Aug 18, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich @KarlWOestreich
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   CNN Calling BS on BMI: How can we tell how fat we are? by Jen Christensen "BMI really was a measurement created for epidemiology to give data that was relative and could be used in research," said Dr. Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, an obesity expert at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. Up until the 1980s, he said, doctors and scientists had been using a variety of measures to track whether a person had gained so much weight that it could hurt their health. The variety in measurement made it hard to chart trends. And as doctors were noticing that people were getting bigger, they wanted to understand how big a problem it was…"Over time, BMI has gained a clinical use, but that was not the original intention behind its creation," Mayo Clinic's Lopez-Jimenez said. "That's because it does have real limitations." Reach: CNN.com has 29.7 million unique visitors to its website each month. Additional coverage: Gant News Context: Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. The research program of Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D., studies obesity and cardiovascular disease from different angles, from physiologic studies assessing changes in myocardial mechanics and structural and hemodynamic changes following weight loss, to studies addressing the effect of physicians' diagnosis of obesity on willingness to lose weight and successful weight loss at follow-up. Contact: Traci Klein   ActionNewsJax Woman regains independence after brain mapping surgery at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville by Deanna Bettineschi A brain mapping surgery at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville has helped a woman regain her independence. For more than two decades, Peggy Cardona struggled with “I got to where I was having anywhere from seven to 11 seizures a month,” Cardona said. She said the seizures affected her ability to process words and formulate sentences. She saw several doctors and tried almost every medication available, but nothing worked. Cardona finally found the help she needed when she went to Dr. William Tatum at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida. Context: William Tatum, D.O. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist.   Post-Bulletin Our View: Mayo and Rochester are family, with all that entails Nearly everyone in town has a connection to what used to be called, without irony, Mother Mayo. Some folks, no doubt, will argue that Mayo is no longer the family it used to be. We don't entirely disagree with that. It happens to organizations that grow the kind of footprint Mayo has developed in recent decades. It's been a long time since Drs. Will and Charlie presided over what was basically a family operation, with a couple of clinic buildings and a few hundred employees. The world of medical care has advanced eons beyond those times, and Mayo has advanced with it. The challenge for Mayo today is to remain as family-oriented as possible, while maintaining the quality of practices that have placed it No. 1… Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a daily readership of more than 32,000 people and more than 442,000 unique visitors to its website each month. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota. Context: Mayo Clinic was again named the best hospital in the country in U.S. News & World Report’s annual list of top hospitals published on the U.S. News & World Report website recently.  More information about the rankings can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Mayo Clinic also recently released a societal impact report demonstrating the powerful effect the organization has on medical practice, patients and the American economy. The report ─ a first-of-its-kind study for Mayo Clinic ─ shows that Mayo Clinic contributed $28 billion to the U.S. economy and created 167,000 jobs nationwide through its business expenditures and the employer multiplier effect. TEConomy Partners, LLC, a consulting firm that provides econometric analysis, conducted this study. More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Duska Anastasijevic   Modern Healthcare Overcoming​ past​ mistakes​ with​ patients​ in​ medical​ research by Steven Ross Johnson …"The standard cancer trial was you took patients with a certain type of cancer and randomized them into treatment A versus treatment B and looked at the effects on survival and other outcomes," said Dr. Sundeep Khosla, a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist and clinical researcher. "With precision medicine and the ability to sequence the tumors, you might have patients with lung, ovarian or breast cancer all part of a trial because they happen to have a common mutation that happens to be targeted by a particular drug." Reach: Modern Healthcare, published by Crain Communications, is a healthcare news weekly that provides hospital executives with healthcare business news. The magazine specifically covers healthcare policy, Medicare/Medicaid, and healthcare from a business perspective. It also publishes a daily e-newsletter titled Modern Healthcare’s Daily Dose. The weekly publication has a circulation of more than 70,800 and its on-line site receives nearly 462,000 unique visitors each month. Context: Sundeep Khosla, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. His research focuses on focuses on the mechanisms of age-related bone loss, sex steroid regulation of bone metabolism and the detrimental effects of diabetes mellitus on bone. Dr. Khosla's research group in his Osteoporosis and Bone Biology Laboratory is examining how fundamental aging mechanisms in bone lead to increased skeletal fragility. In addition, Dr. Khosla also uses a number of genetically engineered disease models to define how estrogen regulates the skeleton. In clinical studies, Dr. Khosla is examining the adverse effects of type 2 diabetes mellitus on bone structure and material properties, which may explain the increase in fracture risk in this population. Contact: Bob Nellis [...]
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
Aug 11, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich @KarlWOestreich
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   Pioneer Press Study: Mayo Clinic had $28B impact on U.S economy in 2015 A study commissioned by Mayo Clinic calculates the health care giant’s national economic footprint as well as other related benefits. Ohio-based TEConomy Partners released a report Thursday that found that Mayo Clinic contributed almost 170,000 jobs and $28 billion to the U.S. economy in 2015, the Post Bulletin reported. Reach:  The St. Paul Pioneer Press has a daily circulation of more than 194,000 that spans the Twin Cities, parts of Minnesota, and a large part of Wisconsin. Its website has more than 2.1 million unique visitors each month. Additional coverage: Twin Cities Business, Mayo Clinic Tops ‘Best Hospitals’ List for Third Time in Four Years Kansas City Star, U.S. News & World Report, Star Tribune, Austin Herald Previous coverage in August 4, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Context: Today, Mayo Clinic released a societal impact report demonstrating the powerful effect the organization has on medical practice, patients and the American economy. The report ─ a first-of-its-kind study for Mayo Clinic ─ shows that Mayo Clinic contributed $28 billion to the U.S. economy and created 167,000 jobs nationwide through its business expenditures and the employer multiplier effect. TEConomy Partners, LLC, a consulting firm that provides econometric analysis, conducted this study. While the study confirms that Mayo Clinic is a national economic force, the report, Remarkable Moments of Sharing, details how Mayo Clinic also provides many additional benefits to households, businesses, government and other organizations across the U.S. Mayo Clinic’s unique integration of clinical care, research and education creates connections that lead to a meaningful impact on patients, researchers, medical students and communities. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Duska Anastasijevic   Post-Bulletin Mayo Clinic retains No. 1 ranking in U.S. News by Brett Boese — Mayo Clinic retained the top spot in U.S. News & World Report's 2017-18 Best Hospital rankings, but the annual report included a historic first that gave Mayo officials another reason to celebrate. Mayo's Rochester facility earned the coveted No. 1 ranking for the second straight year and the third time in four years. This year, Mayo officials also celebrated out west as the Phoenix campus finished No. 20 in a report that examined more than 4,500 medical centers across the country. It's the first time in the 28-year history of the U.S. News rankings that Mayo has placed more than one campus on the Honor Roll, and the first time any Arizona facility has landed in the Top 20. Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a daily readership of more than 32,000 people and more than 442,000 unique visitors to its website each month. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota. Additional coverage: KAAL, Rochester Businesses Strive to Stand with Mayo as #1 Medscape, KARE 11, Healio, KTTC, KXLT FOX 47, Medical Health News, Healthcare Dive Arizona Republic, Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix among top 20 in national ranking KPNX, Phoenix Business Journal, KTAR Phoenix Florida Times-Union, Jacksonville’s Mayo Clinic ranked best hospital in Florida by U.S. News & World Report  South Florida Business Journal, Tampa Bay Business Journal, Orlando Sentinel KEYC Mankato, Mayo Clinic Health System Mankato Named Among Top Hospitals In Minnesota Context: Mayo Clinic was again named the best hospital in the country in U.S. News & World Report’s annual list of top hospitals published on the U.S. News & World Report website recently.  Other highlights include: Mayo Clinic’s Arizona campus ranked No. 20 among hospitals nationwide Mayo Clinic ranked No. 1 in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota Mayo Clinic ranked No. 1 in the Jacksonville, Florida, and Phoenix metro areas More information about the rankings can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contacts: Rhoda Fukushima Madson, Kevin Punsky, Jim McVeigh, Micah Dorfner   KMSP Mayo Clinic: Gut bacteria may lead to multiple sclerosis treatment A human gut microbe discovered by researchers at Mayo Clinic may help treat autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis, according to findings published in the journal Cell Reports. The Mayo research team, including researchers from th University of Iowa, tested gut microbial samples from patients on a mouse model of MS. Of three bacterial strains, they found one microbe, called Prevotella histicola, effectively suppressed immune disease in the preclinical model of MS. “If we can use the microbes already in the human body to treat human disease beyond the gut itself, we may be onto a new era of medicine,” said a statement from Dr. Joseph Murray, M.D., a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist. “We are talking about bugs as drugs." Additional coverage: Medical Xpress, TIME, Medical News Today Reach:  KMSP, Fox 9, broadcasts in the Minneapolis-St. Paul market. Context: Joseph Murray, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist and hepatologist. Contact:  Joe Dangor   First Coast News New Mayo Clinic facility aims to increase lungs available for transplant In the coming months, construction will begin on a new facility at Mayo Clinic’s Jacksonville campus. Mayo Clinic announced a partnership with Maryland-based United Therapeutics Corporation to build and operate a lung restoration center in 2015. “There’s only one other center right now in the country that’s actually doing what we do,” Windell Smith, Mayo Clinic operations administrator, said. “And that’s in Silver Springs, Maryland.” Reach: First Coast News refers to two television stations in Jacksonville, Florida. WJXX, the ABC affiliate and WTLV, the NBC affiliate. Context: Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, and United Therapeutics Corporation (NASDAQ: UTHR) will build and operate a lung restoration center on the Mayo campus. The goal is to significantly increase the volume of lungs for transplantation by preserving and restoring selected marginal donor lungs, making them viable for transplantation. The restored lungs will be made available to patients at Mayo Clinic and other transplant centers throughout the United States. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact:  Paul Scotti [...]
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
Aug 4, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich @KarlWOestreich
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   US News & World Report Students Begin Class at New Metro Phoenix Medical School Fifty students in Arizona took the first steps of a four-year journey to becoming medical doctors. The Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, also called Mayo Med School, began instruction last week at its metro Phoenix campus in Scottsdale. Its inaugural class includes 10 students who from Arizona or with ties to the state. Mayo Med School Interim Dean Dr. Michele Halyard told the school's inaugural class her stress-reliever as a student doctor came in the form of exercising regularly and eating a healthy diet. Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month. Additional coverage: WFTV Orlando, KTAR, Santa Fe New Mexican, Star Tribune, KTTC, Chicago Tribune, KPNX 12 News Previous coverage in August 4, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Previous coverage in July 21, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Previous coverage in July 14, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Context: This July, Mayo Clinic's campuses in Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona, will become the third campus of Mayo Medical School. Students will join about 5,700 Mayo Clinic employees who care for more than 100,000 patients every year. It's a close-knit (but not too small) Mayo Clinic campus in one of the biggest metropolitan areas in the country. Contact: Jim McVeigh   Univision Q’s Hands by Jorge Ramos The brain is pulsating in front of me — I never imagined that the brain could pulsate as the heart does. It’s beige, almost light brown. Purple veins and arteries sprawl like a spider web…The patient, who we’ll call M, is a 29-year-old who had a brain tumor. He allowed me and my television crew to record the procedure. M put his faith and his brain in the hands of Dr. Alfredo Quiñones and the experts at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida. I would have done the same. Dr. Q is a living legend. At 49, he has performed some 2,500 brain surgeries. But the most riveting story is how he managed to become one of the world’s most talented neurosurgeons. Reach: Univision is the leading destination for U.S. Hispanics by a significant margin, commanding 60% share of the Spanish-language primetime Adult 18-49 audience and reaching an estimated 108 million average monthly unduplicated media consumers. Previous coverage in May 26, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Previous coverage in May 12, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Previous coverage in January 13, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Previous coverage in September 23, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Previous coverage in April 22, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Context: Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, M.D., prominent neurosurgeon, researcher and educator, joined Mayo Clinic in 2016 as chair of the Department of Neurosurgery on the Florida campus, along with several members of his research team from Johns Hopkins Medicine. Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa is renown nationally and internationally as a surgeon, researcher, humanitarian and author. His laboratory has published many manuscripts and articles, submitted a number of patents and obtained three NIH grants. Students and fellows who worked with Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa have gone on to join leading neuroscience programs throughout the world. Mayo Clinic's world-renowned neurosurgeons perform more than 7,000 complex surgical procedures every year at campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. Contact: Kevin Punsky, Sharon Theimer   First Coast News Doctors studying CTE injuries at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville by Janny Rodriguez Boston University study finding that 110 of 111 deceased NFL players showed Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), a disease caused by repeated blows to the head, has gotten national attention. Locally, the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville is studying ways to determine if people have CTE, especially at a young age. Mayo Dr. Kevin Bieniek says even at a high school level players are at risk. His own research has found that one third of high school football players had CTE. "Even younger cases are not immune and that's what this Boston study shows and that's what our research shows," said Dr. Bieniek. Reach: First Coast News refers to two television stations in Jacksonville, Florida. WJXX, the ABC affiliate and WTLV, the NBC affiliate. Context: Kevin Bieniek, Ph.D. is associated with Dennis Dickson, MD's brain bank as part of Mayo Clinic's neuroscience research. Neuroscientists at Mayo Clinic in Florida are leaders in the discovery of new genes, biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Dennis Dickson, M.D., a member of the Department of Neuroscience and a Potamkin Prize winner, directs the brain bank, which contains more than 5,000 specimens. Contact: Kevin Punsky   Post-Bulletin What's Mayo Clinic's impact? by Jeff Kiger The Mayo Clinic Effect spreads far beyond the hospital walls to add an estimated $28 billion to the U.S. economy is no surprise of residents of Rochester. "There's no doubt it makes a huge impact for us," said Nick Powers, general manager of the Canadian Honker restaurant across Second Street from Mayo Clinic's Saint Marys Hospital. When we started 33 years ago, this was a small restaurant that seated 40 people. We essentially grew along with Mayo." Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a daily readership of more than 32,000 people and more than 442,000 unique visitors to its website each month. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota. Context: Today, Mayo Clinic released a societal impact report demonstrating the powerful effect the organization has on medical practice, patients and the American economy. The report ─ a first-of-its-kind study for Mayo Clinic ─ shows that Mayo Clinic contributed $28 billion to the U.S. economy and created 167,000 jobs nationwide through its business expenditures and the employer multiplier effect. TEConomy Partners, LLC, a consulting firm that provides econometric analysis, conducted this study. While the study confirms that Mayo Clinic is a national economic force, the report, Remarkable Moments of Sharing, details how Mayo Clinic also provides many additional benefits to households, businesses, government and other organizations across the U.S. Mayo Clinic’s unique integration of clinical care, research and education creates connections that lead to a meaningful impact on patients, researchers, medical students and communities. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Duska Anastasijevic [...]
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
Jul 28, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich @KarlWOestreich
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   Washington Post Healthier living could reduce worldwide dementia by a third, report says by Tara Bahrampour That report, which was sponsored by the National Institute on Aging and used different methodologies than the Lancet Commission’s, found that just three types of intervention offered “encouraging but inconclusive” evidence: cognitive training, blood pressure management for hypertension and increased physical exercise. Ronald C. Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center and the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging, presented the report Wednesday at the conference and said large trials that are currently ongoing or forthcoming could provide more evidence to support the effects of lifestyle intervention. Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month. Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services. Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist   National Public Radio Is Inflammation Bad For You Or Good For You? by Katherine Hobson Chronic, low-level inflammation seems to play a role in a host of diseases, including type 2 diabetes, heart disease, Alzheimer's, cancer and even depression. And even though the science on inflammation and disease is far from settled, tests and treatments are being promoted that claim to reduce that risk… But the blood test for the hs-CRP marker isn't specific, which means it can tell you there's inflammation going on, but not why it's happening. It could be an infection, or an autoimmune disease, or that sprained ankle. So it's not terribly helpful on its own. "As we confront or deal with a specific medical issue, we usually end up being very focused and precise about the disease process," says James Li, an allergist-immunologist at the Mayo Clinic. "We don't look at these conditions globally as inflammation in the body." Reach: Shots is the online channel for health stories from the NPR Science Desk. Shots reports on news that can makes a difference for in people's health and shows how policy shapes people's health choices. Shots also includes the latest on research and medical treatments, as well as the business side of health. The blog receives more than 242,000 unique visitors to its site each month. Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist   Hospitals & Health Networks Mayo Schools Students in Medicine and Health Care Delivery Science, Mayo Clinic School of Medicine welcomes students to Arizona campus, new curriculum by Matt O’Connor This week, members of the first class to start at the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine's new campus in Arizona will embark on the first leg of their medical careers and will find something extra in the curriculum as well. The 50 students at Mayo's new Phoenix-Scotsdale campus will be introduced to the school’s Science of Health Care Delivery curriculum. Piloted in 2015, the curriculum focuses on exposing students to the special challenges of working in a health system. Reach:  Hospitals & Health Networks is a monthly magazine, with a circulation of more than 77,000, is geared toward health care executives and clinical leaders in hospitals and health systems. Its website has more than 58,000 unique visitors each month. Additional coverage: Arizona Republic, 50 students start down grueling path in Mayo Med School's inaugural Scottsdale class Previous coverage in July 21, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Previous coverage in July 14, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Context: This July, Mayo Clinic's campuses in Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona, will become the third campus of Mayo Medical School. Students will join about 5,700 Mayo Clinic employees who care for more than 100,000 patients every year. It's a close-knit (but not too small) Mayo Clinic campus in one of the biggest metropolitan areas in the country. Contact: Jim McVeigh   HealthLeaders Complete Technology Overhaul Costs Mayo Clinic $1.5 Billion The Mayo Clinic Health System's $1.5 billion EHR rollout will affect thousands of employees nationwide. The Mayo Clinic Health System recently began a $1.5 billion electronic health record (EHR) rollout which will affect all 70 of the system’s facilities and 51,000 employees across the country, according to Fierce Healthcare. The system until recently used a combination of two EHR programs—a situation many CDI specialists may bemoan—but the Wisconsin facilities have now begun the consolidation to Epic’s EHR. Reach:  HealthLeaders is published monthly with a circulation of more than 40,000 and is targeted toward senior executives in the health care industry. Its website receives more than 161,000 unique visitors each month. Previous Coverage in the July 21, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Context:  Mayo Clinic has started the process of moving to a single, integrated electronic health record and billing system with the implementation of Epic at its Mayo Clinic Health System sites in Wisconsin. Mayo Clinic Health System sites in Wisconsin began implementing Epic last weekend. Mayo Clinic Health System sites in Minnesota are scheduled to go live in November 2017, followed by Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus in May 2018 and Mayo Clinic’s campuses in Arizona and Florida in October 2018. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson [...]
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
Jul 21, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich @KarlWOestreich
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   US News & World Report Mayo Clinic Launches New $1B Electronic Records System Mayo Clinic officials say a $1 billion project launched by the health care provider will combine all of its electronic health records into a single, upgraded computer system. Mayo Clinic Health System sites switched to the new system by Wisconsin-based Epic Systems Corp. on Saturday, the Post-Bulletin reported. It allows all medical personnel involved to see information about a patient's medications, allergies and health issues. "By applying the world's most forward-thinking technology and processes to our electronic health records and collaborative care systems, our experts will be even more connected in delivering the high-value care, research and education that Mayo is known for and patients deserve," said Christopher Ross, a spokesman for Mayo Clinic. Additional coverage: American Nursing Informatics Association, Healthcare IT News, Star Tribune, Post-Bulletin, KSTP, Mankato Free Press, Albert Lea Tribune, KEYC Mankato, Fierce Biotech, WQOW La Crosse, Becker’s Hospital Review, SFGate, Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal, Austin Daily Herald, Milwaukee Business Journal, EHR Intelligence, KTTC, Healthcare Informatics, DOTmed.com  Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month. Context:  Mayo Clinic has started the process of moving to a single, integrated electronic health record and billing system with the implementation of Epic at its Mayo Clinic Health System sites in Wisconsin. Mayo Clinic Health System sites in Wisconsin began implementing Epic last weekend. Mayo Clinic Health System sites in Minnesota are scheduled to go live in November 2017, followed by Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus in May 2018 and Mayo Clinic’s campuses in Arizona and Florida in October 2018. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson   Star Tribune Mayo joint venture looks for new uses for drug molecules by Joe Carlson A new venture between the Mayo Clinic and a Boston-area artificial intelligence firm will work with drug companies to discover whether molecules researched for treatment of one disease can effectively treat other conditions. The month-old research company is called Qrativ and will target conditions for which current treatments are lacking. Mayo’s partner in the joint venture is Cambridge-based Nference. “Mayo’s interest in this is not only will we be making new therapies for patients, but I believe that this is also going to enhance Mayo’s research capabilities,” said Mayo’s Dr. Andrew Badley, an infectious disease specialist who directs Mayo’s Office of Translation to Practice. “Already we’ve used the Nference platform for a few investigators at Mayo, which has led to new insights and new associations that have advanced the progress of science tangibly.” Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation. Additional coverage: Xconomy, Fierce Biotech Context: Recently, Mayo Clinic and nference launch a startup company for drug development that will be powered by clinical expertise and artificial intelligence (AI). The company, named Qrativ(pronounced cure-a-tiv) will combine nference’s AI-driven knowledge synthesis platform with Mayo Clinic’s medical expertise and clinical data. Qrativ seeks to discover and develop treatments for diseases with unmet medical need. This effort is being boosted by an $8.3 million Series A financing supported by Matrix Capital Management, Matrix Partners and Mayo Clinic. Qrativ’s initial focus will be on rare diseases and highly targeted patient populations. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Duska Anastasijevic   HuffPost Obesity: An Individualized Approach Doubles The Success Rate Of Weight Loss Therapy In the new Obesity Clinic within Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine, a multidisciplinary team selects therapy for each patient based on his or her genetic and biological characteristics, environment and behavior. The new approach is already dramatically increasing treatment success and pioneering the application of precision medicine to treat chronic diseases. The Obesity Clinic is open to anyone who is overweight or obese and wants to lose weight. Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique viewers. Context: Individualized medicine, also known as personalized medicine or precision medicine, means tailoring diagnosis and treatment to each patient to optimize care. Patients have experienced this kind of care for a century and a half at Mayo Clinic, where teams of specialists have always worked together to find answers. The Center for Individualized Medicine solves the clinical challenges of today and tomorrow by bringing the latest discoveries from the research laboratory to your doctor's fingertips in the form of new genomics-based tests and treatments. Contacts: Colette Gallager, Susan Buckles   HuffPost Study Pioneers Use Of Pharmacogenomic Data In Electronic Health Record Each one of us has a unique genetic makeup, and we all respond differently to drugs. In recent years, precision medicine has made headlines by predicting the possibility an individual may develop a specific disease — think BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic mutations linked to breast and ovarian cancer. But that is just the tip of the genomic iceberg, says Richard Weinshilboum, M.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine’s Pharmacogenomics Program and the Mary Lou and John H. Dasburg Professor of Cancer Genomics. “When you look at the clinical application of genomics, everyone thinks of cancer — and this is appropriate, because cancer is a genomic disease,” Dr. Weinshilboum says. “However, the aspect of clinical genomics that will affect everyone everywhere is pharmacogenomics,” or how an individual’s genetic makeup influences how the body responds to medications. Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique viewers. Context: Individualized medicine, also known as personalized medicine or precision medicine, means tailoring diagnosis and treatment to each patient to optimize care. Patients have experienced this kind of care for a century and a half at Mayo Clinic, where teams of specialists have always worked together to find answers. The Center for Individualized Medicine solves the clinical challenges of today and tomorrow by bringing the latest discoveries from the research laboratory to your doctor's fingertips in the form of new genomics-based tests and treatments. Contacts: Colette Gallager, Susan Buckles   Post-Bulletin Gehrig-signed ball completes a circuit by Brett Boese A baseball signed by New York Yankees legend Lou Gehrig is finally home — with a story to tell. Mayo Clinic has opened a new display at Heritage Hall, its free museum staffed by volunteers, to display a baseball Gehrig signed for a Rochester boy in 1939 just before he was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), which is often called Lou Gehrig's disease. That boy — Rochester native Bob Tierney — cherished the artifact for decades before selling it to Rochester businessman Andy Chafoulias in December 2014, shortly before Tierney's death. Chafoulias and his 13-year-old daughter, Taylor, immediately donated the ball to Mayo, sparking more than a year of planning and preparation before the display recently opened along the back wall of Heritage Hall. Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a daily readership of more than 32,000 people and more than 442,000 unique visitors to its website each month. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota. Context: Bob Tierney connected with Yankees legendary first baseman Lou Gehrig instantly. "We hit it off," says Bob, now 91 years old. The advice the Iron Horse gave the 15-year-old changed his life. The year was 1939. Bob would come to the fields just south of Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, to hit and play catch with the American Legion team, a group of young men in love with the game but with long odds of making a career out of it. Gehrig, too, was looking for the game he'd spent a lifetime mastering. Gehrig was eager to find local players in Rochester when he asked the hotelier, who pointed the Yankees legend to the same fields that Bob and the rest of the boys occupied. More information about this story can be found here. Contact:  Kelly Reller [...]
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
Jul 14, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich @KarlWOestreich
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   Bloomberg Mayo Clinic CEO Says Trump's Budget Is Probably D.O.A. John Noseworthy, Mayo Clinic president and chief executive officer, discusses the health-care legislation currently before the U.S. Congress and the state of the health-care industry with Bloomberg's David Gura at the Allen & Company Media Conference in Sun Valley, Idaho. Reach: Bloomberg News is an international wire service, including print, television, radio and Internet, that provides news, data and analysis to business and media professionals around the world. Bloomberg publishes over 6,000 stories on an average day, syndicating to over 450 newspapers worldwide with a combined circulation of 80 million people. Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Contact: Duska Anastasijevic   Arizona PBS Mayo Medical School Classes will start for the first time at the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine in Scottsdale. We'll hear more from Dr. Michele Halyard, dean of the new school. Reach: Eight, Arizona PBS is a PBS station that has focused on educating children, reporting in-depth on public affairs, fostering lifelong learning and celebrating arts and culture. Its signal reaches 86 percent of the homes in Arizona. With more than 1 million viewers weekly, Eight consistently ranks among the most-viewed public television stations per capita in the country. Eight is a member-supported service of Arizona State University. Context: This July, Mayo Clinic's campuses in Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona, will become the third campus of Mayo Medical School. Students will join about 5,700 Mayo Clinic employees who care for more than 100,000 patients every year. It's a close-knit (but not too small) Mayo Clinic campus in one of the biggest metropolitan areas in the country. Contact: Jim McVeigh   First Coast News Robot performs first knee surgery at Mayo Clinic by Janny Rodriguez For the first time, doctors at Mayo Clinic Jacksonville are using a robot to help perform full knee replacement surgeries on patients. "I was playing tennis, I was hitting a forehand and I heard something pop," said native Texan, Mini Kincaid. She said she tore her meniscus and since skiing, hiking and even walking became painful. Eventually she was told she would need a full knee replacement. A robot at Mayo Clinic Jacksonville came to her rescue. "All of a sudden I'm walking, and I'm biking and I'm almost normal," she said. Her surgery at Mayo Clinic was a success and the first in the region to be performed with the help of the robotic arm. "I do the surgery, I'm holding an instrument, but it guides my hand," said Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Cedric Ortiguera. He said he never dreamed of having that kind of partner in surgery. Reach: First Coast News refers to two television stations in Jacksonville, Florida. WJXX, the ABC affiliate and WTLV, the NBC affiliate. Context: Cedric Ortiguera, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon. Contact: Kevin Punsky   HealthDay Parkinson's Disease and Melanoma May Occur Together, Study Finds by Robert Preidt People with Parkinson's disease are about four times more likely to develop melanoma skin cancer, and conversely, people with melanoma have a fourfold higher risk of getting Parkinson's, researchers report. Although doctors have known about the connection between these diseases, they still don't know why having one increases the risk of the other. "Future research should focus on identifying common genes, immune responses and environmental exposures that may link these two diseases," said study first author Dr. Lauren Dalvin, who's with the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. "If we can pinpoint the cause of the association between Parkinson's disease and melanoma, we will be better able to counsel patients and families about their risk of developing one disease in the setting of the other," she said in a Mayo news release. Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives nearly 398,000 unique visitors each month. Additional coverage: Philly.com, Parkinson’s News Today, UPI.com, Doctors Lounge Context: People with the movement disorder Parkinson’s disease have a much higher risk of the skin cancer melanoma, and vice versa, a Mayo Clinic study finds. While further research is needed into the connection, physicians treating one disease should be vigilant for signs of the other and counsel those patients about risk, the authors say. The findings are published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Overall, patients with Parkinson’s were roughly four times likelier to have had a history of melanoma than those without Parkinson’s, and people with melanoma had a fourfold higher risk of developing Parkinson’s, the research found. More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Sharon Theimer   ABC News Trying to keep brain sharp doesn't have to be costly by Linda A. Johnson While there's nothing you can do or take to ensure you won't get Alzheimer's disease, experts say there are some strategies that might help keep your brain sharp. And you don't need to dole out a lot of money to do it. "Does one have to spend their life savings on computer games? I don't think so," said Dr. Yonas Geda, a psychiatrist at the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona, who's looked at some alternatives. Reach: ABCNews.com is the official website for ABC News. Its website receives more than 24.1 million unique visitors each month. Additional coverage: New York Times, Albany Times Union, Columbia Missourian Context: Mayo Clinic researchers have found that engaging in mentally stimulating activities, even late in life, may protect against new-onset mild cognitive impairment, which is the intermediate stage between normal cognitive aging and dementia. The study found that cognitively normal people 70 or older who engaged in computer use, craft activities, social activities and playing games had a decreased risk of developing  mild cognitive impairment. The results are published in the Jan. 30 edition of JAMA Neurology.  More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason [...]
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
Jul 7, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich @KarlWOestreich
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   Arizona Republic Ask a Doc: Making radiation treatment for cancer safer by Steven E. Schild Question: How does proton beam compare to other forms of radiation treatment? Answer: Radiation therapy is an important treatment for many cancers. More than half of all cancer patients receive one or more courses of radiation therapy as part of their treatment. In radiation therapy, intense amounts of energy are directed through X-ray at cancer cells to destroy the genetic material that controls cell growth. The electromagnetic waves in X-rays pass through most objects because of their physical properties. — Steven E. Schild, M.D., is chairman of Radiation Oncology at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Reach: The Arizona Republic has daily circulation of more than 180,000 and its website azcentral.com has more than 2.6 million unique visitors each month. Context: Mayo Clinic offers proton beam therapy for patients at new facilities in Arizona and Minnesota. Through its Proton Beam Therapy Program, Mayo brings a new capability in radiotherapy to people who can benefit from highly targeted precision beam therapy. Intensity-modulated proton beam therapy with pencil beam scanning, the latest form of proton beam therapy, allows Mayo radiation oncologists to destroy cancer while sparing healthy tissue. Steven Schild, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic radiation oncologist. Dr. Schild's research is focused mainly on the treatment of tumors arising in the lung and prostate gland. Contact: Jim McVeigh   FiveThirtyEight Lyme Disease Is Spreading, And It’s Partly This Mouse’s Fault by Sheila M. Eldred The role of the white-footed mouse is so important in spreading tick-borne diseases that Dr. Bobbi Pritt always works it into the discussion. “Interventions to decrease the mice [population] could potentially prevent Lyme disease” and other tick-borne diseases too, said Pritt, whose team discovered a new bacterial species that causes Lyme disease while leading research on parasites and vector-borne diseases at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. The expanded range of the white-footed mouse can also clue scientists in to where tick-borne diseases may spread. Reach: FiveThirtyEight covers politics, economics, science, life and sports with a focus on data analysis, statistics and predictive models. It receives more than 8.6 million unique visitors to its website each month. Context: Bobbi Pritt, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic pathologist who focuses on infectious disease. Her research interests are in clinical parasitology, vector-borne diseases, trainee education and appropriate test utilization. Dr. Pritt is also the author of the Parasite Wonders blog where she explores new parasite cases each week. Contact: Gina Chiri-Osmond   KAAL Slowing Memory Loss with Age Sometimes as people get older, their memory starts to fade, but recent findings from the National Academies of Science show that certain techniques can change that. “I wish things could be where they were so that I could do things without worrying about anything," said Donna Ties who was diagnosed with Alzheimer's six years ago. "Some people benefit from these brain exercises," said Dr. Ron Petersen with the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Center. Peterson, who was on the committee that wrote a recent report for the National Academies of Sciences, said there are ways to help with memory before a diagnosis of dementia or Alzheimer’s. "The exercises that were done 10 years ago actually had an effect two years out, five and 10 years out at slowing down cognitive aging," Petersen said. Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa. Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Contact: Kelly Reller   USA Today Competitive eating: How do they do it? by Sean Rossman On the 240th anniversary of his country's independence, American Joey Chestnut ate 70 hot dogs in 10 minutes. A new record. "Jaws," as Chestnut is known, put down a summer's worth of cased meats at the Nathan's Famous Hot Dog Eating Contest in 2016. It was an impressive physical accomplishment and a gargantuan intake of calories, fat and salt. ..The normal human stomach is about the size of a Nerf football, said Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist David Fleischer. At its biggest, it stretches about 15%. On the other hand, competitive eaters can expand their stomachs two to three times their normal size. Reach: USA Today is a national, general interest newspaper covering consumer-driven and general interest topics with a circulation of more than 2.2 million daily. USA Today Online has more than 36.7 unique million visitors each month. Context: David Fleischer, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist. Contact:  Kelley Luckstein [...]
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
Jun 30, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Emily Blahnik @eblahnik
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   NBC News What Can Prevent Alzheimer’s? Here’s What the Evidence Shows by Maggie Fox — “At present, there are no pharmacologic or lifestyle interventions that will prevent mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer's disease,” said Dr. Ronald Petersen, an Alzheimer’s expert at the Mayo Clinic, who was on the committee. “All this is not new, but this review is the strongest evidence base we have,” Petersen added.  “We have all been exposed to a study here, a study there. One suggests this intervention is beneficial, the other finds it’s not. This review looked at the totality of literature over last six years and put it to most rigorous test you can imagine.” Additional coverage: NBC News, Alzheimer's Prevention: Some Common-Sense Practices That May Help Slow Alzheimer's Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month. Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Contacts: Traci Klein, Susan Barber Lindquist   NBC News Gene Testing for Most Effective Drugs Could Help Save Lives An apparent breakthrough in the field of personalized medicine: people can now test their genetic profiles to see how they might process a variety of drugs from pain relievers to more complex cancer treatments. Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month. Related coverage: NBC News, Is Your Medication Helping or Hurting? DNA Tests May Be a Guide Context: Pharmacogenomics is the study of the role of inheritance in variation in drug response phenotypes, which range from life-threatening adverse drug reactions to lack of the desired therapeutic effect of a drug. Richard Weinshilboum, M.D. studies pharmacogenomics. The goal is to develop safer and more effective drug therapy to treat diseases that range from cancer to depression. Contacts: Traci Klein, Susan Buckles, Colette Gallagher   HuffPost Mayo Investigator Is Developing A Screening Test For Endometrial Cancer Inspired by the patients she cares for each day, Jamie Bakkum-Gamez, M.D., is working to create a screening test for endometrial cancer that uses a tampon to collect vaginal fluid from a patient. The fluid is then analyzed to detect molecular and genetic changes could signal endometrial cancer. “Only five to ten percent of women with symptoms of endometrial cancer, which include abnormal vaginal bleeding, actually have the disease. However, nearly all women with these symptoms undergo an invasive endometrial biopsy to rule out endometrial cancer.” Reach:  HuffPost receives more than 22.9 million unique visitors to its site each month. Context: Jamie N. Bakkum-Gamez, M.D.'s research include screening and early detection modalities in ovarian cancer and endometrial cancer; prognostic molecular markers in ovarian cancer and endometrial cancer; and quality improvement in postoperative outcomes after ovarian cancer staging surgery. Contacts: Joe Dangor, Kelley Luckstein   Eau Claire Leader-Telegram UW-EC, Mayo to collaborate by Samantha West An official partnership formed between UW-Eau Claire and Mayo Clinic Health System will pave the way for heightened research opportunities that will benefit students and the entire Chippewa Valley, officials said. “The collaboration will definitely benefit both of our institutions,” said Dr. Richard Helmers, regional vice president of Mayo Clinic Health System’s northwestern Wisconsin region. “But most important, it will better the lives of residents of the Chippewa Valley community.” Reach: Leader-Telegram is a daily newspaper, with a circulation of more than 18,700, published for the residents of Eau Claire County, Chippewa Falls, and Menomonie, Wisconsin.  Its website receives more than 18,700 unique visitors each month. Additional coverage: WQOW Eau Claire, UW-Eau Claire, Mayo Clinic Health System announce research agreement WEAU Eau Claire, Historic agreement made between UW-Eau Claire and Mayo Clinic Health System Context: The University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and Mayo Clinic Health System announced a new agreement on June 28 that will increase opportunities for research collaboration between the two institutions, create new avenues of learning for UW-Eau Claire students, and make way for projects that will lead to improved health and wellness in the community. A new master collaborative research agreement will enable researchers at the two institutions to work together on projects. UW-Eau Claire and Mayo Clinic Health System will be better able to help prepare the next generation of scientists, innovators, and health care providers and leaders, officials said during a press conference at Mayo Clinic Health System’s Eau Claire campus. More information on the new agreement can be found here. Contacts: Dan Lea, Kristin Everett   ABC News (Good Morning America) What to know about the new research on migraines Dr. David Dodick, Mayo Clinic neurologist, is interviewed on Good Morning America on chronic migraines. Interview starts at 2:09. Reach: Good Morning America is a national morning news program that airs on the ABC Television Network. GMA averages more than 4.6 million viewers daily. Context:  David Dodick, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist. Dr. Dodick's research efforts include the testing of novel compounds for the acute and preventive treatment of migraine and cluster headache. Contact:  Jim McVeigh   [...]
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
Jun 23, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich @KarlWOestreich
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   New York Times Who Really Needs to Be Gluten-Free? by Jane E. Brody Approximately one person in 140 is known to have celiac disease, which can remain silent for decades and become apparent at any age. The true incidence may be a lot higher. In a Denver study that followed children born from 1993 through 2004 into their teen years, 3.1 percent turned out to have celiac disease. “That’s an unbelievable number of Americans who may be affected,” said Dr. Joseph A. Murray of the Mayo Clinic, an international expert on the disease… “There’s a simple blood test for celiac, but it must be done before you change your diet,” Dr. Murray said in an interview. Aside from intestinal damage, failing to detect asymptomatic celiac at an early age can result in poor bone development and suppressed growth, Dr. Murray said. This can create “a high risk for fractures both before and after a diagnosis of celiac, which might not happen until age 40 or 50,” he explained. Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million. Context: Joseph Murray, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist. Dr. Murray's research interests focus in two distinct areas. The first is celiac disease or gluten sensitivity and enteropathy. This research program, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, focuses on clinical epidemiology of celiac disease, the role of genetics in predicting disease, the development of animal models for the disease and its associated dermatologic condition, and dermatitis herpetiformis. Research focus number two revolves around esophageal disorders, particularly esophageal functional disorders, particularly reflux, and the detection of atypical reflux. Contacts:  Joe Dangor, Traci Klein   Florida Times-Union Guest column: Research drives economic growth of Florida’s diverse economy Working side-by-side, Mayo physicians and scientists seek to take these discoveries and accelerate life-changing therapies, surgical procedures and technologies. Clinical trials allow for new discoveries to be directly used for patient care. Patients at Mayo Clinic often are among the first to benefit from new therapies or innovative techniques through clinical trials. Because of research, over 1.3 million people came to Mayo Clinic for care in 2016, seeking medical answers they hadn’t found elsewhere. On Florida’s campus, patients have come from all 50 states and more than 140 countries for treatment since the clinic opened in 1986…— Gianrico Farrugia is a physician and CEO of Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus. Tushar Patel is a physician scientist and Dean for Research at the campus. Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday. Additional coverage: BioFlorida, Mayo Clinic building wellness in diverse ways Previous coverage in June 16, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Context: Gianrico Farrugia, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vice president and CEO of Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida. Tushar Patel, M.B., Ch.B., is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist and is dean of research at Mayo Clinic's Florida campus. Contact: Kevin Punsky   Star Tribune At Mayo, pitcher finds relief in lifelong battle with colitis by Jeremy Olson Jake Diekman has struggled since he was 10 with ulcerative colitis and the abdominal pains, diarrhea and emergency bathroom trips that it can cause. But the Texas Rangers relief pitcher said he taught himself to block out those symptoms whenever he took the mound…Diekman had been on a long train of medications, including the steroid prednisone, which he said made him feel better and lousy all at the same time. But Dr. Robert Cima, Diekman’s surgeon at Mayo, said they were no longer effective. Drugs either don’t work or become ineffective in 25 to 40 percent of cases, he noted. “Jake was not able to maintain his quality of life. He was not able to maintain the physical activity level he needs,” Cima said. “And given his profession, that was a big issue.” Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation. Context: Robert Cima, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic colorectal surgeon. Mayo Clinic surgeons helped develop minimally invasive (laparoscopic) colon and rectal surgery and use these techniques on almost all surgeries. Laparoscopic procedures use smaller incisions than conventional surgery, which decreases bleeding, lessens pain and shortens both expected hospital stays and overall recovery times. They are also skilled in robotic surgery, a specialized form of laparoscopic surgery, and ileoanal anastomosis surgery that avoids the need for a permanent colostomy. Contact: Sharon Theimer Contacts:  Sharon Theimer, Kelley Luckstein   KARE 11 Mayo offering fast-track breast cancer treatment by Adrienne Broaddus Early-stage breast cancer patients now have a fast-track treatment option at Mayo Clinic. Select, low-risk patients are completing their surgery and radiation in less than 10 days. "It’s a great option for women who are really, really busy and would like to complete all their therapy within a (short) time frame and get on with the rest of their life," says Dr. Tina Hieken, a Mayo Clinic surgeon who helped develop the program. "Yet, we're still able to deliver the maximum cancer therapy benefit (with) the optimal treatment to just the right area." Reach: KARE-TV is the NBC affiliate serving the Minneapolis-Saint Paul market. Context: Early-stage breast cancer patients now have a fast-track treatment option at Mayo Clinic. Select, low-risk patients are completing their surgery and radiation in less than 10 days. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Dennis Douda   KJZZ Joseph Sirven: Two Sides Of Hope My patient’s mom drops a 500-page collection of internet pages that she had printed in front of me. It’s meticulously researched and indexed about her daughter’s rare epilepsy condition. “Dr. Sirven, this is light reading for your lunches this week and maybe dinners too,” she said. “I hope your wife doesn’t mind.” I quietly thumbed through the bound tome feigning a smile.   “Don’t worry, I know you can’t read it today,” the patient’s mother continued. “But I think you need to go through this in order for you to cure my daughter’s condition.” “Of course,” I said with a sigh. “I’ll go through this.” At a lunch break, I started going through the material consisting of interesting yet overwhelmingly positive articles on unproven therapies bordering on quackery. This clinical scenario is increasingly common. Reach: KJZZ-FM is a commercial station owned by Maricopa Community Colleges in Tempe, AZ. The format of the station is news and jazz. KJZZ-FM's target audience is news and jazz music listeners, ages 18 to 64, in the Tempe, AZ area. Context: Joseph Sirven, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist. Contact:  Jim McVeigh   Post-Bulletin Mayo medical school part of $52.5 million initiative by Brett Boese The Mayo Clinic School of Medicine has been selected to take part in a new national collaborative aimed at transforming medical education. The $52.5 million initiative called the Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Institute for the Transformation of Medical Education (Kern Institute) was announced Thursday with seven of the nation's top medical schools collaborating to "transform medical education across the continuum from premedical school to physician practice," Mayo said in a release. Reach:  The Post-Bulletin has a daily circulation of more than 32,000 and serves the Minnesota cities of Rochester, Austin and surrounding communities. Its website has more than 440,000 unique visitors each month. Context: Mayo Clinic School of Medicine has been chosen to be part of the newly formed Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Institute for the Transformation of Medical Education (Kern Institute), a national initiative to transform medical education across the continuum from premedical school to physician practice. “We must redefine medical education and advance innovative medical education models if we are to meet the needs of patients and society in the 21st century,” says Fredric Meyer, M.D., Juanita Kious Waugh Executive Dean for Education, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science. The Kern Institute and the National Transformation Network demonstrate the transformative impact that strategic philanthropy, dedicated leadership and aligned infrastructure can make in advancing innovation in medical education.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact:  Matthew Brenden [...]
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
Jun 16, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich @KarlWOestreich
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   New York Times Why Does Hair Turn Gray at a Young Age? by Karen Weintraub Q. What causes hair to turn gray? Why do some people go gray at a young age? Is there any evidence that rapid weight loss, slow weight loss or intense exercise accelerates graying? I’ve noticed that women in dieting “after” pictures commonly have a new hair color, while older male marathon runners are more gray and haggard than average…A. Hair goes gray as cells called melanocytes at the base of each hair follicle get damaged by disease, environmental exposures or age. Everyone has some gray hairs throughout life, but the balance tends to tip in the 40s or 50s, with the rate of change varying by genetics, gender and ethnicity, said Dr. James Kirkland, director of the Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging at the Mayo Clinic. Blacks tend to go gray later than Caucasians, with Asians falling somewhere in between. Women generally gray later than men. Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million. Context: James Kirkland, M.D., Ph.D. leads the  Mayo Clinic Kogod Center on Aging. Dr. Kirkland's research focuses on the impact of cellular aging (senescence) on age-related dysfunction and chronic diseases, especially developing methods for removing these cells and alleviating their effects. Senescent cells accumulate with aging and in such diseases as dementias, atherosclerosis, cancers, diabetes and arthritis. Contacts: Megan Forliti   HuffPost 3-D Mammograms And Molecular Breast Imaging Personalized Approaches To Breast Cancer Screening – A picture is worth a thousand words. While that saying may be true, for the more than 50 percent of all women who have dense breast tissue, a picture from traditional, 2-D mammography may not tell the full story about whether they have breast cancer. “Breast density is like the wolf in sheep’s clothing. Both tumors and dense breast tissue appear white on a mammogram. A traditional 2-D mammogram may not distinguish between the two. That’s why mammograms find as few as 40 percent of cancers in women with dense breasts,” says Deborah Rhodes, M.D., a Mayo Clinic Breast Clinic physician. Reach: Huff Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique viewers. Context: Individualized medicine, also known as personalized medicine or precision medicine, means tailoring diagnosis and treatment to each patient to optimize care. Patients have experienced this kind of care for a century and a half at Mayo Clinic, where teams of specialists have always worked together to find answers. Contacts:  Susan Buckles, Colette Gallagher   HealthDay Abused Women Prone to Unnecessary Ovary Removal: Study by Robert Preidt Women who are victims of abuse may be at increased risk for unnecessary ovary removal, a new study suggests. "Our current findings suggest that physical, emotional or sexual abuse predisposes women to seek medical attention for multiple gynecological symptoms, such as abdominal pain or excessive bleeding," said study co-author Dr. Liliana Gazzuola-Rocca. She is a health sciences researcher and psychiatrist at the Mayo Clinic, where the study was done. "These gynecological symptoms may lead the women and their gynecologists to opt for removal of the reproductive organs at a young age -- even when these organs are completely normal," she said in a clinic news release. Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month. Additional coverage: Arizona Daily Star, Daily Mail, MinnPost, Medscape Context: Mayo Clinic researchers report that women who suffered adverse childhood experiences or abuse as an adult are 62 percent more likely to have their ovaries removed before age 46. These removals are for reasons other than the presence of ovarian cancer or a high genetic risk of developing cancer, says the new study published today in BMJ Open. In previous studies examining the effects of removing the ovaries of younger women, the research team has demonstrated a myriad of health risks resulting from ovary removal. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Elizabeth Zimmerman Young   News-Press Mayo Clinic building wellness in diverse ways by Dr. Gianrico Farrugia and Dr. Tushar Patel Collaborative team science is at the heart of Mayo Clinic’s approach to finding answers and new treatments for complex diseases. Some of the world’s most celebrated medical advancements have been developed at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. For example, researchers have discovered genetic causes of neurological diseases and genes involved in the development and spread of cancer. Working side-by side, Mayo physicians and scientists seek to take these discoveries and accelerate their translation and application into life-changing therapies, surgical procedures and technologies. Clinical trials allow for new discoveries to be directly used for patient care. Patients at Mayo Clinic often are among the first to benefit from new therapies or innovative techniques through clinical trials. Because of research, more than 1.3 million people came to Mayo Clinic for care in 2016, seeking medical answers they hadn’t found anywhere else.— Gianrico Farrugia is a physician and CEO of Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida. Dr. Tushar Patel is a physician scientist and Dean for Research at Mayo’s Florida campus. Reach: The News-Press is a daily broadsheet newspaper located in Fort Myers, Florida serving primarily Lee County, as well as parts of Charlotte and Collier Counties. The daily circulation is more than 56,000 and its website receives more than 858,000 unique visitors each month. Context: Gianrico Farrugia, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vice president and CEO of Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida. Tushar Patel, M.B., Ch.B., is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist and is dean of research at Mayo Clinic's Florida campus. Contact: Kevin Punsky   El Paso Times Funding key for medical research by Wyatt Decker, M.D. We know the challenges of balancing innovation with costs. Make no mistake: Research isn’t an expense but an investment in our nation’s economy and health of our fellow citizens. Understanding the biological processes that contribute to human disease and proposing new treatments, as well as clinical trials and validation all take time and are necessary, and sometimes expensive, steps along the path to cures. That’s why we at Mayo Clinic, as a not-for-profit organization, heavily invest in medical research. NIH funding has remained flat over the past decade while Mayo Clinic has doubled its investment in research. Knowing that cancer rates continue to rise, our physicians and scientists are focused on fighting cancer – exploring the emerging fields of immunotherapy, regenerative medicine, individualized medicine, data aggregation and artificial intelligence. We do all we can to advance innovation. Reach: The El Paso Times is a local, daily newspaper published for the residents of El Paso, TX and Southern New Mexico. The daily circulation is more than 29,000 and its website has more than 537,000 unique visitors each month. Context: Wyatt Decker, M.D. is vice president, Mayo Clinic, and CEO of Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Contact: Jim McVeigh   KARE 11 Healthy summer grilling hacks Grilling season opens up plenty of opportunities to put healthy food on your plate. Chef Jen Welper, Wellness Chef at The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program, stopped by the KARE 11 at 4 to share some tips on staying healthy while enjoying your grilled favorites. Reach: KARE-TV is the NBC affiliate serving the Minneapolis-Saint Paul market. Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life. Contact: Kelley Luckstein [...]
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
Jun 9, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich @KarlWOestreich
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   Wall Street Journal Mayo Clinic’s Unusual Challenge: Overhaul a Business That’s Working by Ron Winslow Change is hard. It is especially hard when the organization in question is among the top in its field. Doctors at the Mayo Clinic, the 153-year-old institution that pioneered the concept of patient-centered care, considered it an ideal place to practice, one that wasn’t in much need of fixing. It is renowned for diagnosing and treating medicine’s most complex patients. Dr. John Noseworthy, Mayo’s chief executive officer, had a different view about the need for change. He saw declining revenue, he says, from accelerating efforts by government health programs, private insurers and employers to rein in health-care costs as a looming threat to the clinic’s health. Reach: The Wall Street Journal has a daily circulation of more than 1.3 million readers; its website has more than 43.5 million unique visitors each month and is one of the top national newspapers in the United States ranked by circulation. Additional coverage: Post-Bulletin,  Furst Draft: Noseworthy says, 'The storm is still coming' Fierce Healthcare,  Regulatory pressures force Mayo Clinic to rethink how it does business, cut costs Advisory Board,  How Mayo Clinic overhauled its world-renowned care—and saved $900 million Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal, Mayo Clinic's pretty great — and that's a problem if you're trying to fix it Context: Mayo Clinic is recognized for high-quality patient care more often than any other academic medical center in the nation. These endorsements reinforce our century-old commitment to provide the highest quality care to each patient every day. John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic president and CEO. Contact: Traci Klein   Washington Post Much shorter chemo works for many colon cancer patients, study says by Laurie McGinley Many colon cancer patients can cut their chemotherapy regimen in half, improving their quality of life and reducing their chances of having debilitating side effects, according to a major international study released Sunday. “It's really good news,” said senior author Axel Grothey, an oncologist at the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center in Rochester, Minn. “Our goal is to help patients have lower toxicity, while not reducing its efficacy.” Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month. Additional coverage: KMSP, Cancer Network, Cure, Medscape, MedPage Today, Star Tribune, San Diego Union-Tribune, Post-Bulletin, Healio, Chicago Tribune, BioWorld Context: Axel Grothey, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic oncologist. Contact: Joe Dangor   WCCO Mayo Clinic’s High-Tech Analysis Helps Improve Your Golf Swing & Prevent Injuries Some golfers are getting help to play it safe before they ever set foot on a course, Angela Davis reports. Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts. Context: Whatever your age or current skill level, Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine golf specialists deliver a comprehensive and individualized approach to improve every aspect of your game. It starts with a thorough assessment of your golf skills, as well as analysis of your flexibility, strength and balance, and how they impact your performance. Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson   ActionNewsJax Thyroid medication incorrectly dosed by Kaitlyn Chana Thyroid medication is the most commonly prescribed drug in the U.S. also may be one of the most overprescribed for older individuals. Mayo Clinic Endocrinologist Dr. Robert Smallridge told us about 40% of patients on thyroid medication in the United States are not taking the right dose. He says roughly 25 million individuals are taking one form or another of thyroid medication. “The thyroid controls almost every system in our body,” said Smallridge. Doctors explained its important patient’s alert their physician if there are no changes after taking this medication. This way there is a plan to try and figure out the root of the reoccurring symptoms. “I look at the average patient list and they are on 10 different medications and you look at the side effects of those medications,” said Smallridge. Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida. Context: Robert Smallridge, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Contact: Paul Scotti [...]
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
Jun 2, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich @KarlWOestreich
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   CBS News "Smartphone thumb" is plaguing more people, doctors say A condition that doctors used to only see in factory workers is becoming more widespread.The pain that comes from the repetitive movements of texting has been dubbed "smartphone thumb" by doctors. Kristin Zhao, a biomedical engineer at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, explained what might be happening inside the hand to cause "smartphone thumb." "One of the hypotheses is that the joints get loose and lax, and because of that, the bones kind of move differently than they would in a normal situation," said Zhao. Zhao and a team of colleagues have been studying "smartphone thumb" for the last seven years. She says the movements we require our thumbs to make as we hold our phones are awkward. Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month. Additional coverage: International Business Times, Hindustan Times, Ten Eyewitness News, Daily Mail, HuffPost UK, NDTV, Daily Tech, CBS Philly, WCAX Vermont Context: Kristin D. Zhao, Ph.D., uses innovative technologies, device fabrication and imaging methods to investigate pathogenesis related to the musculoskeletal system. The long-term goal of Dr. Zhao's research team is to develop and use diagnostic tools to enable earlier diagnosis, prescribe effective interventions for individuals with disabilities and diseases, and assess outcomes. You can learn more about her research here. Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson   US News & World Report Men: Here's How to Eat and Exercise to Lose That Pool T-Shirt by Ruben Castaneda Lift weights or do resistance training. It’s a fallacy that we can transform fat into muscle, says Dan Gaz, a wellness exercise specialist with the Mayo Clinic’s healthy living program in Rochester, Minnesota. “Fat and muscle are two completely different things,” Gaz says. “We can’t change one into the other, but we can change the proportionality.” Lifting weights can help change your shape, Gaz says. You needn’t lift like an aspiring bodybuilder – starting out with moderately difficult resistance is fine, so long as you keep pushing yourself by incrementally lifting more weight or adding more repetitions. You don’t want to stay in a routine that’s comfortable. “Say you’re doing three sets of 10 reps of bench presses at 100 pounds,” Gaz says. “If that gets easy, try three sets of 10 at 105 pounds, or four sets of 10 of 100 pounds.” Additional coverage: Bustle, 10 Worst Pieces Of Common Fitness Advice That You Should Never Follow Other U.S. News coverage: US News & World Report, Disfigurement of the Hands and Feet in RA May Be a Thing of the Past Reach: U.S. News & World Report is a multi-platform publisher of news and information, which includes http://www.usnews.com and http://www.rankingsandreviews.com. Contact: Kelley Luckstein   NPR In The Age Of Digital Medicine, The Humble Reflex Hammer Hangs On by Bret Stetka Dr. Andrew Wilner, an assistant professor of neurology at the Mayo Clinic, recounted the story of one of his patients, who had back pain, weakness and numbness of the legs. Wilner was leaning toward a diagnosis of either Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) — an autoimmune disorder of peripheral nerves — or a myelopathy, an injury of some kind to the spinal cord. Both conditions can lead to medical emergencies, but each requires drastically different treatment. "The reflex hammer was arguably our most important tool in narrowing down the differential diagnosis," he says. "Had we found diminished or absent deep tendon reflexes, GBS would have been more likely. As it turned out, the patient had brisk pathological knee jerks, pointing to a lesion in the brain or spinal cord." Reach: Shots is the online channel for health stories from the NPR Science Desk. We report on news that can make a difference for your health and show how policy shapes our health choices. Context: Andrew Wilner, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist. Contact: Jim McVeigh   BuzzFeed 13 Tips For Snacking A Little Healthier by Anthony Rivas I reached out to registered dietitians Jessica Jones, co-creator of Food Heaven Made Easy and author of 28-Day Plant-Powered Health Reboot, and Jason Ewoldt, wellness dietitian at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program, for advice on how best to resist snacking mindlessly — because I will come for all the goodies. If you're in the same boat, here's what you should know…While the goal should be to snack better, you can technically still snack mindfully and reduce caloric intake on that giant bag of chips or candy or what-have-you — just portion it out instead of eating straight from the package, Ewoldt says. This way you have a predetermined amount of food that's available to you. "You can eat the whole thing in five minutes or 50 minutes. It doesn't matter because it's already pre-portioned into a serving," he says. Reach: BuzzFeed features the kind of things like an outrageous video that's about to go viral, an obscure subculture breaking into the mainstream, a juicy bit of gossip that everyone at the office will be talking about tomorrow, or an ordinary guy having his glorious 15 minutes of fame. BuzzFeed has more than 17.6 million unique visitors each month. Additional coverage: Muscle & Fitness, 11 signs you’re eating too many carbs AARP, Greek Yogurt vs. Regular Yogurt: Is One Better?  Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life. Contact: Kelly Reller [...]
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
May 26, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich @KarlWOestreich
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   Pioneer Press Once a migrant worker, he’s revolutionizing brain surgery, cancer fight by Ruben Rosario Dr. Q’s eyes widen and the hands that once picked grapes and now perform surgeries spring into action. He explains in layman’s terms how he and a plastic surgeon teamed up to perform anterior brain tumor removals through an incision on the eyelid. “The way traditional surgery has been done is to remove the scalp forward, and then you do the removal of the bone, and then you take the tumor out,” Dr. Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa explained during a chat Thursday at a hotel in downtown Rochester, Minn. Now, he explained, the plastic surgeon teammate “makes the same incision used for movie stars when their eyelids get droopy.” And tumors as large as three centimeters have been excised through this eyebrow-raising technique. Supremely impressive. The same could be said of Quiñones-Hinojosa, who now serves as chair of Neurologic Surgery at the Mayo Clinic complex in Jacksonville, Fla. Colleagues tagged him with that catchy Dr. Q moniker years ago. Reach: The St. Paul Pioneer Press has a daily circulation of 208,280 and its Sunday newspaper circulation is 284,507. Its TwinCities.com website had approximately 20.4 million page views (March 2013). Mobile page views on smartphones and tablet computers totaled more than 11.4 million in March 2013. Additional coverage: MedCity Beat Previous coverage in May 12, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Previous coverage in January 13, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Previous coverage in September 23, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Previous coverage in April 22, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Context: Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, M.D., prominent neurosurgeon, researcher and educator, joined Mayo Clinic in 2016 as chair of the Department of Neurosurgery on the Florida campus, along with several members of his research team from Johns Hopkins Medicine. Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa is renown nationally and internationally as a surgeon, researcher, humanitarian and author. His laboratory has published many manuscripts and articles, submitted a number of patents and obtained three NIH grants. Students and fellows who worked with Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa have gone on to join leading neuroscience programs throughout the world. Mayo Clinic's world-renowned neurosurgeons perform more than 7,000 complex surgical procedures every year at campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. Contact: Kevin Punsky   Kiplinger Joint-Replacement Surgery Gets Boomers Back in the Game by Pat Mertz Esswein … Joint replacement is not just a boon to hurting baby boomers; it is also a lucrative business. Surgeons and hospitals often compete for patients by touting a particular product, technique or surgical strategy. For instance, some surgeons repeat manufacturers’ claims that the replacement they use produces the “best knee for an athlete” or “best knee for a woman.” In fact, all hip and knee implants have become more durable and anatomically accurate than they used to be and function more naturally thanks to innovations in design and materials, including a wear-resistant plastic that all manufacturers use. These implants come in all sizes and can be mixed and matched to create an exact fit for any patient, says Dr. Mark Pagnano, professor and chairman of the department of orthopedic surgery at the Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minn. Context: Kiplinger is a Washington, D.C.-based publisher of business forecasts and personal finance advice, available in print and online. Its monthly personal finance magazine has more than 618,000 subscribers and its website has more than 3.1 million unique visitors each month. Context: Mark Pagnano, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon. Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeons are recognized nationally and internationally for their surgical technical excellence and innovative abilities to solve both simple and difficult orthopedic problems. Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson   Post-Bulletin Just 24, he gives Mayo's carillon new peal by Matthew Stolle As Mayo Clinic's newest carillonneur, Austin Ferguson has one foot planted in a 500-year-old musical tradition and one finger on his Twitter feed. High above the Mayo campus, in the belfry of the Plummer Building, Ferguson serenades clinic employees and patients alike on his carillon, a medieval piano-like instrument that uses bells instead of strings. Ferguson is only the fourth carillonneur (you have to say it like the French, "care-uh-lawn-NUR") ever employed by Mayo since it installed the instrument in 1928. And, at 24, he is by far the youngest Mayo player and perhaps the youngest in all of North America. Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota. Additional coverage: KIMT, Mayo Clinic's bells play in honor of Manchester bombing victims KAAL, Rochester's Special Musical Tribute to Manchester KTTC, Plummer Building carillonneur performs tribute to Manchester MPR,  In a tower 300 feet above Rochester, a new carillonneur plays songs for all to hear Context: Since its dedication on Sept. 16, 1928, the Rochester carillon has become a Mayo Clinic landmark. In honor of its 85th anniversary, long-lost chimes and songs will return to the original 23 bells of the Rochester carillon, and many new musical selections will become possible — all through a computerized clock function. Contact:  Kelly Reller   Cronkite News Officials hope new Mayo Clinic medical school in Scottsdale will help ease state’s doctor shortage by Amanda Luberto Dr. Amit Shah smiles as he demonstrates the new technology at the Mayo Clinic’s new medical school campus in Scottsdale. “There is no center stage in the middle, (with) just a person beaming down information at you, as many of us – unfortunately – learned in medicine,” he said. Shah said the school will provide a new way to learn the practice of medicine. “You’re not smart anymore as a physician because you know some small detailed fact,” Shah said. “You’re great as a physician if you know how to communicate to patients, to work in teams and how to access information.” Reach: Cronkite News features stories, photos and video packages about Arizona issues. The news service is a part of Arizona State University and serves as a professional experience for the students of the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication. Cronkite News is also the news division of Arizona PBS. Its website receives more than 5,200 unique visitors each month. Related coverage: Post-Bulletin, Dear Answer Man, did you know that Mayo Medical School is expanding to Mayo Scottsdale? Context: Mayo Clinic School of Medicine matriculated its first class in 1972. For over 40 years, a world-class faculty of physicians and scientists has educated aspiring physicians in patient-centered, science-driven, team-based, high-value health care. Founded upon Mayo Clinic's 150-year-old tradition of patient-centered care, Mayo Clinic School of Medicine is highly innovative and selective, cultivating future physician leaders through a broad array of unparalleled learning opportunities. Contacts:  Deborah Anderson, Jim McVeigh   WCCO Mayo Clinic Researchers Declare ‘Smartphone Thumb’ War by Angela Davis Doctors say more and more patients complain about pain in their thumb each year…The repetitive motion appears to be leading to cases of tendonitis as people use their thumbs to tap out their thoughts on their smartphones. “One of the hypotheses is that, you know, the joints get loose and lax, and because of that the bones kind of move differently than they would in a normal situation,” said Dr. Kristin Zhao, a biomedical engineer at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester. Dr. Zhao and a team of doctors have been looking into what’s called “smartphone thumb” for the last seven years. She says the movements we require our thumbs to make as we hold our phones are awkward. Reach: WCCO 4 News is the CBS affiliate for Minneapolis-St. Paul. Additional coverage: MSN Other WCCO coverage: WCCO, How Much Vitamin D Should We Be Getting? Context: Kristin D. Zhao, Ph.D., uses innovative technologies, device fabrication and imaging methods to investigate pathogenesis related to the musculoskeletal system. The long-term goal of Dr. Zhao's research team is to develop and use diagnostic tools to enable earlier diagnosis, prescribe effective interventions for individuals with disabilities and diseases, and assess outcomes. You can learn more about her research here. Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson [...]
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
May 19, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Emily Blahnik @eblahnik
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   CNN What snacks to eat for better sleep by Jacqueline Howard Tryptophan, an amino acid, might help you snooze because once it enters your body, it's converted into two brain chemicals associated with sleep: melatonin, which helps regulate your body's natural sleep and wake cycles, and serotonin, which causes relaxation and drowsiness. "Tryptophan is the reason why it is widely perceived that a Thanksgiving dinner causes drowsiness, because of the tryptophan in turkey. However, other foods contain tryptophan, and some have more tryptophan than turkey," said Dr. Donald Hensrud, medical director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program and specialist in nutrition and preventive medicine. Reach: Cable News Network (CNN) is a worldwide news and information network providing live, continuous coverage of news from around the globe, 24 hours a day. CNN online received more than 55 million unique visitors to its website each month. Additional coverage: News4Jax Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life. Donald Hensrud, M.D. is the program’s medical director. Contact: Kelley Luckstein   CNN Are you getting the vaccines you need before going abroad? by Jacqueline Howard "People often underestimate the risk of getting infections," said Dr. Pritish Tosh, an infectious disease physician and researcher at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, who was not involved in the new paper. The highest-risk group for travel-related illnesses tends to be people who think they are at a lower risk, Tosh said. For instance, "people who were from a country and come to the United States to live and then they visit their friends and relatives back in their country of origin and they often think, 'Well, when I was there, things were fine,' and they don't seek travel advice. They don't get medications to prevent malaria. They don't get vaccinations and these other things," he said. "So, the people who think they are the lowest risk actually have the highest risk of getting some sort of travel-related infection, mostly because they don't think they are at risk." Reach: Cable News Network (CNN) is a worldwide news and information network providing live, continuous coverage of news from around the globe, 24 hours a day. CNN online received more than 55 million unique visitors to its website each month. Context: Pritish Tosh, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist. Dr. Tosh is interested in emerging infections and preparedness activities related to them, ranging from collaborating with the Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group in basic science vaccine development to hospital systems research related to pandemic preparedness. Influenza is a viral infection that attacks your respiratory system — your nose, throat and lungs. Influenza, commonly called the flu, is not the same as stomach "flu" viruses that cause diarrhea and vomiting. Contact: Bob Nellis   CBS News Chance meeting ends in life-saving kidney transplant for vet On any given day, about 100,000 people are waiting for a kidney transplant. About 5,000 people a year die waiting. Edgar Roberts will receive his transplant Tuesday after meeting his donor, John Branson, by complete chance at a Cracker Barrel restaurant in Georgia. In our series, A More Perfect Union, we meet these two strangers who changed each other's lives forever. Mark Strassmann reports. Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month. Additional coverage: Washington Times-Herald Context: Mayo Clinic surgeons perform more than 600 kidney transplants a year, including for people with very challenging kidney conditions who need special solutions and surgeries. And Mayo Clinic kidney transplant teams in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota are leaders in living-donor kidney transplants. Contact: Paul Scotti   CBS News Sushi parasite that embeds in the stomach is on the rise, doctors warn by Mary Brophy Marcus Dr. Donald Hensrud, medical director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program and specialist in nutrition and preventive medicine, told CBS News that pregnant women and people with compromised immune systems, such as HIV patients or individuals taking biologic drugs, should avoid raw or undercooked fish and seafood. They can carry a risk for other illnesses, too. "Two years ago, a salmonella outbreak was linked to raw tuna.," said Hensrud, the author of the Mayo Clinic Diet book. Don't eat raw fish at sketchy restaurants, either, Eiras recommended.  "I would not go to a restaurant with a 'C' rating in New York largely for this reason. It's a big red flag when a sushi restaurant can't maintain an 'A' rating, because one of the main things they get rated on is refrigeration. They're not cooking the fish so that is the only prevention method, keeping it cold," he said. Additional coverage: WDEF News 12 Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month. Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life. Donald Hensrud, M.D. is the program’s medical director. Contact: Kelley Luckstein   WCCO Mayo Researchers: ACL Injuries Need 2 Years To Heal It is amazing what the human body in its best form can do. But when an athlete gets hurt and the diagnosis is ruptured ACL, they know they have a long recovery process ahead of them. Dr. Timothy Hewett, the director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Research Center, has studied ACL injuries for nearly 30 years. “When you tear the ACL, it just splays apart. It looks like crab meat almost,” Hewett said. “And those mechanoreceptors, that nervous tissue, that sensory system is completely disrupted.” Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts. Context: Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center is a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, sports performance optimization, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries. Timothy Hewett, P.hD. studies human health, fitness and performance with a long-term perspective. Dr. Hewett's diverse research interests allow him to organize, execute and oversee large-scale investigations of in vivo, in vitro and in silico kinetics and kinematics. Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson   Arizona Daily Star Wyatt Decker: Funding is the lifeblood of medical research To ask the question today, “Will there ever be a cure for cancer?” you may get the answer: “No, there will be cures for cancer.” What seemed so distant not long ago is fast becoming reality for different types of cancer. We have seen amazing advancements and momentum that is both encouraging to the medical community and provides hope for millions of patients. But that momentum is at risk. In Washington, D.C., there has been talk of cuts to research funding through the National Institutes of Health. This funding is the lifeblood of medical research and a catalyst for philanthropy and other research backing nationwide. — Wyatt Decker, M.D., vice president, Mayo Clinic, and CEO of Mayo Clinic in Arizona Reach: The Arizona Daily Star has a circulation of more than 65,000 readers in Tuscon, Arizona. Its website has more than 446,000 unique visitors each month. Context: Wyatt Decker, M.D. is CEO of Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Contact: Jim McVeigh   Associated Press Few doctors discuss cancer costs with patients, study finds by Marilynn Marchione Cancer patients are three times more likely to declare bankruptcy than people without cancer are, but many doctors are not having the conversations that might help prevent this and sometimes don't know the cost themselves, the results suggest. "That would not occur in any other industry I can think of" where a service or product is sold, said the study leader, Dr. Rahma Warsame of the Mayo Clinic…The study has some limitations — it's not nationwide, and it includes newly diagnosed patients, where cost is most likely to come up, as well as others further along in treatment who may have discussed this earlier. But the larger point is clear, Warsame said: The "financial toxicity" of treatments that can cost more than $100,000 a year is growing, and talks about that aren't happening enough. Reach: The Associated Press is a not-for-profit news cooperative, owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members. News collected by the AP is published and republished by newspaper and broadcast outlets worldwide. Additional coverage: Washington Post, Herald-Whig, Star Tribune, Seattle Times, Yahoo!, Voice of America, ABC News, New York Times, KTTC, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, CNBC Context: Rahma Warsame, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic fellow who will join Mayo Clinic as a staff member this summer. Dr. Warsame's research is focused on amyloidosis and multiple myeloma. She is interested in investigating existing health care delivery systems to improve patient-reported outcomes and quality of life. She is also working on incorporating patient perspectives into clinical practice and determining its effect on clinical outcomes. Her How costs get discussed (or not) in routine oncology practice can be found here. Contacts: Traci Klein, Joe Dangor [...]
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
May 12, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich @KarlWOestreich
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   BBC News From Cotton Picker to Brain Surgeon Dr Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa has had a most unusual career trajectory. Today he's chair of neurosurgery at the Mayo Clinic in Florida. He's a brain surgeon, finding a cure for cancer. Dr Quinones was born and grew up in Mexico and at the age of just 5, he was selling food to drivers to help make money for his family. But from an early age he had big dreams. Reach: BBC World Service Outlook produces true-life stories from around the world. The BBC reaches a record weekly audience of 348 million people worldwide. Previous coverage in January 13, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Previous coverage in September 23, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Previous coverage in April 22, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Context: Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, M.D., prominent neurosurgeon, researcher and educator, joined Mayo Clinic in 2016 as chair of the Department of Neurosurgery on the Florida campus, along with several members of his research team from Johns Hopkins Medicine. Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa is renown nationally and internationally as a surgeon, researcher, humanitarian and author. His laboratory has published many manuscripts and articles, submitted a number of patents and obtained three NIH grants. Students and fellows who worked with Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa have gone on to join leading neuroscience programs throughout the world. Mayo Clinic's world-renowned neurosurgeons perform more than 7,000 complex surgical procedures every year at campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. Contacts: Kevin Punsky, Sharon Theimer Health Leaders Clinicians in the C-Suite by Debra Beaulieu Healthcare leadership is evolving in a way that must merge the silos of clinical care and administration, resulting in a growing minority of C-suite positions occupied by physicians and nurses. There are numerous industry drivers of the clinician leadership trend, not the least of which includes mounting industry emphasis on value and quality. The Mayo Clinic, for example, boasts a 108-year tradition of physician leadership. “I’m pleased to see the idea expanding,” says John Noseworthy, MD, president and CEO since 2009 of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. “I suspect it means that these organizations are trying to find a way to provide more focus on the patients while keeping the tension between business and patients in balance,” he adds, noting that the Mayo model is one of dyad leadership, in which virtually every physician leader is paired with a nonclinical administrative partner. Reach:  HealthLeaders Media has more than 40,000 readers each month and is targeted to senior executives with leading hospitals, health systems, health plans, physician organizations, and allied and ancillary service providers and provides in-depth, informed reports on the nation's most innovative and entrepreneurial healthcare service organizations across the continuum of care. Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is president and CEO of Mayo Clinic. Contact: Duska Anastasijevic,   MPR Mayo searching for way to screen for multiple kinds of cancer at once — There are many ways to screen for a single kind of cancer, but no single way to screen for many kinds of cancer. Two research teams at the Mayo Clinic are working on parallel efforts to develop a simpler way to screen for multiple kinds of cancer. MPR's Cathy Wurzer spoke with Dr. Keith Stewart, who is leading one of those teams in partnership with Grail, a start-up aimed at improving cancer detection. Stewart is a professor at Mayo and the director of the Center for Individualized Medicine. Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network. Previous coverage in May 5, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Previous coverage in April 28, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Context: GRAIL, Inc., a life sciences company whose mission is to detect cancer early when it can be cured, announced that it has commenced its second multi-center clinical study, the STRIVE Study, to facilitate the development of GRAIL’s blood tests for early-stage cancer detection. STRIVE is a longitudinal, prospective, observational study that will enroll up to 120,000 women at the time of their screening mammogram to train and validate a blood test to detect breast cancer. Additionally, the study will be used to develop a pan-cancer test to detect multiple cancers at early stages. The STRIVE Study is a prospective, multicenter, observational study of 120,000 women undergoing screening mammography. The purpose of the STRIVE Study is to train and validate a test for detection of breast cancer. The cohort will also be utilized to train and develop a pan-cancer test. The STRIVE Study will include medical centers throughout the Sutter Health system that serves Northern California, and Mayo Clinic. Mayo Clinic locations include Rochester, Minnesota; Jacksonville, Florida; and Phoenix, Arizona; as well as the Mayo Clinic Health System Franciscan Healthcare locations in La Crosse and Onalaska, Wisconsin. More information can be found in GRAIL's news release. Contact: Susan Buckles   WCCO Mayo Clinic’s High-Tech Analysis Helps Improve Your Golf Swing & Prevent Injuries by Angela Davis Now that the weather is warmer, many people are returning to one of their favorite sports: Golf. And some of them are getting help with their golf swing before they ever set foot on a course. You can now work with specialists at the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine facilities in Rochester and Minneapolis to get a high-tech analysis of your golf swing. Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts. Additional coverage: MSN Context: Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center is a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, sports performance optimization, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries. More information about Mayo's golf performance program can be found here. Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson   First Coast News Doctors warn of lesser-known tick-borne virus by Juliette Dryer Local experts are warning people to take precautions to avoid tick bites to help reduce the risk of contracting the tick-borne virus, Powassan. “You could range from having no symptoms whatsoever to being very sick, having inflammation of the brain tissue,” said Dr. Vandana Bhide with the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. Reach: First Coast News is the ABC and NBC affiliate for Jacksonville, Florida. Context: Vandana Bhide, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic hospital internal medicine physician. Contact: Kevin Punsky   [...]
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
May 5, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich @KarlWOestreich
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   Reuters Rethink emphasis on lowering saturated fat to save hearts: docs by Andrew M. Seaman Instead of eating less saturated fat and worrying about so-called bad cholesterol, a group of doctors suggests an alternative approach for preventing heart disease. More important, they say, is to focus on decreasing insulin resistance and inflammation in the body by targeting diet, exercise and reducing stress…Dr. Stephen Kopecky, a cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, agrees with the experts' inflammation theory but isn't ready to remove the emphasis on LDL cholesterol.  Kopecky told Reuters Health that LDL levels are still an important measure to watch and treat with medications. Reach: Reuters has 196 editorial bureaus in 130 countries and 2,400 editorial staff members and covers international news, regional news, politics, social issues, health, business, sports and media. Context: Stephen Kopecky, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. His research interests include cardiovascular clinical trials primarily in coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndromes. Contact: Sharon Theimer   Star Tribune Mayo Clinic scientists on the trail of a 'pan cancer' test by Jeremy Olson Mayo Clinic is in a race against itself on a project that could revolutionize cancer care, as two research teams pursue a “pan cancer” test that could detect the presence and severity of multiple types of the disease. On one side is Dr. David Ahlquist in Rochester and his partnership with Exact Sciences, which together already produced a home test for colon cancer known as Cologuard. On the other is Dr. Keith Stewart in Scottsdale, Ariz., and a Mayo partnership with Grail, a start-up company with the financial backing of Bill Gates and Jeff Bezos, which launched a large breast cancer screening trial this month. Both teams believe that a simple blood draw and analysis could soon produce a way to screen for a dozen types of cancer. Both are taking advantage of improved understanding of human genetics and cancer tumors, and technological advances that track genetic activities that were once beyond detection. Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation. Additional coverage: KARE 11, WFMY News2 Context:  David Ahlquist M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist and co-inventor of the Cologuard test.A. Keith Stewart, M.B., Ch.B. is the executive director of Mayo Clinic's Center for Individualized Medicine. Contact: Joe Dangor   Florida Times-Union Mayo researchers use nanoparticles to shrink breast tumors in mice by Charlie Patton In the Cancer Nanotechnology and Tumor Immunology Laboratory at the Mayo Clinic’s Jacksonville campus, researchers led by Betty Kim have been using a new type of cancer-fighting nanoparticle to shrink breast cancer tumors in mice and prevent their recurrence… “In this proof-of-concept study, we were astounded to find that the animals treated with these nanoparticles showed a lasting anti-cancer effect,” Kim said. Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday. Additional coverage: Science Daily, Sceince Times, New Atlas, Zee News  Context: A Mayo Clinic research team has developed a new type of cancer-fighting nanoparticle aimed at shrinking breast cancer tumors, while also preventing recurrence of the disease. In the study, published today in Nature Nanotechnology, mice that received an injection with the nanoparticle showed a 70 to 80 percent reduction in tumor size. Most significantly, mice treated with these nanoparticles showed resistance to future tumor recurrence, even when exposed to cancer cells a month later. The results show that the newly designed nanoparticle produced potent anti-tumor immune responses to HER2-positive breast cancers. Breast cancers with higher levels of HER2 protein are known to grow aggressively and spread more quickly than those without the mutation.  “In this proof-of-concept study, we were astounded to find that the animals treated with these nanoparticles showed a lasting anti-cancer effect,” says Betty Y.S. Kim, M.D., Ph.D., principal investigator, and a neurosurgeon and neuroscientist who specializes in brain tumors at Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Kevin Punsky   Forbes It's Worth Getting That Second Doctor Opinion, Study Finds by Kate Ashford Up to 88% of patients seeking a second opinion receive a new or refined diagnosis, according to a new study from the Mayo Clinic. That means only 12% of patients are leaving with the news that their original diagnosis was correct. “Effective and efficient treatment depends on the right diagnosis,” said James Naessens, Sc.D, a health care policy researcher at Mayo Clinic and leader of the study research team, in a press release. “Knowing that more than one out of every five referral patients may be completely [and] incorrectly diagnosed is troubling—not only because of the safety risks for these patients prior to correct diagnosis, but also because of the patients we assume are not being referred at all.” Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 million unique visitors each month. Additional coverage: HuffPost, Witchita Eagle, Lab Soft News, Fox 31 Denver Previous coverage in April 28, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Previous coverage in April 7, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Context: Many patients come to Mayo Clinic for a second opinion or diagnosis confirmation before treatment for a complex condition. In a new study, Mayo Clinic reports that as many as 88 percent of those patients go home with a new or refined diagnosis – changing their care plan and potentially their lives.  Conversely, only 12 percent receive confirmation that the original diagnosis was complete and correct. These findings were published online recently  in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice. The research team was led by James Naessens, Sc.D., a health care policy researcher at Mayo Clinic. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact:  Elizabeth Zimmerman Young [...]
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
Apr 28, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich @KarlWOestreich
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   Star Tribune How to survive a 250-day flight to Mars? Mayo tests an answer by Jeremy Olson Considering that astronauts on a mission to Mars will face more than 250 days of confinement, stress and boredom, an extra bag of peanuts isn’t likely to cut it. So Mayo Clinic has been asked to study whether medically induced hypothermia might help them endure the medical and logistical rigors of a journey that NASA hopes to launch less than two decades from now. Anxiety, depression and personal conflict are just a few of the risks that would face astronauts who remained fully conscious in a cramped craft for a journey of that duration.But cooling them into a hibernation-like state could make the trip passable, said Dr. Matthew Kumar, an anesthesiologist with Mayo’s Aeromedical Unit. And it would simplify and shrink the design of their spacecraft. Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation. Context: Matthew Kumar, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist.  Research in the Aerospace Medicine & Vestibular Research Laboratory primarily focuses on investigating problems that emanate from human exposure to the high and extreme altitude, acceleration, and spatial disorientation environment. This team studies the ability to influence and enhance spatial orientation by use of galvanic vestibular stimulation. This work also encompasses the mitigation of motion and simulator sickness, making it of broader relevance in flight simulation. Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist   CBS News States with the highest child vaccine rates by Mary Brophy Marcus The MMR vaccine, given as a two-dose series, protects against measles, mumps and rubella and could reduce those numbers, said Dr. Gregory Poland, who studies the immunogenetics of vaccine response in adults and children, and heads up the Vaccine Research Group at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota….There are generally two types of people who don’t vaccinate their children or themselves, the Mayo Clinic’s Poland told CBS News.“On one end of the spectrum, you have some people who are ignorant of vaccine recommendations. They just may not know or may not have access to care. At the other end of the spectrum, you have people who should have access and have health care and education but reject vaccines,” Poland said. Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month. Context: Gregory Poland, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious disease expert. Dr. Poland and his team within the Vaccine Research Group aim to improve the health of individuals across the world by pursuing challenges posed by infectious diseases and bioterrorism through clinical, laboratory and epidemiologic vaccine research. Contact: Bob Nellis   Phoenix Business Journal Mayo Clinic to study blood test to detect breast cancer early by Angela Gonzales Mayo Clinic in Arizona has begun a clinical trial to develop blood tests for early-stage breast cancer. Mayo campuses in Minnesota, Florida and Wisconsin will join Sutter Health sites in California to enroll upwards of 120,000 women who will give blood samples when they get their mammograms. Mayo and Sutter are working with Menlo Park, California-based Grail Inc. to test Grail's blood tests. Reach: The Phoenix Business Journal is published by American City Business Journals which owns more than 40 other local business newspapers. Additional coverage: US News & World Report, Star Tribune, KTTC, Post-Bulletin, Austin Herald, MedCity News, WSAW Wausau, WXOW La Crosse, WEAU Eau Claire, La Crosse Tribune, Idaho Statesman, Genome Web, MedPage Today Related coverage: La Crosse Tribune, New Mayo-Franciscan screening method expected to escalate breast cancer detection; WIZM News Talk, WXOW La Crosse, WKBT La Crosse Context: GRAIL, Inc., a life sciences company whose mission is to detect cancer early when it can be cured, announced that it has commenced its second multi-center clinical study, the STRIVE Study, to facilitate the development of GRAIL’s blood tests for early-stage cancer detection. STRIVE is a longitudinal, prospective, observational study that will enroll up to 120,000 women at the time of their screening mammogram to train and validate a blood test to detect breast cancer. Additionally, the study will be used to develop a pan-cancer test to detect multiple cancers at early stages. The STRIVE Study is a prospective, multicenter, observational study of 120,000 women undergoing screening mammography. The purpose of the STRIVE Study is to train and validate a test for detection of breast cancer. The cohort will also be utilized to train and develop a pan-cancer test. The STRIVE Study will include medical centers throughout the Sutter Health system that serves Northern California, and Mayo Clinic. Mayo Clinic locations include Rochester, Minnesota; Jacksonville, Florida; and Phoenix, Arizona; as well as the Mayo Clinic Health System Franciscan Healthcare locations in La Crosse and Onalaska, Wisconsin. More information can be found in GRAIL's news release. Contacts: Susan Buckles, Rick Thiesse   HuffPost Why You Should Always Ask For A Second Opinion by Ann Brenoff Two years ago, when actress-singer Rita Wilson was 58, she underwent a double mastectomy and had this to say about it: Getting a second opinion saved her life. Wilson was right to insist on a second opinion, according to a Mayo Clinic study released this month…Knowing that more than 1 out of every 5 referral patients may be completely [and] incorrectly diagnosed is troubling,” Dr. James Naessens, the study lead and a health care policy researcher at Mayo Clinic, said in a statement. “Not only because of the safety risks for these patients prior to correct diagnosis, but also because of the patients we assume are not being referred at all.” Reach: Huff Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique viewers. Additional coverage: Healthline, HospiMedica Previous coverage in April 7, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Context: Many patients come to Mayo Clinic for a second opinion or diagnosis confirmation before treatment for a complex condition. In a new study, Mayo Clinic reports that as many as 88 percent of those patients go home with a new or refined diagnosis – changing their care plan and potentially their lives.  Conversely, only 12 percent receive confirmation that the original diagnosis was complete and correct. These findings were published online recently  in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice. The research team was led by James Naessens, Sc.D., a health care policy researcher at Mayo Clinic. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact:  Elizabeth Zimmerman Young [...]
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
Apr 21, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich @KarlWOestreich
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   Chicago Tribune Are heartburn medicines linked to a serious gut infection? by Seem Yasmin Researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., analyzed data from 16 older studies which included 7,703 patients with C. difficile. Of these, about 1 in 5 patients suffered recurrent infection. They found that the rate of recurrent C. difficile infection was 22.1 percent among people taking medicines to suppress gastric acid. The rate of recurrent C. difficile infection was 17.3 percent in people not taking those medicines. Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has daily circulation of more than 382,000 and its website has more than 23.9 million unique visitors each month. Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic have found patients who use gastric suppression medications are at a higher risk for recurrent Clostridium difficile (C-diff) infection. C-diff is a bacterium that can cause symptoms ranging from diarrhea to life-threatening inflammation of the colon. The study is published in JAMA Internal Medicine. "In our study, we found that use of gastric acid suppression medications are associated with a statistically significant increased risk of development of recurrent C-diff in patients with a prior episode of C-diff," says Sahil Khanna, M.B.B.S., a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic and senior author of the study. More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Joe Dangor   Twin Cities Business MRI Pioneer, Mayo Clinic Researcher Richard Ehman Honored as Elite U.S. Inventor by Don Jacobson Mayo Clinic radiologist, researcher and entrepreneur Richard Ehman, M.D., recognized this month as one of U.S. academia’s top inventors, says that of all his accomplishments as a pioneer in the development of magnetic resonance imaging technology, what matters most to him is how patients have benefited from his creations. “When I started out in medicine as a doctor, I never really saw myself as being an ‘inventor,’” Ehman told TCB after his selection as one of 175 National Academy of Inventors fellows for 2016, the highest professional distinction accorded solely to academic inventors whose work has been judged to have “made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development and welfare of society.” Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website. Context: Richard Ehman, M.D. is best known for his groundbreaking work in medical imaging, specifically in nuclear magnetic resonance and its use in diagnosing a variety of conditions. He is also credited with developing magnetic resonance elastography, which allows physicians to determine the stiffness of internal organs without invasive procedures. His research program is focused on developing new imaging technologies.  Dr. Ehman holds more than 40 patents, and many of these inventions are widely used in medical care. His research has been supported by competitive grants from the National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, and the National Institute of Aging. Dr. Ehman is a prolific author, with over 600 published articles, books, book chapters, abstracts and commentaries. More information about Dr. Ehman's research can be found on the Advanced Medical Imaging Lab site. Contacts: Duska Anastasijevic, Bob Nellis   MSN One particular type of exercise can make your body younger, suggests science by Francesca Rice While everyone knows that exercise is beneficial for our health, little has been known about how it affects our cells, and how those effects can change according to our age and the type of workout we're doing – until now... Researchers at Mayo Clinic conducted an experiment on over 70 men and women with sedentary lifestyles. Some were under the age of 30, while the other half of volunteers were aged 64 or older. Study leader Dr. Sreekumaran Nair now believes that the cellular health of muscles that is associated with ageing can be 'corrected' by exercise. And, since the older people's cells responded most positively to intense bursts of exercise, he says the results have shown that it really is never too late to benefit from working out! Reach:  MSN has more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month. Additional coverage: Men’s Fitness, Prevention Previous coverage in the March 24, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Previous coverage in March 17, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Previous coverage in March 1o, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Context: Everyone knows that exercise is good for you, but what type of training helps most, especially when you’re older - say over 65? A Mayo Clinic study says it’s high-intensity aerobic exercise, which can reverse some cellular aspects of aging. The findings appear in Cell Metabolism. Mayo researchers compared high-intensity interval training, resistance training and combined training. All training types improved lean body mass and insulin sensitivity, but only high-intensity and combined training improved aerobic capacity and mitochondrial function for skeletal muscle. Decline in mitochondrial content and function are common in older adults. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact:  Bob Nellis   Men’s Health The 4 Worst Things to Eat Before Bed by Marham Heid While experts say eating before bed doesn’t play a major role in weight-gain, that pre-slumber snack could disturb your sleep. “I tell people not to eat anything 3 hours before bedtime if they can avoid it, especially a big meal,” says Joseph Murray, M.D., a gastroenterologist with Mayo Clinic. Murray says it takes about 3 hours for a normal person’s stomach to break down food and pass the partially digested results to the lower intestine. Climb into bed before your stomach has done its thing, and sleep can interrupt that process. Reach:  Men's Health reaches more than 13.5 million readers each month. Context: Joseph Murray, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist. Dr. Murray's research interests focus in two distinct areas. The first is celiac disease or gluten sensitivity and enteropathy. This research program, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, focuses on clinical epidemiology of celiac disease, the role of genetics in predicting disease, the development of animal models for the disease and its associated dermatologic condition, and dermatitis herpetiformis. Research focus number two revolves around esophageal disorders, particularly esophageal functional disorders, particularly reflux, and the detection of atypical reflux. Contact: Joe Dangor [...]
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
Apr 14, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich @KarlWOestreich
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   ABC News What patients need to know about new recommendations for prostate cancer screening by Allison Bond The new recommendations may help patients get personalized care to address their health and specific concerns. The guidelines empower patients to talk with their doctor about personalized care tailored to their health and priorities, Dr. Jeff Karnes, a urologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, who was not involved in the new recommendations, told ABC News. “A man should be allowed to discuss with his physician whether to have a PSA ordered or not,” Karnes said. Reach: ABC News Online has more than 28.8 million unique visitors to its site each month. ABC’s World News Tonight with David Muir averages about 9.2 million viewers each night. Additional coverage: NBC News, KTIC Nebraska Context: R. Jeffrey Karnes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic urologist. Dr. Karnes and his urologist colleagues diagnose and treat problems involving the male and female urinary tract and the male reproductive organs. Contact: Joe Dangor   Daily Mail Paralysed man moves his legs and STANDS for the first time after a computer-controlled electrode is inserted into his abdomen and stimulates his spinal chord by Claudia Tanner A man paralysed from the waist down has moved his legs for the first time after doctors inserted an electrode sending an electrical current to the spinal cord… Mayo Clinic researchers, who tested the pioneering treatment, say these results offer further evidence that a combination of this technology and rehabilitation may help patients with spinal cord injuries regain control. Context: the Daily Mail has a circulation of more than 1.4 million readers. Its website has more than 16.4 million unique visitors each month. Additional coverage: ReliaWire, Infobae.com Previous coverage in April 7, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the April 7, 2017 News Weekly Highlights Context: Mayo Clinic researchers used electrical stimulation on the spinal cord and intense physical therapy to help a man intentionally move his paralyzed legs, stand and make steplike motions for the first time in three years. The case, the result of collaboration with UCLA researchers, appears today in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Researchers say these results offer further evidence that a combination of this technology and rehabilitation may help patients with spinal cord injuries regain control over previously paralyzed movements, such as steplike actions, balance control and standing. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contacts: Susan Barber Lindquist, Rhoda Fukushima Madson   Twin Cities Business Mayo Clinic Expanding Sports Medicine Facility In Minneapolis by Sam Schaust It was revealed last week when Chicago-based LaSalle Investment Management purchased Mayo Clinic Square that the building was 96 percent leased. Mayo spokeswoman Rhoda Madson told TCB that the medical institution’s expansion would be into the existing space on the second level connected to the skyway. “The cost of the project and our staffing needs are still being determined,” Madson said, noting that work on the new space is expected to wrap by the end of the year. Mayo said in a release on Friday that the expansion would include a number of additions and improvements to its current operation. Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website. Additional coverage: Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal, KTTC, Post-Bulletin Context: Mayo Clinic announced April 6 that it is expanding its services, space and other capabilities at its sports medicine facility in downtown Minneapolis to meet the growing demand for its expertise. Construction on the 16,000-square-foot project at Mayo Clinic Square is expected to begin in late April. “This project builds on our commitment to patients in the Twin Cities area by providing more convenient and accessible sports medicine services,” says Edward Laskowski, M.D., co-director of Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine. “This expansion allows us to serve our patients better by tapping Mayo Clinic’s expertise, cutting-edge technology, research and educational capabilities." More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson   Star Tribune Mayo doctor performs 'life-changing' surgeries on kids all over the world by Allie Shah Born with a congenital heart defect, a 13-year-old girl in Mongolia was suffering from severe heart failure. Even worse, she had no place to go for the medical care she desperately needed. Enter Dr. Allison Cabalka, a Mayo Clinic pediatric cardiologist. As part of a U.S. medical team, she traveled to Mongolia to treat children with heart defects in countries where heart surgical resources are limited or nonexistent. Cabalka also helped bring the girl to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, where she underwent surgery. “It was life-changing,” Cabalka said. “She graduated from high school and university training in Mongolia and moved to Istanbul this year to pursue further education.” Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation. Context: Allison Cabala, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic pediatric cardiologist. Dr. Cabalka's research interests in the areas of congenital and interventional cardiac catheterization and congenital echocardiography. Dr. Cabalka cares for patients of all ages with congenital heart disease and also participates in the care of adult patients with structural heart disease with Mayo Clinic's structural heart disease team. Contact: Kelley Luckstein   Florida Times-Union Guest column: Medical research plays an important role in meeting patient needs by Gianrico Farrugia, M.D. Ingenuity, innovation and hard work have been the key drivers of our state’s economic destiny. The support of state and federal governments, the private sector and philanthropy must continue to advance research, promote discovery and develop the next generation of scientists and innovators. This is vital to solve the threats to public health while maximizing the tremendous economic benefit of innovation for Florida’s communities…Mayo Clinic is a committed partner in accelerating Florida’s economy. While the NIH budget over the past decade has remained flat with the exception of some targeted funding from the 21st Century Cures Act, Mayo Clinic has doubled our investment in research. Right now we are testing a vaccine that could become a gold standard therapy and prevent recurrence of breast cancer, and testing drugs that starve cancers. We also are developing mechanisms for the body’s immune system to protect itself from cancer. — Physician Gianrico Farrugia is CEO of Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville. Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday. Context: Gianrico Farrugia, M.D. is CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida. Contact: Kevin Punsky [...]
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
Apr 7, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich @KarlWOestreich
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   Star Tribune At Mayo, steps toward helping paralyzed patients By Pam Louwagie Jered Chinnock, a 28-year-old from Tomah, Wis. who was injured in a snowmobile accident in February 2013, is one of a handful of patients in the country who, through the collaborative work of pioneering researchers, have had a small electrical stimulator surgically implanted on their spine. He did physical therapy the Mayo Clinic Hospital Saint Mary's Campus in Rochester, Minn. on March 27, 2017. Additional photo gallery in Star Tribune Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation. Additional coverage: KARE 11, Science Daily, Consumer Affairs, e Science News, India Today, Tech Times, Post-Bulletin, Voice of America, Times of India, KIMT, BioSpace, Daily Mail, UPI.com, Medical Xpress, Futurism Context: Mayo Clinic researchers used electrical stimulation on the spinal cord and intense physical therapy to help a man intentionally move his paralyzed legs, stand and make steplike motions for the first time in three years. The case, the result of collaboration with UCLA researchers, appears today in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Researchers say these results offer further evidence that a combination of this technology and rehabilitation may help patients with spinal cord injuries regain control over previously paralyzed movements, such as steplike actions, balance control and standing. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contacts: Susan Barber Lindquist, Rhoda Fukushima Madson   Washington Post 20 percent of patients with serious conditions are first misdiagnosed, study says by Lenny Bernstein Twelve percent of the people who asked specialists at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., to review their cases had received correct diagnoses, the study found. The rest were given diagnoses that were partly in line with the conclusions of the Mayo doctors who evaluated their conditions…“Diagnostic error is an area where we need more research, more study and more information,” said James M. Naessens, a professor of health services research at the Mayo Clinic, who led its study. “The second opinion is a good approach for certain patients to figure out what’s there and to keep costs down.” Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month. Additional coverage: San Diego Union-Tribune, CBS News, KMSP, KTTC, KARE 11, Science Newsline, Tech Times, Fierce Healthcare, WBAL Baltimore, Bend Bulletin, Global News, NY Daily News, National Daily News, Becker’s Hospital Review, KQDS Duluth, Apex Tribune, LifeHacker Australia, WTSP 10 News, AARP, CBS Denver, Doctors Lounge, domain-B.com, FOX 17 Nashville, Kankakee Daily Journal, Global News, Toledo Blade Context: Many patients come to Mayo Clinic for a second opinion or diagnosis confirmation before treatment for a complex condition. In a new study, Mayo Clinic reports that as many as 88 percent of those patients go home with a new or refined diagnosis – changing their care plan and potentially their lives.  Conversely, only 12 percent receive confirmation that the original diagnosis was complete and correct. These findings were published online recently  in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice. The research team was led by James Naessens, Sc.D., a health care policy researcher at Mayo Clinic. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact:  Elizabeth Zimmerman Young   Minnesota Monthly How Personalized Medicine Will Make Us Healthier by Mo Perry “It’s really what we think is the future of medical care and medicine in the United States,” says Dr. Keith Stewart, director of the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine, one of the nation’s leaders in moving genomics from the laboratory to clinical care since it was established in 2012. “Every single American should have their genome sequenced.” Reach: Minnesota Monthly has a circulation of more than 53,000 readers and its website has more than 61,000 unique visitors each month. The magazine serves as an urban twin cities and greater Minnesota lifestyle magazine covering issues, arts, dining, wine and personalities. Context:  Mayo Clinic's Center for Individualized Medicine solves  the clinical challenges of today and tomorrow by bringing the latest discoveries from the research laboratory to your doctor's fingertips in the form of new genomics-based tests and treatments. A. Keith Stewart, M.B., Ch.B. is the center's executive director. As an intern on a bone marrow transplant ward at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Dr. Stewart witnessed young adults struggling with the ruthlessness of often-fatal blood cancers and the vicious side effects of treatment. But he also saw the doctors' compassion, patients' resolve and the clear need for better therapies. This ignited his passion for fighting blood cancers. The relentless pursuit of that passion underscores his leadership vision for the Center for Individualized Medicine. Here, Dr. Stewart shares his past experiences … and his hopes for the future of personalized medicine. Contact:  Susan Buckles   Huffington Post ‘Is It Just Me?’ Comfort In Commonality Just ask any woman with an M.D., D.O. or doctoral degree if she has ever experienced a situation where her title of “doctor” was withheld while a male colleague in the same situation was referred to as “Dr. X.” Invariably you will hear, “Oh yes, this happens all the time, but I never know if it’s just me?” As co-authors, we had all noticed this annoying occurrence throughout our careers…It took the proverbial straw that broke the camel’s back to move us to share our experiences and to formally investigate. Dr. Julia Files was the spark. An excellent speaker and educator, Dr. Files is in great demand to speak at conferences to share her expertise. Several years ago she returned from one such event and shared with us her less than gratifying experience. — Blog authors Anita P. Mayer, M.D., Julia A. Files, M.D., and Sharonne N. Hayes, M.D. are physicians at Mayo Clinic. Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique viewers. Context: Sharonne Hayes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist and Anita Mayer, M.D. and Julia Files, M.D. are Mayo Clinic internists. Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson   Today.com How to choose the best seat in a meeting, every time by Joan Raymond Generally, people fall into two camps when it comes to meetings, said Dr. Richard Winters, an emergency medicine physician with the Mayo Clinic and an executive coach for healthcare leaders. There’s the stealth camp of “please don’t call on me” and “please don’t look at me.” Or the master-of-the-universe camp who wants to get the show on the road.  If you’re in stealth mode, choose the chairs that are on the outside of the realm of influence of power players.  “You know the (chairs) behind the chairs that actually sit at the table,” said Winters. In other words, “the kid’s table,” he said. Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show. Context: Richard Winters, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic emergency medicine physician. Dr. Winters also serves as a professional and executive coach for physician leaders. Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist [...]
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
Mar 31, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich @KarlWOestreich
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   NY Times How to Follow the News in a Political Age of Anxiety by Lesley Alderman Another day and, for many, another worrisome news alert out of Washington — or two, or three. Travel bans. Policy reversals. Wire taps. In October, during the buildup to Election Day, we heard from therapists about how their patients were feeling fearful, angry and distrustful in reaction to the contentious presidential race. Now, these same therapists report that many of their patients are even more upset as they struggle to make sense of the direction in which the country is heading. And many can’t tear themselves away from the news. … “Many of my patients are frightened and on edge. They wonder, Could the next news alert report that missiles are flying through the air?” said Dr. Robert Bright, a psychiatrist at the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix. “Almost all my patients report having insomnia.” He tells clients who are feeling overwhelmed to turn off news alerts on their phones and instead tune into the news just once a day. If social media feels as if it’s making your blood pressure rise, limit the number of times per week you log on. Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million. Context: Robert Bright, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic psychiatrist. Contacts: Jim McVeigh, Traci Klein   Today.com 'Black Insomnia' may be the strongest coffee in the world by Emi Boscamp A couple years ago, scientists unveiled the world's blackest black, called Vantablack, which absorbs 99.965% of visible light. Well, now there may be a coffee equivalent to Vantablack, called Black Insomnia. It debuted in South Africa last year and just arrived in the United States. No word yet on how much light it absorbs. … But what would happen if you drank more than that? We're jittery just thinking about it. "It depends how sensitive you are to caffeine, Dr. Sharonne N. Hayes, M.D., cardiologist at Mayo Clinic and professor of cardiovascular diseases, explained to TODAY Food over the phone. "It may not cause a serious medical issue, but it may be uncomfortable. For example, people with arrhythmias are triggered by caffeine and may experience palpitations." Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show. Context:  Sharonne Hayes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Hayes studies cardiovascular disease and prevention, with a focus on sex and gender differences and conditions that uniquely or predominantly affect women. With a clinical base in the Women's Heart Clinic, Dr. Hayes and her research team utilize novel recruitment methods, social media and online communities, DNA profiling, and sex-specific evaluations to better understand several cardiovascular conditions. A major area of focus is spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD), an uncommon and under-recognized cause of acute coronary syndrome (heart attack) that occurs predominantly in young women. Contact: Traci Klein   Star Tribune With almost $300 million in private funds, Mayo's Rochester project set to get $585M in public money by Matt McKinney Millions of dollars in state aid for expansion of the Mayo Clinic should start to arrive in Rochester this fall, it was announced Thursday. The public dollars were pledged for the Destination Medical Center (DMC) project in 2013, but the Legislature said they wouldn’t come until the clinic and private investors first put up their own money. Now that has happened, with almost $300 million in private investment. The figures released Thursday by the DMC board put private investment totals so far at $297.7 million, a figure that covers everything from a new sign at a private business to a $68 million Mayo project at its Saint Marys Campus. Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation. Additional coverage: KTTC, Becker’s Hospital Review, U.S. News & World Report, KDLT News, Kansas City Star, Post-Bulletin, Santa Cruz Sentinel, LMT Online, Post-Bulletin, ABC News, Wichita Eagle, Las Vegas Sun Related coverage: Star Tribune, Destination Medical Center by Lisa Clarke Post-Bulletin (special report table of contents) Post-Bulletin, Special Report- DMC: Transforming Rochester Post-Bulletin, The hustle is over; the show’s about to begin Post-Bulletin, Where in Discovery Square will Mortenson build first?  Post-Bulletin, Saint Marys area prepares for dramatic change Post-Bulletin, Developers discover Discovery Square  Post-Bulletin, Hammes doubles down on Rochester investment Post-Bulletin, Where health care meets hospitality  Post-Bulletin, Staver: As DMC unfolds, we must protect city’s values Post-Bulletin, DMC will be a draw for millennials  Post-Bulletin, Powers: History should repeat itself, with DMC Post-Bulletin, Will DMC create 'Silicon Valley of Medicine'?  Context: The Destination Medical Center Corporation (DMCC) Executive Committee announced today that the DMC economic development initiative exceeded the $200 million private development investment threshold –needed to trigger the release of state DMC dollars to be used for public infrastructure improvements – by $97.7 million, totaling $297.7 million in private investment. “Reaching this important milestone reaffirms that we are on the right track, and Rochester is already experiencing growth and new opportunities,” said Lt. Gov. Tina Smith, DMCC Board Chair. “With the $200 million threshold met, I look forward to working with the State of Minnesota, Rochester community and Mayo Clinic to invest in transportation, world-class amenities, and other public infrastructure that supports opportunity for everyone.” More information can be found on the Destination Medical Center website. Contacts:  Kelley Luckstein, Bob Nellis   ActionNewsJax Mayo Clinic study: High-intensity interval training can reverse aging process by Danielle Avitable A new study by the Mayo Clinic found that certain workouts can reverse the aging process. The study found that a high-intensity interval training workout, combined with resistance training, can turn back time. "You're essentially slowing down that aging process, what I think is amazing, because we didn't have those things before," Dr. Vandana Bhide, of the Mayo Clinic, said. Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida. Additional coverage: Atlanta Journal-Constitution Previous coverage in March 24, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Previous coverage in March 17, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Previous coverage in March 1o, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Context: Everyone knows that exercise is good for you, but what type of training helps most, especially when you’re older - say over 65? A Mayo Clinic study says it’s high-intensity aerobic exercise, which can reverse some cellular aspects of aging. The findings appear in Cell Metabolism. Mayo researchers compared high-intensity interval training, resistance training and combined training. All training types improved lean body mass and insulin sensitivity, but only high-intensity and combined training improved aerobic capacity and mitochondrial function for skeletal muscle. Decline in mitochondrial content and function are common in older adults. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact:  Kevin Punsky, Bob Nellis [...]
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
Mar 24, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich @KarlWOestreich
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   New York Times The Best Exercise for Aging Muscles by Gretchen Reynolds Exercise is good for people, as everyone knows. But scientists have surprisingly little understanding of its cellular impacts and how those might vary by activity and the age of the exerciser. So researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., recently conducted an experiment on the cells of 72 healthy but sedentary men and women who were 30 or younger or older than 64. After baseline measures were established for their aerobic fitness, their blood-sugar levels and the gene activity and mitochondrial health in their muscle cells, the volunteers were randomly assigned to a particular exercise regimen. It seems as if the decline in the cellular health of muscles associated with aging was “corrected” with exercise, especially if it was intense, says Dr. Sreekumaran Nair, a professor of medicine and an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic and the study’s senior author. Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million. Additional coverage: Vogue, Men's Health Previous coverage in March 17, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Previous coverage in March 10, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Context: Everyone knows that exercise is good for you, but what type of training helps most, especially when you’re older - say over 65? A Mayo Clinic study says it’s high-intensity aerobic exercise, which can reverse some cellular aspects of aging. The findings appear in Cell Metabolism. Mayo researchers compared high-intensity interval training, resistance training and combined training. All training types improved lean body mass and insulin sensitivity, but only high-intensity and combined training improved aerobic capacity and mitochondrial function for skeletal muscle. Decline in mitochondrial content and function are common in older adults. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact:  Bob Nellis   Wall Street Journal Medical School Seeks to Make Training More Compassionate by Lucette Lagnado “We found at admission that the kids look fine,” says Liselotte Dyrbye, professor of medicine at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. “It is as if they go through our training process, and they develop worsening mental health.” Dr. Dyrbye blames this on an “absurd” medical system: “It is the curriculum, it is the learning environment, it is the type of stuff you do as a [young] physician, and it is not unique to Mayo, it is not unique to Sinai.” The Mayo researcher, who studies physician well-being, says in addition to mastering vast amounts of information, medical students and residents cope with “complex patient interactions, the suffering, the deaths.” Too often, “it is not a supportive environment—students are set up to compete with each other.” Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions. Context: Liselotte "Lotte" Dyrbe, M.D., MHPE, is a Mayo Clinic Primary Care Internal Medicine physician. Dr. Dyrbe focuses on the well-being of medical students, residents and physicians. Dr. Dyrbye partners with Tait D. Shanafelt, M.D., and Colin P. West, M.D., Ph.D., to direct the Mayo Clinic Department of Medicine Physician Well-Being Program. Contact: Matt Brenden   Today.com Why your doctor should measure blood pressure in both arms by A. Pawlowski Healthy people can have slightly different numbers between arms, but a substantial difference in the readings could signal a blockage or an abnormality, said Dr. Sharonne Hayes, director of the Women's Heart Clinic at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.  “Probably the biggest thing I see in day-to-day practice is somebody who always gets their blood pressure checked in a given arm and they’re told over and over again it’s great,” Hayes told TODAY. But when her office checks the other arm, it reveals uncontrolled high blood pressure that has gone undetected, which can potentially damage the brain and kidneys. Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show. Context:  Sharonne Hayes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Hayes studies cardiovascular disease and prevention, with a focus on sex and gender differences and conditions that uniquely or predominantly affect women. With a clinical base in the Women's Heart Clinic, Dr. Hayes and her research team utilize novel recruitment methods, social media and online communities, DNA profiling, and sex-specific evaluations to better understand several cardiovascular conditions. A major area of focus is spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD), an uncommon and under-recognized cause of acute coronary syndrome (heart attack) that occurs predominantly in young women. Contact: Traci Klein   NBC News Study Connects Genes to Late Onset Alzheimer’s in African-Americans by Andrea King Collier A study from researchers at the Mayo Clinic, published in the February issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, may show some insights into the genetics of the disease in Black Americans who develop the disease after age 65.  The study's senior investigator, Dr. Nilufer Ertekin-Taner, M.D., Ph.D., a neurogeneticist and neurologist at Mayo Clinic's Florida campus says that while the reasons for these high rates of Alzheimer's in the Black community remains unknown, there could be multiple reasons. She cites "higher vascular risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol, as well as differences in genetics and/or differences in socioeconomic factors." Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month. Context: A Mayo Clinic research team has found a new gene mutation that may be a risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease in African-Americans. This is the first time this gene has been implicated in the development of this disease in this population. Alzheimer’s disease has been understudied in African-Americans, despite the fact that the disease is twice as prevalent in African-Americans, compared to Caucasians and other ethnic groups. This likely pathogenic variant may be unique to the African-American population, the researchers say. It has not been found in Caucasians with Alzheimer’s disease or in gene repositories from more than 60,000 subjects who are not African-Americans.  More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Kevin Punsky [...]
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
Mar 17, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich @KarlWOestreich
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   KTTC Mayo Clinic researchers pinpoint experimental drug that may shrink tumors in multiple myeloma patients by Jason Pope The Mayo Clinic says this experimental drug is leading to tumor shrinkage in patients affected by multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma is a cancer that affects the blood cells that fight infection. Rather than fighting infection, the cancer causes kidney problems and infections. According to Dr. Marta Chesi, the drug was developed to support tumor death but instead of killing the tumor cells, it made them more visible. This visibility helps the immune system spot the tumor cells and eliminate them. Reach: KTTC is an NBC affiliate that serves the Rochester, Minn. area including the towns of Austin, Mason City, Albert Lea and Winona. Its website receives more than 73,300 unique visitors each month. Additional coverage: Life Science Daily Context: Mayo Clinic researchers have found that an experimental drug, LCL161, stimulates the immune system, leading to tumor shrinkage in patients affected by multiple myeloma. The findings are published in Nature Medicine. Multiple myeloma is a blood cancer that affects plasma cells – white blood cells that normally produce antibodies to fight infection. Rather than produce helpful antibodies, the cancer cells, as they grow, secrete large amounts of a single antibody that accumulate in the body, causing kidney problems and infections. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason   Huffington Post Finding treatments to fight fibroids Fibroid embolization and focused ultrasound are minimally invasive options that reproductive endocrinologist Dr. Ebbie Stewart says warrant more research to help guide women and health care providers on a treatment plan. She co-authored a recent study that looked at the two treatments, compared recovery time, and noted adverse events in the first six weeks after treatment, Dr. Stewart says. Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique viewers. Context:  Elizabeth "Ebbie Stewart, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic ObGyn. Dr. Stewart studies uterine fibroids, also called uterine leiomyomas or myomas. Fibroids are noncancerous tumors of the uterus that commonly cause heavy menstrual bleeding, pelvic pain and pressure, bowel and bladder problems, and sometimes infertility and miscarriage. Fibroids are also the leading cause of hysterectomy. Contact: Kelley Luckstein   Men’s Health This Exact Workout Routine May Actually Reverse Aging by Elizabeth Millard Research has shown physical activity can reduce inflammation in your body and improve heart health—both important for staying young beyond your years. But not all exercise is the same in keeping age-related decline at bay, researchers from the Mayo Clinic say…“Decline is mitochondria is the key factor responsible for age-related physical declines,” says the study’s senior author, Sreekumaran Nair, M.D., Ph.D. That includes osteoporosis, arthritis, gastrointestinal issues, decreased flexibility, hypertension, and cardiovascular issues. “Higher intensity of exercise seems to elicit a rejuvenation of mitochondrial [processes] in everybody, including older people.” Reach: Men's Health has an audience of more than 13.5 million readers. Additional coverage: Healthline, The Hans India, Canindia.com, AARP Context: Everyone knows that exercise is good for you, but what type of training helps most, especially when you’re older - say over 65? A Mayo Clinic study says it’s high-intensity aerobic exercise, which can reverse some cellular aspects of aging. The findings appear in Cell Metabolism. Mayo researchers compared high-intensity interval training, resistance training and combined training. All training types improved lean body mass and insulin sensitivity, but only high-intensity and combined training improved aerobic capacity and mitochondrial function for skeletal muscle. Decline in mitochondrial content and function are common in older adults. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact:  Bob Nellis   Washington Post It’s not just being stuck inside; cold weather sets us up for getting sick by Emily Sohn It's not clear why winter brings so many health woes, says Pritish Tosh, an infectious-disease physician and researcher at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. "The reason one virus is a wintertime virus may not be the same reason another virus is a wintertime virus," Tosh says. "We're finding more and more that it's not one size fits all." Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month. Additional coverage: Chicago Tribune, Why do we get sick in winter? Health, How to Get Rid of the Flu Faster Context: Pritish Tosh, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist. Dr. Tosh is interested in emerging infections and preparedness activities related to them, ranging from collaborating with the Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group in basic science vaccine development to hospital systems research related to pandemic preparedness. Influenza is a viral infection that attacks your respiratory system — your nose, throat and lungs. Influenza, commonly called the flu, is not the same as stomach "flu" viruses that cause diarrhea and vomiting. Contact: Bob Nellis [...]
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
Mar 10, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich @KarlWOestreich
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   Wall Street Journal Zika Linked to Heart Problems by Betsy McKay In a study conducted at the Institute of Tropical Medicine in Caracas, Venezuela, researchers identified nine patients who developed heart rhythm disorders and other serious cardiovascular complications while they had Zika. “While we anticipated that we would see cardiovascular effects from Zika, we were surprised at the severity of the findings,” said Karina Gonzalez Carta, a cardiologist and research fellow at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who led the study. She provided details of the findings to reporters ahead of the American College of Cardiology’s Annual Scientific Session in Washington where the findings will be presented. Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions. Additional coverage: New York Times, HealthDay, ABC News, Associated Press, Star Tribune, KTTC, TIME, FOX News, Twin Cities Business, WebMD, Medical Xpress Context: Zika also may have serious effects on the heart, new research shows in the first study to report cardiovascular complications related to this virus, according to data being presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 66th Annual Scientific Session. In a study at the Institute of Tropical Medicine in Caracas, Venezuela, of nine adult patients with Zika and no previous history of cardiovascular disease, all but one developed a heart rhythm problem and two-thirds had evidence of heart failure. It is known that Zika can cause microcephaly, a severe birth defect in babies born to women infected with the virus, and Guillain-Barré syndrome, a neurological condition that can lead to muscle weakness and, in severe cases, paralysis. “We know that other mosquito-borne diseases, such as dengue fever and chikungunya virus, can affect the heart, so we thought we might see the same with Zika. But we were surprised by the severity, even in this small number of patients,” says Karina Gonzalez Carta, M.D., cardiologist and research fellow at Mayo Clinic and the study’s lead author. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact:  Traci Klein   Jacksonville Business Journal Mayo Clinic announces $70.5 million expansion in Jacksonville by Derek Gilliam Mayo Clinic took another step toward becoming the "premier destination medical center in the Southeast" with an $70.5 million expansion plan. That follows an already active development cycle for Mayo Clinic's Florida Campus that's located in Jacksonville. The hospital has invested more than $300 million in expanding its hospital campus. That has allowed for the global hospital system to grow their employee base to 5,900 in Jacksonville, according to Mayo Clinic. “We are extremely grateful to the family of Dan and Brenda Davis for their generous and unyielding support for Mayo Clinic,” said Dr. Gianrico Farrugia, vice president of Mayo Clinic and CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida. Reach:  The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.  Additional coverage: First Coast News, Mayo Clinic continues rapid expansion with two new projects announced Tuesday WOKV Jacksonville, Mayo Clinic plans $70 million construction project Florida Times-Union, Mayo Clinic continues rapid expansion with two new projects announced Tuesday Jacksonville Business Journal, How Mayo Clinic plans to make Jacksonville a medical destination Context: Over the past two years Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus has erupted with substantial growth in major construction projects and new staff to serve a fast-growing patient population, especially those who require complex medical care. During this time, Mayo Clinic has invested more than $300 million in major construction projects and added 900 new staff as it advances its status as the premier destination medical center in the Southeast. Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus now has about 5,900 employees and contributes roughly $2 billion to the Florida economy. As part of this economic boom, Mayo Clinic today announced another major construction project on its Florida campus – an investment of $70.5 million to add four floors for a total of five to Mayo Building South and remodel existing space in the Davis Building. The project will add 80,000 new square feet and renovate 40,000 existing square feet. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Kevin Punsky     Star Tribune Mayo spending $217 million on construction in Rochester by Christopher Snowbeck Mayo Clinic plans to spend $217 million on construction projects at its St. Marys hospital campus in Rochester. The project, announced Thursday, would help the clinic grow its patient volume and provide those patients better service in more efficient facilities, said Dr. Robert Cima, medical director for the Rochester hospital operations at the Mayo Clinic. “We anticipate continued growth in our patient visits,” Cima said in an interview. “We’ve been seeing that steadily year after year. This is really a commitment to providing access to as many patients as possible.” Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation. Additional coverage: KAAL, Mayo Clinic Giving Saint Marys Campus $217 Million Expansion, Upgrade KTTC, Mayo Clinic approves $217 million expansion for its Saint Marys Campus KIMT, Mayo Clinic unveils $217 million construction project KAAL,  In-Depth at 6:30: Impact of Saint Marys Twin Cities Business, Mayo Clinic Spending $458M To Renovate, Expand Its MN, FL Campuses Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic to invest $217M to expand, upgrade Saint Marys Context: The Mayo Clinic Board of Trustees approved plans for enhanced and increased procedural and patient-dedicated facilities at Mayo Clinic Hospital – Rochester, Saint Marys Campus. Mayo Clinic will invest $217 million in the growth and modernization of Saint Marys Campus, while also relocating and upgrading its Cardiac Surgery facilities. Both sets of projects will address the needs of an increasingly complex patient population, rising inpatient volume and innovative practice, while providing the highest level of safe, efficient and affordable care. “These enhancements further Mayo Clinic’s mission of advancing the practice by investing in our facilities to help ensure we provide the best possible care for our patients,” says C. Michel Harper, M.D., executive dean for practice at Mayo Clinic. “The improvement of our facilities is a natural extension of Mayo Clinic’s efforts to provide both a modern and coordinated health care environment.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact:  Kelly Reller   CNN Interval training exercise could be a fountain of youth by Susan Scutti Looking for a fountain of youth? You may need to search no further than your sneakers. "Any exercise is better than being sedentary," said Dr. Sreekumaran Nair, senior author of the study and a diabetes researcher at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. However, Nair noted that high-intensity interval training (HIIT), in particular, is "highly efficient" when it comes to reversing many age-related changes. Reach: Cable News Network (CNN) is a worldwide news and information network providing live, continuous coverage of news from around the globe, 24 hours a day. CNN online received more than 55 million unique visitors to its website each month. Additional coverage: Daily Mail, New Scientist, Express UK, Ask Men, FOX News Context:  Everyone knows that exercise is good for you, but what type of training helps most, especially when you’re older - say over 65? A Mayo Clinic study says it’s high-intensity aerobic exercise, which can reverse some cellular aspects of aging. The findings appear in Cell Metabolism. Mayo researchers compared high-intensity interval training, resistance training and combined training. All training types improved lean body mass and insulin sensitivity, but only high-intensity and combined training improved aerobic capacity and mitochondrial function for skeletal muscle. Decline in mitochondrial content and function are common in older adults. High-intensity intervals also improved muscle protein content that not only enhanced energetic functions, but also caused muscle enlargement, especially in older adults. The researchers emphasized an important finding: Exercise training significantly enhanced the cellular machinery responsible for making new proteins. That contributes to protein synthesis, thus reversing a major adverse effect of aging. However, adding resistance training is important to achieve significant muscle strength. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Bob Nellis   Woman’s Day 10 Simple Tips That Will Help You Prevent Alzheimer's Disease by Stacey Colino Many women fear losing their mental faculties as they age, and consider the future to be the luck of the draw. In fact, 44% of 1,200 adults surveyed by the Marist Institute for Public Opinion were more scared of getting Alzheimer's disease than cancer, stroke, heart disease or diabetes. What you may not realize is just how much you can protect yourself. "We all have the power to influence how our brains age," says Ron Petersen, MD, PhD, director of Mayo Clinic's Alzheimer's Disease Research Center in Rochester, MN. "What you do at midlife will have late-life benefits on the health of your brain and heart." Know the facts, then take simple steps to get on track. Reach: Woman’s Day reaches a monthly audience of more than 3.3 million. Its website receives more than 4.7 million unique visitors each month. Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services. Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist   Today.com 5 steps that helped this woman shed 68 pounds and transform her life When Jacqueline Gilmore-Jackson’s mother passed away, she turned to food for comfort. It wasn’t uncommon for her to snack mindlessly and eat at odd hours, even enjoying dinner at midnight. Since that sad time in 2010, her weight slowly increased. In March, she applied to participate in the Woman’s Day Live Longer and Stronger Challenge. The magazine selected five women from across the country to receive nutrition and exercise counseling from Joy Bauer and guidance from experts at Mayo Clinic to lose weight and improve their health. Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show. Context: The Live Longer & Stronger challenge—headed by Joy Bauer, RDN, with guidance from experts at Mayo Clinic—is about more than just lowering the numbers on the scale. Some of these women walked more steps than they'd ever dreamed possible, while others cut out medications they'd been taking for years, leading to greater happiness and healthier hearts. Contact:  Traci Klein [...]
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
Mar 3, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich @KarlWOestreich
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   USA Today Having a baby past 35: What women should know by Ashley May … Have a plan, and the money to execute it, before 35. Fertility doctors say women approaching 35 who want children but aren’t yet ready should look into egg or embryo freezing. Charles Coddington, professor and OB/GYN for Mayo Medical School, also advises getting a full checkup for reproductive health. After age 35, pregnancy is more difficult because of less frequent ovulation. Also, women 35-45 have a 20-35% chance of miscarriage, compared with women under 35 that average a 15-20% chance of miscarriage, according to the American Pregnancy Association. … Frozen eggs of a woman younger than 35 have a greater than 50% chance of producing a live birth. Past age 40, freezing eggs or embryos will not have a great success – less than 9 percent result in live birth, Coddington said. Reach: USA TODAY  has an average daily circulation of 4.1 million which includes print, various digital editions and other papers that use their branded content. Context: Charles Coddington, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic ObGyn. The Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota supports women throughout their lifelong journey from childbearing age to menopause and beyond. You can learn more about Dr. Coddington's research interests here. Contact:  Kelley Luckstein   Star Tribune Mayo Clinic investing $70 million in Mankato hospital by Christopher Snowbeck Mayo Clinic’s regional network of medical centers is investing $70 million to expand and renovate the surgery suite and orthopedic clinic at its hospital in Mankato. The project includes a $65 million upgrade to the hospital’s surgery facilities that is part of a broader plan to better link the Mankato campus with Mayo Clinic’s headquarters in Rochester, according to details released Friday. “Mayo Clinic is committed to the needs of patients in Mankato and the surrounding communities we serve,” said Dr. James Hebl, vice president of Mayo Clinic Health System in southwest Minnesota, in a statement. Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation. Additional coverage: KROC AM, KEYC Mankato, Minneapolis/St. Paul Business, Journal, Post-Bulletin, Healthcare Dive, Germany Sun, Becker’s ASC Review, Mankato Free Press Context:  Mayo Clinic Health System today announced plans for a $65 million hospital surgical suite expansion in Mankato. Construction is expected to begin later this year. “Mayo Clinic is committed to the needs of patients in Mankato and the surrounding communities we serve,” says James Hebl, M.D., vice president of Mayo Clinic Health System in Southwest Minnesota. “The projects are an investment in our patients, our staff and the needs of our communities. Providing access to outstanding care in state-of-the-art facilities closer to where patients live is of paramount importance, and is the driving force behind the decision to dedicate substantial resources to these initiatives.” More information about the expansion can be found here. Contact:  Micah Dorfner   Star Tribune Mayo earnings hit by Medicaid, labor costs by Christopher Snowbeck Mayo Clinic's net income slipped last year as the Rochester-based health care giant spent more on staffing for growth initiatives, and saw more losses on patients with Medicaid coverage. Even so, the overall results being released Monday show "it was a strong year," said Kedrick Adkins Jr., the clinic's chief financial officer. Mayo posted $475 million in net income on $11 billion in revenue, down about 10 percent from 2015 net income of $526.4 million, according to the clinic's latest financial report. Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation. Additional coverage: KTTC, Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal, Dotmed.com, Becker’s Hospital Review, Healthcare Dive Context: With more than 1.3 million patients seeking Mayo Clinic’s expertise yearly, the institution continues its work to provide the best care to every patient through integrated clinical practice, education and research. Mayo Clinic reported a strong financial position in 2016, with contributions of $466 million to its pension plan for staff and more than $600 million in capital projects. “The outstanding work of Mayo Clinic employees is the engine that drives our mission to our patients, advances important research and educational initiatives, and positions our institution as a key voice for the future of health care,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic. “Our strong financial performance enables Mayo to hire and retain the best talent, and invest in technology, facilities and our staff as we strive to deliver the best outcomes and service to our patients.” Contact:  Susan Barber Lindquist     KAAL Mayo Clinic Performs Rare In-Womb Surgery to Give Baby New Chance at Life by Marissa Collins An Austin mom and her baby are doing well after her pregnancy took an unexpected turn. Nineteen weeks in, doctors told her something was wrong with her unborn baby … Her baby was diagnosed with a severe form of Spina Bifida halfway through her pregnancy. “Once the baby is being formed the babies back does not close. The spine does not close, so the nerves can be open," says Dr. Rodrigo Ruano, Director at Mayo Clinic Fetal Diagnostic and Intervention Center. Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa. Context: The Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota supports women throughout their lifelong journey from childbearing age to menopause and beyond. The Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine staff care for women experiencing high-risk pregnancies related to obstetric, medical, surgical or genetic complications. Contact:  Kelley Luckstein [...]
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