June 7th, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

 

 

June 7, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

CNBC
Mayo Clinic's CEO on $5 Billion Expansion

John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO, discusses what his company is doing to create more jobs, the best opportunities internationally for growth and Obamacare.

Reach: CNBC provides real-time financial market coverage and business information to more than 340 million homes worldwide, including more than 95 million households in the United States and Canada.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic President and CEO, was interviewed by Maria Bartiromo on CNBC’s Closing Bell.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

Florida Times-Union
What Northeast Florida hospitals charge for procedures can vary by thousands
by Kate Perry

To treat a Medicare patient with chest pain, Orange Park Medical Center charges almost $36,000 — more than three times the cost at the Mayo Clinic. But when the federal government sends payment, the Hospital Corporation of America-owned hospital gets paid $3,300. It’s a far cry from their listed charge and $1,000 less than the Mayo Clinic will receive for the same procedure, according to data released this month by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services showing the hospital charge and the rate Medicare paid for the 100 most popular procedures in 2011.

Circulation: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Bob Brigham is chair, administration at Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punksy

MPR – The Daily Circuit
Is your iPad an anti-sleeping tablet?

Many people spend their last moments before sleep reading on a tablet computer or checking messages on a smart phone. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic wondered whether the light emitted by such devices might be disrupting users' sleep patterns. The initial findings of a sleep study suggest that dimming a smartphone and holding it at least 14 inches from your face might help you sleep better. Dr. Lois Krahn, a psychiatrist at Mayo's Scottsdale, Ariz., clinic, conducted the study to determine if smartphones and tablets were interfering with melatonin, a hormone that helps control the body's sleep cycle.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Additional coverage:

KARE11 , Using your smartphone and not disrupting your sleep 
ABC News Radio, Innovations Report, Deccan Chronicle, Yahoo! Noticias, Yucatan Hoy, starMedia, El Imparcial, Headlines and Global News, Daily Mail UK, Biomedicine, Yahoo! Noticias, RxPG NEWS, Medical News Today, Times of India, Headlines & Global NewsHealth News Digest, Health Canal, Times of India, NDTV Gadgets, Indian Express, , Medical Daily, Science Codex, Sisat Daily, Cyber India Online, Innovations Report

Context: Smartphones and tablets can make for sleep-disrupting bedfellows. One cause is believed to be the bright light-emitting diodes that allow the use of mobile devices in dimly lit rooms; the light exposure can interfere with melatonin, a hormone that helps control the natural sleep-wake cycle. But there may be a way to check your mobile device in bed and still get a good night's sleep. A Mayo Clinic study suggests that dimming the smartphone or tablet brightness settings and holding the device at least 14 inches from your face while using it will reduce its potential to interfere with melatonin and impede sleep. "In the old days people would go to bed and read a book. Well, much more commonly people go to bed and they have their tablet on which they read a book or they read a newspaper or they're looking at material. The problem is it's a lit device, and how problematic is the light source from the mobile device?" says co-author Lois Krahn, M.D., a psychiatrist and sleep expert at Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz.

News Release: Are Smartphones Disrupting Your Sleep? Mayo Clinic Study Examines the Question

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

MPR
Making the most out of doctor-patient conversations

As doctors engage patients in conversations about their health, they need skills they didn't necessarily learn in medical school…Less medicine for overwhelmed patients "It's hard enough to live with a chronic condition like diabetes, says Dr. Victor Montori of the Mayo Clinic. But sometimes doctors make it harder, by piling on more tests and treatments than the patient can bear.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: The research of Victor Montori, M.D., takes place in the Knowledge and Evaluation Research Unit at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Montori is interested in how knowledge is produced, disseminated and taken up in practice — and how this leads to optimal health care delivery and patient outcomes. Dr. Montori also serves as director of the Health Care Delivery Research Program in the Mayo Clinic Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

Post-Bulletin
Officials, residents pack Rochester City Council meeting about Mayo Clinic's DMC
by Edie Grosfield

City and Mayo Clinic officials and citizens packed a Rochester City Council committee-of-the-whole meeting Monday afternoon to hear an overview of the Destination Medical Center legislation that was passed recently as part of the state's tax bill.

Post-Bulletin
DMC has big plans
by Mike Klein

The words "infrastructure plan" conjure images of utilitarian streets and sewers, but Mayo Clinic'sDestination Medical Center calls for far more than that. The $500-million-plus plan envisions creating a pleasing urban environment in downtown Rochester where pedestrians could walk on leafy plazas with shopping and restaurants, and be trundled to their appointments by streetcars, based on documents created by DMC and the city of Rochester.

Related Coverage:
Post-Bulletin
Fran Bradley: DFL took some of the shine off of DMC

MPR
Mayo Clinic expansion boosts talk of high-speed rail

MPR
Mayo Clinic win could help attract high-speed rail

Post-Bulletin
Destination Twin Cities? Rochester high-speed rail plan studied

Additional Coverage: Star Tribune, Post-Bulletin, KAAL, Post-Bulletin, MPR, KAAL, MPR

Context: Destination Medical Center (DMC), an economic development initiative designed to secure Mayo Clinic and Minnesota’s future as a global medical destination, passed on May 20 as part of the Minnesota Legislature’s tax bill. It will help fund the public infrastructure required to keep pace with an estimated $5 billion private investment by Mayo Clinic and other private entities over the next 20 years.

Destination Medical Center Website

Public Affairs Contacts: Bryan Anderson, Karl Oestreich, Nora O'Sullivan (Zip Rail)

MinnPost
Mayo doctors propose higher — and new — 'sin taxes'
by Susan Perry

Two Mayo Clinic physicians have joined the growing ranks of health professionals who believe we should be using our tax codes to help change behavior and improve health. In a provocative commentary published in the June issue of the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, anesthesiologists Dr. Michael Joyner and Dr. David Warner propose increasing current taxes on alcohol and tobacco and implementing new taxes on fatty foods and sugary beverages.

Circulation: MinnPost is a nonprofit, nonpartisan enterprise which provides news and analysis based on reporting by professional journalists, most of whom have decades of experience in the Twin Cities media. According to MinnPost, the site averages more than 450,000 visits and more than 850,000 page views a month. At the end of 2010, MinnPost also had 8,800 followers on Twitter and its main Facebook page was liked by 3,500-plus readers.

Additional Coverage: BringMeTheNewsNewsTrackIndia, Business Standard, FOX9 News, Medical Xpress, Feed My Science, Science Newsline, Science Codex, Toronto Telegraph, Post-Bulletin, ThirdAge, KAAL

Context: Go ye and sin no more — or pay for it, when it comes to junk food, smoking and consuming alcohol. That's the message from two Mayo Clinic physicians who say raising "sin" taxes on tobacco and alcoholic beverages and imposing them on sugary drinks and fatty foods would lead many people to cut back, improving public health. The article by Michael Joyner, M.D., and David Warner, M.D., appears in the June issue of the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

News Release: Smoking, Sugar, Spirits and 'Sin' Taxes: Higher Price Would Help Health, Mayo Clinic Doctors Say

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

MinnPost
The telemedicine tourniquet
by Denise Logeland

Inside the Mayo Clinic’s Center for Innovation in Rochester, a new initiative is taking shape: the development of Mayo’s Center for Connected Care. “This is a major initiative of the Mayo Clinic across all of its campuses,” says Dr. Bart Demaerschalk, director of the Mayo Clinic’s telestroke and teleneurology program and a vascular neurologist with the Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix. The vision is to “provide virtual care to patients regionally, within states that are historically Mayo Clinic territories, but also nationally and globally.” And not just in Demaerschalk’s specialty of stroke diagnosis and treatment.

Circulation: MinnPost is a nonprofit, nonpartisan enterprise which provides news and analysis based on reporting by professional journalists, most of whom have decades of experience in the Twin Cities media. According to MinnPost, the site averages more than 450,000 visits and more than 850,000 page views a month. At the end of 2010, MinnPost also had 8,800 followers on Twitter and its main Facebook page was liked by 3,500-plus readers.

Context: Bart Demaerschalk, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona and also director of the Mayo Clinic Telestroke and Teleneurology program. In stroke telemedicine, also called telestroke, doctors who have advanced training in the nervous system (neurologists) remotely evaluate people who've had acute strokes and make diagnoses and treatment recommendations to emergency medicine doctors at other sites. Doctors communicate using digital video cameras, Internet telecommunications, robotic telepresence, smartphones and other technology.

Public Affairs Contact: Shelly Plutowski

Star Tribune
Mayo swings for fences in sports medicine
by Jackie Crosby

The Mayo Clinic is making a big play to attract ailing athletes and weekend warriors with aching knees to its campus. The hospital system plans to open a 22,000-square-foot sports medicine facility in Rochester next spring that will double its existing practice. The center aims to be a sort of high-tech medical playground that will help the injured get back in the game and the healthy hone their skills. “A lot of people think of Mayo as the last resort,” said Dr. Edward Laskowski, co-director of Mayo’s Sports Medicine Center. “We want to change that.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional Coverage:
MinnPost
Mayo Clinic to build sports medicine center

Post-Bulletin
Our View: Sports Medicine Center is part of paradigm shift 

Additional Coverage: Sioux City Journal

Previous Coverage

Context: Mayo Clinic announced this week an expansion to its sports medicine practice to meet the growing regional, national and international demand for its expertise. The expansion is part of the 100,000-square-foot Mayo Clinic Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center building project, and is scheduled to open in spring of 2014. The Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Centeris a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Planning Major Sports Medicine Center Expansion

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic starts individualized medicine consulting clinic

Mayo Clinic has announced a new individualized medicine consulting clinic for patients with serious medical conditions who have not found answers through conventional testing. The IM Clinic does not focus on research. Rather, Mayo reports, whole-genome sequencing will be used as a standard part of care by a team of 20 genomics-trained physicians. Genetic counselors will guide patients through the process. The IM Clinic startup period began about six months ago.

Circulation: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: You have a serious medical condition, but the conventional tests fail to find an answer. You still have no diagnosis and no effective treatment. What do you do? Mayo Clinic has always been a destination for patients seeking answers. Now, Mayo is taking that concept to the next level with the public launch of its Individualized Medicine Clinic — at all three of its campuses, in Minnesota, Florida and Arizona.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Launches Individualized Medicine Consulting Clinic

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

WEAU Eau Claire
Mayo to make change to help avoid infections

There will be a change at a local hospital starting next week to try to avoid infections. Mayo Clinic Health System Eau Claire says it will start washing all critical care patients with a powerful germ-killing soap to prevent MRSA infections. It says currently it only uses the soap on select critical care patients, like people who have had heart surgery.  Registered Nurse and Critical Care Director Marguerite Paradris with the hospital says the germs they’re most worried about, are not actually that uncommon outside the hospital.

Reach: WEAU-TV is the NBC affiliate for much of western Wisconsin, including Eau Claire and La Crosse. WEAU is licensed to Eau Claire and its transmitter is located in Fairchild, Wisc.

Context: Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire says it will start washing all critical care patients with a powerful germ-killing soap to prevent MRSA infections. It says currently it only uses the soap on select critical care patients, like people who have had heart surgery. Registered Nurse and Critical Care Director Marguerite Paradis with the hospital says the germs they’re most worried about are not actually that uncommon outside the hospital.

“Those resistant organisms exist probably everywhere in our environment, and many of us probably have touched them or been around them. What happens is when you come to the hospital it's when you're the most vulnerable and those organisms can then cause infections in people who are in the hospital," Paradis said.

A recently released study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found washing all ICU patients with the soap daily can help prevent MRSA infections, but the hospital says their change was already in the works before the study was released.

Public Affairs Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

WQOW Eau Claire
Eau Claire man bikes, swims, and runs road to recovery after heart attack

Within the first five minutes of meeting 53-year-old Tom Draz, you'd probably discover he's a seasoned athlete… But a year ago, his fast pace was faced with a shock. Tom says, "Last year, before the Eau Claire Half Marathon I was scheduled to run, I was swimming in the pool at the YMCA and started feeling really weak and tired." After some persuasion from his wife, Geralyn, Tom went to the hospital where he learned he was having a heart attack…Amy Olson, a Registered Nurse, at Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire, says, "Being a runner myself, runners tend to connect on a different level. So my heart went out to him knowing he had spent so much time training for such an event and not being able to do it."

Reach: WQOW-TV is an ABC-affiliated television station in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. The station broadcasts its channel 18 DTV signal on UHF RF channel 15. The station is owned and operated by Quincy Newspapers Inc., which also owns WXOW-TV in La Crosse.

Context: Our friends at Mayo Clinic Health System report on the Hometown Health blog, the lifelong runner and Eau Claire, Wis., resident was at the local YMCA getting in some last-minute training for a half marathon when he began to feel "unusually tired and had chest pain." The pain and fatigue was such that it kept him from finishing his workout and forced him to make a trip to the Emergency Department at Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire, where doctors told him he was having a heart attack. They stabilized him, but while recovering in the hospital the next day, Draz went into cardiac arrest. "One minute I was alive, and the next minute I was dead," he told Hometown Health. Quick action by his nurses, who used a defibrillator to restore his heart rhythm, "got my heart beating again and saved my life," Draz says.

Public Affairs Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

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