Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Posted on March 3rd, 2017 by Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

USA Today
Having a baby past 35: What women should know
by Ashley May

Have a plan, and the money to execute it, before 35. Fertility doctors say women approaching 35 who want children but aren’t yet ready should look into egg or embryo freezing. Charles Coddington, professor and OB/GYN for Mayo Medical School, also advises getting a full checkup for reproductive health. After age 35, pregnancy is more difficult because of less frequent ovulation. Also, women 35-45 have aUSA Today newspaper logo 20-35% chance of miscarriage, compared with women under 35 that average a 15-20% chance of miscarriage, according to the American Pregnancy Association. … Frozen eggs of a woman younger than 35 have a greater than 50% chance of producing a live birth. Past age 40, freezing eggs or embryos will not have a great success – less than 9 percent result in live birth, Coddington said.

Reach: USA TODAY  has an average daily circulation of 4.1 million which includes print, various digital editions and other papers that use their branded content.

Context: Charles Coddington, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic ObGyn. The Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota supports women throughout their lifelong journey from childbearing age to menopause and beyond. You can learn more about Dr. Coddington's research interests here.

Contact:  Kelley Luckstein

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic investing $70 million in Mankato hospital
by Christopher Snowbeck

Mayo Clinic’s regional network of medical centers is investing $70 million to expand and renovate the surgery suite and orthopedic clinic at its hospital in Mankato. The project includes a $65 million upgrade to the Star Tribune newspaper logohospital’s surgery facilities that is part of a broader plan to better link the Mankato campus with Mayo Clinic’s headquarters in Rochester, according to details released Friday. “Mayo Clinic is committed to the needs of patients in Mankato and the surrounding communities we serve,” said Dr. James Hebl, vice president of Mayo Clinic Health System in southwest Minnesota, in a statement.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: KROC AM, KEYC Mankato, Minneapolis/St. Paul Business, Journal, Post-Bulletin, Healthcare Dive, Germany Sun, Becker’s ASC ReviewMankato Free Press

Context:  Mayo Clinic Health System today announced plans for a $65 million hospital surgical suite expansion in Mankato. Construction is expected to begin later this year. “Mayo Clinic is committed to the needs of patients in Mankato and the surrounding communities we serve,” says James Hebl, M.D., vice president of Mayo Clinic Health System in Southwest Minnesota. “The projects are an investment in our patients, our staff and the needs of our communities. Providing access to outstanding care in state-of-the-art facilities closer to where patients live is of paramount importance, and is the driving force behind the decision to dedicate substantial resources to these initiatives.” More information about the expansion can be found here.

Contact:  Micah Dorfner

 

Star Tribune
Mayo earnings hit by Medicaid, labor costs
by Christopher Snowbeck

Mayo Clinic's net income slipped last year as the Rochester-based health care giant spent more on staffing for growth initiatives, and saw more losses on patients with Medicaid coverage. Even so, the overall results being released Monday show "it was a strong year," said Kedrick Adkins Jr., the clinic's chief financial officer. Mayo posted $475 million in net income on $11 billion in revenue, down about 10 percent from 2015Star Tribune newspaper logo net income of $526.4 million, according to the clinic's latest financial report.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: KTTC, Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal, Dotmed.comBecker’s Hospital Review, Healthcare Dive

Context: With more than 1.3 million patients seeking Mayo Clinic’s expertise yearly, the institution continues its work to provide the best care to every patient through integrated clinical practice, education and research. Mayo Clinic reported a strong financial position in 2016, with contributions of $466 million to its pension plan for staff and more than $600 million in capital projects. “The outstanding work of Mayo Clinic employees is the engine that drives our mission to our patients, advances important research and educational initiatives, and positions our institution as a key voice for the future of health care,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic. “Our strong financial performance enables Mayo to hire and retain the best talent, and invest in technology, facilities and our staff as we strive to deliver the best outcomes and service to our patients.”

Contact:  Susan Barber Lindquist

 

 

KAAL
Mayo Clinic Performs Rare In-Womb Surgery to Give Baby New Chance at Life
by Marissa Collins

An Austin mom and her baby are doing well after her pregnancy took an unexpected turn. Nineteen weeks in, doctors told her something was wrong with her unborn baby … Her baby was diagnosed with a severe KAAL 6 News Rochester Logoform of Spina Bifida halfway through her pregnancy. “Once the baby is being formed the babies back does not close. The spine does not close, so the nerves can be open," says Dr. Rodrigo Ruano, Director at Mayo Clinic Fetal Diagnostic and Intervention Center.

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Context: The Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota supports women throughout their lifelong journey from childbearing age to menopause and beyond. The Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine staff care for women experiencing high-risk pregnancies related to obstetric, medical, surgical or genetic complications.

Contact:  Kelley Luckstein

CBS News, VA vows more drug tests, inspections amid rising cases of opioid theft — Keith Berge, a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist who chairs its Medication Diversion Prevention group, said drug theft was serious and patients could be seriously harmed if deprived of medication. Conducting drug tests before hiring at the VA was critical, he said. “It is not good enough to merely have effective policies and procedures on the books; they must actually be rigorously followed.” Additional coverage: Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Associated Press, KTTC

Washington Post, AP: VA data show low rate of discipline for drug loss, theft by Hope Yen — Keith Berge, a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist who chairs its Medication Diversion Prevention group, said drug theft was serious and patients could be seriously harmed if deprived of medication. Drug addicts are clever and will seek out hospitals where they believe monitoring is weak, he said. “It is not good enough to merely have effective policies and procedures on the books; they must actually be rigorously followed,” Berge said. Additional coverage: Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Associated Press, Star Tribune, KTTC

New York Times, Why Was Her Thumb Turning Black? by Lisa Sanders, M.D. — The doctor had seen the rash before…After a moment of silence, he made his recommendation: She should take her mother to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., nearly 600 miles away. “Don’t make an appointment,” he told her. Take her to the emergency room. They’d figure it out. He was sure of that. Early the next morning, mother, two friends and another daughter set off on the 10-hour, four-state trek north to the Mayo Clinic. By the time they arrived, the mother could barely walk to the door. In the waiting room, she suddenly began to shiver. Clearly they’d brought her in just in time…

Today.com, Should you treat a cut yourself? When to seek help for common medical issues by Dr. Natalie Azar — 3. Over-the-counter or prescription?: According to the Mayo Clinic, when using over-the-counter sleep aids it’s best to start with your doctor. You don't need your doctor's approval to take an over-the-counter sleep aid, but it's a good idea to ask your doctor if the sleep aid might interact with other medications or underlying conditions — and to determine the best dosage.

FOX News, Many pacemaker recipients can safely get non-chest MRIs — "This is very significant in terms of clinical practice because for years and years and years it's always been that scanning pacemaker patients with MRI was contraindicated" unless they had a newer device specifically designed to be safe during the test, said Dr. Robert Watson, chairman of neuroradiology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. But it's also "absolutely imperative that people not misconstrue this study with the sound bite that MRI is safe in patients with pacemakers. You can still kill a patient with an MRI if you do it wrong," said Watson, who was not involved in the study.

CNN, Bad heart? Time to hit the gym by Michael Nedelman — In recent years, doctors have continued to push the limits of what they thought cardiac patients could do, opting for high-intensity interval training over more moderate exercise, said Ray Squires, program director of cardiac health and rehabilitation at Mayo Clinic. In 2009, Mayo Clinic began recommending HIIT to people who had been diagnosed with heart attack or heart failure. "I don't know if there was anybody else doing it in the United States" at the time, Squires said. Additional coverage: News4Jax

Prevention, 40% Of Heart Attacks In Women Under 50 Are Due To This Condition You’ve Never Heard Of — People with connective tissue disorders, especially noncoronary fibromuscular dysplasia, also have a greater chance of suffering from this type of heart attack. In fact, one study of 116 SCAD patients at the Mayo Clinic found that 44% of them had this disorder. And being young doesn't protect you: The average age for a SCAD heart attack is 42—that's well below 70, the average age for women's heart attacks overall.

Atlanta Journal Constitution, Atlanta’s largest crawfish festival brings Mardi Gras style to food and music by Zachary Hanson — Resolving to eat healthier in the new year? Anya Guy, a clinical dietitian at Mayo Clinic in Florida, offers nutritional advice on what order when dining out to the hidden fats in avocados.

Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Butter or olive oil? Eggs or no? New nutritional review cuts through the myths — Resolving to eat healthier in the new year? Anya Guy, a clinical dietitian at Mayo Clinic in Florida, offers nutritional advice on what order when dining out to the hidden fats in avocados.

Healio, Mayo Clinic, CHOP to collaborate on research, treatment for rare congenital heart disease — Mayo Clinic’s Todd and Karen Wanek Family Program for Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome is collaborating with Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia to share resources and innovate treatments for hypoplastic left heart syndrome, according to a press release. “What is unique about this collaboration is that it allows members, like Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, around the nation to be integrated into the research foundation that we have here at Mayo Clinic and it allows them to literally financially invest within the program so that we can have a shared responsibility for the successes of the program,” Timothy Nelson, MD, PhD, director of Todd and Karen Wanek Family Program for Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome, told Cardiology Today.

Cardiology Today, New tool may help detect patients in need of individualized rehabilitation after cardiac event — Through a retrospective analysis, researchers have developed a prediction model tool to help identify patients that will show suboptimal improvement in exercise capacity with cardiac rehabilitation after a cardiac event and may benefit more from individualized programs to help increase their exercise capacities. “Our primary aim was to develop a tool to identify those with suboptimal improvement in [exercise capacity] after [cardiac rehabilitation],” Johannes Bargehr, MD, MPhil, from the department of cardiovascular diseases at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, and the division of cardiovascular medicine at University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, United Kingdom, and colleagues wrote in the abstract.

Chicago Sun-Times, 2 Chicago news anchors take time off for medical treatment — Hosea Sanders of ABC-7 and Rob Stafford of NBC-5 announced this week that they would take time away from their stations to undergo treatment…Stafford said in the email that he will be off the anchor desk for several months. He is scheduled to begin treatment Friday at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. “The Mayo hematologists are among the best amyloid experts in the world,” Stafford wrote. “They say a bone marrow transplant using my own stem cells and chemotherapy is clearly the best option for me. Two-thirds of amyloid transplant patients go into remission and my doctors are confident I will be one of them.” Additional coverage: NBC Chicago, Chicago Tribune

HealthDay, Ice Fishing Can Invite Serious Injuries — Ice fishing may seem like a relaxing pastime, but it can result in broken bones, concussions and other injuries, according to surgeons from the Mayo Clinic. "Ice fishing has become more popular in the last few years, and, with this, we have seen an increase in ice fishing-related injuries," study author Dr. Cornelius Thiels, a surgical resident, said in a hospital news release.  "What is even more concerning is that ice fishing injuries tend to be more severe than injuries associated with traditional fishing," Thiels said.

LifeZette, Even More Reason to Kick That Sedentary Lifestyle by Carleen Wild — Current recommendations call for most people to be screened for colorectal cancer starting at age 50, unless they have a family history of the disease. "This has been something that has been of concern in the screening and cancer prevention communities," said Dr. Kiesel, a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic and assistant professor of medicine at Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. "Would patients under the age of 50 but of average risk — meaning, lacking a hereditary reason to be screened for colon cancer, benefit from screening at an earlier age?"

AccuWeather, Eastern US allergy sufferers face early, prolonged spring pollen season by Kevin Byrne — Tree pollen peaks in the spring and, along with grass pollen in the summer and weed pollen in the fall, is one of the main types of allergens, according to Dr. Martha Hartz, chair of pediatric allergy and immunology at the Mayo Clinic Children’s Center in Rochester, Minnesota. “Tree pollen does trigger eye symptoms and sometimes that’s what’s most bothersome to people is their eye symptoms,” Hartz said. Experts state that allergens tend to flourish on hot and breezy days, while damp and rainy weather tends to clear the pollen from the air.

ASH Clinical News, How should this patient with severe macrocytic anemia be managed? By Ruben Mesa, M.D., consultant hematologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona — I have a 73-year-old male patient with the following characteristics: severe macrocytic anemia; hemoglobin 7.4 gm/dL; atypical monocytes 1.6k/μL in peripheral smear and confirmed by flow cytometry; bone marrow hypercellular (80%); severe erythroid hypoplasia; 1-3 percent blasts; JAK2-negative; myelodysplastic syndromes FISH panel that was negative; erythropoietin >797 mIU/mL; immunoglobulin M parvovirus negative; and with a clinical diagnosis of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia-1. I doubt that he will respond to an erythropoiesis stimulating agent. How should he be managed?

WOFL Jacksonville, Vaccine could prevent breast, ovarian, lung cancer by Joette Giovinco — It's a dream many parents would welcome for their children: A vaccine that could prevent breast, ovarian and some lung cancers. It's also the dream of immunology professor Dr. Keith Knutson. "The hope is we can develop vaccines before the development of cance He's says although he's getting closer to realizing that dream, he'll first need to test the vaccine in patients fighting triple-negative breast and ovarian cancers.r much in the way that we use a polio vaccine or a flu vaccine," Dr. Knutson told us in in his Mayo Clinic Jacksonville laboratory.

Action News Jax, Mayo Clinic study: New gene mutation may be risk factor for Alzheimer's in African-Americans by Letisha Bereola — A Mayo Clinic research team has found a new gene mutation that may be a risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease in African-Americans. … Action News Jax spoke to the lead author of the study, Dr. Nilufer Ertekin-Taner. “We just wanted to generate knowledge in an area where not sufficient knowledge is in existence right now,” said Ertekin-Taner. The research team conducted a genetic screening on more than 200 African-Americans who have Alzheimer’s disease. The screening yielded significant data that is crucial to understanding the disease in African-Americans.

Star Tribune, Some Rochester patients help treat grief with acupuncture — Some Rochester residents are being treated with acupuncture to help heal from grief. Mayo Clinic acupuncturist Sara Bublitz told KTTC-TV that most patients come in for some kind of pain management, and several find the ancient Chinese medical practice to be an emotional release. "It's like a weight has lifted off your shoulders and that sadness can be released," Bublitz said. "It's really powerful." Additional coverage: KTTC

Star Tribune, Ask science: Are fat cells forever? by Alice Callahan — The size of individual fat cells is remarkably variable, expanding and contracting with weight gain or weight loss. And as with most cell types in the body, adipocytes die eventually. “Usually when old ones die, they are replaced by new fat cells,” said Dr. Michael Jensen, an endocrinologist and obesity researcher at the Mayo Clinic. Cell death and production appear to be tightly coupled, so although about 10 percent of adipocytes die each year, they’re replaced at the same rate.

Star Tribune, Legislation could derail high-speed train to Rochester before it's built by Janet Moore — Several measures aimed at blocking a proposed $4.2 billion high-speed passenger rail line between the Twin Cities and Rochester have been introduced recently at the Legislature. But even though the Minnesota Corridor Project would be privately funded, opponents along the route are still determined to head off any possibility of public funding — from cities, counties, the Metropolitan Council, the Minnesota Department of Transportation, even the Mayo Clinic-driven Destination Medical Center economic development agency — to plan, build or operate the line.

Star Tribune, What you should know about another Wild, NHL mumps outbreak by Jason Gonzalez — The Wild is at the center of another mumps outbreak in the NHL. Zach Parise and Jason Pominville missed Monday night’s game and will sit out at least two more games after being placed in isolation for five days. This is the second time in three seasons Wild players have been diagnosed with the virus. So what is the mumps and why is it an issue in the NHL? … The Mayo Clinic warns that mumps "spreads easily from person to person through infected saliva. If you're not immune, you can contract mumps by breathing in saliva droplets of an infected person who has just sneezed or coughed.

Twin Cities Business, Sonex Health Claims Carpel Tunnel Device Milestone by Don Jacobson — A Mayo Clinic spinoff company seeking to commercialize a medical device for carpal tunnel syndrome announced it has reached an impressive milestone: The successful completion of the first ultrasound-guided procedure for the hand condition in the United States. Sonex Health, co-founded by a pair of Mayo doctors in 2014 and housed within the Mayo Clinic Business Accelerator, raised at least $2 million from angel investors for the development of the SX-One MicroKnife, described as “an ultra-low profile surgical device that allows physicians to perform carpal tunnel release surgery through a single micro-incision using ultrasound guidance.”

Twin Cities Business, Sonex Health Claims Carpel Tunnel Device Milestone by Don Jacobson — A Mayo Clinic spinoff company seeking to commercialize a medical device for carpal tunnel syndrome announced it has reached an impressive milestone: The successful completion of the first ultrasound-guided procedure for the hand condition in the United States. Sonex Health, co-founded by a pair of Mayo doctors in 2014 and housed within the Mayo Clinic Business Accelerator, raised at least $2 million from angel investors for the development of the SX-One MicroKnife, described as “an ultra-low profile surgical device that allows physicians to perform carpal tunnel release surgery through a single micro-incision using ultrasound guidance.”

WSLS Roanoke, Heart Health with Mayo Clinic by Brittany Flowers — February is Heart Health Month, so Natalie is getting tips to keep your heart in tip-top shape. Interview with Dr. John Wald. Additional coverage: Tom Sumner Show

Post-Bulletin, Answer Man Dear Magnificent One, here's a question you'd only get in the Med City: What does "code salmon" mean? — At my house, it means we have dinner plans at Red Lobster. But I'm told by a reliable authority that at Mayo Medical Laboratories, the big medical sample testing facility along West Circle Drive at Superior Drive, "code salmon" means there's a delay in the arrival of specimens for testing. I would assume there was a "code salmon" Friday morning, for example, because of our unpleasant weather and the impact on air service.

Post-Bulletin, Mayo play looks at end-of-life issues by Tom Weber — Actress Megan Cole will present the one-woman play, "The Faraway Nearby: Life-and-Death Choices through the Patient's Lens," March 8 at Mayo Clinic's Gonda Building. The play was written to give voice to a patient on a ventilator, and considers the important question of what makes a life worth living. What questions arise when a life should end? Where is the patient's voice when silenced by a ventilator?

Post-Bulletin, 'It's never too late to make a change' by Taylor Nachtigal — Amy Kuth, a certified laughter yoga leader and health and wellness coach at Mayo Clinic, leads a group in laughter yoga Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017, during the Go Red for Women Luncheon at the Mayo Clinic Civic Center in Rochester.

KLGR-FM, Dayton has prostate cancer surgery today at Mayo Clinic — Governor Mark Dayton undergoes prostate cancer surgery at Mayo Clinic in Rochester this morning. Dayton says he plans to leave the hospital Saturday and adds, “I’m gonna be back at work on Monday. Whether I’m physically here [at the Capitol] or at the [Governor’s] Residence, I’m back to work on Monday.” Additional coverage: WCCO, KTTC, Star Tribune, KARE 11

Albert Lea Tribune, Local physician earns national recognition — Kathleen Hectorne, a dermatologist at Mayo Clinic Health System in Albert Lea and Austin, was selected to receive both the Rose Hirschler and President’s awards from the Women’s Dermatologic Society. Both annual awards will be presented at the Women’s Dermatologic Society annual business meeting during the American Academy of Dermatology meeting on Sunday in Orlando. “I am so honored to have been recognized by my peers, whom I hold in high regard, and am humbled that I have been chosen for not one but two awards,” Hectorne said.

Owatonna People’s Press, Author coming to Owatonna to discuss book on founding generation of Mayo Clinic women by Ryan Anderson — Virginia Wright-Peterson will discuss her book, “Women of Mayo Clinic: The Founding Generation,” Thursday at the Owatonna Arts Center. Because “we sit in Mayo’s backyard,” there’s a “local connection,” said Mary Kaye Tillmann, a member of the Owatonna chapter of the American Association of University Women (AAUW), which is bringing the author to Owatonna. “She does a good job of covering the early women who got it started from the ground up.”

Austin Daily Herald, Telemedicine program to benefit patients with behavioral health needs by Sarah Stultz — Bo Madsen, medical director of emergency medicine at Mayo Clinic Health System throughout southeast Minnesota, said many smaller hospitals aren’t able to have psychiatrists and psychologists on hand all the time, so the option for telemedicine gives patients the opportunity for access to these services without having to wait or travel. “Instead of sitting in an emergency department for potentially 72 hours … I think people appreciate that we’re doing things immediately,” Madsen said.

Mankato Free Press, Grant awarded for proposed child advocacy center — The child advocacy center discussed by the Blue Earth County attorney in January received $165,000 in grant funding Tuesday. The center would create a place for police, child protection and social service agencies to work with children who’ve been abused or are involved in other legal issues. The idea is to create a more efficient, child-friendly, way of handling such situations. … The county is partnering with Mayo Clinic Health System and other supporting agencies on the project. Victoria Hanson, Mayo Clinic Health System in Mankato’s vice chair of administration, said current medical services for the children are provided by Dr. Arne Graff of Mayo Clinic Rochester, who travels to the Mankato campus’ pediatric clinic twice per month. Additional coverage: KEYC Mankato

WQOW Eau Claire, Half Moon Dragon Boat Festival — Calling all paddlers! Registration for the third annual Half Moon Dragon Boat Festival opens this Wednesday. Get your team together now. Sara Carstens and Maria Seibel from Mayo Clinic Health System sat down with Aaron Rhody during today’s “Daybreak” to break down details of this popular community event.

Mankato Free Press, Study: Opioid prescription frequency varies by doctor by Brian Arola — Dr. Brian Bartlett, vice chief medical officer for hospital specialties at Mayo Clinic Health System in Mankato, said there's a great focus now in emergency departments to look at other forms of pain relief before turning to opioids. Other forms could include physical therapy and Tylenol. “Our focus has really been on using (opioids) only when necessary and when other means of pain control are ineffective,” he said.

Mankato Free Press, Study: Opioid prescription frequency varies by doctor by Brian Arola — Julie Gerndt, chief medical officer at Mankato Clinic, said the medical community is having to backtrack from the prescribing practices of past decades, when there was great pressure to relieve patient pain but little understanding of how damaging the opioids could be. As the dangers of opioids became more apparent, clinics had to shift their focus to other methods of pain relief. The shift necessitated patient education, as they were coming in expecting to receive quick pain relief.

La Crosse Tribune, AP Exclusive: Twin tragedies give survivor a new face by Sharon Cohen — Over the next five years, Sandness made yearly visits to Mayo. Then in spring of 2012, he received a life-changing call. Mardini told him it looked like Mayo was going to launch a face transplant program and Sandness might be an ideal patient. The doctor had already begun traveling to France, Boston and Cleveland to meet doctors who’d done face transplants. Additional coverage: Bella Naija, KTVQ Billings, Fox 25 Boston, KVRR Fargo

KEYC Mankato, If You Got The Flu Vaccine, It's About 50-50 Against Influenza by Shawn Loging — Infectious Disease Physician Assistant at Mayo Clinic Health System–Mankato Jessica Sheehy says the most common strain of influenza doctors and nurses are seeing is one the vaccine hasn't been very effective combating. Sheehy said, "The vaccine has a 48 percent efficacy this year, seems to be a little bit more effective against the influenza B–strain with about a 73 percent efficacy, about 43 percent against influenza A." Sheehy said, "February, March is the time period when we see the highest incidents of cases."

WEAU Eau Claire, American Heart Month - Cutting Saturated Fats — February is National Heart Month and it's the perfect time for all of us to cut saturated fat from our diets. That doesn't mean you have to cut out great taste in your meals. Nutrition Educator, Katie Johnson with Mayo Clinic Health System joined Hello Wisconsin to share more.

Albert Lea Tribune, Local Mayo Clinic Health System named 1 of top rural hospitals in nation — Two nationally known organizations have named Mayo Clinic Health System in Albert Lea and Austin in the top 100 rural and community hospitals nationwide. “This award is a tribute to the excellent care and service our employees provide daily,” said Mark Ciota, CEO at Mayo Clinic Health System in Albert Lea and Austin. “Receiving this national designation reaffirms the value our efforts bring to our patients and our commitment to providing the best care possible, close to home.”

El Universal, Realizan exitoso trasplante de cara a un hombre de Wyoming – La extensa cirugía realizada en la Clínica Mayo cambiará la vida del paciente al mejorar su capacidad de masticar, deglutir, respirar y oler. El receptor es Andrew Sandness, hombre de 32 años, procedente de la zona oriental del estado de Wyoming y a quien un arma de fuego destrozó la cara cuando tenía 21 años.

El Universal, El gluten ataca el intestino delgado de los celíacos — A veces, cuando a alguien se le diagnostica como celíaco, se sorprende. La razón es que muchas veces no ha manifestado síntomas, o al menos, síntomas de importancia. Y entonces surge la pregunta de si debe seguir una estricta dieta sin gluten, considerando que su condición no es tan “grave”. La respuesta la desarrolla la gastroenteróloga y hepatóloga Amy Oxentenko, de la Clínica Mayo de Rochester, en Minnesota, Estados Unidos. Según sus argumentos, seguir estrictamente una dieta sin gluten es importante para todos los que padecen la enfermedad celíaca, aunque el trastorno no les provoque ningún síntoma.

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