affairs Contact: mcveigh.jim@mayo.edu

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic Jacksonville plans $100 million expansion
by Roger Bull

Mayo Clinic Jacksonville is planning a nearly $100 million expansion that will include a 40 percent increase in beds and a separate primary care clinic. The expansion will come in two projects and is expected to result in 250 construction jobs and 400 permanent employees at the clinic. The largest project is a two-story, $80 million addition on the top of its six-story hospital at the main campus on San Pablo Road. That will increase the square footage from 730,000 to 842,000 and the beds from 214 to 304. "We're just running at a high occupancy," said Bob Brigham, chief administrative officer. "We call it a red light when the morning census exceeds the number of beds. "By the end of the day, we have to get them all taken care of." Additional coverage:  Action News Jax, St. Augustine Record Fla., Topix.com, Jacksonville Business Journal, Post-Bulletin, BringMeTheNews, Jacksonville Business Journal.

Circulation: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Mayo Clinic in Florida issued a news release May 21 announcing the expansion on Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida.

Public Affairs Contact: punsky.kevin@mayo.edu

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic study: Special light can detect pancreatic cancer
by Charlie Patton

Pancreatic cancer, a frequently deadly form of cancer, is difficult to diagnose in its early stages. But a new pilot study at the Mayo Clinic's Jacksonville campus was able to detect pancreatic cancer 100 percent of the time using a special light that measures changes in cells and blood vessels in the small intestine during a routine endoscopy. Gastroenterologist Michael Wallace, chief of gastroenterology and hepatology at Mayo, gave a report on the pilot study Monday in San Diego during the international Digestive Disease Week 2012, the world's largest gathering of physicians and researchers who treat disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Additional coverage: Jacksonville Business Journal, Science Codex, MSNBC, MyHealthNewsDaily, Toronto Telegraph

Circulation: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Mayo Clinic in Florida issued a news release May 21. Michael Wallace, M.D., a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic in Florida, focuses research on advanced imaging systems for the detection and treatment of early cancers and pre-cancerous lesions of the gastrointestinal tract.

Public Affairs Contact: punsky.kevin@mayo.edu

Chicago Tribune
Robots useful in hysterectomies
by Andrea Brown

A common operation in the United States, hysterectomies are now going high-tech as many surgeons embrace robotics as another tool to help them do their jobs better…The Mayo Clinic in Arizona, one of the first institutions to use robotic laparoscopy, pioneered the technique in the early 2000s, said Dr. Rosanne Kho, assistant professor and fellowship program director in the clinic's Division of Urogynecology, Department of Gynecological Surgery.

Circulation:  The Tribune’s average weekday circulation is more about 425,000. Average Sunday circulation is more than 781,000. According to the Tribune, its newspaper reaches more than five million consumers while covering 76% of the market.

Context: Rosanne Ko, M.D., is a gynecologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Public Affairs Contact: mcveigh.jim@mayo.edu

Kansas City Star
Deal gives Mayo Clinic a foothold in St. Joseph
by Eric Adler

Patients wanting to tap the expertise of Mayo Clinic physicians will no longer have to travel 400 miles to Minnesota to do so. St. Joseph-based Heartland Health on Wednesday announced an arrangement with the famed Rochester, Minn., research hospital to become part of its Mayo Clinic Care Network…“It allows us to extend our brand and our reach,” said physician David Hayes, medical director of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, who announced the alignment at a ceremony in St. Joseph. “And it allows us to extend it with organizations we are comfortable with.” Additional coverage: HealthLeaders Media, Post-Bulletin, KQTV St. Joseph, Kansas City Business Journal, News Press Now, Modern Healthcare, St. Joseph News-Press, NECN Mass. (AP), : The Republic Ind., Fierce Healthcare, St. Louis Today, Washington Examiner, St. Joseph Post, Springfield News-Leader, Columbia Missourian, KCTV 5

Reach: The Kansas City Star has a daily circulation of 553,200 daily and 770,300 on Sunday. Kansascity.com, its website has more than 3.8 million unique visitors and 28 million page views a month.

Context: Mayo Clinic held a news conference May 23 announcing Heartland Health, based in St. Joseph, MO., is joining the Mayo Clinic Care Network. The network extends Mayo Clinic's knowledge and expertise to physicians and providers interested in working together in the best interest of their patients. Heartland Health's physicians will have Mayo Clinic expertise at their fingertips, including the ability to connect with Mayo Clinic physicians, who can help them care for their patients and improve their systems and the health of their communities. For more information, refer to the news release.

Public Affairs Contacts: anderson.bryan@mayo.edu, lowreyschrandt.sherri@mayo.edu

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic's Everest researchers reflect on expedition
by Edie Grossfield

Mayo Clinic researchers Bryan Taylor and Amine Issa returned a week ago from an expedition to Mount Everest base camp in Nepal. Now, back in Rochester with the rest of the six-man team, Taylor, 29, and Issa, 27, took a break Thursday from their post-expedition paperwork to talk about their trip. It was clear the two had become close friends during the challenging expedition, as they joked back and forth about things that happened and shared similar views about the good and bad of their travels. Related Post-Bulletin coverage.

Circulation: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: Amine Issa, Ph.D., and Bryan Taylor, Ph.D., sat down for a chat with Post-Bulletin reporter Eddie Grossfield after they returned from the Everest expedition. Mayo Clinic's research expedition has been chronicled on the Advancing the Science blog.

Public Affairs Contact: nellis.robert@mayo.edu

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Tags: ABC News, Anne Issa, AskMayoExpert, ASU Health Services, Bryan Taylor, C. Difficile, Chicago Tribune, David Hayes, Digestive Disease Week 2012, Division of Gastroenterology, Dr. Michael Wallace, Dr. Rosanne Kho, Dr. Sahil Khanna, Dr. Virend Somers, Florida Times-Union, Fox News, FoxNews.com, Gary Tinsley, Heartland Health, Jane Brody, Kansas City Star, Mike Ackerman, Mount Everest, MPR, NPR, pancreatic cancer, Pheonix Business Journal, Post Bulletin, robotic laparoscopy, sleep apnea, The New York Times

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