Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Posted on September 28th, 2012 by


September 28, 2012

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

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Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

USA Weekend
Step it Up!

How just 10 minutes of walking each day can change your life… And you don’t have to be a super-athlete to reap the benefits. Physician Michael Joyner, an anesthesiologist and specialist in exercise science with the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., says some of the biggest health winners are couch potatoes who transition from being totally sedentary to moderately active. “If they only had one thing to do, the average person can get a whole lot of benefit out of walking,” Joyner says. “The first two miles of brisk walking are most critical.”

Circulation: USA TODAY has a circulation of 1.8 million and a readership of 3.1 million. USA TODAY websites have 26.3 million unique visitors a month.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist. His research focuses on how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss. Dr. Joyner and his team study how the nervous system regulates blood pressure, heart rate and metabolism in response to these forms of stress. They are also interested in how blood flow to muscle and skin responds to these stressors. These responses are studied in young healthy subjects, healthy older subjects and people with conditions such as heart failure.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob Nellis, Brian Kilen

USA Today
Keep moving, and other advice to keep men healthy with age
by Janice Lloyd

… "Men are the king of the remote control but they're going to have to get up and do something instead of watching sports all weekend or late into the night," says Martha Grogan, a cardiologist and editor of the Mayo Clinic book Healthy Heart for Life!... "You don't have to get up and move around for long but you should move for 10 minutes every hour," she says. "You can even run in place in front of the TV or move around during the commercials. My brother always says he can do the Nordic Track quickly when watching a football game." If you don't like aerobic exercise, it's OK, says James Levine, also of the Mayo Clinic. He is the author of Move a Little, Lose a Lot and pioneered the concept of NEAT (non-exercise activity thermogenesis).

Circulation: See first post above.

Context: Martha Grogan, M.D., a Mayo Clinic cardiologist, gave her expert perspective. She was not involved in the study. Dr. Grogan is medical editor of Mayo Clinic Healthy Heart for Life, a new book which became available earlier this year.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

USA Today
Lists, experts disagree on the 'best hospitals'
by Jayne O’Donnell

Nearly 40% of consumers surveyed last year said they use hospital ratings to choose a health care facility, but there's little agreement between the lists, raising questions about their value. Consumers pore over reviews and ratings of everything from cars to washing machines, but it's doctor and hospital rankings that may be the most confusing and controversial. 'Consumer Reports' rankings by safety…7. Mayo Clinic Hospital, Phoenix…U.S. News' 'Honor Roll' of hospitals…3. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.

Circulation: See first post above.

Context: Mayo Clinic ranked near the top of the 23rd U.S. News & World Report annual America's Best Hospital list, earning the No. 3 overall spot on its "Best Hospitals" list. Mayo Clinic in Rochester also was rated best in the nation in three clinical areas — gynecology, diabetes and endocrinology, and gastroenterology. A news release highlighting the ranking is here.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

NY Times
Avoiding Sugared Drinks Limits Weight Gain in Two Studies
by Roni Rabin

…Two-thirds of all American adults and one-third of children in the United States are overweight or obese. The contribution of sugary sodas and fruit drinks to this epidemic has been hotly disputed. But two new randomized clinical trials published on Friday in The New England Journal of Medicine lend credence to the idea that limiting access to these beverages may help reduce obesity…Both clinical trials have limitations, but they are unusual in that they demonstrate the effect of a single behavioral change on weight gain, said Dr. Seema Kumar, a pediatric endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic Children’s Center. “Typically when you do a weight loss intervention, we talk about multiple aspects, changing food choices, portion sizes, frequency of snacks, types of snacks,” she said.

Circulation: The New York Times has the third highest circulation nationally, behind USA Today (2nd) and The Wall Street Journal (1st) with 1,150,589 weekday copies circulated and 1,645,152 circulated on Sundays.

Context: Seema Kumar, M.D. is a  a Mayo Clinic pediatric endocrinologist with joint appointments in Endocrinology and Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine. Her research primarily relates to molecular mechanisms of development of childhood obesity.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Kelley Luckstein

NY Times
Study Divides Breast Cancer Into Four Distinct Types
by Gina Kolata

In findings that are fundamentally reshaping the scientific understanding of breast cancer, researchers have identified four genetically distinct types of the cancer. And within those types, they found hallmark genetic changes that are driving many cancers… But researchers found that this cancer was entirely different from the other types of breast cancer and much more resembles ovarian cancer and a type of lung cancer.  “It’s incredible,” said Dr. James Ingle of the Mayo Clinic, one of the study’s 348 authors, of the ovarian cancer connection. “It raises the possibility that there may be a common cause.”

Circulation: See post immediately above this one.

Context: James Ingle, M.D, is a Mayo Clinic medical onvcologist and the principal investigator for the Mayo Clinic Breast Cancer SPORE Grant. The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center is one of 11 cancer research centers to receive a National Cancer Institute (NCI) Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) grant for breast cancer research.

Public Affairs Contacts: Joe Dangor, Traci Klein

NY Times
Seeking Cures, Patients Enlist Mice Stand-Ins
by Andrew Pollack

Megan Sykes, a medical researcher, has a mouse with a human immune system — her own. She calls it “Mini-Me.”… In what could be the ultimate in personalized medicine, animals bearing your disease, or part of your anatomy, can serve as your personal guinea pig, so to speak. Some researchers call them avatars, like the virtual characters in movies and online games. “The mice allow you the opportunity to test drugs to find out which ones will be efficacious without exposing the patient to toxicity,” said Colin Collins, a professor at the University of British Columbia…At the Mayo Clinic, avatars are being used to “immortalize” tumors from patients in a clinical trial. The Jackson Laboratory in Sacramento is building a big collection of personalized animal models representing various cancer types to use in studies. Companies like Oncotest, based in Germany, and StemMed in Houston are helping pharmaceutical companies do clinical trials on the mouse surrogates of patients.

Circulation: See post above.

Context: The Breast Cancer Genome Guided Therapy Study (BEAUTY Project) will help physicians tailor chemotherapy to breast cancer patients based on their individual genomes and the genomes of their tumors. Mayo Clinic researchers will obtain three whole genome sequences: one from the patients’ healthy cells before treatment, and two tumor genomes – one before chemotherapy and one after. Patients will be paired with mouse “avatars” that will help physicians identify the best treatment for each person.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Bob Nellis

Oprah Magazine
A Reason to Be Hopeful: 5 New Breast Cancer Breakthroughs
by Rachel Bertsche

As October's pink ribbons remind us, the fight against breast cancer is far from over. But after a host of recent breakthroughs, doctors are optimistic. "There's a tremendous amount of work being done," says Deborah Rhodes, MD, a specialist in breast cancer risk at the Mayo Clinic. "With such a multifaceted approach, we're gradually winning the war." Here, some of the most inspiring discoveries of 2011.

Reach: Oprah, the magazine, has a total circulation of 2.3 million.

Context:  Deborah Rhodes, M.D. is a preventive medicine specialist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Her research focus is the evaluation and management of women at increased risk for breast cancer.

Public Affairs Contacts: Dana Sparks, Alyson Fleming, Joe Dangor

Prevention
Lose 35+ Pounds without Working Out
by Carol Krucoff

…James Levine, MD, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, has spent a decade studying the role that everyday movement, or NEAT (nonexercise activity thermogenesis), plays in metabolism. His discovery: People who tap their feet, prefer standing to sitting, and generally move a lot burn up to 350 more calories a day than those who sit still. That adds up to nearly 37 pounds a year!

Circulation: For 60 years, Prevention has delivered information, breaking news and energizing lifestyle advice that women can use today for a happier, healthier, stronger life. Prevention's average newstand sales are more than 226,000 and is the 14th largest consumer managezine in the United States.

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob Nellis, Alyson Fleming

Related Story:
Prevention
7 Ways to Work Out at the Office
by Jessica Cassity

You’ve heard that a desk job leads to weight gain, but this bad rap can be beat, says James Levine, MD, a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic. In a recent study, more on-the-job standing and walking led workers to lose an average of 9 pounds and to lower triglyceride levels by nearly 40% in 6 months. Lose weight at the office with these 7 sneaky fat-burning tips.

Fast Company
Is The Maverick At Your Company A Genius Or A Jerk?
By Bob Vanourek

Mavericks Are Essential to Innovation…Look to a surprising example we discovered in our research and interviews for our new book, Triple Crown Leadership: Building Excellent, Ethical, and Enduring Organizations: Mayo Clinic, founded in 1889. The Mayo network serves more than a million patients annually. It is a global leader in health care delivery, research, and education, with a sterling brand in health care. Patients from all corners of the globe journey to Mayo for treatment. For over twenty straight years, Mayo hospitals have earned top U.S. News & World Report rankings. Mayo has compiled a stunning record of impacts, from to establish medical residency education to performing the first FDA-approved hip replacement opening their Center for Innovation in 2008.

Reach: Fast Company's editorial focus is on innovation in technology, ethonomics (ethical economics), leadership, and design. Written for, by, and about the most progressive business leaders, Fast Company and FastCompany.com inspire readers and users to think beyond traditional boundaries, lead conversations, and create the future of business.

Context: Mayo Clinic was cited as an innovator in the article:  "Look to a surprising example we discovered in our research and interviews for our new book, Triple Crown Leadership: Building Excellent, Ethical, and Enduring Organizations: Mayo Clinic, founded in 1889. The Mayo network serves more than a million patients annually. It is a global leader in health care delivery, research, and education, with a sterling brand in health care. Patients from all corners of the globe journey to Mayo for treatment. For over 20 straight years, Mayo hospitals have earned top U.S. News & World Report rankings. Mayo has compiled a stunning record of impacts, from to establish medical residency education to performing the first FDA-approved hip replacement opening their Center for Innovation in 2008."

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

Star Tribune
Health Check blog: Prostate cancer surgery brings on anxiety
by Coleen Stoxen

Men who have surgery for prostate cancer have excellent survival prospects – but nonetheless experience high levels of cancer anxiety that can lead to depression and reduced sexual satisfaction, Mayo Clinic researchers say… "The 10-year survival for a man undergoing surgery to remove localized prostate cancer is greater than 95 percent. Given that the majority of men who undergo prostatectomy for prostate cancer will not die from their disease, we are concerned about what life will be like for these patients decades after diagnosis and treatment," says the study's senior investigator, Alexander Parker, Ph.D., an associate professor of epidemiology and urology.

Additional coverage: Medical Xpress, Science Codex

Circulation: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 514,457 copies and weekday circulation is 300,330. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation. Health Check blog: Star Tribune blog which features the latest trends, research and news in medicine, health and science. A team of Star Tribune staffers aggregates updates from news wires, websites, magazines and medical journals.

Context: Men who undergo surgical removal of prostate cancer can experience significant levels of anxiety one year after surgery, and higher levels of anxiety appear to be linked to poor sexual satisfaction and depression, say researchers at Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida. Their recent study, published in the online edition of Psycho-Oncology, suggests that men who experience high levels of "cancer-specific anxiety" following surgery for prostate cancer could likely benefit from counseling designed to address their worries and improve their quality of life. A news release highlighting the study results is here.

Additional Coverage:
Jacksonville Business Journal

Mayo Clinic prostate cancer research finds link to reduced quality of life
by Michael Clinton

Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus has found prostate cancer diagnosis and surgery can lead to anxiety, depression and a reduced quality of life…“The 10-year survival for a man undergoing surgery to remove localized prostate cancer is greater than 95 percent. Given that the majority of men who undergo prostatectomy for prostate cancer will not die from their disease, we are concerned about what life will be like for these patients decades after diagnosis and treatment,” said Dr. Alexander Parker, the study’s senior investigator and an associate professor of epidemiology and urology, in the release.

Circulation: The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

Star Tribune
Editorial: Soda ban spotlights pop's health risk, (graphic on site is from Mayo Clinic)

For speaking a hard truth about pop and other sugar-drenched drinks -- there's no need to guzzle them by the near-bucketful -- New York City's feisty billionaire Mayor Michael Bloomberg has predictably been accused of turning "nanny-state" fears into reality. But it's a good bet that in years ahead, Bloomberg will not be remembered as the Big Gulp-Busybody-In-Chief, but instead as one of the first high-profile public officials to sound the alarm about these drinks' significant health risk.

Circulation: See entry immediately above.

Context: Donald Hensrud, M.D., a Mayo Clinic preventive medicine physician and endocrinologist, is often sought out for his expertise in obesity, nutrition and disease prevention, physical activity and health promotion, and clinical preventive medicine.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Bob Nellis, Nick Hanson

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Tags: America's Best Hospital List, Beauty Project, Best Hospitals, Breast Cancer, Cancer, Cardiology, Cardiology, diabetes, Dr. Alexander Parker, Dr. Deb Rhodes, Dr. Donald Hensrud, Dr. James Ingle, Dr. James Levine, Dr. Martha Grogan, Dr. Michael Joyner, Dr. Seema Kumar, endocrinology, Endocrinology / Diabetes, Fast Comapny, gastroenterology, GI, GYN, Gynecology, innovation, large soda pop ban, Mayo Clinic, Mayo Clinic book Healthy Heart for Life, Mayo Clinic Breast Cancer SPORE Grant, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Mayo Clinic Children's Center, Mayo Clinic in the News, National Cancer Institute, NCI, NEAT, Nephrology, Nephrology, Neurology, Neurology, Oprah, Orthopedics, Orthopedics, Ovarian Cancer, Pediatrics, Pediatrics, Prevention Magazine, Preventive Medicine, Preventive Medicine, prostate cancer, Pulmonary, Pulmonology, Sports Medicine, Star Tribune, The Breast Cancer Genome Therapy Study, The NewYork Times, Urology, Urology, USA Today, walking

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