Items Tagged ‘3D printing’

December 9th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Los Angeles Times
A senior-friendly workout to improve movement and prevent injury

Jogging outdoors, running on a treadmill or lifting weights at the gym aren’t always practical — or enjoyable — activities for everyone. However, one type of exercise works for everyone, no matter your age or ability, because it relies on improving practical movements often involved inLogo for Los Angeles Times newspaper everyday activities. “Natural movement is universal, and it’s about bringing movement back to the basics,” says Bradly Prigge, wellness exercise specialist with the Mayo Clinic’s Healthy Living Program. “It’s not about following the latest fitness craze or learning the newest secret to weight loss. Natural movement is about connecting with your body and cultivating an awareness of your full abilities.”

Reach:  The Los Angeles Times has a daily readership of 1.9 million and 2.9 million on Sunday, more than 8 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.5 million. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 128 years.

Additional coverage: Mountain Grove News-Journal

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life.

Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Joe Dangor

 

Prevention
4 Easy Moves To Ease Your IBS Symptoms

When you're dealing with the abdominal pain, bloating, cramping, constipation, or diarrhea that comes along with irritable bowel syndrome Prevention logo(IBS), the last thing you probably want to do is exercise. Yet according to research, moving your body can decrease the pain associated with this condition that affects an estimated one in six Americans. Brent A. Bauer, MD, director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program, says many movement practices, such as yoga and tai chi, as well as meditation and guided imagery, benefit those suffering from IBS thanks to the fact that they induce the relaxation response. "This in turn balances the autonomic nervous system," says Bauer, which influences the function of many internal organs, including the digestive system.

Reach:  Prevention magazine has a monthly circulation of more than 1.5 million readers and covers practical health information and ideas on healthy living. Its website has nearly 1.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context:  Brent Bauer, M,D., is director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program. As director of the program, Dr. Bauer has broad and varied research interests. Since its founding in 2001, the program has promoted a collaborative spirit that enables researchers from both within and outside Mayo Clinic to share resources, ideas and expertise regarding research in this exciting realm.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic co-sponsoring World Stem Cell Summit
by Brett Boese

The Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine is co-sponsoring next week's World Stem Cell Summit in FloLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaperrida. More than 1,200 people are expected to attend the 12th annual event. Mayo will have a delegation of administrators, researchers and clinical experts participating in presentations and panel discussions involving stem cell discoveries, promising clinical trials and therapy options currently available.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine is a co-sponsor of the 2016 World Stem Cell Summit. More than 1,200 attendees are expected at the 12th annual event in West Palm Beach, Florida. A delegation of administrators, researchers and clinical  experts from Mayo Clinic will participate in featured presentations and panel discussions highlighting advances in discovery science, promising clinical trials and available therapies. Diverse topics to be covered include cardiovascular regeneration, restoring eyesight, and growing stem cells in a microgravity environment in space. Mayo Clinic experts also will be involved in panel discussions regarding education, consumer information and stem cell clinics. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Angela Bingham

 

KIMT
Study: Changes in how someone walks could predict decline in memory and thinking
by DeeDee Stiepan

Researchers at Mayo Clinic believe that changes in how someone walks over time could help predict if they will develop memory loss. The study KIMT LOGOanalyzed gait, which is the manner in which someone walks that includes everything from stride length to speed, even arm swing. They found that changes in those parameters were associated with decline in memory, thinking and language skills. “The goal will be to identify these individuals that develop these changes through time and potentially do something to prevent the decline if possible,” explains Rodolfo Savica, M.D. a Mayo Clinic Neurologist and lead author of the study.

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Context: Walking is a milestone in development for toddlers, but it’s actually only one part of the complex cognitive task known as gait that includes everything from a person’s stride length to the accompanying swing of each arm. A Mayo Clinic study recently published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease found that problems associated with gait can predict a significant decline in memory and thinking. More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

KAAL
3D Printing Improving Surgery Outcomes at Mayo Clinic

For nearly ten years, Rochester’s Mayo Clinic has been creating life-like models of people’s organs, vascular systems, and bones to help with surgery. This is all done using a three dimensional printer, which Mayo Clinic says says the demand for is only growing. The very first modelKAAL 6 News Rochester Logo surgeons created was a liver, and neuroradiologist Dr. Jonathon Morris says the rest was history. "So then we went into spine models, complex congenital scoliosis cases, from there we went into tumor, and then after we went into tumors we went into cancer, and then there was no turning back," Dr. Morris said.

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Context:  Mayo Clinic’s 3-D anatomic modeling program started with a realization that surgeons needed a new way to look at human anatomy that went beyond two-dimensional images. Surgeons who were planning the separation of conjoined twins in 2008 approached the Department of Radiology about producing a 3-D model of the babies’ shared liver. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Ethan Grove

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Tags: "work-fit" stations, 21st Century Cures Act, 3D printing, alzheimers, Ambert Kohnhorst, Ashville Citizen-Times, Associations Now, AZFamily, Boston Globe, Bradly Prigge, brain games, Cancer


December 2nd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

NBC News
Study: 1 in 6 Breast Cancer Patients Have Symptoms Other Than Lumps

A new study of more than 2,300 women in England showed 1 IN 6 patients have symptoms other than lumps — some symptoms far more subtle than others. Interview with Dr. Deborah Rhodes.NBC News Logo

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Context: Deborah Rhodes, M.D., is a physician with Mayo Clinic's Breast Diagnostic Clinic. Dr. Rhodes studies the application of a new breast imaging device, molecular breast imaging, to breast cancer screening. The long-term goal of Dr. Rhodes' research is to develop an individualized approach to breast cancer screening that incorporates breast density, age, and other factors that impact breast cancer risk and mammography sensitivity.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

KARE11
Mayo chef shares healthier holiday recipes
by Pat Evans

Chef Jen Welpert, Executive Wellness Chef for Mayo Clinic’s Healthy Living Program joined us on KARE11 News@4 to serve up some recipes. She showed some ways to use less fat, sugar and other rich ingredients KARE-11 Logomaking dishes lighter and healthier.

Reach: KARE-TV is the NBC affiliate serving the Minneapolis-Saint Paul market.

Related coverage of Mayo Clinic's Healthly Living Program:

WGN Radio, Healthy Thanksgiving Leftovers  Executive Wellness Chef at The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program Jen Welper talks about the healthy things you can make with Thanksgiving leftovers.

KAAL, Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program: Nutrition

KAAL, Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program: Fitness 

KAAL, Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program: Elements of Movement 

KAAL, Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program: Stress Management & Wellness Coaching

KAAL, Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program: Rejuvenate and Restore

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Arizona Horizon (PBS)
Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University Alliance for Health Care

Arizona State University and Mayo Clinic are joining forces to improve health care delivery, increase research and open up a Mayo Clinic School of Medicine in Arizona. ASU president Michael Crow and Dr. Wyatt Decker, Mayo Clinic Chief Executive Officer, Arizona, will discuss the Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University Alliance for Health Care.

Reach: Eight, Arizona PBS is a PBS station that has focused on educating children, reporting in-depth on public affairs, fostering lifelong learning and celebrating arts and culture. Its signal reaches 86 percent ofArizona PBS the homes in Arizona. With more than 1 million viewers weekly, Eight consistently ranks among the most-viewed public television stations per capita in the country. Eight is a member-supported service of Arizona State University.

Previous coverage in October 28, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context:  Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University have announced the launch of a comprehensive new model for health care education and research: the Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University Alliance for Health Care. The goal of the alliance is to innovate health care delivery to improve patient care, accelerate cutting-edge research discoveries, and transform medical education. The alliance further links two of the Phoenix area’s most recognizable institutions. ASU recently was named the nation’s No. 1 “most innovative” university by U.S. News & World Report.Mayo Clinic earned the No. 1 top ranking nationally on 2016 U.S. News & World Report's Honor Roll of America's Best Hospitals, as well as the No. 1 spots for top hospitals in Arizona and Phoenix, Minnesota and Florida. The formalized alliance provides cohesion to a collection of joint projects, which have evolved over the past decade and sets the stage for many more. This expansion promises growing impact and scale. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic New Network and on Mayo Medical School's website.

Contact:  Jim McVeigh

 

News4Jax
Doctors warn of extremely contagious virus this holiday season
by Francesca Amiker

Many doctors have been seeing patients with an extremely contagious virus this holiday season, causing appointments to book up at after-hours clinics across Jacksonville. The virus, which can include symptoms News Jax 4 Logosimilar to the stomach flu, usually lasts two to three days, but doctors said it's lasting much longer than that this year. Vandana Bhide at Mayo Clinic said the outbreak has already spread to many of her patients. She said it's a virus that can be one of two types. "It's usually the norovirus or rotavirus," Bhide said. "Both of them can cause watery diarrhea and it can be in adults and kids."

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville. This Week in Jacksonville is a weekly public affairs program on WJXT.

Context: Vandana Bhide, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic internist and pediatrician.

Contact: Kevin Punksy

 

WCCO
Mayo Clinic Nurse Recounts 100-Foot Fall

Six months after surviving a huge fall down an Arizona canyon, a Rochester woman is heading back to work, reports Jennifer Mayerle.

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

CBS Minnesota

Context: Amber Kohnhorst loves animals and adventure. The trip she'd planned to Best Friends Animal Sanctuary in Utah promised both. She'd spend time volunteering at the shelter and do some hiking in nearby Cane Beds, Arizona. But what sounded like a perfect vacation quickly became a nightmare when the 25-year-old Mayo Clinic nurse fell 100 feet down a cliff during what was supposed to be a short hike. You can read more about Amber's story on Mayo Clinic In the Loop.

Contact:  Ginger Plumbo

 

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Tags: 3D printing, active shooter situation, adenomyosis, Alzforum, alzheimers, Amy Davis, Arizona Horizon (PBS), ayo Family Clinic in Kasson, Breast Cancer, Business Insider, Business Standard, calcium


September 4th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich


Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

TIME
Sitting is Killing You

by Alice Park

You’ve already heard that sitting is the new smoking. Now, scientists reveal exactly how it hurts the body—and novel ways to undo the damage (without clocTime magazine logoking hours at the gym). You might want to stand up for this…All of which has doctors and health experts calling for a paradigm shift. “In the same way that standing up is an oddity now, sitting down should be,” says Dr. James Levine, director of the Mayo Clinic-Arizona State University Obesity Solutions Initiative and probably best known as the inventor of the first treadmill desk.

Reach: Time magazine has a weekly circulation of 3.3 million. Time Online receives mores than 4.6 million unique visitors to its website each month and its monthy page views are more than 32.8 million.

Additional Coverage:

Arizona Republic
Workplace treadmill desks beginning to make strides
by Ken Alltucker

Arizona Republic newspaper logo…Now entrepreneurs and exercise companies have pounced on the idea that sitting can be hazardous to your health. "It is a hidden killer if you like," said James Levine, a Mayo Clinic doctor who examined the topic in his book "Get Up! Why Your Chair is Killing You and What You Can Do About It."

ReachThe Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday. The newspaper’s website Arizona Central, averages 83 million pages views each month.

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob NellisJim McVeigh

 

KARE11
Measles shot helps eliminate woman's cancer
by Adrienne Broaddus

Stacy Erholtz battled cancer for 10 years. But now, she says her cancer is in remission after a massive dose of the measles vaccine. While her journey has been tough, her faith hasn't wavered. After returningKARE-11 TV, Minneapolis-St. Paul from a taping a segment in Los Angeles with "The Doctors," Erholtz stopped by KARE 11 to chat about her journey. She said the show will highlight her treatment…Erholtz, 49, of Pequot Lakes, was one of two patients in a Mayo Clinic clinical trial last year using virotherapy. As she sips on a diet Pepsi, she can't stop smiling as she talks about her medical miracle.

Reach: KARE is a an NBC affiliate in the Minneapolis-St.Paul market.

Additional coverage: BringMeTheNews, WTVM Ga., WFSB, KCTV Kansas CityKCBD

Previous Coverage in May 15, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: In a proof of principle clinical trial, Mayo Clinic researchers have demonstrated that virotherapy — destroying cancer with a virus that infects and kills cancer cells but spares normal tissues — can be effective against the deadly cancer multiple myeloma. The findings appear in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Two patients in the study received a single intravenous dose of an engineered measles virus (MV-NIS) that is selectively toxic to myeloma plasma cells. Both patients responded, showing reduction of both bone marrow cancer and myeloma protein. One patient, a 49-year-old woman, experienced complete remission of myeloma and has been clear of the disease for over six months. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

 

MPR
Mayo doctor's tips for stress-free living and better health

MPR News logoDr. Amit Sood, author of the "Mayo Clinic's Guide to Stress-Free Living," speaks at a Minnesota Public Radio "Healthy States" event about the ways to improve your health by alleviating stress. Gratitude, compassion, acceptance, forgiveness and focusing on the meaning of life are key.Book cover Mayo Clinic's Guide to Stress-Free Living, with female doing cartwheel

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: In The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living, Mayo Clinic stress management and resiliency expert Amit Sood, M.D., draws on decades of groundbreaking research to offer readers a scientifically proven, structured and practical approach to reducing stress. He explains the brain’s two modes — focused mode and default mode — and how an imbalance between the two produces unwanted stress, and he shares new insights about how the mind works, including its natural tendency to wander. In this easy-to-follow guide, Dr. Sood provides actionable steps to cultivate emotional and mental strength, find greater fulfillment and nurture a kind disposition. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Sood, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Ginger Plumbo, Brian Kilen

 

Chicago Defender
Black Women Move Past ‘Tuskegee Experiment’ Mistrust
by Oretha Winston

If a research survey of African American professional women is any indication, attitudes may be changing towards participation in medical research. Mayo Clinic and The Links, Incorporated Chicago Defender newspaper logoresearchers teamed up to survey members of the international women’s organization, and found that a majority of African American women surveyed are willing to or have taken part in medical research…“Our findings are highly encouraging,” says Sharonne Hayes, M.D., Mayo Clinic cardiologist, co-author of the study, and director of Mayo’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion.

Reach: The Chicago Defender covers local and national news of interest to its black readership, residing in the Chicago metropolitan area. The publication has a weekly circulation of more than 7,400 readers. The online version attracts more than 13,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Elev8

Context: If a research survey of African American professional women is any indication, attitudes may be changing towards participation in medical research. Mayo Clinic and The Links, Incorporated researchers teamed up to survey members of the international women’s organization, and found that a majority of African American women surveyed are willing to or have taken part in medical research. The results appear in the Journal of Women’s Health. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

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Tags: 3D printing, ABC15 Arizona, acute sinusitis, Adela Grando, ADHD in children, African-American, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer's diseease, Arizona Pop Warner Football, Arizona Republic, Arizona State University


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