Items Tagged ‘AARP’

March 17th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

KTTC
Mayo Clinic researchers pinpoint experimental drug that may shrink tumors in multiple myeloma patients
by Jason Pope

The Mayo Clinic says this experimental drug is leading to tumor shrinkage in patients affected by multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma is a cancer that affects the blood cells that fight infection. Rather than fighting infection, the cancer causes kidney problems and infections. AccordingKTTC TV logo to Dr. Marta Chesi, the drug was developed to support tumor death but instead of killing the tumor cells, it made them more visible. This visibility helps the immune system spot the tumor cells and eliminate them.

Reach: KTTC is an NBC affiliate that serves the Rochester, Minn. area including the towns of Austin, Mason City, Albert Lea and Winona. Its website receives more than 73,300 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Life Science Daily

Context: Mayo Clinic researchers have found that an experimental drug, LCL161, stimulates the immune system, leading to tumor shrinkage in patients affected by multiple myeloma. The findings are published in Nature Medicine. Multiple myeloma is a blood cancer that affects plasma cells – white blood cells that normally produce antibodies to fight infection. Rather than produce helpful antibodies, the cancer cells, as they grow, secrete large amounts of a single antibody that accumulate in the body, causing kidney problems and infections. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

Huffington Post
Finding treatments to fight fibroids

Fibroid embolization and focused ultrasound are minimally invasive options that reproductive endocrinologist Dr. Ebbie Stewart says warrant Huffington Post Logomore research to help guide women and health care providers on a treatment plan. She co-authored a recent study that looked at the two treatments, compared recovery time, and noted adverse events in the first six weeks after treatment, Dr. Stewart says.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique viewers.

Context:  Elizabeth "Ebbie Stewart, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic ObGyn. Dr. Stewart studies uterine fibroids, also called uterine leiomyomas or myomas. Fibroids are noncancerous tumors of the uterus that commonly cause heavy menstrual bleeding, pelvic pain and pressure, bowel and bladder problems, and sometimes infertility and miscarriage. Fibroids are also the leading cause of hysterectomy.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Men’s Health
This Exact Workout Routine May Actually Reverse Aging
by Elizabeth Millard

Research has shown physical activity can reduce inflammation in your body and improve heart health—both important for staying young beyond your years. But not all exercise is the same in keeping age-related decline at bay, researchers from the Mayo Clinic say…“Decline is mitochondria isMens Health Logo the key factor responsible for age-related physical declines,” says the study’s senior author, Sreekumaran Nair, M.D., Ph.D. That includes osteoporosis, arthritis, gastrointestinal issues, decreased flexibility, hypertension, and cardiovascular issues. “Higher intensity of exercise seems to elicit a rejuvenation of mitochondrial [processes] in everybody, including older people.”

Reach: Men's Health has an audience of more than 13.5 million readers.

Additional coverage: Healthline, The Hans India, Canindia.com, AARP

Context: Everyone knows that exercise is good for you, but what type of training helps most, especially when you’re older - say over 65? A Mayo Clinic study says it’s high-intensity aerobic exercise, which can reverse some cellular aspects of aging. The findings appear in Cell MetabolismMayo researchers compared high-intensity interval training, resistance training and combined training. All training types improved lean body mass and insulin sensitivity, but only high-intensity and combined training improved aerobic capacity and mitochondrial function for skeletal muscle. Decline in mitochondrial content and function are common in older adults. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Bob Nellis

 

Washington Post
It’s not just being stuck inside; cold weather sets us up for getting sick
by Emily Sohn

It's not clear why winter brings so many health woes, says Pritish Tosh, an infectious-disease physician and researcher at the Mayo Clinic in Washington Post newspaper logoRochester, Minnesota. "The reason one virus is a wintertime virus may not be the same reason another virus is a wintertime virus," Tosh says. "We're finding more and more that it's not one size fits all."

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:
Chicago TribuneWhy do we get sick in winter?
Health, How to Get Rid of the Flu Faster

Context: Pritish Tosh, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist. Dr. Tosh is interested in emerging infections and preparedness activities related to them, ranging from collaborating with the Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group in basic science vaccine development to hospital systems research related to pandemic preparedness. Influenza is a viral infection that attacks your respiratory system — your nose, throat and lungs. Influenza, commonly called the flu, is not the same as stomach "flu" viruses that cause diarrhea and vomiting.

Contact: Bob Nellis

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Tags: AARP, ABC News, Analitica, Anesthesiology News, Associated Press, Becker’s Hospital Review, bone health, Brandix, bullying, BuzzFeed, Canindia.com, Cardiovascular Business


March 11th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

International Business Times
Betting On Cancer: Phoenix Aims To Become Oncology Destination As More Cities Look To Biotech For Growth
by Elizabeth Whitman

A transformation has taken place in the Phoenix area over the past decade as oncology centers and research institutions have merged, expanded and reconfigured their operations….“We’ve said, ‘Hey, we’re good at cancer. We’re going to do more,’” saidInternational Business Times Logo Dr. Wyatt Decker, the CEO of the Mayo Clinic in Arizona as well as an emergency room physician. More than 20 percent of the clinic’s patients come from out of state, drawn by the Mayo brand's reputation and the perks of the temperate, picturesque desertscape of the Valley of the Sun. In 2010, the clinic generated a positive annual economic impact of more than $1.5 billion, the Mayo Clinic has calculated, and Decker estimated that amount has grown by 30 to 50 percent since then.

Reach:  The International Business Times has more than 1.6 million unique visitors to its website each month. International Business Times is a digital global news publication that provides comprehensive coverage and analysis of business, economic, political and technological issues around the world. It reaches over 55 million people every month in seven global editions and four different languages.

Context:  Mayo Clinic introduced its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota in 2015 and in Arizona in mid March 2016. Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients — especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures — proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

International Business Times
Obesity In America: As Healthcare Costs Rise, Hospitals Weigh New Ways Of Caring For Larger Patients
by Elizabeth Whitman

“It’s those little things that add up,” said Robert Cima, a colorectal surgeon at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Many International Business Times Logohospitals have neither the equipment nor the resources to move their patients efficiently, he said, even though they long ago began buying parallel sets of surgical equipment for operating on larger patients. Now, “the real issue is caring for them on the floor. That cost is huge, relative to the operating room,” Cima said.

Reach:  The International Business Times has more than 1.6 million unique visitors to its website each month. International Business Times is a digital global news publication that provides comprehensive coverage and analysis of business, economic, political and technological issues around the world. It reaches over 55 million people every month in seven global editions and four different languages.

Context: Robert Cima, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic colorectal surgeon. Mayo Clinic surgeons helped develop minimally invasive (laparoscopic) colon and rectal surgery and use these techniques on almost all surgeries. Laparoscopic procedures use smaller incisions than conventional surgery, which decreases bleeding, lessens pain and shortens both expected hospital stays and overall recovery times. They are also skilled in robotic surgery, a specialized form of laparoscopic surgery, and ileoanal anastomosis surgery that avoids the need for a permanent colostomy.

Contact:  Sharon Theimer

 

Los Angeles Times
As measures of health, fitness and fatness matter more than weight
by Melissa Healy

The new studies suggest that these caveats about BMI are especially true for people as they age beyond their 50s and enter seniority, said Mayo Clinic cardiologist Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, who researches obesity's health effects. In the CanadianLos Angeles Times Logo study and others that have raised what's called "the obesity paradox," Lopez-Jimenez said it's possible that older people who carry a few extra pounds are protected by having a reserve of excess weight they can afford to lose during an illness.

Reach:  The Los Angeles Times has a daily readership of 1.9 million and 2.9 million on Sunday, more than 8 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.5 million. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 128 years.

Context: Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Lopez-Jimenez studies obesity and cardiovascular disease from different angles, from physiologic studies assessing changes in myocardial mechanics and structural and hemodynamic changes following weight loss, to studies addressing the effect of physicians' diagnosis of obesity on willingness to lose weight and successful weight loss at follow-up.

Contacts: Joe Dangor, Traci Klein

 

Huffington Post
Why The Fat You Can See Isn’t The Fat You Should Worry About
by Erin Schumaker

In reality, the area of your body where you store your fat may be a better predictor of health -- regardless of your body mass index. "All fat is not the same," said Dr. Virend Somers, a cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Fat directly under the skin -- the stuff we can see -- isn't necessarily harmfuHuffPost Healthy Livingl.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique visitors.

Context: Virend Somers, M.D., Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic physician with joint appointments in cardivascular diseases and nephrology and hypertension. Dr. Somers directs the Cardiovascular Facility and the Sleep Facility within Mayo Clinic's Center for Clinical and Translational Science.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

CBS News
Can drinking lots of coffee lower risk for MS?
by Mary Brophy Marcus

In this case, a new study in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry suggests being a java drinker may lower the risk for multiple sclerosis (MS). Dr. Mark Keegan, professor of neurology and chair of the division of multiple sclerosis at theCBS News Logo Mayo Clinic, said, "They show some observational evidence that in two separate populations high amounts of coffee intake was associated with a reduction in the risk of MS," but he also cautioned that observational studies don't equal medical advice.

Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

Context: B. Mark Keegan, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist. Dr. Keegan is involved in clinical and translational research in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and other related inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Post-Bulletin
Mayo sees big potential for small MRI machine
by Brett Boese

After nearly nine years of planning, Mayo Clinic researchers are just weeks away from collecting data on a $5.7 million Logo for Post-Bulletin newspapercompact 3T MRI scanner on its Rochester campus. Lead researchers John Huston III, a neuroradiologist, and Matt Bernstein, a medical physicist, are optimistic that their targeted work on the brain will improve patient diagnoses and outcomes, particularly involving strokes, Alzheimer's, tumors and high-impact injuries such as concussions.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context: The reality of magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, machines is one of great size — both in price and physical space. This, then, restricts access to needed medical screenings. But what if you could shrink both and still produce high-quality MR images? Mayo Clinic researchers, in a partnership with GE and funding through a National Institutes of Health grant, are hoping to answer that question, and many others, now that a new, one-of-a-kind compact 3-Tesla MRI scanner is in place at the Department of Radiology research labs. More information about the new MRI scanner can be found on Discovery's Edge, Mayo Clinic's research magazine.

Contact: Ethan Grove

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Tags: 24news.ca, AARP, alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer’s Research Center at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Amazon.com, Ambient Clinical Analytics, APoE4 gene, Associated Press, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Atypical Afib, AWARE, bariatric patients


February 26th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Heather Privett  with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Florida Times-Union
Stenting and surgery equally effective in treating a narrowed carotid artery, according to study
by Charlie Patton

Stenting and surgery are equally effective at reducing the risk of stroke in someone with a narrowed carotid artery, Thomas Brott, a physician who is a professor of neurosciences at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, told participants in the AmericanFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo Heart Association’s International Stroke Conference in Los Angeles Thursday… “The second phase completes a story, and the results are very encouraging,” Brott told the Times-Union this week.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage: Medscape, Medical News Today, HealthDay, com, Healio.com, Health.com, Doctors Lounge, US News & World ReportNew Hampshire VoiceBismarck Tribune, Arizona Daily Star, La Crosse Tribune, MedPage Today, The Daily StarMedPage Today 

Context: Stenting and surgery are equally effective at lowering the long-term risk of stroke from a narrowed carotid artery, according to results of CREST – a 10-year, federally funded clinical trial led by researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida. The results were published recently online in the New England Journal of Medicine and presented at theAmerican Heart Association’s International Stroke Conference in Los Angeles. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

NBC News
Want to Reduce Your Cholesterol? Doctors Suggest Lowering Stress

As millions of Americans tackle high cholesterol, experts say one of the most significant risk factors — stress — is often NBC News With Lester Holt Logooverlooked. Interview with Dr. Stephen Kopecky.

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Context: Stephen Kopecky, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

KJZZ Ariz.
Phoenix Mayo Clinic Opens New Cancer Center, Proton Beam Therapy Program
 by Andrew Bernier

Traditional radiation treatment for cancer can hurt as many healthy cells as cancerous ones. Now a Valley hospital is opening a new cancer center linked to a national network which includes pencil-thin radiation targeting often deadly tumors. The MayoKJZZ NPR -AZ Logo Clinic Cancer Center in north Phoenix provides a dedicated facility to the hospital's practicing oncologists. Ruben Mesa, director of the Cancer Center, said having a common facility can better unite doctors and researchers working on a wide variety of cancers.

Reach: KJZZ-FM is a commercial station owned by Maricopa Community Colleges in Tempe, AZ. The format of the station is news and jazz. KJZZ-FM's target audience is news and jazz music listeners, ages 18 to 64, in the Tempe, AZ area.

Additional coverage: AZ Bio.org

Previous coverage

Context:  Mayo Clinic introduced its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota in 2015 and in Arizona in by mid March 2016. Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients — especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures — proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

New York Times
I Don’t Drink Coffee. Should I Start?
by Daniel Victor

As someone who doesn’t drink coffee, I’m sometimes forced to ponder whether I’ve escaped an unhealthy addiction or if I’ve New York Times Well Blog Logojust been asleep my whole life…“There aren’t any guidelines to help guide you on this,” said Dr. Donald Hensrud, director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. “This is kind of an individual decision.”

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life. Donald Hensrud, M.D. is the program’s medical director.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

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Tags: AARP, ABC 6 News, ABC Salud, ACS Surgery News, Advisory, Alto Nivel, alzheimers, amyloid deposition, anti-ageing drugs, APoE4 gene, Arizona Daily Star, Attn.com


October 29th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Wall Street Journal
Scientists Probe Indoor Work Spaces for Clues to Better Health
by Sumathi Reddy

… Clinical trials are due to get underway early next year at the Well Living Lab, a new, 7,500-square-foot research facility adjacent to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., designed to study indoor environments with the aim of creating healthier spaces.WSJ Banner Sensors throughout the building monitor factors ranging from noise levels to air quality and temperature; other sensors in furniture will tell how long people stay seated and their posture. “The ultimate goal is to improve health,” said Brent Bauer, medical director of the Well Living Lab and professor of medicine for the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program. “If we spend 90% of our time in an indoor environment there are almost endless opportunities to find better ways to do what we’re doing inside the building,” he said.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has anaverage circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Exposure to indoor environments is at an all-time high. In fact, Americans spend more than 90 percent of their time indoors, whether at home, work, school, retail stores, fitness centers, health care facilities and more. But what many people don’t realize is that buildings, and everything in them, can affect human health and well-being. Today marked the opening of the Well Living Lab, a new research facility dedicated to studying these environments and creating healthier indoor spaces in which to live, work and play. “There is a growing awareness and body of scientific evidence that indoor, built environments can affect human health and well-being, with the perception often being that indoor environments have a negative impact on health,” said Brent Bauer. M.D., medical director of the Well Living Lab and professor of medicine for Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program. “But new knowledge shows that by building healthier indoor environments, we can actually preserve and enhance human health and quality of life.” More information about the Well Living Lab can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

MPR
What is the best research on breast cancer screenings?

On Monday morning, Kerri Miller and her guests try to bring clarity these new MPR News logoevidence-driven guidelines. Dr. Nancy Keating is a primary care physician at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and Dr. Sandhya Pruthi, who specializes in breast cancer research at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, join Miller to sort through the latest research on breast cancer screenings.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: The American Cancer Society (ACS) has updated its recommendations for breast cancer screening for women at average risk of the disease. The recommendations strongly support the value of mammograms and provide some further direction for women at both ends of the age spectrum. Sandhya Pruthi, M.D., a Breast Clinic physician and Mayo Clinic Cancer Center researcher says,"This is an important paper and we are pleased that ACS has paid attention to and respected patient preferences and values in its recommendation. While the ACS now recommends annual screening mammograms for women who have no risk factors at age 45, it did recommend that women age 40 and up still receive an annual screening mammograms if they choose to seek screening. This shared-decision making approach between a patient and her provider is something we support at Mayo Clinic. Overall, the new ACS recommendations reaffirm that screening mammography for women in their 40s is associated with a decrease in breast cancer deaths." More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

KIMT 
Special day for special kid

A Minnesota toddler who has battled brain cancer for more than half his life had a very special day on Monday in Rochester. Vito from Waconia rang a bell at MayoKIMT Clinic to signify the end of his proton beam therapy in Rochester. The now two-year-old was first diagnosed with Medullblastoma at 11 months old and we are told that type of cancer is usually treated with giving radiation to the brain. However, that can be difficult for someone with a developing brain, like Vito. That’s why the family decided to come to Mayo so doctors could focus their treatment, with the proton beam, on specific areas of the brain.

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Additional coverage:

KTTC — 2-year-old boy celebrates completion of proton beam therapy; KWWL Iowa, KOMU Mo., KJRH Okla.

Context:  Mayo Clinic introduced its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota this past June and in Arizona in spring 2016. Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients — especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures — proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Billboard magazine
Meet Music's Top Throat Doctors Who've Saved the Voices of Adele, Sam Smith and More
by Carolina Buia

DAVID LOTT, Phoenix  Specializing in regenerative ­medicine, Lott, the Mayo Clinic’s ­director of its head and neck ­regeneration program, has developed a process to re-create parts of the voice box and vocal folds using stem cells and 3D printing. Although the technology is still in the investigation stage, he plans to offer Billboard magazine logothe treatment to patients (which includes opera and Broadway stars) in 2016…“By addressing the physical and mental aspects of the pain in addition to retraining her vocal system, she could speak with confidence,” he says.

Reach: Billboard has served the entertainment business since 1894. Beginning as a weekly for the bill posting and advertising business, Billboard and its popular music charts have evolved into the primary source of information on trends and innovation in music, serving music fans, artists, top executives, tour promoters, publishers, radio programmers, lawyers, retailers, digital entrepreneurs and many others. Written for music industry professionals and fans. Functions as the trade journal for the music and entertainment industries. Contents provide news, reviews and statistics for all genres of music, including music videos, related internet activity and retail updates. The weekly publication has an audience of 18,000 and its website receives more than 24.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Davi Lott, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic ENT who is dedicated to investigating disorders of the larynx (voice box) and airway. This includes bioengineering of laryngeal and tracheal tissues, laryngeal transplantation techniques and immunotherapy, laryngeal cancer, and functional outcomes of various laryngeal surgical procedures. Read more about Dr. Lott's research here.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Florida Times-Union
Lead Letter: Mayo Clinic is a leader in telemedicine
by Sarvam P. TerKonda, medical director, Connected Care, Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus

The Federal Communications Commission and Mayo Clinic recently sponsored a forum for Florida policy makers on the future of telemedicine — delivery of patientFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo care through a secure video or computer link… Studies have shown that for management of chronic conditions that become more prevalent with age, such as congestive heart failure, diabetes and stroke, outcomes are improved when patients and their local caregivers can be connected remotely to specialty care.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Sarvam TerKonda, M.D., is Mayo Clinic's medical director for Connected Care at Mayo Clinic in Florida. Connected Care integrates new care and service delivery models into traditional outpatient and inpatient care.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

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Tags: "habit cough" (HC), "non-activity thermogenesis, A.L.S., AARP, Abnormal Thyroid Function, Advance Directives Task Force, Alzheimer's Caregivers, Alzheimer's disease (AD), anaplastic thyroid cancer, Apervita, Apnea Treatment Vacuum, Arizona Capital Times


July 24th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

 

The Wall Street Journal
Doctors Object to High Cancer-Drug Prices

by Jeanne Whalen —More than 100 oncologists from top cancer hospitals around the U.S. have issued a harsh rebuke over soaring cancer-drug prices and called for new regulations to control them.…In an editorial published in the Mayo Clinic’s WSJ Bannermedical journal, the doctors focus attention on the financial burden to patients, saying the out-of-pocket costs are bankrupting many just as they’re fighting a deadly illness.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Additional coverage:

Reuters, Experts support call for lower cancer drug prices

NPR, Doctors Press For Action To Lower 'Unsustainable' Prices For Cancer Drugs

New Hampshire Public Radio, Doctors Speak Out Against 'Unsustainable' Rise In Cancer Drug Prices,

The New York Times, Drug Prices Soar, Prompting Calls for Justification

Kansas City Star (The New York Times), As drug prices soar, calls for justification intensify

Forbes, 155 Doctors Say This Is The Solution To Terrifying Drug Prices

Fortune, Doctors say cancer drug costs are out of control

Newsweek — The High Cost of Cancer Care: Your Money or Your Life? 

The Washington Post — Cancer experts call for curbs on rising drug prices

POLITICO Pro, Top cancer docs want patients to join pushback on drug costs 

NBC News, Can Cancer Drugs Be Made Affordable? More Than 100 Experts Weigh In

Time, Top Cancer Doctors Call for Lower Drug Costs

CBS News, Rising cancer costs pit doctors against drugmakers

FOX News (Reuters), Experts support call for lower cancer drug prices

Yahoo! (Reuters) Over 100 Doctors Call for Lower Cancer Drug Prices

HealthDay, U.S. Oncologists Decry High Cost of Cancer Drugs,

OncLive, Cancer Care Leaders Demand Drug Pricing Reforms

CNBC, Eli Lilly CEO: Obamacare out-of-pocket costs high

UPI.com, Experts: Cancer drug costs 'not sustainable'

ThinkProgress, More Than 100 Doctors Tell Big Pharma To Stop Making Cancer Drugs So Expensive

Times Gazette, Doctors Agree That Cancer Drug Prices Must be Decreased

American Pharmacists Association, More than 100 doctors object to high cancer drug prices

Tech Times, 118 Experts Support Calls To Lower Prices Of Cancer Meds

Youth Health Magazine, Are Cancer Drugs Getting Too Expensive? A Group of Oncologists Says So

Valley News (AP), Cancer Experts Say Curb Drug Costs

fox4kc.com, Doctors urge action on cancer drug costs

The Fiscal Times, As Drug Prices Soar, Doctors Voice Outrage

 

Context: A group of 118 of the nation's leading cancer experts have drafted a prescription for reducing the high cost of cancer drugs and voiced support for a patient-based grassroots movement demanding action on the issue. Their recommendations and support are outlined in a commentary, co-authored by the group, in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.  "High cancer drug prices are affecting the care of patients with cancer and our health care system," says lead author Ayalew Tefferi, M.D., a hematologist at Mayo Clinic. "The average gross household income in the U.S. is about $52,000 per year. For an insured patient with cancer who needs a drug that costs $120,000 per year, the out-of-pocket expenses could be as much as $25,000 to $30,000 – more than half their average household income." More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

The Florida Times-Union
Money from Ice Bucket Challenge helps pay for ongoing research into ALS at Jacksonville's Clinic
by Charlie Patton

Last summer, according to the ALS Association, the Ice Bucket Challenge raised $115 million to help find treatments and a cure for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the disease that killed Hall of Fame baseball player Lou Gehrig. Of thatFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo money, $77 million was allocated for research. The ALS Association announced last week 58 new research grants totaling $11,621,638. About $1 million of that is going to the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville in three grants.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:

Augustine Record — Money from Ice Bucket Challenge helps pay for ongoing research into ALS at Jacksonville's Clinic 

Context: Leonard Petrucelli, Ph.D.'s research team research is investigating the cellular mechanisms that cause neurodegeneration in diseases characterized by abnormal protein aggregation, such as Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In expanding upon his commitment to understanding the causes of such diseases, Dr. Petrucelli is now emphasizing translational research geared toward identifying and developing therapies for treatment and prevention.

Contact: Kevin Punksy

 

Washington Post
Alzheimer’s scientists to meet in D.C. amid signs of progress for treatment
by Fredrick Kunkle

…Dean Hartley, director of science initiatives at the Alzheimer’s Association, said Congress is debating the possibility of increasing the annual Washington Post newspaper logoresearch budget of about $600 million by an additional $300 million to $350 million a year, beginning in fiscal 2016. But he said that’s still less than what is currently spent on cancer, heart disease or HIV research, and well below the estimated $2 billion that the scientific community has said would be necessary to try to find a cure or effective treatments by 2025. “We’ve got to ramp up now,” said Ronald C. Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center and chairman of the national Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post averages 518,700, and Sunday circulation averages 736,800.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contacts: Duska Anastasijevic, Sharon Theimer

 

Reuters
Ahead of Alzheimer’s meeting, researchers seize on signs of progress
by Bill Berkrot

After decades of Alzheimer’s research that led to dead ends, including 123 drugs that failed, top researchers in the field sayReuters Logo they are far more confident now of producing an effective treatment...Dr. Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, agrees with Sperling that a multi-prong approach will be required to keep the disease at bay.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world newsbusiness newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile and interactive television platforms.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contacts: Duska Anastasijevic, Sharon Theimer

 

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic ranked nation's second best hospital
by John Scott

After a year at the top of the U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals list, Mayo Clinic has traded places with last year's number two, Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperMassachusetts General Hospital. Rounding out the top five spots, Johns Hopkins Hospital tied with UCLA Medical Center for number three, and the Cleveland Clinic came in fourth..."We're extremely pleased to be honored by U.S. News & World Report because it is used by so many health consumers to help guide their care," said Dr. John Wald, medical director for public affairs and marketing for Mayo Clinic Enterprise. "To be ranked No. 1 in eight of those specialties, and to be ranked one, two and three in all data-driven specialties ... it really speaks to the breadth of our practice and not to one specialty. The reason we are Mayo Clinic is because patients come here to get seamless, integrated care. I think this ranking really defines that for us," Wald said.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Additional Coverage:

Healio — Mayo Clinic named best hospital for pulmonology care

Healio — US. News & World Report ranks Mayo Clinic best hospital for gastroenterology, GI surgery 

Healio — US. News & World Report ranks top hospitals for diabetes, endocrinology care 

Medscape — The Roanoke Times, Crain’s Detroit Business, KTTC,  The Boston Globe, Detroit Free Press, WXOW News 19 La Crosse, MinnPost, The Hub at Johns Hopkins, KROC AM 1340, KTIV 4 Sioux City, WQOW, WSJV, WDSI, Yahoo!, ABC15 Arizona, Medscape, boston.com, Minneapolis/ St. Paul Business Journal, ConsumerAffairs, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Newsmax, KXLT- FOX 47, KWWK, The Denver Post, Chicago Tribune

Context: Mayo Clinic has been named one of the best hospitals nationwide by U.S. News and World Report. Mayo Clinic earned more No. 1 rankings in individual specialties than any other provider based on reputation, services and volumes, safety and clinical outcomes. “This ranking underscores our long-standing commitment to provide the highest-quality care that best meets our patients’ needs,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic. “Mayo Clinic is fortunate to be ranked No. 1 in more specialties than any other hospital in the nation. We owe our success to staff members who dedicate themselves daily to this shared mission.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Madson

 

Phoenix Business Journal
U.S. News & World Report' unveils Phoenix hospital rankings

U.S. News & World Report has released its 2015-16 list of the country's best hospitals, but none of Arizona's hospitals made the national Honor Roll. Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, which was No. 2 last year, claimed the No. 1 spot on the Honor Roll, which highlights hospitalsPhoenix Business Journal that are exceptional in numerous specialties. The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, ranked No. 2 on the Honor Roll, while Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore and UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles tied for third...Dr. Wyatt Decker, CEO at Mayo Clinic in Arizona and vice president of Mayo Clinic, said the Mayo staff takes great pride in developing the most innovative treatments and care delivery models in an effort to best service its patients. "Examples include the proton beam and new cancer center facility now under construction on our Phoenix campus, as well as our telemedicine programs, which are bringing much-needed specialty expertise to rural parts of our state," Decker said.

Reach: The Phoenix Business Journal is published by American City Business Journals which owns more than 40 other local business newspapers.

Context: Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix is ranked No. 1 in Arizona and the Phoenix metro area in the annual U.S. News & World ReportAmerica’s Best Hospital List released today. Hospitals included in the U.S. News Report such as the Mayo Clinic, are part of an elite group recognized for “breadth of excellence,” according to the magazine. Mayo Clinic in Arizona ranked nationally in 12 specialties including Cancer; Cardiology and Heart Surgery; Diabetes and Endocrinology; Ear, Nose and Throat; Gastroenterology and Gastroenterologic Surgery; Geriatrics; Gynecology; Nephrology; Neurology and Neurosurgery; Orthopedics; Pulmonology and Urology. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
These three Jacksonville facilities made U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Hospitals” list

U.S. News & World Report has named Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus, UF Health Jacksonville and St. Vincent's Medical Center to its annual list of Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logo“America’s Best Hospitals” published online today. Mayo Clinic is ranked No. 1 in the Jacksonville metro area, No. 4 in Florida and among the top 50 hospitals nationally in cancer, gastroenterology and GI surgery, geriatrics, and neurology and neurosurgery.

Reach:  The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals

Context: U.S. News & World Report again has named Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus to its annual list of “America’s Best Hospitals” published online today. Mayo Clinic is ranked No. 1 in the Jacksonville metro area, No. 4 in Florida and among the top 50 hospitals nationally in cancer,gastroenterology (GI) and GI surgery, geriatrics, and neurology and neurosurgery. The Florida campus also was recognized as high performing in diabetes and endocrinology, ear, nose and throat, gynecology, nephrology, orthopedicspulmonology and urology. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

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May 1st, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

C-SPAN
New Medicare Law and the Future of U.S. Healthcare

Dr. John Noseworthy talked about a law that eliminated the Medicare sustainable growth rate (SGR) formula and reformed the way Medicare payments were made to physicians. He also spoke about how the change was affecting the Mayo Clinic. Dr. Noseworthy spoke via video linkC-Span from Rochester, Minnesota.

Reach: C-SPAN (Cable-Satellite Public Affairs Network), created in 1979 as a private, non-profit service of the cable industry, is a network dedicated to 24-hour a day public affairs programming. C-SPAN provides coverage of a variety of public affairs events. Speeches, news conferences, forums, seminars, government committee meetings and hearings in Washington, D.C. and beyond are some of the events covered by the network. C-SPAN has more than 86.2 million viewers.

Previous Coverage in April 24, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Mayo Clinic has been a strong advocate of modernizing Medicare and repealing the Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) and replacing it with a reimbursement system that truly rewards quality and efficiency not simply volume. The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act strengthens Medicare, extends the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and makes numerous other improvements to the health care system.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Huffington Post
This Is What Happiness Really Means by Lindsay Holmes

An excited puppy. The company of your loved ones. A rewarding volunteer experience. No matter how you define joy, chances are it boils down to Huff Post Healthy Living Logoprinciples over, well, stuff. As described in the video above by Amit Sood, M.D., a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, happiness is more about our circumstances than our possessions. Joy can be found in the present moment. It can also be discovered in your overall experiences. But most importantly, it can appear when we're creating, connecting and caring.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique visitors.

Context: Amit Sood, M.D., Mayo Clinic General Internal Medicine, has helped tens of thousands of patients and students with scientifically-validated programs which offer useful insights into human stress, well-being, resiliency, and happiness. His life’s mission is to share this scientific and practical approach with as many as he can so we can live peaceful, content and happier lives.

Contact: Brian Kilen

 

Arizona Republic
4 Arizona hospitals get top ratings in patient survey
by Ken Alltucker

…. "Most patients don't have the data or technical skills to judge quality and safety, so they fall back on service," said Dr. Wyatt Decker, CEO of Mayo Clinic in Arizona. "If the service is good, they equate that to good care." Though much of Mayo Clinic's focus is on quality and how well aArizona Republic newspaper logo patient fares, Decker said the hospital has paid attention to things like how courteous doctors, nurses and other employees can be and whether the hospital is clean and appealing. Mayo hired an executive who oversees such patient experiences and also contracts with a vendor who surveys Mayo patients.

Reach: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday and has an average daily circulation of more than 261,000 readers. The newspaper’s website Arizona Republic - Online, averages more than 5.4 million unique visitors each month.

Context: On April 16, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) added “star ratings” to its Hospital Compare website. Hospitals received ratings of one to five stars – with five stars being the highest score – based on data from the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) patient experience survey. This represents a change in how information is displayed, not the addition of questions to be answered or data to be collected. Thirteen of Mayo Clinic's 21 hospitals received star ratings – all 3 or above. 

Contacts:  Jim McVeigh, Ann Schauer

 

Florida Trend
The business of cancer therapy
by Andrew Corty

Unfortunately, cancer has touched us all. Sometimes it strikes family members, friends or colleagues -- and once in a while ourselves. There’s Florida Trendsimply no escaping it. Doctors diagnose about 114,000 cases of various cancers each year in Florida, so cancer has become a big business, both in medical care and in research… Our major hospitals are keeping pace. While Moffitt is the only NIH-designated cancer center based in Florida, there are other heavy hitters. Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville has a cancer specialty (and its own NIH designation, albeit from Minnesota), and the Cleveland Clinic has just opened a cancer center in Weston.

Reach: Florida Trend magazine and its website offer regionally-based stories and reporting. The magazine has a readership of more than 250,000 readers and its website receives 85,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center is a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center with a multisite presence. Its three campuses — in Scottsdale, Ariz., Jacksonville, Fla., and Rochester, Minn. — give the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center a broad geographic reach, enabling it to serve diverse patient populations around the world.

Contact: Paul Scotti

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Tags: 4 Arizona hospitals get top ratings, AARP, Aducanumab, Albany Democrat-Herald, alzheimers, Ames Tribune, anaphylactic shock, AP, Argus Leader, Arizona Public Media (PBS/NPR), Arizona Republic, Asthma discovery


March 26th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

 

Star Tribune
Mayo unravels a mystery disease for Minnesota attorney
by Dan Browning

Greg Widseth didn’t know what hit him. The Polk County attorney felt fine as he coached his son’s ninth-grade basketball workout last March. He remembers smiling at a young woman as he left the building. Now Widseth, who once had a photographic memory,Star Tribune Health newspaper logo is struggling to reconstruct the events that put him in the hospital and led his wife, a former emergency room nurse, to seek help from the Mayo Clinic… When it became clear that her husband wasn’t getting better, she called her sister in Rochester, whose neighbor happened to be Dr. Jeffrey Britton, a Mayo neurologist specializing in autoimmune encephalitis. Britton and his colleague, Dr. Andrew McKeon, a neuroimmunologist, agreed to see Widseth within a few days.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Andrew McKeon, M.B., B.Ch., M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician with appointments in Laboratory Medicine and Pathology and Neurology. His research focuses in autoimmune neurological disorders, paraneoplastic neurological disorders and movement disorders. Jeffrey Britton, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist. His research focuses on clinical epilepsy, stimulation treatment in epilepsy and cortical stimulation mapping and seizure localization. Sean Pittock, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist. Dr. Pittock is Co-director of the Neuroimmunology Laboratory at Mayo Clinic. Mayo Clinic's top-ranked team of neurologists diagnoses and treats more than 500 neurological conditions, including many rare or complex disorders. The Mayo Clinic Department of Neurology is one of the largest in the world. It includes more than 100 subspecialized experts trained in epilepsy, movement disordersdementias and other cognitive conditions, stroke and cerebrovascular diseases, neuro-oncology, multiple sclerosis and demyelinating disorders, autoimmune neurology, pediatric neurology, neurophysiology, headache, neuromuscular diseases, peripheral nerve, sleep neurology, and speech pathology. These care providers work together to evaluate and treat people utilizing the most advanced techniques and technologies.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Bloomberg
New Alzheimer's Research Throws Cold Water on Biogen's Recent Breakthrough
by Cynthia Koons

Just days after Biogen Inc. revealed promising early data from an experimental Alzheimer’s treatment, new research from the Mayo Bloomberg news logoClinic may revive a long-running debate over whether the drug industry is focusing on the right target in developing therapies to treat the disease… “Amyloid has a relationship with cognitive decline, but if you’re looking at both of them together, tau is the bad guy,” Melissa Murray, a neuroscientist at the Mayo Clinic campus in Jacksonville, Florida, said in a telephone interview. The majority of research into the disease has focused on beta amyloid over the past 25 years, she said.

Reach: Bloomberg has 2,300 media professionals in 146 bureaus across 72 countries. Bloomberg delivers its content across more than 400 publications, over 310 million households worldwide through Bloomberg Television and 500,000 in the New York metro area and 18.5 million subscribers through satellite radio.

Additional coverage: Florida Times-Union, Yahoo! News, Science Codex, Science 2.0, News-Medical, Medical Xpress, Health Canal

Context: By examining more than 3,600 postmortem brains, researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campuses in Jacksonville, Florida and Rochester, Minnesota have found that the progression of dysfunctional tau protein drives the cognitive decline and memory loss seen in Alzheimer’s disease. Amyloid, the other toxic protein that characterizes Alzheimer’s, builds up as dementia progresses, but is not the primary culprit, they say. The findings, published in Brain, offer new and valuable information in the long and ongoing debate about the relative contribution of amyloid and tau to the development and progression of cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer’s, says the study’s lead author, Melissa Murray, Ph.D., a neuroscientist at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

LA Times
Migraine studies yield fresh approaches to ward off pain
by Lisa Mulcahy

If you suffer from migraine headaches, you're not alone. More than 10% of the population is hurting right along with you, including 18% of women. Migraines are most common from the ages of 25 to 55. The good news: New research can help change yourLogo for Los Angeles Times newspaper approach to managing your migraines. Here are five strategies to try… If you experience a strong smell like perfume, flickering or flashing lights, less sleep and you eat a cold-cut sub with nitrates all in one day, yes, you may get a migraine, but if you ate that sub on a day when you didn't experience those other triggers, you might be just fine," said Dr. Fred Cutrer, a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., in an interview.

Reach:  The Los Angeles Times has a daily readership of 1.9 million and 2.9 million on Sunday, more than 8 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.5 million. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 128 years.

Context: Fred (Michael) Cutrer, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist. The study of migraine, particularly its pathophysiology and the optimal delivery of treatment, has been the research focus of Dr. Cutrer.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Reuters
Uncommon form of heart attack likely runs in family – study
by Sharon Begley

… In the new study, in JAMA Internal Medicine, researchers at the Mayo Clinic combed a registry of patients who had suffered Reutersspontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD), in which one layer of a coronary artery splits off from another like cheap laminate. Blood seeps out between the arterial layers, starving the heart of oxygen and causing chest pain. If not treated quickly, it can cause heart attack and sometimes death…That is a problem because treatment for common heart attack - clearing arterial blockages - can worsen SCAD. Some 30 percent to 40 percent of SCADs should be left to heal on their own, said Mayo's Dr. Sharonne Hayes, who led the study.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world newsbusiness newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile and interactive television platforms.

Additional coverage: Huffington Post, FOX News

Context:  A Mayo Clinic study has identified a familial association in spontaneous coronary artery dissection, a type of heart attack that most commonly affects younger women, suggesting a genetic predisposition to the condition, researchers say. The results are published in the March 23 issue of JAMA Internal Medicine. Researchers used the Mayo Clinic SCAD Registry of 412 enrollees to identify five familial cases of SCAD, comprised of three pairs of first-degree relatives (mother-daughter, identical twin sisters, sisters) and two pairs of second-degree relatives (aunt and niece, and first cousins). Researchers believe this is the first study to identify SCAD as an inherited disorder. More information, including a video interview with Sharonne Hayes, M.D., the study's senior author and a cardiologist can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

 

Everyday Health
The Man Without a Heart
by Dr. Sanjay Gupta

“You can feel it,” Charles Okeke says. “It’s pounding. If I opened my mouth, it was very audible.” Okeke is remembering the days when his blood was pumped by a massive 400-pound machine. It was one stage in a remarkable journey that has finally broughtEveryday Health him where he is today — a healthy man with a healthy heart once again beating in his chest…“Charles was very sick when he showed up at our hospital,” remembers Eric Steidley, MD, a cardiologist at Mayo Clinic. “Charles was going to die unless we did something.”

Reach: Everyday Health Media, LLC is a provider of online consumer health content across a broad portfolio of over 25 websites that span the health spectrum — from lifestyle offerings in pregnancy, diet and fitness to in-depth medical content for condition prevention and management.

Context: For almost two years, Charles Okeke lived in a Mayo Clinic hospital tethered to a machine. He had just turned 30 when a blood clot destroyed his heart.

Public Affairs Contact: Lynn Closway

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
How Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville makes its reach global
by Colleen Jones

Most international patients seen at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville come from Latin America, the Caribbean, Mexico and Canada. To Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logofacilitate inbound medical travel, Mayo offers coordination services at information offices in Quito, Ecuador; Bogotá, Colombia; Guatemala City; Mexico City; and Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada.

Reach:  The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Context: Thousands of people come to Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville, Fla., annually for diagnosis or treatment of a medical condition. In Florida, Mayo Clinic primarily treats adults, although some specialists see teenagers and children. Doctors in the Primary Care centers treat people of all ages. Many people make their own appointments and some are referred by a doctor. Mayo Clinic doctors can work closely with your hometown doctor to coordinate your care.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

Star Tribune
Mayo researcher appeals for increased Alzheimer's funding
by Jim Spencer

Dr. Ronald Petersen did not promise the Senate Special Committee on Aging a cure for Alzheimer’s disease in 10 years. But on Wednesday, the Mayo Clinic’s director of Alzheimer’s research held out hope for highly effective treatments in a decade if theStar Tribune National government significantly increases its investment in research. Last year, Alzheimer’s, the disease that has become the curse of 5.3 million Americans and the fear of tens of millions more, received less than $600 million in research funding. That compares with $5.3 billion for cancer, $3 billion for HIV/AIDS and $2 billion for heart disease.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: CSPAN, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services. Dr. Petersen testifed this week at the Senate Special Committee on Aging.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

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November 20th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

National Public Radio: Sound Medicine News
Research Encourages Surgeons To Ask About Quality Of Life Before Operation

Our next story is about the conversations that surgeons and patients have before the operation. Traditionally surgeons have wanted to know whether any health problems may pose a risk to patients’ safety during the procedure. But a new study may encourage surgeons to spend a few extra minutes asking, “How’s your qualitySound Medicine logo of life?” Dr. Juliane Bingener of the Mayo Clinic joins us to tell us more. Your new study found that people’s quality of life before colon cancer surgery might affect their odds of complications shortly after surgery. How did you measure their quality of life before the surgery?

ReachSound Medicine is hosted by Barbara Lewis and features in-depth discussion on scientific research and the latest medical developments.  Sound Medicine is produced by WFYI and the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis. The show is broadcast on a variety of NPR affiliates nationwide.

Context:  Juliane Bingener-Casey, M.D., is a gastroenterologic surgeon at Mayo Clinic. Her  research and clinical practice focuses on minimally invasive surgery and endoscopy. The long-term goal of her research program is to utilize novel minimally invasive technology to improve patient outcomes by reducing the impact of surgery on patients' quality of life.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer 

 

Twin Cities Business
2014 Person Of The Year: Mayo Clinic President And CEO John Noseworthy
by Dale Kurschner

He may perhaps become best known in Minnesota as “the $6 billion man,” given his success in launching what is expected to become the state’s largest-ever development project: the transformation of downtown Rochester Twin Cities Businessinto a “Destination Medical Center.”… But the Destination Medical Center (DMC) is just the tip of the iceberg Mayo Clinic president and CEO Dr. John Noseworthy is carefully navigating through churning economic and industry waters.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Additional Coverage:
Digital Journal, Twin Cities Business Names Mayo Clinic President and CEO Dr. John Noseworthy 2014 Person of the Year

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

 

Star Tribune
Rochester becoming a hot market for foreign investors
by Maya Rao

… With word of the Mayo Clinic’s massive expansion and the state’s $585 million aid for the project spreading, Dickson has orchestrated separate sales of a nearby bank and skyway plaza to companies from the Middle East. Other real estate brokers have talked to investors from Venezuela, SaudiStar Tribune newspaper logo Arabia and India who are drawn by the idea that major medical centers are recession-proof.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Related Coverage:
KTTC, Tale of Two Cities: Cleveland 

Post-Bulletin, Slatterly Park residents in Rochester talk DMC

Context: Destination Medical Center (DMC) is an innovative economic development initiative to secure Minnesota's status as a global medical destination now and in the future.

Public Affairs Contact: Jamie Rothe

 

Post-Bulletin
Coleman named Mayo Clinic Board of Trustees member

The Mayo Clinic Board of Trustees has named a new public member during its recent quarterly meeting in Florida. Biochemist Mary Sue Coleman, Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperPh.D. — named by Time as one of the "10 Best College Presidents" — is president emeritus of the University of Michigan and also previously served as president of the University of Iowa.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn. and southeast Minnesota.

Additional Coverage:
The Michigan Daily, President Emerita Coleman appointed to Mayo Clinic board. Former University President Mary Sue Coleman has been appointed to a seat on the Mayo Clinic’s Board of Trustees. According to a release published on the clinic’s website, Coleman attended her first quarterly meeting of the board Friday…“Trustees are invited based upon their experience, expertise, and other priority characteristics identified from time to time by the Governance & Nominating Committee,” Oestreich wrote in a statement.

Michigan Daily, President Emerita Coleman appointed to Mayo Clinic board by Sam Gringlas. Former University President Mary Sue Coleman has been appointed to a seat on the Mayo Clinic’s Board of Trustees. According to a release published on the clinic’s website, Coleman attended her first quarterly meeting of the board Friday.

Michigan Live, Michigan News

Context: The Mayo Clinic Board of Trustees welcomed Mary Sue Coleman, Ph.D., as a new public member at its quarterly meeting Nov. 14. Dr. Coleman is president emeritus of the University of Michigan, (U-M) an institution she led for 12 years before retiring in July 2014. Time magazine named her one of the nation’s “10 best college presidents,” and the American Council on Education honored her with its Lifetime Achievement Award. She previously was president of the University of Iowa. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

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Tags: A.E.D., AARP, ABC15 Phoenix, activity trackers, aging, alzheimer's disease, American Humane Association, arthroplasty, artificial turf safety, arts and healing, ASCO Post, asthma and risk of heart disease


February 21st, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations


Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic updates its model for the modern age
by Lori Sturdevant

Milestone anniversaries can be useful things. Take this season’s 150th anniversary of the cold January 1864 day when Dr. W.W. Mayo placed an ad in area newspapers announcing that his medical Star Tribune commentaries logopractice was open for business in downtown Rochester and the Mayo Clinic was born. A burst of high-risk, high-opportunity change is hard upon the health care industry in general and Mayo Clinic in particular. That makes this a fine time for Mayo folk to reflect on how their mammoth enterprise became famous for the best in medical care, and how that story might guide what comes next.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation. Lori Sturdevant writes editorials and a weekly column about topics she has covered for more than 30 years, state government and politics.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

On Jan. 27, 1864, English-born Dr. William Worrall Mayo first notified the public about his medical practice in Rochester, Minn., planting the seeds of what would eventually become an international medical organization with more than 59,000 expert physicians, scientists and health care professionals, attracting millions of patients from across the globe. This year marks 150 years of continuous service to patients, and Mayo Clinic is launching a yearlong recognition that will honor a legacy of medical accomplishments and a model for the future of health care. Dr. Mayo’s sons, Drs. William and Charles Mayo, joined the practice in the late 1880’s and, with their father, created Mayo Clinic’s medical hallmark: The integrated care model that focuses a team of experts on one patient at a time and puts patients’ needs first.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic Commemorates 150th Anniversary in 2014

Public Affairs Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Karl Oestreich

KAAL
ABC 6 Exclusive Interview with Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. Noseworthy

KAAL-TV 6In an exclusive interview ABC 6 News Anchor Ellery McCardle sits down with Mayo Clinic President & CEO Dr. John Noseworthy. In a three part conversation, they talked about the changes Mayo will experience, including the possibility of layoffs, the organizations future expansion in new cities and countries, and concerns of people who may be worried about such a large expansion. Part 1, Part 2Part 3

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bryan Anderson, Karl Oestreich

Yahoo! Homepage Centerpiece
Why a cat bite could land you in the hospital: Surprising results from new study
by Eric Pfeiffer

Cat lovers might want to take extra caution the next time they tempt the wrath of their favorite pet feline. A new study produced by the Mayo Clinic has found that cat bites are potentially more seriousLogo of Yahoo News than most individuals, and medical experts, previously thought.

Reach: Yahoo! reaches more than a half a billion across devices and around the globe. According to news sources, roughly 700 million people visit Yahoo websites every month.

Additional coverage:
Wall Street Journal (Video), Cat Bites Pose Little-Known Dangers, Cats can reduce stress and lift spirits, but there can be serious risks involved with keeping felines in the house. A new study from the Mayo Clinic reveals cat bites can be very difficult to treat. Anna Mathews reports on Lunch Break.

Wall Street Journal, Cat Bites Pose Little-Known Dangers by Anna Mathews, A new study by researchers at the Mayo Clinic has found that of 193 patients who came in for cat bites on their hands over a three-year period, 30% had to be hospitalized for an average stay of 3.2 days…"Cat bites can be very serious, and when you do get an infection, it can be very difficult to treat," said Brian T. Carlsen, a Mayo surgeon who was an author of the study. That's particularly true with a hand injury because of the structure of the tendons and joints, he said.

MPR Blog, Roses are red, violets are blue, it’s Valentine’s Day, the rest’s up to you… 3) LOVE AND MARRIAGE GO TOGETHER LIKE … CATS AND THE WEB (OF YOUR HAND)?... An elusive regional angle for a cat story on the Internet — it’s a writer’s dream. Don’t put your hand near that cat’s mouth; you don’t know where it’s been! In a three-year retrospective study published in the February issue of The Journal of Hand Surgery, researchers reviewed records of 193 people who came to Mayo Clinic Hospital with cat bites to the hand. Additional coverage: CBS DenverWebProNews 

Context: Dogs aren’t the only pets who sometimes bite the hands that feed them. Cats do too, and when they strike a hand, can inject bacteria deep into joints and tissue, perfect breeding grounds for infection. Cat bites to the hand are so dangerous, 1 in 3 patients with such wounds had to be hospitalized, a Mayo Clinic study covering three years showed. Two-third of those hospitalized needed surgery. Middle-aged women were the most common bite victims, according to the research, published in the Journal of Hand Surgery.

Mayo Clinic News Network: When Cats Bite: 1 in 3 Patients Bitten in Hand Hospitalized, Infections Common

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: "sitting disease", 1500 ESPN, 1500 ESPN Garage Logic, 150th anniversary, 26.2 with Donna, AARP, Abbott Northwestern, ABC News, ABC15, ADHD, Affordable care act, Alaska Public Radio


April 1st, 2013

David Murdock Wants You to Live Forever

By Logan Lafferty loganlafferty

"I think anyone who wants to live past 100 can do it," says billionaire businessman David Murdock. This brash pronouncement is surprising for someone with Murdock's family history; he has lost many loved ones before their time…And Gabriele, his beloved third wife and the mother of his children, died of ovarian cancer at 43…During the year and a half the couple spent at the Mayo Clinic while Gabriele endured radiation, chemotherapy and surgery — her lush brown hair thinning and her luminous skin turning ashen — Murdock grasped for ways to help her survive…Inspired by his findings on how nutrition can improve health, Murdock went on to coauthor an encyclopedic book on the subject with professionals from the Mayo Clinic and UCLA in 2001.

 

AARP by Jessica Wapner

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Tags: AARP, David Murdock, improve health, lifespan, Nutrition


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