Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Posted on May 31st, 2013 by Karl W Oestreich

 

 

May 31, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

US News & World Report
What to Know Before You Glow
by Rachel Pomerance

It's officially summer. You want to get your glow on, but you know better than to do it the old-fashioned way. In case you missed the memo, tanning is bad for you. Sure, the rays get you vitamin D. But so does milk. Even a so-called "baseline tan" is not OK, says Jerry Brewer, chair of dermatologic surgery at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Plain and simple: Tanned skin equals DNA damage, he says. "Asking what's a safe amount of tan is kind of like asking how much cyanide do you want in your breakfast."

Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional Coverage:
KMSP FOX9
Sun Smart Campaign
KAAL
National Don’t Fry Day - Sun Safety Awareness

Previous Coverage

Context: Have fun in the sun, but be sun smart. That’s the message two cartoon-style moles deliver to kids of all ages in new public service announcements released by Mayo Clinic as part of Skin Cancer Awareness Month in May. Melanoma is on the rise, particularly among teens and young adults. It can be deadly. In the public service messages, available for use on television, radio, online and other platforms, two moles — animal moles, that is — illustrate the importance of four, key skin cancer prevention and early detection tips…

YouTube: Mayo Clinic: Have Fun in the Sun, But Be Sun Smart – Skin Cancer Prevention PSA

News Release: Have Fun in the Sun, But Be Sun Smart

News Release: Mayo Clinic: Melanoma Up to 2.5 Times Likelier to Strike Transplant, Lymphoma Patients

News Release: Mayo Clinic Study Finds Dramatic Rise in Skin Cancer in Young Adults

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Nick Hanson

KSTP
Mayo Clinic Experts Work with Schools to Fight Obesity
by Scott Theisen

The state health department says obesity is one of its most serious concerns in Minnesota. Twenty-five percent of adults are obese, and for kids 2 to 5 years old, 13 percent are obese; more are overweight… Mayo Clinic Dr. Esther Krych and colleagues developed the BMI screening material. They want to identify kids whose BMI is too high and educate parents. "Our goal is to try to stop the problem before it starts, and that's really prevention," Krych said.  

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Context: There's a serious obesity epidemic in the United States and it's a growing concern when it comes to children. Being overweight or obese as a child puts you at greater risk of being overweight as an adult and increases the risk of heart disease and diabetes. So, experts at Mayo Clinic are exploring ways to help prevent childhood obesity. One project has Mayo teaming up with school districts to add body mass index (BMI) screening to the standard kindergarten screening.  Esther Krych, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic pediatrician.

Public Affairs Contact: Dana Sparks

Star Tribune
As May fades to gray, we’re kind of blue
By Bill McAuliffe

It might be the end of May, but at one St. Paul tanning parlor, wintry blues are knocking on the door. “The ones that tan normally in the winter, they’re coming back,” said Chris Frank, owner of Perfect Tan in the Merriam Park neighborhood, where the gray May has helped boost business by 20 percent over last year. “They want that vitamin D. They’re saying they thought the longer days would help, but they’re really dragging.’’…The conditions aren’t quite enough to trigger seasonal affective disorder, a chronic condition tied to the short days and long nights of winter, said Dr. Katherine M. Moore, a psychiatrist in the Mayo Clinic’s Department of Psychiatry and Psychology. But the disappointments and the altered routines that have come with the cool and wet May have certainly been enough to make people feel, well, gloomy.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277.

Context: Katherine Moore, M.D., is a psychiatrist in the Mayo Clinic’s Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, which is one of the largest psychiatric treatment groups in the United States. Highly skilled specialists provide expert care to adults, teenagers and children who have mental, addictive and emotional disorders.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Chicago Health
Growing Up with Tragedies

Terribly violent storms, like the one witnessed in Oklahoma this week, can leave lasting damages much more permanent than a shredded earth. This is especially so for children. Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health problem in kids and adults. Mayo Clinic Children’s Center anxiety prevention expert and psychologist Stephen Whiteside, Ph.D., offers tips to help conquer weather-related fears.

Reach: Chicago Health: Top Doctors & Hospitals offers expert insight into modern healthcare and lifestyle, the best practices and treatments, and more through engaging editorial and professional profiles. It is a resource for Chicagoans to advocate for their own care and an opportunity for medical institutions and practitioners at the apex of their field to educate the public. Chicago Health: Top Doctors & Hospitals is published by Northwest Publishing, LLC, a Chicago based media company.

Previous Coverage

Context: Violent storms — often accompanied by lightning, thunder, heavy rain, powerful winds and even tornado warnings — can be stressful for anyone, but severe weather can trigger much more severe anxiety, especially among children. Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health problem in kids and adults. Mayo Clinic Children’s Center anxiety prevention expert and psychologist Stephen Whiteside, Ph.D., offers tips to help conquer weather-related fears.

News Release: Thunderphobia: Mayo Experts Offer Tips to Help Children Conquer Severe Weather Fears

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Twin Cities Business Magazine
Mayo Clinic to Build Sports Medicine Center
by Rebecca Omastiak

Mayo Clinic announced Tuesday that it plans to build a 22,000-square-foot sports medicine center to meet the demands for its growing sports medicine and rehabilitation practice. The Sports Medicine Center aims to provide both sports rehabilitation and training equipment and facilities and is part of the 100,000-square-foot, four-floor, Mayo Clinic Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center building project… “Mayo Clinic is able to serve athletes of all levels in a multidisciplinary environment that can manage the entirety of our patients’ needs,” Edward Laskowski, Mayo’s Sports Medicine Center co-director, said in a statement.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Additional Coverage:
Pioneer Press
Rochester: Mayo to double up on sports medicine

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic hopes to triple Sports Medicine Center numbers

MPR, KELOland S.D., Argus Leader S.D., KSTP, KARE 11, KTTC, BringMeTheNews, News Medical, FOX47, KAAL, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal, News Medical , Post-Bulletin

Context:
Mayo Clinic announced this week an expansion to its sports medicine practice to meet the growing regional, national and international demand for its expertise. The expansion is part of the 100,000-square-foot Mayo Clinic Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center building project, and is scheduled to open in spring of 2014. The Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center is a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Planning Major Sports Medicine Center Expansion

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

Green Bay Press-Gazette
Unusual medical condition gives Abe, his parents tough start to new
life by Peter Srubas

Baby Abe’s sucking and breathing skills still aren’t what they should be, but the little guy once known as “the big boy of the NIC unit” at Mayo Clinic is giving every indication he’s eventually going to have a normal life, his doctor says. Abe, son of Emma and Mike Slowinski of De Pere, was born Feb. 11 and already has been through three major surgeries, thanks to an uncommon ailment called a congenital diaphragmatic hernia — that is, due to a flaw in his diaphragm, his stomach and intestines were up in his chest, shoving his heart to the wrong side and interfering with his lung development…“It happens in about one in every 3,000 births,” said Dr. Chris Colby, a neonatologist at Mayo Clinic’s Children’s Center in Rochester, Minn.

Reach: The Green Bay Press-Gazette is one of 10 daily newspapers within Gannett Wisconsin Media and has a daily circulation of more than 40,000 subscribers. Its web site attracts more than 337,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: Abraham Slowinski was born in Rochester after the family had received the diagnosis of him having an uncommon ailment called a congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Chris Colby, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neonatologist at Mayo Clinic’s Children’s Center.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

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Tags: Abe Slowinski, anxiety, Argus Leader S.D., baseline tan, BMI, body mass index, BringMeTheNews, Cancer, Cancer, childhood obesity, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, Dermatology, DNA damage, Dr. Chris Colby, Dr. Edward Laskowski, Dr. Esther Krych, Dr. Jerry Brewer, Dr. Katherine Moore, Dr. Stephen Whiteside, Emma Slowinski, FOX47, Fox9 Twin Cities, Green Bay, Green Bay Press-Gazette, KAAL, KARE 11, KELOland S.D., KMSP FOX9, KSTP, KTTC, lymphona, Mayo Clinic, Mayo Clinic Children's Center, Mayo Clinic Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic in the News, Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center, melanoma, Mike Slowinski, Minneapolis-St. Paul Business Journal, Minnesota Public Radio, MPR, neonatologist, Neonatology, News Medical, Obesity, Pediatrics, Pediatrics, Pionerr Press, PM&R, Post Bulletin, Prevention, PSA, Psychology and Psychiatry, Public Service Announcement, rochester, skin cancer, Skin Cancer Awareness Month, skin cancer prevention, Sports Medicine, Sports Medicine, St. Paul Pioneer Press, Star Tribune, sun smart, tanning, thunderphobia, tornado warnings, Twin Cities, Twin Cities Business Magazine, U.S. News & World Report, vitamin D, weather-related fears

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