Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Posted on June 8th, 2012 by

June 8, 2012

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

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Wall Street Journal
Controlling High Blood Pressure, Through the Kidney
by Christopher Weaver

For a decade, a daily regimen of eight drugs, abstinence from salty foods, exercise and meditation did nothing to stem Tracy Fritchley's dangerously high blood pressure. Doctors had little else to offer. But now, medical-device makers have rallied to a new experimental treatment for such stubborn hypertension: Singeing the walls of nerve-lined arteries leading to the kidneys, blocking the organs' ability to raise blood pressure… "Until now, there were no other options for such patients, other than adding more drugs," said Issam Moussa, a Mayo doctor who is participating in the trial, but not Ms. Fritchley's care.

Circulation: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is tops in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 2 million copies on weekdays.

Context: Issam Moussa, M.D, is chair of cardiovascular diseases at Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Public Affairs Contacts: Kevin Punsky, Traci Klein

TIME
Immune System Glitch Linked to Four Times Higher Risk of Death
by Alexandra Sifferlin

People with an immune system flaw that causes the overproduction of an antibody molecule called a free light chain are four times more likely to die of diseases including cancer, diabetes and cardiac and respiratory disease than those with normal levels, according to researchers from the Mayo Clinic…Dr. Vincent Rajkumar, a Mayo Clinic hematologist and lead author of the new study, and his colleagues first noted the association between free light chains and death risk during earlier research of melanoma precursors. “It’s interesting that levels that are abnormal years prior to an event can be a predictor. A test that tells you something about a patient before anything adverse occurs is valuable,” says Rajkumar.

Circulation: Time magazine has a weekly circulation of 3.3 million. Time, Inc. engages more than 138 million U.S. consumers in print, online and via mobile devices each month.

Context: Mayo Clinic researchers have identified an immune system deficiency whose presence shows someone is up to four times likelier to die than a person without it. The glitch involves an antibody molecule called a free light chain; people whose immune systems produce too much of the molecule are far more likely to die of a life-threatening illness such as cancer, diabetes and cardiac and respiratory disease than those whose bodies make normal levels. The study is published in the June issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Mayo Clinic issued a news release June 3.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

HealthDay
Immune System Glitch Linked to Greater Risk of Death

People with a certain flaw in their immune system are up to four times more likely to die than people who don’t have this “glitch,” a new study indicates. Researchers from the Mayo Clinic explained that people whose immune system produced too much of an antibody molecule known as a free light chain, are far more likely to die from a serious illness, such as cancer, diabetes or heart disease.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day.

Additional coverage: Health.com, Medical Daily, CNN Blog, Ozark First, Bioscience Technology, , DoctorsLounge, News Day

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Men’s Fitness
The Extreme Workout: How Much Exercise Is Too Much?

When you finally get off the couch and experience your first runner’s high, you may want to run forever, but is it possible to get too much exercise? The answer is yes, according to a recent review of research by a team led by cardiologist Dr. James O’Keefe. In some ways, exercise is like a medication that can be used to prevent and treat many chronic diseases. As with prescription drugs, though, it’s possible to “overdose” on exercise. The researchers, who published their work in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings, looked at studies of people who competed in marathons, iron man triathlons, ultramarathons, and long distance bicycle races. Additional coverage: Dayton Daily news, Belfast Telegraph, Herald Scotland, KARE 11, WFMY, Middletown Journal, Springfield News-Sun,CNN Blog, TIME, CBC.ca, Telegraph UK, Kansas City Star, Scientific American Blog, Mail on Sunday UK, NBC San Diego, Star Tribune, US News & World Report, KHBS NW Ark, Huffington Post , Canoe.ca , Discovery News

Circulation: Men's Fitness is a lifestyle magazine for men. The magazine includes information on diet and nutrition, fashion, and sex, as well as training, fitness products and body building. Men's Fitness has a circulation of 65,135.

Context: This research, which was published in June 2012 issue of  Mayo Clinic Proceedings, looked at studies of people who competed in marathons, iron man triathlons, ultramarathons, and long distance bicycle races.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

HealthDay
Ginseng Capsules Seem to Ease Cancer-Related Fatigue

The herb ginseng appeared to significantly reduce cancer-related fatigue compared to an inactive placebo, although it took several weeks for the herb's effects to take effect in the patients, a new study reports… The patients took capsules of pure American ginseng instead of some over-the-counter ginseng products that can include ethanol. Ethanol may be potentially dangerous to breast cancer patients, study researcher Debra Barton of the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center said in a news release from the clinic. Additional coverage: ABC News, Drugs.com, WLS AM NY, MSN Health, Times of India, MPR, ABC News Radio

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day.

Context: High doses of the herb American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) over two months reduced cancer-related fatigue in patients more effectively than a placebo, a Mayo Clinic-led study found. Sixty percent of patients studied had breast cancer. The findings are being presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology's annual meeting. A news release was distributed by Mayo Clinic June 4.

Public Affairs Contact: Joe Dangor

Chicago Sun-Times
Breast cancer drug that targets unhealthy cells shows promise
by Monifa Thomas

An eagerly awaited study presented Sunday in Chicago found that a new type of drug successfully delayed progression in certain breast cancer patients and had fewer side effects. The Phase III study of the T-DMI, sponsored by Roche’s Genentech, was released at the American Society of Clinical Oncology…Yet the four-drug, known as Cyclone, appears to be “as good, if not better” than the drugs used now to reduce tumors, said lead author Dr. Joseph Mikhael, a hematologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. A more detailed Phase III trial is being done now.

Reach: Chicago Sun-Times reaches 4.5 million people through its print and online vehicles.

Context: A four-drug combination of chemotherapy drugs scored high marks as a highly effective treatment for patients newly diagnosed with the blood cancer multiple myeloma, according to results from a Mayo Clinic-led study. The multidrug regimen, called CYCLONE (comprised of Cyclophosphamide, Carfilzomib, Thalidomide and Dexamethasone), boasted strong results in the phase II trial, most notably for how quickly and effectively it worked and how well tolerated it was by the study recipients. The study was presented by at an American Society of Clinical Oncology conference in Chicago by Joseph Mikhael, M.D., a hematologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Public Affairs Contacts: Julie Janovsky-Mason, Joe Dangor

Star Tribune
Minnesota seeks to limit psych drugs for kids
by Jeremy Olson

Concerned by a sharp rise in the use of powerful psychiatric drugs for adolescents, Minnesota will start requiring doctors in many cases to begin using a state-funded consulting service before prescribing such medications for children. The state Department of Human Services on Monday awarded a two-year contract to Mayo Clinic to run the service, which will advise pediatricians and family doctors on whether antipsychotic and stimulant medications are appropriate for their young patients…"We know there is overprescribing. We know there are some harmful drug combinations," said Dr. Peter Jensen, a Mayo psychiatrist.

Circulation:  The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 514,457 copies and weekday circulation is 300,330. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: The Minnesota Department of Human Services has entered into a two-year contract with Mayo Clinic to provide expert guidance to pediatricians and other primary care providers who prescribe psychotropic medications for children. The new service is referred to as "collaborative psychiatric consultation" and is based on pilot projects that improved care and saved money. Mayo Clinic issued a news release June 4.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Pioneer Press
Minnesota, Mayo contract addresses psych medications for children

The Minnesota Department of Human Services has entered into a $1.7 million contract with the Mayo Clinic in which the Rochester, Minn.,-based health system will guide primary care doctors when they prescribe psychotropic medications for children.  The program will run for two years and is expected to pay for itself with reduced hospitalizations and medication use in the Medical Assistance program -- the state's version of the state-federal Medicaid public health insurance program.

Circulation: The St. Paul Pioneer Press has a daily circulation of 226,108 and its Sunday newspaper circulation is 270,811. Its TwinCities.com website had approximately 18.6 million page views (March 2011) and the Pioneer Press and TwinCities.com reaches about 3.3 million people each month.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

MPR, Mayo-led group will focus on children's mental health
by Lorna Benson

The Mayo Clinic will lead a new partnership to provide mental health training to doctors. The collaboration is a response to Minnesota's severe shortage of child mental health experts. There are only 81 child psychiatrists in the state, which means that patients who may need psychotropic medications must often rely on family physicians or pediatricians for a prescription. Mayo psychiatrist Peter Jensen says these powerful drugs can help children, but they can also be harmful or unnecessary in many cases. "We've seen these many-fold increases in cocktails of medicines, if you will, without an adequate evidence base, with medicines that cause side effects, in an untrained population of physicians," Jensen says.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Mankato Free Press
Our View: Pediatric mental health idea solid

An effort by the Minnesota Department of Human Services and the Mayo Clinic to expand knowledge of pediatric mental health cases and offer support to doctors and practitioners seems very much needed and a worthwhile public health problem to tackle.

Circulation: The Free Press news staff covers six counties -- Blue Earth, Nicollet, Le Sueur, Brown, Waseca and Watonwan. The major cities of Mankato, North Mankato, Waseca, St. Peter and Le Sueur are also primary coverage areas. It also has wide coverage of local sports and Minnesota State University in Mankato. It also is the publisher of Mankato Magazine (circulation 10,000), the MN Valley Business magazine and The Land (circulation 35,000).

Additional coverage: MPR, MinnPost, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal , Star Tribune, PhysOrg, Bio-Medicine, a2z News

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Eau Claire Leader-Telegram
Chief nursing officer to retire
by Christena O’Brien

Lynn Frank has had lots of nursing jobs with one employer - Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire. But after 42 years, Frank - vice president and chief nursing officer - is retiring. Her last day is Friday. "I've had a lot of opportunities and challenges here," said Frank, a Cadott native known for putting the patients' needs first.

Circulation: The Leader-Telegram is the largest daily newspaper in west-central Wisconsin. It covers 12 counties with circulations of 23,500 weekdays and 29,800 Sundays.

Context: A news release was distributed on June 4 by Mayo Clinic Health System, Eau Claire.  After 42 years with Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire — the last 27 as vice president and chief nursing officer — Lynn Frank was retiring.

Public Affairs Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

ESPN The Magazine
Title Waves

More significantly, the splash they made in 1976 has had a rippling effect. Mary O'Connor, who went from being an Olympic rower to the head of orthopedic surgery at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville (and the proud mother of a daughter who's a competitive rower), said, "Title IX has given women so much. What I'm most proud of is that we showed people the backbone of Title IX.”

Circulation: ESPN W aims to be the primary destination for women's sports.

Context: This feature story chronicles the pioneering roles that Mary O'Connor, M.D.,  head of orthopedic surgery at Mayo Clinic in Florida, and her rowing colleagues had when Title IX came into being in 1972.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punksy

Pioneer Press
Mayo picks up Fairview hospital in Red Wing

The Mayo Clinic and Fairview Health Services have signed a tentative agreement for the Minneapolis-based health system to transfer control of a hospital in Red Wing, Minn., to the Rochester-based clinic … The agreement marks the latest of example of growth in the Mayo Clinic's system of hospitals and clinics. Fairview, meanwhile, has faced recent financial struggles. Post-Bulletin, Biz Journals, Star Tribune, Republican Eagle, Modern HealthCare

Circulation: The St. Paul Pioneer Press has a daily circulation of 226,108 and its Sunday newspaper circulation is 270,811. Its TwinCities.com website had approximately 18.6 million page views (March 2011) and the Pioneer Press and TwinCities.com reaches about 3.3 million people each month.

Context:  Mayo Clinic issued a news release June 7 announcing a tentative agreement today for Fairview Red Wing Health Services to become part of Mayo Clinic Health System. The parties will work to finalize the details of the agreement and acquisition during the next several weeks, targeting July 1 for Mayo Clinic Health System to assume operations.

Public Affairs Contacts: Joe O'Keefe, Nick Hanson

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Tags: American Society of Clinical Oncology, Breast Cancer, Cancer, Cardiology, Chicago Sun-Times, Complementary/Alternative Medicine, Dr. Issam Moussa, Dr. James O'Keefe, Dr. Joseph Mikhael, Dr. Mary O'Connor, Dr. Vincent Rajkumar, Eau Claire Leader-Telegram, ESPN The Magazine, Genentech, ginseng, HealthDay, Hematology, high blood pressure, Immunology, Makato Free Press, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Mayo Clinic Health System, Mayo Clinic in the News, Mayo Clinic Jacksonville, Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Mayo Clinic Rochester, Men's Fitness, Minnesota Department of Human Services, MPR, Orthopedics, Peter Jensen, Pioneer Press, Psychology and Psychiatry, psychotropic medications, Research, Sports Medicine, Star Tribune, T-DMI, TIME, Wall Street Journal, Wellness

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