Items Tagged ‘AAN’

February 24th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Associated Press
AP Exclusive: Twin tragedies give survivor a new face
by Sharon Cohen

He'd been waiting for this day, and when his doctor handed him the mirror, Andy Sandness stared at his image and absorbed the enormity of the moment: He had a new face, one that had belonged to another man. His father and his brother, joined by several doctors and nurses at MayoAssociated Press Wire Service Logo Clinic, watched as he studied his swollen features. He was just starting to heal from one of the rarest surgeries in the world — a face transplant, the first at the medical center. He had the nose, cheeks, mouth, lips, jaw, chin, even the teeth of his donor. Resting in his hospital bed, he still couldn't speak clearly, but he had something to say. He scrawled four words in a spiral notebook: "Far exceeded my expectations," he wrote, handing it to Dr. Samir Mardini, who read the message to the group.

Reach: The Associated Press is a not-for-profit news cooperative, owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members. News collected by the AP is published and republished by newspaper and broadcast outlets worldwide.

Additional coverage: New York Times, STAT, Washington Post, USA TODAY, CBS Minnesota, KSTP, Louis Post-Dispatch, ABC News, MSN, NWF Daily News, AP Big Story, Stamford Advocate, Medical Xpress, CTV News, WTOP, Evening Standard, DailyMail.com, Olean Times Herald, Evening Standard, TribLivePeople, News-medical.net, Morning Ticker, KARE 11, WCCO, The West Australian, KAAL, Star Tribune, Mirror UK, BBC,CBC, US Magazine, GoMN, Chicago Tribune, KGWN, FOX News, Arizona Republic, Pioneer Press, Latinos Health, Science Alert, iTech Post, The Columbian, Eau Claire Leader-Telegram, Knoxville News Sentinel, BABW News, Canada Journal, Jackson Hole News & Guide, Counsel & HealBecker’s Hospital Review, New York Post, Herald-Whig, Sky News, Business Insider, com.au, Metro UK, UPI.com, Yahoo! Australia, The Inquisitr, WDEF, Deccan Herald, Aurora Sentinel, KRNV, Rapid City Journal, WNYT, Cortez Journal, Daily Star, Metro UK, Tri-City Herald, Tech Times, India.com, WQOW, Gephardt Daily, Hindustan Times, Pulse Headlines, KBMT, Sumter Item, ABC13 Houston, FuturismStar TribuneNew York Times, RedOrbit, Catholic Online, NBC 6 South Florida, The HitavadaBecker’s Hospital Review, NBC ChicagoTCT magazine

Context:  A multidisciplinary team of surgeons, physicians and other health professionals recently completed a near-total face transplant on a Wyoming man on Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus. The extensive, life-changing surgery will improve the patient’s ability to chew, swallow, speak, breathe and smell. The recipient, Andrew Sandness, is a 32-year-old man from eastern Wyoming whose face was devastated by a gunshot wound at the age of 21. He is doing well. “I am absolutely amazed at the outcome so far,” says Sandness. “I am now able to chew and eat normal food, and the nerve sensation is slowly improving, too. My confidence has improved, and I’m feeling great ― and grateful. I am so thankful to my donor and the donor’s family, and to all of the people who have supported me throughout this process.” For more information on the face transplant, the following segments are available on Mayo Clinic News Network:

Mayo Clinic announces successful face transplant on Wyoming man

Mayo Clinic Radio: Face transplant — how the surgical team prepared

Transforming a life: Mayo Clinic announces its first face transplant

Contact:  Ginger Plumbo

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo researcher Abba Zubai is sending stem cells for study on the International Space Station
by Charlie Patton

As a boy growing up in Nigeria, Abba Zubair dreamed of becoming an astronaut. But as he prepared to apply to college, an advisor told him to Florida Times-Union newspaper logofind a different path. “He said it may be a long time before Nigeria sends rockets and astronauts into space, so I should consider something more practical,” Zubair saud. He decided to become a physician, and is currently the medical and scientific director of the Cell Therapy Laboratory at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. And while he’ll almost certainly never get to make a journey outside the Earth’s atmosphere himself, if the weather stays good Saturday he’ll be sending a payload into space.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage: Action News Jax, Augustine Record, KTIV, Spaceflight Now, KTTCTechnology Networks

Context: Consider it one physician’s giant leap for mankind. Today, the latest rocket launch from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, included a payload of several samples of donated adult stem cells from a research laboratory at Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus. The launch by SpaceX, an American aerospace manufacturer and space transport services company, is part of NASA’s commercial resupply missions to the International Space Station. The biological cells come from the laboratory of Abba Zubair, M.D., Ph.D., who says he has eagerly awaited the launch following several delays over the past couple of years. Dr. Zubair, who specializes in cellular treatments for disease and regenerative medicine, hopes to find out how the stem cells hold up in space. He says he’s eager to know whether these special cells, which are derived from the body’s bone marrow, can be more quickly mass-produced in microgravity and used to treat strokes. Microgravity is the condition in which people or objects appear to be weightless. The effects of microgravity can be seen when astronauts and objects float in space. Microgravity refers to the condition where gravity seems to be very small. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Kevin Punsky

 

USA Today
Can't sleep? When is it time to seek professional help
by Mary Bowerman

It’s no secret that Americans aren’t getting enough sleep. For those who are self-medicating or tossing and turning, it may be time to look at your sleeping habits once and for all, according to Timothy Morgenthaler, co-director of Mayo’s Center for Sleep Medicine in Rochester. "I think it'sUSA Today newspaper logo becoming increasingly clear that sleep is a vital component of health; for many years we've been aware of nutrition and exercise, and I think we now realize that sleep is very closely entwined with overall health," Morgenthaler said.

Reach: USA TODAY  has an average daily circulation of 4.1 million which includes print, various digital editions and other papers that use their branded content.

Context: Timothy Morgenthaler, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine physician who also practices in Mayo Clinic's Center for Sleep Medicine.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

KARE 11
Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup
by Pat Evans

New findings about America’s heart health awareness, opinions, and behaviors have been uncovered as part of the Mayo Clinic National Health KARE-11 LogoCheckup, which first launched in January 2016 and provides a quick pulse on consumer health opinions and behaviors at multiple times throughout the year. “The Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup helps us to better understand the health knowledge and practices of all Americans, beyond the patients that walk through our doors,” says John Wald, M.D., Medical Director for Public Affairs at Mayo Clinic.

Reach: KARE-TV is the NBC affiliate serving the Minneapolis-Saint Paul market.

Additional coverage: KGUN TucsonCNBCKAALKXLY Spokane

Context: A new survey by Mayo Clinic revealed that more than two-thirds of African-Americans are concerned about their heart health (71 percent), which is significantly more than Caucasian (41 percent) or Hispanic (37 percent) respondents. Respondents from the South (51 percent) were also significantly more likely to express concern than those in the Northeast (39 percent) or West (35 percent). These findings were uncovered as part of the Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup, which first launched in January 2016 and provides a quick pulse on consumer health opinions and behaviors at multiple times throughout the year. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

FOX 13 Tampa Bay
Vaccine could prevent breast, ovarian, lung cancer
by Dr. Joette Giovinco

It's a dream many parents would welcome for their children: a vaccine that could prevent breast, ovarian and some lung cancers. It'Fox 13 Tampa Bay Logos also the dream of immunology professor Dr. Keith Knutson. "The hope is we can develop vaccines before the development of cancer much in the way that we use a polio vaccine or a flu vaccine," Dr. Knutson tells us in in his Mayo Clinic Jacksonville laboratory.

Reach:  Fox 13 is the Fox affiliate in Tampa Bay, Florida.

Context: Researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have been awarded a $13.3 million, five-year federal grant to test a vaccine designed to prevent the recurrence of triple-negative breast cancer, a subset of breast cancer for which there are no targeted therapies. The grant, the Breakthrough Award from the U.S. Department of Defense’s Breast Cancer Research Program, will fund a national, phase II clinical trial testing the ability of a folate receptor alpha vaccine to prevent recurrence of this aggressive cancer following initial treatment. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Knutson, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

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Tags: AAN, ABC News, ABC13 Houston, acupuncture, Alain Elkann, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimers, Ambient Clinical, Andy Sandness, anxiety, AP Big Story, Arizona Republic


February 28th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

LA Times
Bit by bit, a more fit workplace
by Rene Lynch

Nearly all of us need to make more time for fitness. Finding that time, though, can seem impossible. But what if you could wedge that workout in at work? If it sounds far-fetched (or a great way to get yourself fired), listen up. Dr. James Levine, an obesity expert at theLogo for Los Angeles Times newspaper Mayo Clinic, says Americans don't need to log more time at a gym. Instead, they need to banish their sedentary ways by incorporating easy bursts of activity from dawn to dusk.

Reach: The Los Angeles Times has a daily readership of 1.9 million and 2.9 million on Sunday, more than 8 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.5 million. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 128 years.

Related coverage:

ABC NewsABC NewsFitness Trackers Get Stylish, But Accuracy May Need Work, Experts Say by Liz Neporent…To think it all started with a pair of "magic underwear." Dr. James Levine, a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona, studies the relationship between movement performed outside the gym and obesity. About a decade ago, he rigged up an undergarment with sensors designed to catch the body's every little shift in movement.

ABC NewsABC News Radio, Fitness Trackers Get Stylish, but Accuracy May Need Work, Activity trackers -- wearable devices that count steps and measure calorie burn -- are going through a boom. Sales of the devices last year topped $330 million, according the market research group NPD, and consumers have more than two dozen brands and styles to choose from, including shoe chips, bracelets, anklets, pendants and clip-ons…Dr. James Levine, a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona, studies the relationship between movement performed outside the gym and obesity. Additional coverage: Good Morning America

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob Nellis, Jim McVeigh

HealthDay
Getting Teeth Pulled Before Heart Surgery May Pose Serious Risks
by Randy Dotinga

…In a small, retrospective study, Mayo Clinic researchers found that 8 percent of heart patients who did not wait to have teeth pulled suffered major adverse health outcomes, such as a heart attack, stroke, kidney failure or death. "Guidelines from the American College of Health DayCardiology and American Heart Association label dental extraction as a minor procedure, with the risk of death or non-fatal heart attack estimated to be less than 1 percent," study co-author Dr. Mark Smith said in a statement. Additional coverage:  KSAZ Ariz.US News & World ReportFOX NewsMedicineNet.comForbes.comWMCTV.comFox5Vegas.com19ActionNews.comWDAM.comHHS HealthFinder.gov

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: To pull or not to pull? That is a common question when patients have the potentially dangerous combination of abscessed or infected teeth and the need for heart surgery.  In such cases, problem teeth often are removed before surgery, to reduce the risk of infections including endocarditis, an infection of the inner lining of the heart that can prove deadly.  But Mayo Clinic research suggests it may not be as simple as pulling teeth: The study found that roughly 1 in 10 heart surgery patients who had troublesome teeth extracted before surgery died or had adverse outcomes such as a stroke or kidney failure. The findings are published in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Pulling Problem Teeth Before Heart Surgery to Prevent Infection May Be Catch-22

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic had strong 2013 despite challenges
by Jeff Kiger
Despite the uncertainty of the health-care market, Mayo Clinic revenues grew by 6 percent to $9.4 billion in 2013. CEO and President John Noseworthy and Chief Administration OfficerLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaper Jeff Bolton discussed highlights of Mayo Clinic's 2013 financial results Wednesday during a brief telephone press conference.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Additional coverage: Star Tribune, Net income up 55 percent at Mayo Clinic for 2013; KTTC, Star Tribune (PDF), FOX47, Post-Bulletin, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal

Context: As Mayo Clinic recognizes its Sesquicentennial year, the not-for-profit organization reached a record 63 million people in 2013. The strong performance was bolstered by successful implementation of new care delivery models — such as the Mayo Clinic Care Network — that provide knowledge to patients, physicians and consumers in traditional and new ways. “Expanding our reach is not a new goal for us,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. “In fact, as we consider our history, growth has been a constant for 150 years.”

Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic Reports Strong Performance in 2013, Reaching More Than 63 Million People

Public Affairs Contacts: Karl Oestreich, Bryan Anderson

Harvard Business Review
How Mayo Clinic Is Using iPads to Empower Patients
by David Cook, Joseph Dearani

Throughout the world, companies are embracing mobile devices to set customer expectations, enlist them in satisfying their own needs, Harvard Business Review Logoand get workers to adhere to best practices. An effort under way at the Mayo Clinic shows how such technology can be used to improve outcomes and lower costs in health care.

Reach: Harvard Business Review – Online provides editorial content designed to complement the coverage found in its parent print publication, which focuses on business management. The site receives more than 232,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: David Cook, M.D., Mayo Clinic General Internal Medicine, conducts research in medical education. Joseph Dearani, M.D. is chair of Cardiovascular Surgery, Minnesota.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: : ABC News Radio, 19ActionNews.com, 2013 Mayo Clinic Performance Report, 26.2 with Donna, AAN, ABC News, AD and aging, Advance for Nurses, African-American, African-American pioneers, African-Americans, alcohol


February 8th, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

 

 

 

February 8, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

New York Times
Peter Hauri, Psychologist Who Focused on Insomnia, Dies at 79
by Paul Vitello

Peter Hauri, a psychologist who was among the first researchers to study the mysterious mechanics of a good night’s sleep, and who established widely used guidelines for avoiding insomnia without drugs, died on Jan. 31 in Rochester, Minn., where he had been director of the Mayo Sleep Disorders Center until he retired in 2000. He was 79…In the 2010 archive interview, Dr. Hauri was asked what had begun his interest in sleep. He replied with an impish smile, “My mother was a very famous insomniac.” And, he added, “I don’t sleep so well myself.”

Circulation: The New York Times has the third highest circulation nationally, behind USA Today (2nd) and The Wall Street Journal (1st) with 1,150,589 weekday copies circulated and 1,645,152 circulated on Sundays.

Additional Coverage: KAAL

Context: Peter Hauri, Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic psychologist, founded the American Sleep Disorders Association.

Public Affairs Contacts: Nick Hanson, Alyson Fleming

Post Bulletin
Our View: Dig into details before scoffing at Mayo Clinic's $6 billion plan

Just one day after Mayo Clinic announced it wants to pay for the lion's share of a $6 billion plan to turn Rochester into one of the world's foremost medical destinations, Lenczewski wasn't just skeptical — she was dismissive, calling the project "a massive public subsidy" that "seems pretty unlikely to ever happen." We would politely suggest that, when the state's largest employer declares its desire to bring up to 45,000 new jobs to Minnesota over a 20-year period, with a resulting $3 billion in additional tax revenue, it might behoove the tax chair at least to hold a hearing or two before she publicly scoffs at the idea.

Post Bulletin
Tony Wirt: Mayo Clinic, unlike the Vikings, isn't asking for a handout
(also published in Pioneer Press)

Circulation: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Additional Coverage: MPR, KAAL, KAAL, Post Bulletin, KTTC, MPR, KARE 11, HealthLeaders Media, MPR, MPR, Minneapolis St. Paul Business Journal, MPR, WIZM, KIMT, Post BulletinPost Bulletin, MPR, TPT, Pioneer Press, Pioneer Press, Leader-Telegram, Post Bulletin, WCCO, KEYC, Pioneer Press (AP), Minneapolis St. Paul Business Journal

Context: Last week, Mayo Clinic announced Destination Medical Center (DMC), a $5 billion economic development initiative to secure Minnesota’s status as a global medical destination center now and in the future. The goal of DMC is to ensure that Minnesota and Mayo Clinic are destinations for medical care in the coming decades. This initiative is the culmination of a three-year study by Mayo Clinic to chart its future business strategy in an increasingly complex, competitive and global business environment.

Previous Coverage

News Release: Mayo Clinic to Invest More than $3 Billion to Position Minn. as World Destination for Health Care

Destination Medical Center Website

DMC Media Kit

Frequently Asked Questions About DMC

Public Affairs Contacts:  Karl Oestreich, Bryan Anderson 

ABC News
Heart Disease Trigger May Be in Your Genes
by Steven Driver, M.D.

A type of cholesterol you've probably never heard of may be linked to the third leading cause of heart disease in the country…Dr. Stephen Kopecky of the Mayo Clinic agreed. He said that when it comes to preventing heart disease, tried-and-true advice still applies. "Too often, Americans may be looking for a quick fix that will allow us to trade in our bodies for new ones after 55 years or so," he said. 

Circulation:  ABCNews.com is the official website for ABC News.

Context: Steven Kopecky, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Nick Hanson

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic new Weaver Simulation Center provides broad range of medical training
by Charlie Patton

Using computerized manikins, animal tissue and human actors, medical personnel at the Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville are able to train 24 hours a day in preparation for medical situations that might arise. Since the start of January, that training has been done in the new J. Wayne and Delores Barr Weaver Simulation Center. The 9,600-square-foot center replaces a 2,600-square-foot simulation center that opened in April 2011.

Circulation: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional Coverage: News4Jax, WOKV, Jacksonville Business Journal

Context: Medical teams and community organizations can learn and practice medical skills in a safe, highly realistic environment with the opening of the Mayo Clinic J. Wayne and Delores Barr Weaver Simulation Center at Mayo Clinic in Florida.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Simulation Center Opens as State-of-the-Art Training for Medical Teams and Community

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

Fox News
New saliva gland test may better diagnose patients with Parkinson's
by Loren Grush

It’s difficult for patients to absolutely know if they have Parkinson’s disease…But now, a conclusive clinical test may soon be available.  Researchers from the Mayo Clinic in Arizona have found that examining a specific portion of a person’s saliva gland may be able to diagnose someone with Parkinson’s…“[During the autopsy] you can see the protein alpha-synuclein” – an abnormal protein associated with Parkinson’s disease – “and we find that in multiple areas of the body as well,” Adler, with the Mayo Clinic Arizona and a fellow of the American Academy of Neurology, told FoxNews.com.  

Reach: FoxNews.com has more than 13 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Described as a "big step forward" for research and treatment of Parkinson's disease, new research from Mayo Clinic in Arizona and Banner Sun Health Research Institute suggests that testing a portion of a person's saliva gland may be a way to diagnose the disease. The study was released today and will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's annual meeting in San Diego in March.  "There is currently no diagnostic test for Parkinson's disease," says study author Charles Adler, M.D., Ph.D., a neurologist with Mayo Clinic in Arizona. "We have previously shown in autopsies of Parkinson's patients that the abnormal proteins associated with Parkinson's are consistently found in the submandibular saliva glands, found under the lower jaw. This is the first study demonstrating the value of testing a portion of the saliva gland to diagnose a living person with Parkinson's disease. Making a diagnosis in living patients is a big step forward in our effort to understand and better treat patients."

News Release: Saliva Gland Test for Parkinson's Shows Promise, Study Finds

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

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Tags: AAN, AASM, ABSM, American Academy of Neurology, American Sleep Disorders Association, ASDC, Associated Professional Sleep Societies, Banner Sun Health Research Institute, Cardiology, cholesterol, Dr. Charles Adler, Dr. Steven Kopecky


January 18th, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

 

 

January 18, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Wall Street Journal
Researchers Mine Data From Clinic, Big Insurer
by Anna Wilde Mathews

UnitedHealth Group Inc. and Mayo Clinic are set to unveil a new research initiative that will draw on millions of health-insurance claims and in-depth clinical patient records, part of a broader effort in the health industry to glean insights about care from a growing flood of data…The initiative will focus on research into "best outcomes for patients at lower costs," said John H. Noseworthy, M.D., chief executive of Mayo Clinic, a nonprofit. Some initial projects include analyzing how to improve the diagnosis of hepatitis C and looking at the relative cost-effectiveness of certain medical devices, the partners said.

Circulation: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is tops in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 2 million copies on weekdays.

Bloomberg
UnitedHealth Joins Mayo Clinic in Pact to Improve Care
By Michelle Fay Cortez

UnitedHealth Group Inc. (UNH), the largest U.S. provider of medical coverage, will join the Mayo Clinic in a research alliance designed to merge insurance records and medical data to find more efficient ways to deliver care. The venture will focus on fundamental issues that may help standardize care in a way that will lower costs, said Veronique Roger, M.D. head of the clinic’s Center for the Science of Health Delivery. This could include things such as analyzing the steps needed for successful hip replacement surgery or ways to get patients to consistently take their medicines, she said.

Circulation:  Bloomberg has 2,300 media professionals in 146 bureaus across 72 countries. Bloomberg delivers its content across more than 400 publications, over 310 million households worldwide through Bloomberg Television and 500,000 in the New York metro area and 18.5 million subscribers through satellite radio.

Star Tribune
United and Mayo pool info to drop cost of care
by Maura Lerner

The Mayo Clinic and UnitedHealth Group announced a new research institute Tuesday that will pool data on more than 110 million patients as part of an effort to help scientists study ways to improve medical care and lower costs. The two Minnesota powerhouses said the project, called Optum Labs, could become health care's version of "Bell Labs," the 20th-century idea factory that sparked such innovations as the transistor and the laser… Dr. John Noseworthy, Mayo's president and CEO, called the project the "largest effort of this type in the country." He said it would help scientists see how patients fare over time, comparing treatments and outcomes.

Circulation: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 514,457 copies and weekday circulation is 300,330. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Pioneer Press 
Mayo Clinic, UnitedHealth form health research lab in Massachusetts
By Christopher Snowbeck

Until a few years ago, the world-famous Mayo Clinic wasn't even an "in-network" option for people with insurance from UnitedHealth Group. But now, amid more examples of collaboration between insurers and health care providers across the country, Mayo Clinic and UnitedHealth have decided to jointly open a research lab in Massachusetts that will analyze how to get more value from health care spending.

Circulation: The St. Paul Pioneer Press has a daily circulation of 226,108 and its Sunday newspaper circulation is 270,811. Its TwinCities.com website had approximately 18.6 million page views (March 2011) and the Pioneer Press and TwinCities.com reaches about 3.3 million people each month.

MPR
Two Minn. health giants announce collaboration
by Elizabeth Baier

A new collaborative research initiative between two Minnesota health giants will work to improve patient care and lower costs. Announced Tuesday morning, the partnership between Mayo Clinic and UnitedHealth Group's Optum division is the largest health data-sharing effort of its kind in the country. The new alliance is called Optum Labs. Think of it as a massive database that combines Optum's claim records from more than 100 million patients over the last 20 years, with five-million of Mayo's clinical records from the last 15 years.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

CBS Boston-WBZ NewsRadio 1030
Mayo Clinic, UnitedHealth Announce Massive Research Project
By Anthony Silva

Two of the largest names in healthcare have announced a massive medical research project to be centered in Cambridge. Mayo Clinic and UnitedHealth Group will form a company called Optum Labs to research millions of medical records in search of the best outcomes, procedures and practices.

Reach: WBZ-AM 1030 is a commercial news and talk radio station in the Boston, Mass., area. The station is owned by CBS Radio. WBZ-AM uses the tagline "News Radio 1030."

Additional Coverage: AP, Bloomberg Businessweek, Pioneer Press, Post Bulletin, WCCO, KARE 11KAAL, KTTC, Boston Herald, ModernHealthcare, Becker’s Hospital Review, Kaiser Health News, Mankato Free Press, iHealthBeatUPI, NECN.com, Insurance News Net, Financial Content, Toronto Telegraph, TMCnet, Mpls St. Paul Business Journal, Twin Cities Business, Healthcare IT News, Hartford Courant, Hispanic Business, FierceHealthPayer, Information Week, Mpls St. Paul Business Journal, MedCity News

Context: These stories were the result of the annoucement this week by Optum and Mayo Clinic about the launch of Optum Labs, an open, collaborative research and development facility with a singular goal: improving patient care. Based in Cambridge, Mass., Optum Labs provides an environment where the health care industry can come together to combine information and ideas that benefit patients today while also driving long-term improvements in the delivery and quality of care.

News Release: Optum, Mayo Clinic Partner to Launch Optum Labs: An Open, Collaborative Research and Innovation Facility Focused on Better Care for Patients

Mayo Clinic News Blog: Transforming Health Care in the U.S.

Website: Welcome to Optum Labs

Website: Mayo Clinic Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Sharon Theimer, Karl Oestreich, Jeffrey Smith (Optum)

Wall Street Journal
Find the Perfect Sleep Position
by Sumathi Reddy

Tossing and turning all night to find that perfect sleeping position? Experts say there is no one right way to sleep…Roughly 10% of sleep apnea patients can be cured by changing their sleep position, said Eric Olson, co-director of the Mayo Clinic's Center for Sleep Medicine in Rochester, Minn. While there are many sleep products designed to keep people off their backs, Dr. Olson and other experts recommend sewing a tennis ball onto the back of your night shirt to avoid rolling on to your back. And for people who want to stay on their back, he suggests elevating the head by at least 30 degrees or using a wedge pillow.

Circulation: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is tops in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 2 million copies on weekdays.

Context: Eric Olson, M.D., has joint appointments in Mayo Clinic Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine and the Center for Sleep Medicine. Mayo Clinic doctors trained in sleep disorders evaluate and treat adults and children in the Center for Sleep Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. The Center for Sleep Medicine is one of the largest sleep medicine facilities in the United States. Staff in the center treat about 6,500 new people who have sleep disorders each year. The Center for Sleep Medicine is accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Dr. Olson's research focuses on sleep disorders and interstitial lung disease.

Public Affairs Contacts: Alyson Fleming, Traci Klein

Wall Street Journal
A Good Way to Measure Obesity? Fat Chance

by Carl Bialik

A report last week that people who are slightly overweight have less chance of dying than those of normal weight had some researchers calling for further study of how a little extra fat can apparently be good for you. But others saw it as another sign thatthe standard way of measuring who is too heavy should be scrapped… "I suspect it's primarily an issue with BMI being unable to measure the things it's intended to measure, or what really matters," said Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, a cardiologist and professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Circulation: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is tops in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 2 million copies on weekdays.

Context:  Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D. is a cardiologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester. People who are of normal weight but have fat concentrated in their bellies have a higher death risk than those who are obese, according to  his Mayo Clinic research. Dr. Lopez-Jimenez presented research on the topic at the European Society of Cardiology Congress in Munich last August. A news release contains highlights of that reserach presented at the meeting.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

New York Times
As Flu Rages, Caregiving Suffers
by Judith Graham

Nationally, about 60 percent of health care workers get flu vaccines, which are voluntary in most hospitals, nursing homes and assisted-living facilities, according to Dr. Gregory Poland, director of the Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group. And when workers are struck by the flu, infections among residents can follow. “The disruptions, the costs, the complications from this virus, no one should confuse it with a minor illness,” said Dr. Poland, who has advocated for mandatory immunizations for health care workers.

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Star Tribune
Flu shot flaws leave experts queasy
by Maura Lerner
 
The flu shot, it might be said, is the black sheep of the vaccine family. In good years, people ignore it because they think the flu is no big deal. In bad years -- like this one -- they complain that it doesn't work well enough. But the biggest problem, says Dr. Gregory Poland, a leading vaccine researcher, is that scientists are still scrambling to understand the elusive virus and come up with a better alternative…"Like every single man-made product, influenza vaccine is imperfect,'' said Poland, head of the Vaccine Research Group at the Mayo Clinic. "But I liken it to seat belts. Who would want to be in a crash without a seat belt?"

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Context: Gregory Poland, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic General Internal Medicine and an infectious diseases expert and advisor to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Mayo Clinic News Blog: Mayo Clinic Evaluates this Flu Season’s Outbreak

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

Fox News
New saliva gland test may better diagnose patients with Parkinson's
by Loren Grush

It’s difficult for patients to absolutely know if they have Parkinson’s disease. To date, the only way to diagnose someone with Parkinson’s is to do a clinical exam to access his or her symptoms.  And in order to definitively get an answer, an autopsy is performed on the brain – only after the person has died. But now, a conclusive clinical test may soon be available.  Researchers from the Mayo Clinic in Arizona have found that examining a specific portion of a person’s saliva gland may be able to diagnose someone with Parkinson’s.

Reach: FoxNews.com has more than 13 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Described as a "big step forward" for research and treatment of Parkinson's disease, new research from Mayo Clinic in Arizona and Banner Sun Health Research Institute suggests that testing a portion of a person's saliva gland may be a way to diagnose the disease. The study was released today and will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's annual meeting in San Diego in March. "There is currently no diagnostic test for Parkinson's disease," says study author Charles Adler, M.D., Ph.D., a neurologist with Mayo Clinic in Arizona. "We have previously shown in autopsies of Parkinson's patients that the abnormal proteins associated with Parkinson's are consistently found in the submandibular saliva glands, found under the lower jaw. This is the first study demonstrating the value of testing a portion of the saliva gland to diagnose a living person with Parkinson's disease. Making a diagnosis in living patients is a big step forward in our effort to understand and better treat patients."

News Release: Saliva Gland Test for Parkinson's Shows Promise, Study Finds

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

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