Items Tagged ‘ABC News’

March 17th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

KTTC
Mayo Clinic researchers pinpoint experimental drug that may shrink tumors in multiple myeloma patients
by Jason Pope

The Mayo Clinic says this experimental drug is leading to tumor shrinkage in patients affected by multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma is a cancer that affects the blood cells that fight infection. Rather than fighting infection, the cancer causes kidney problems and infections. AccordingKTTC TV logo to Dr. Marta Chesi, the drug was developed to support tumor death but instead of killing the tumor cells, it made them more visible. This visibility helps the immune system spot the tumor cells and eliminate them.

Reach: KTTC is an NBC affiliate that serves the Rochester, Minn. area including the towns of Austin, Mason City, Albert Lea and Winona. Its website receives more than 73,300 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Life Science Daily

Context: Mayo Clinic researchers have found that an experimental drug, LCL161, stimulates the immune system, leading to tumor shrinkage in patients affected by multiple myeloma. The findings are published in Nature Medicine. Multiple myeloma is a blood cancer that affects plasma cells – white blood cells that normally produce antibodies to fight infection. Rather than produce helpful antibodies, the cancer cells, as they grow, secrete large amounts of a single antibody that accumulate in the body, causing kidney problems and infections. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

Huffington Post
Finding treatments to fight fibroids

Fibroid embolization and focused ultrasound are minimally invasive options that reproductive endocrinologist Dr. Ebbie Stewart says warrant Huffington Post Logomore research to help guide women and health care providers on a treatment plan. She co-authored a recent study that looked at the two treatments, compared recovery time, and noted adverse events in the first six weeks after treatment, Dr. Stewart says.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique viewers.

Context:  Elizabeth "Ebbie Stewart, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic ObGyn. Dr. Stewart studies uterine fibroids, also called uterine leiomyomas or myomas. Fibroids are noncancerous tumors of the uterus that commonly cause heavy menstrual bleeding, pelvic pain and pressure, bowel and bladder problems, and sometimes infertility and miscarriage. Fibroids are also the leading cause of hysterectomy.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Men’s Health
This Exact Workout Routine May Actually Reverse Aging
by Elizabeth Millard

Research has shown physical activity can reduce inflammation in your body and improve heart health—both important for staying young beyond your years. But not all exercise is the same in keeping age-related decline at bay, researchers from the Mayo Clinic say…“Decline is mitochondria isMens Health Logo the key factor responsible for age-related physical declines,” says the study’s senior author, Sreekumaran Nair, M.D., Ph.D. That includes osteoporosis, arthritis, gastrointestinal issues, decreased flexibility, hypertension, and cardiovascular issues. “Higher intensity of exercise seems to elicit a rejuvenation of mitochondrial [processes] in everybody, including older people.”

Reach: Men's Health has an audience of more than 13.5 million readers.

Additional coverage: Healthline, The Hans India, Canindia.com, AARP

Context: Everyone knows that exercise is good for you, but what type of training helps most, especially when you’re older - say over 65? A Mayo Clinic study says it’s high-intensity aerobic exercise, which can reverse some cellular aspects of aging. The findings appear in Cell MetabolismMayo researchers compared high-intensity interval training, resistance training and combined training. All training types improved lean body mass and insulin sensitivity, but only high-intensity and combined training improved aerobic capacity and mitochondrial function for skeletal muscle. Decline in mitochondrial content and function are common in older adults. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Bob Nellis

 

Washington Post
It’s not just being stuck inside; cold weather sets us up for getting sick
by Emily Sohn

It's not clear why winter brings so many health woes, says Pritish Tosh, an infectious-disease physician and researcher at the Mayo Clinic in Washington Post newspaper logoRochester, Minnesota. "The reason one virus is a wintertime virus may not be the same reason another virus is a wintertime virus," Tosh says. "We're finding more and more that it's not one size fits all."

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:
Chicago TribuneWhy do we get sick in winter?
Health, How to Get Rid of the Flu Faster

Context: Pritish Tosh, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist. Dr. Tosh is interested in emerging infections and preparedness activities related to them, ranging from collaborating with the Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group in basic science vaccine development to hospital systems research related to pandemic preparedness. Influenza is a viral infection that attacks your respiratory system — your nose, throat and lungs. Influenza, commonly called the flu, is not the same as stomach "flu" viruses that cause diarrhea and vomiting.

Contact: Bob Nellis

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Tags: AARP, ABC News, Analitica, Anesthesiology News, Associated Press, Becker’s Hospital Review, bone health, Brandix, bullying, BuzzFeed, Canindia.com, Cardiovascular Business


March 10th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Wall Street Journal

Zika Linked to Heart Problems
by Betsy McKay

In a study conducted at the Institute of Tropical Medicine in Caracas, Venezuela, researchers identified nine patients who developed heart rhythm disorders and other serious cardiovascular complications while they had Zika. “While we anticipated that we would see cardiovascular effects from Zika, we were surprised at the severity of the findings,” said Karina Gonzalez Carta, a cardiologist and research fellow at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who led the study. She provided details of the findings to reporters ahead of the American College of Cardiology’s Annual Scientific Session in Washington where the findings will be presented.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Additional coverage: New York Times, HealthDay, ABC News, Associated Press, Star Tribune, KTTC, TIME, FOX News, Twin Cities Business, WebMD, Medical Xpress

Context: Zika also may have serious effects on the heart, new research shows in the first study to report cardiovascular complications related to this virus, according to data being presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 66th Annual Scientific Session. In a study at the Institute of Tropical Medicine in Caracas, Venezuela, of nine adult patients with Zika and no previous history of cardiovascular disease, all but one developed a heart rhythm problem and two-thirds had evidence of heart failure. It is known that Zika can cause microcephaly, a severe birth defect in babies born to women infected with the virus, and Guillain-Barré syndrome, a neurological condition that can lead to muscle weakness and, in severe cases, paralysis. “We know that other mosquito-borne diseases, such as dengue fever and chikungunya virus, can affect the heart, so we thought we might see the same with Zika. But we were surprised by the severity, even in this small number of patients,” says Karina Gonzalez Carta, M.D., cardiologist and research fellow at Mayo Clinic and the study’s lead author. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Traci Klein

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
Mayo Clinic announces $70.5 million expansion in Jacksonville
by Derek Gilliam

Mayo Clinic took another step toward becoming the "premier destination medical center in the Southeast" with an $70.5 million expansion plan. That follows an already active development cycle for Mayo Clinic's Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logoFlorida Campus that's located in Jacksonville. The hospital has invested more than $300 million in expanding its hospital campus. That has allowed for the global hospital system to grow their employee base to 5,900 in Jacksonville, according to Mayo Clinic. “We are extremely grateful to the family of Dan and Brenda Davis for their generous and unyielding support for Mayo Clinic,” said Dr. Gianrico Farrugia, vice president of Mayo Clinic and CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Reach:  The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals

Additional coverage:
First Coast News, Mayo Clinic continues rapid expansion with two new projects announced Tuesday
WOKV JacksonvilleMayo Clinic plans $70 million construction project
Florida Times-UnionMayo Clinic continues rapid expansion with two new projects announced Tuesday
Jacksonville Business Journal, How Mayo Clinic plans to make Jacksonville a medical destination

Context: Over the past two years Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus has erupted with substantial growth in major construction projects and new staff to serve a fast-growing patient population, especially those who require complex medical care. During this time, Mayo Clinic has invested more than $300 million in major construction projects and added 900 new staff as it advances its status as the premier destination medical center in the Southeast. Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus now has about 5,900 employees and contributes roughly $2 billion to the Florida economy. As part of this economic boom, Mayo Clinic today announced another major construction project on its Florida campus – an investment of $70.5 million to add four floors for a total of five to Mayo Building South and remodel existing space in the Davis Building. The project will add 80,000 new square feet and renovate 40,000 existing square feet. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

 

Star Tribune
Mayo spending $217 million on construction in Rochester
by Christopher Snowbeck

Mayo Clinic plans to spend $217 million on construction projects at its St. Marys hospital campus in Rochester. The project, announced Thursday, would help the clinic grow its patient volume and provide those patients better service in more efficient facilities, said Dr. Robert Cima, medical director for the Rochester hospital operations at the Mayo Clinic. “We anticipate continued growth in our patient visits,” Cima said inStar Tribune newspaper logo an interview. “We’ve been seeing that steadily year after year. This is really a commitment to providing access to as many patients as possible.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:
KAALMayo Clinic Giving Saint Marys Campus $217 Million Expansion, Upgrade
KTTCMayo Clinic approves $217 million expansion for its Saint Marys Campus
KIMTMayo Clinic unveils $217 million construction project
KAAL,  In-Depth at 6:30: Impact of Saint Marys
Twin Cities BusinessMayo Clinic Spending $458M To Renovate, Expand Its MN, FL Campuses
Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic to invest $217M to expand, upgrade Saint Marys

Context: The Mayo Clinic Board of Trustees approved plans for enhanced and increased procedural and patient-dedicated facilities at Mayo Clinic Hospital – Rochester, Saint Marys Campus. Mayo Clinic will invest $217 million in the growth and modernization of Saint Marys Campus, while also relocating and upgrading its Cardiac Surgery facilities. Both sets of projects will address the needs of an increasingly complex patient population, rising inpatient volume and innovative practice, while providing the highest level of safe, efficient and affordable care. “These enhancements further Mayo Clinic’s mission of advancing the practice by investing in our facilities to help ensure we provide the best possible care for our patients,” says C. Michel Harper, M.D., executive dean for practice at Mayo Clinic. “The improvement of our facilities is a natural extension of Mayo Clinic’s efforts to provide both a modern and coordinated health care environment.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Kelly Reller

 

CNN
Interval training exercise could be a fountain of youth
by Susan Scutti

Looking for a fountain of youth? You may need to search no further than your sneakers. "Any exercise is better than being sedentary," said Dr. Sreekumaran Nair, senior author of the study and a diabetes CNN Logoresearcher at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. However, Nair noted that high-intensity interval training (HIIT), in particular, is "highly efficient" when it comes to reversing many age-related changes.

Reach: Cable News Network (CNN) is a worldwide news and information network providing live, continuous coverage of news from around the globe, 24 hours a day. CNN online received more than 55 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional coverage: Daily Mail, New Scientist, Express UK, Ask Men, FOX News

Context:  Everyone knows that exercise is good for you, but what type of training helps most, especially when you’re older - say over 65? A Mayo Clinic study says it’s high-intensity aerobic exercise, which can reverse some cellular aspects of aging. The findings appear in Cell Metabolism. Mayo researchers compared high-intensity interval training, resistance training and combined training. All training types improved lean body mass and insulin sensitivity, but only high-intensity and combined training improved aerobic capacity and mitochondrial function for skeletal muscle. Decline in mitochondrial content and function are common in older adults. High-intensity intervals also improved muscle protein content that not only enhanced energetic functions, but also caused muscle enlargement, especially in older adults. The researchers emphasized an important finding: Exercise training significantly enhanced the cellular machinery responsible for making new proteins. That contributes to protein synthesis, thus reversing a major adverse effect of aging. However, adding resistance training is important to achieve significant muscle strength. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Woman’s Day
10 Simple Tips That Will Help You Prevent Alzheimer's Disease
by Stacey Colino

Many women fear losing their mental faculties as they age, and consider the future to be the luck of the draw. In fact, 44% of 1,200 adults surveyed by the Marist Institute for Public Opinion were more scared of getting Alzheimer's disease than cancer, stroke, heart disease or diabetes. What you may not realize is just how much you can protect yourself. "We all have the power to influence how our brains age," says RonWoman's Day Logo
Petersen, MD, PhD, director of Mayo Clinic's Alzheimer's Disease Research Center in Rochester, MN. "What you do at midlife will have late-life benefits on the health of your brain and heart." Know the facts, then take simple steps to get on track.

Reach: Woman’s Day reaches a monthly audience of more than 3.3 million. Its website receives more than 4.7 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Today.com
5 steps that helped this woman shed 68 pounds and transform her life

When Jacqueline Gilmore-Jackson’s mother passed away, she turned to food for comfort. It wasn’t uncommon for her to snack mindlessly and eat at odd hours, even enjoying dinner at midnight. Since that sad time in 2010, her weight slowly increased. In March, she applied to participate in the Woman’s Day Live Longer and Stronger Challenge. The magazine selected five women from across the country to receive nutrition and exercise counseling from Joy Bauer and guidance from experts at Mayo Clinic to lose weight and improve their health.

Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show.

Context: The Live Longer & Stronger challenge—headed by Joy Bauer, RDN, with guidance from experts at Mayo Clinic—is about more than just lowering the numbers on the scale. Some of these women walked more steps than they'd ever dreamed possible, while others cut out medications they'd been taking for years, leading to greater happiness and healthier hearts.

Contact:  Traci Klein

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Tags: 1011 News Nebraska, ABC News, ACL, aging, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimer's disease, Andy Sandness, Ask Men, Associated Press, athletes, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, blood pressure


February 24th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Associated Press
AP Exclusive: Twin tragedies give survivor a new face
by Sharon Cohen

He'd been waiting for this day, and when his doctor handed him the mirror, Andy Sandness stared at his image and absorbed the enormity of the moment: He had a new face, one that had belonged to another man. His father and his brother, joined by several doctors and nurses at MayoAssociated Press Wire Service Logo Clinic, watched as he studied his swollen features. He was just starting to heal from one of the rarest surgeries in the world — a face transplant, the first at the medical center. He had the nose, cheeks, mouth, lips, jaw, chin, even the teeth of his donor. Resting in his hospital bed, he still couldn't speak clearly, but he had something to say. He scrawled four words in a spiral notebook: "Far exceeded my expectations," he wrote, handing it to Dr. Samir Mardini, who read the message to the group.

Reach: The Associated Press is a not-for-profit news cooperative, owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members. News collected by the AP is published and republished by newspaper and broadcast outlets worldwide.

Additional coverage: New York Times, STAT, Washington Post, USA TODAY, CBS Minnesota, KSTP, Louis Post-Dispatch, ABC News, MSN, NWF Daily News, AP Big Story, Stamford Advocate, Medical Xpress, CTV News, WTOP, Evening Standard, DailyMail.com, Olean Times Herald, Evening Standard, TribLivePeople, News-medical.net, Morning Ticker, KARE 11, WCCO, The West Australian, KAAL, Star Tribune, Mirror UK, BBC,CBC, US Magazine, GoMN, Chicago Tribune, KGWN, FOX News, Arizona Republic, Pioneer Press, Latinos Health, Science Alert, iTech Post, The Columbian, Eau Claire Leader-Telegram, Knoxville News Sentinel, BABW News, Canada Journal, Jackson Hole News & Guide, Counsel & HealBecker’s Hospital Review, New York Post, Herald-Whig, Sky News, Business Insider, com.au, Metro UK, UPI.com, Yahoo! Australia, The Inquisitr, WDEF, Deccan Herald, Aurora Sentinel, KRNV, Rapid City Journal, WNYT, Cortez Journal, Daily Star, Metro UK, Tri-City Herald, Tech Times, India.com, WQOW, Gephardt Daily, Hindustan Times, Pulse Headlines, KBMT, Sumter Item, ABC13 Houston, FuturismStar TribuneNew York Times, RedOrbit, Catholic Online, NBC 6 South Florida, The HitavadaBecker’s Hospital Review, NBC ChicagoTCT magazine

Context:  A multidisciplinary team of surgeons, physicians and other health professionals recently completed a near-total face transplant on a Wyoming man on Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus. The extensive, life-changing surgery will improve the patient’s ability to chew, swallow, speak, breathe and smell. The recipient, Andrew Sandness, is a 32-year-old man from eastern Wyoming whose face was devastated by a gunshot wound at the age of 21. He is doing well. “I am absolutely amazed at the outcome so far,” says Sandness. “I am now able to chew and eat normal food, and the nerve sensation is slowly improving, too. My confidence has improved, and I’m feeling great ― and grateful. I am so thankful to my donor and the donor’s family, and to all of the people who have supported me throughout this process.” For more information on the face transplant, the following segments are available on Mayo Clinic News Network:

Mayo Clinic announces successful face transplant on Wyoming man

Mayo Clinic Radio: Face transplant — how the surgical team prepared

Transforming a life: Mayo Clinic announces its first face transplant

Contact:  Ginger Plumbo

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo researcher Abba Zubai is sending stem cells for study on the International Space Station
by Charlie Patton

As a boy growing up in Nigeria, Abba Zubair dreamed of becoming an astronaut. But as he prepared to apply to college, an advisor told him to Florida Times-Union newspaper logofind a different path. “He said it may be a long time before Nigeria sends rockets and astronauts into space, so I should consider something more practical,” Zubair saud. He decided to become a physician, and is currently the medical and scientific director of the Cell Therapy Laboratory at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. And while he’ll almost certainly never get to make a journey outside the Earth’s atmosphere himself, if the weather stays good Saturday he’ll be sending a payload into space.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage: Action News Jax, Augustine Record, KTIV, Spaceflight Now, KTTCTechnology Networks

Context: Consider it one physician’s giant leap for mankind. Today, the latest rocket launch from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, included a payload of several samples of donated adult stem cells from a research laboratory at Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus. The launch by SpaceX, an American aerospace manufacturer and space transport services company, is part of NASA’s commercial resupply missions to the International Space Station. The biological cells come from the laboratory of Abba Zubair, M.D., Ph.D., who says he has eagerly awaited the launch following several delays over the past couple of years. Dr. Zubair, who specializes in cellular treatments for disease and regenerative medicine, hopes to find out how the stem cells hold up in space. He says he’s eager to know whether these special cells, which are derived from the body’s bone marrow, can be more quickly mass-produced in microgravity and used to treat strokes. Microgravity is the condition in which people or objects appear to be weightless. The effects of microgravity can be seen when astronauts and objects float in space. Microgravity refers to the condition where gravity seems to be very small. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Kevin Punsky

 

USA Today
Can't sleep? When is it time to seek professional help
by Mary Bowerman

It’s no secret that Americans aren’t getting enough sleep. For those who are self-medicating or tossing and turning, it may be time to look at your sleeping habits once and for all, according to Timothy Morgenthaler, co-director of Mayo’s Center for Sleep Medicine in Rochester. "I think it'sUSA Today newspaper logo becoming increasingly clear that sleep is a vital component of health; for many years we've been aware of nutrition and exercise, and I think we now realize that sleep is very closely entwined with overall health," Morgenthaler said.

Reach: USA TODAY  has an average daily circulation of 4.1 million which includes print, various digital editions and other papers that use their branded content.

Context: Timothy Morgenthaler, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine physician who also practices in Mayo Clinic's Center for Sleep Medicine.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

KARE 11
Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup
by Pat Evans

New findings about America’s heart health awareness, opinions, and behaviors have been uncovered as part of the Mayo Clinic National Health KARE-11 LogoCheckup, which first launched in January 2016 and provides a quick pulse on consumer health opinions and behaviors at multiple times throughout the year. “The Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup helps us to better understand the health knowledge and practices of all Americans, beyond the patients that walk through our doors,” says John Wald, M.D., Medical Director for Public Affairs at Mayo Clinic.

Reach: KARE-TV is the NBC affiliate serving the Minneapolis-Saint Paul market.

Additional coverage: KGUN TucsonCNBCKAALKXLY Spokane

Context: A new survey by Mayo Clinic revealed that more than two-thirds of African-Americans are concerned about their heart health (71 percent), which is significantly more than Caucasian (41 percent) or Hispanic (37 percent) respondents. Respondents from the South (51 percent) were also significantly more likely to express concern than those in the Northeast (39 percent) or West (35 percent). These findings were uncovered as part of the Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup, which first launched in January 2016 and provides a quick pulse on consumer health opinions and behaviors at multiple times throughout the year. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

FOX 13 Tampa Bay
Vaccine could prevent breast, ovarian, lung cancer
by Dr. Joette Giovinco

It's a dream many parents would welcome for their children: a vaccine that could prevent breast, ovarian and some lung cancers. It'Fox 13 Tampa Bay Logos also the dream of immunology professor Dr. Keith Knutson. "The hope is we can develop vaccines before the development of cancer much in the way that we use a polio vaccine or a flu vaccine," Dr. Knutson tells us in in his Mayo Clinic Jacksonville laboratory.

Reach:  Fox 13 is the Fox affiliate in Tampa Bay, Florida.

Context: Researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have been awarded a $13.3 million, five-year federal grant to test a vaccine designed to prevent the recurrence of triple-negative breast cancer, a subset of breast cancer for which there are no targeted therapies. The grant, the Breakthrough Award from the U.S. Department of Defense’s Breast Cancer Research Program, will fund a national, phase II clinical trial testing the ability of a folate receptor alpha vaccine to prevent recurrence of this aggressive cancer following initial treatment. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Knutson, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

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Tags: AAN, ABC News, ABC13 Houston, acupuncture, Alain Elkann, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimers, Ambient Clinical, Andy Sandness, anxiety, AP Big Story, Arizona Republic


February 10th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Neurology Today
The Neurologist as National Health Care Leader: Mayo Clinic's John H. Noseworthy, MD, FAAN
by Gina Shaw

John H. Noseworthy, MD, discusses his pathway from a passion in multiple sclerosis research and clinical practice to heading up the Mayo Clinic enterprise as its president and chief executive officer…Today, the world of health care knows John H. Noseworthy, MD, FAAN, as the influentialNeurology Today Logo president and chief executive officer (CEO) of the Mayo Clinic. But the world of neurology, and of multiple sclerosis (MS) research, might be very different today had Dr. Noseworthy elected to pursue the medical specialty he had originally planned on: cardiology.

Reach:  Neurology Today is the official publication of the American Academy of Neurology. The magazine is published monthly and has a circulation of more than 24,000.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

NBC News
Doctors Push for Flu Immunizations After Surge of Cases Nationwide

According to the Centers for Disease Control, 40 states are reporting widespread flu activity — with more than 30,000 reported cases in the U.S. NBC News LogoInterview with Dr. Pritish Tosh, Infectious Diseases, Mayo Clinic.

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Context: Pritish Tosh, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist. Dr. Tosh is interested in emerging infections and preparedness activities related to them, ranging from collaborating with the Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group in basic science vaccine development to hospital systems research related to pandemic preparedness. Influenza is a viral infection that attacks your respiratory system — your nose, throat and lungs. Influenza, commonly called the flu, is not the same as stomach "flu" viruses that cause diarrhea and vomiting.

Contacts: Bob Nellis, Sharon Theimer

 

Today
Red Dress Awards: Meet two women who’ve made heart-healthy changes

The Woman’s Day Red Dress Awards, the premiere event to spotlight the fight against heart disease among women, are Tuesday night, and Hoda Kotb will be a presenter. Nutritionist Joy Bauer and cardiologist Dr. Sharonne Hayes are joined on TODAY by two women who will be honored at the awards for meeting the challenge of making heart-healthy changes to their lives.

Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show.

Context:  Sharonne Hayes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Hayes studies cardiovascular disease and prevention, with a focus on sex and gender differences and conditions that uniquely or predominantly affect women. With a clinical base in the Women's Heart Clinic, Dr. Hayes and her research team utilize novel recruitment methods, social media and online communities, DNA profiling, and sex-specific evaluations to better understand several cardiovascular conditions. A major area of focus is spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD), an uncommon and under-recognized cause of acute coronary syndrome (heart attack) that occurs predominantly in young women.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Action News Jax
Mayo Clinic to test vaccine to prevent, treat precancerous breast lesions
by Jenna Bourne

Mayo Clinic doctors will test a vaccine to prevent women from developing precancerous breast lesions. It could someday become part of routine vaccinations for women, but the Mayo Clinic has to first put it through extensive clinical trials. The hospital is able to do that because of a $3.7 million grant from the U.S. Department of Defense…Mayo Clinic immunology professor Dr. Keith Knutson has been working on a vaccine for nearly a decade. Knutson hoped it will help hundreds of thousands of women avoid surgeries and radiation treatments. “That’s been a big problem, because treatments have side effects. And that’s something that we may be able to eliminate by boosting the body’s own natural drug making machinery, which is the immune system,” said Knutson.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Context: Researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have been awarded a $13.3 million, five-year federal grant to test a vaccine designed to prevent the recurrence of triple-negative breast cancer, a subset of breast cancer for which there are no targeted therapies. The grant, the Breakthrough Award from the U.S. Department of Defense’s Breast Cancer Research Program, will fund a national, phase II clinical trial testing the ability of a folate receptor alpha vaccine to prevent recurrence of this aggressive cancer following initial treatment. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Knutson, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Wall Street Journal
A New Device May Mean Fewer Breast-Cancer Surgeries
by Lucette Lagnado

Viewing low re-excision rates as a key indicator of quality, other institutions are highlighting their techniques to reduce second surgeries. At Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., breast surgeons point to their method of having pathologists nearby in the operating suite to examine frozen tissue samples while the patient is in surgery. Their second-surgery rates are 3.6%, though the technique is a century old, says Dr. Judy Boughey, Mayo’s surgical-research chair.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: When diagnosed with breast cancer, women may have thousands of questions running through their minds, but one they may not have immediately is: Will my choice of provider save me time and money? Mayo Clinic researchers have answered this question with what they believe are compelling statistics that may encourage women and their doctors — and the health care system at large — to consider a different way of doing business, specifically with respect to lumpectomies as a treatment for early-stage breast cancer.  The different way would be to use intraoperative frozen section analysis to determine whether the tumor was removed completely during the first surgery. Doing this in a widespread manner could save untold hours of lost work, anxiety and more for women and tens of millions of dollars.  “With the routine use of frozen section analysis of margins on Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus, we rarely — in only 3 to 5 percent of cases — require a second operation for margin re-excision,” says first author Judy Boughey, M.D., a breast surgeon in the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. “So, for over 95 percent of patients undergoing lumpectomy, only one operation is required.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Phoenix magazine
School of Doc
by Jessie Martin
This summer, the University of Arizona College of Medicine’s 50-year run as the only M.D.-granting institution in Arizona will come to an end with the debut Phoenix magazine logoof the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine in Scottsdale. It will be the third branch of the medical college, which was founded in 1972 in Rochester, Minn., followed by a sister campus in Jacksonville, Fla. Lois Krahn, a Mayo Clinic physician of 22 years, says a common misconception of this partnership is that ASU and Mayo Clinic are opening a joint medical school. “It’s important to note that we are not partnering with ASU in the legal sense. We have a very rich and productive collaboration with ASU that dates back over a decade,” Krahn says.

Reach:  Written for the residents of and visitors to the metropolitan Phoenix area, Phoenix magazine has a monthly circulation of more than 70,000.  Phoenix magazine online has more than 43,000 unique visitors each month.

Related coverage:
AMA blog, Not your grandfather’s med school: Changes trending in med ed

Context: Mayo Medical School announced that its planned expansion in Scottsdale, has received licensure by the Arizona State Board for Private Postsecondary Education, the group responsible for regulating private postsecondary degree-granting institutions within the state of Arizona will open with its first class of students this year. "This is a major milestone in our journey to open a full four-year branch campus of Mayo Medical School in Scottsdale,” says Wyatt Decker, M.D., CEO of Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Earlier this month, Mayo Medical School leaders announced they had also received endorsement for the expansion from the Liaison Committee for Medical Education (LCME), the accrediting body for medical education. More information about the medical school can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network and on the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine's website.

Contacts:  Jim McVeigh, Deborah Anderson

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January 27th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik


CBS News
Healthcare providers on how healthcare may change under Trump

The CEOs of the Mayo Clinic, Cleveland Clinic and New York-Presbyterian Hospital sat down with CBS News at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. They offered their thoughts on how healthcare may change in the incoming Trump administration.CBS News Logo

Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

Related coverage in the January 20, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Star Tribune
Aging boomers, lack of funding for Alzheimer's may lead to 'major social and economic crisis'
by Allie Shah

Do we cure cancer, heart disease or diabetes? No, but we can make significant progress," said Dr. Ron Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Star Tribune newspaper logoAlzheimer's disease Research Center. "So if I'm destined to develop Alzheimer's disease-related changes in the brain at age 75, and I can push that to age 78 or 80, that's a big deal. That's why I say delaying onset and slowing progression is a more realistic goal than a cure." Petersen will participate in a panel discussion, hosted by TPT Tuesday, on the state of Alzheimer's disease in Minnesota. The event is sold out.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

NPR
Athlete-Turned-Trucker Works To Improve Truckers' Health
by Alex Smith

On a chilly winter morning, dozens of truck driver trainees file into a classroom at the headquarters of Prime Inc., a trucking company based in Springfield, Mo. At the front is Siphiwe Baleka, an energetic former swimming champion in his mid-40s. He delivers grim news about trucker
health to the new recruits. "If you haven't started to think about this, you need to start right now," Baleka says. ..The relatively small lifestyle changes that Baleka promotes could be enough to make a life-changing difference in the health of many truck drivers, says Dr. Clayton Cowl, chief of preventive, occupational and aerospace medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. "The drivers themselves — they don't need to be running marathons, necessarily," Cowl says.

Reach: Shots is the online channel for health stories from the NPR Science Desk.

Context:  Clayton Cowl, M.D. heads Mayo Clinic's preventive, occupational and aerospace medicine. The division consists of 22 physicians who have specialty training in internal medicine or family practice and a team of trained occupational health nurses. Several of our physicians are board-certified in preventive, occupational and/or aerospace medicine. Mayo Clinic's integrated group practice model makes consultation with any other medical specialists readily available.

Contact:  Kelly Reller

 

Star Tribune
Filmmaker Ken Burns on Mayo Clinic: 'One of the most amazing medical places on Earth'
by Neal Justin

Ever since a Mayo Clinic newsletter mentioned this past October that Ken Burns' production company was spending time on the Rochester Star Tribune newspaper logocampus for an upcoming documentary, details have been sketchy…On a website for the Better Angels Society, the foundation that supports Burns' work and raises funds for them, it categorizes "The Mayo Clinic" under "Ken Burns Presents: The Next Generation," a division dedicated to a new generation of filmmakers with their boss lending his reputation and guidance as an executive producer.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: City Pages

Context:  To learn more about the Ken Burns' film, check out this story in Mayo Clinic in the Loop.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

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January 6th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik


Reuters

‘Hidden’ celiac disease less common now in U.S.
by Shereen Lehman

Fewer people in the U.S. have celiac disease without realizing it, a new study finds. The actual proportion of people with celiac disease in the United States has not changed since 2009, researchers say. “The total prevalence is stable,” Dr. Joseph Murray told Reuters Health in a phone interview. But there are fewer people walking around with “hidden” celiac disease. “When you look at the proportion that are diagnosedReuters Logo versus undiagnosed, that's gone up dramatically. Go back six years and most patients were undiagnosed, with only about one in five getting diagnosed,” said Murray, a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota who was part of the study team.

Reach: Reuters has 196 editorial bureaus in 130 countries and 2,400 editorial staff members and covers international news, regional news, politics, social issues, health, business, sports and media.

Context: Joseph Murray, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist. Dr. Murray's research interests focus in two distinct areas: celiac disease and esophageal disorders. To learn more about celiac disease, check out this Mayo Clinic radio interview with Dr. Murray.

Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Joe Dangor

 

Today.com
The real brain food could be fresh veggies and olive oil, study finds
by Maggie Fox

People got points for light to moderate drinking — in this case about a third of drink a day to no more than three drinks a day on average for men and two for women. Dr. David Knopman, a professor of neurology TODAY Showat the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota who was not involved in the study, said this could translate to real-life benefits. “Loss of brain volume is an inevitable part of the aging process,” Knopman told NBC News. “A bigger brain is in general better for you because at least in late life, it makes a person more resistant to the effects of brain diseases,” he added.

Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show.

Context: David Knopman, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist.  Dr. Knopman is involved in research in late-life cognitive disorders, such as mild cognitive impairment and dementia. Dr. Knopman's specific interests are in the very early stages of Alzheimer's disease, in cognitive impairment due to stroke (cerebrovascular disease) and in cognitive impairment due to frontotemporal degeneration.

Contacts: Susan Barber Lindquist, Traci Klein

 

Post-Bulletin
Brewer has FAITH in Rochester
by Brett Boese

When Mayo Clinic Dr. LaPrincess Brewer took the stage last month in Charlotte, N.C., Jackie Johnson couldn't help beaming with pride. Johnson, a vocal advocate within Rochester's Black community, hasn't stopped singing Brewer's praises as the Brewer's success has resonated across the country, even as it flies under the radar locally. Brewer's FAITH program, an acronym for Fostering African-AmericanLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaper Improvement in Total Health, was among the featured attractions at the 28th annual Healthy Churches 2020 National Conference that was held in her hometown. Its initial success in Baltimore and the ensuing impact in Minnesota since Brewer arrived at Mayo in 2013 has prompted significant accolades for the charismatic 35-year-old cardiologist.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context: LaPrincess Brewer, M.D., M.P.H., has a primary research focus in developing strategies to reduce and ultimately eliminate cardiovascular disease health disparities in racial and ethnic minority populations and in underserved communities through health promotion and community-based participatory research. Dr. Brewer also has special interest in increasing minority and women's participation in cardiovascular clinical trials through mobile health (mHealth) interventions. Additionally, she has published work on faith-based interventions for cardiovascular disease prevention, racial differences in weight maintenance and psychosocial factors influencing cardiac risk factors.

Contact: Ethan Grove

 

ABC News
US News and World Report Releases List of Best Diets
by Gillian Mohney

Every year many Americans make a New Year's resolution to lose weight, but finding ways to drop pounds and keep them off is difficult. Today, U.S. News and World Report released its annual list of the best diets, ABC News logoaccording to nutrition and medical experts. The diets were chosen by a panel of nutritionists, dietary consultants, physicians and other experts convened by U.S News and World Report. Mayo Clinic Diet: This diet is broken into two parts. The first part requires no calorie counting, but dieters are stuck with meals made up of healthy foods including whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and healthy fats, as well as at least 30 minutes of physical activity a day.

Reach: ABC News Online has more than 28.8 million unique visitors to its site each month. ABC’s World News Tonight with David Muir averages about 9.2 million viewers each night.

Additional coverage:
HealthDay, Plant-Based Diets Score Big for Healthy Weight Loss
WATE6 Knoxville, U.S. News and World Report ranks top diets
FOX News, US News ranks best diet plans for 2017
Atlanta Journal-ConstitutionWant to lose weight? Experts say these are the best diets of 2017
FOX4 Dallas, Lose weight faster by tracking habits

Context:  As the second edition of The Mayo Clinic Diet hits store shelves, the diet plan has been named Best Commercial Diet by U.S. News & World Report.  “We are honored to be recognized for a weight-loss method that offers lasting results,” says Donald Hensrud, M.D., medical editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet and director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. Learn more about the Mayo Clinic by watching this Mayo Clinic Minute or read more about it on Mayo Clinic Network. “The Mayo Clinic Diet is much more than a diet,” Dr. Hensrud says. “It’s a lifestyle program in which people can eat great-tasting food and feel better right away ─ even while they lose weight. More importantly, these lifestyle changes are sustainable and can improve long-term health as people reach and maintain a healthy weight.”

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

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November 18th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Washington Post
The one thing missing from the debate over Obamacare, according to a top doctor
by Carolyn Y. Johnson

President-elect Donald Trump’s promise to repeal the Affordable Care Act while preserving some key elements has triggered rampant speculation about the future of American health care — and plunged millions of patients who benefit from the law into deep uncertainty aboutWashington Post newspaper logo the future of their coverage. Little is known about the replacement plan that will ultimately emerge. But one voice angling to shape future policy is the leader of the Mayo Clinic, neurologist John Noseworthy. “Patients are getting frustrated and fearful and anxious that they can’t have access to the care that’s best suited for them,” Noseworthy said. “How can you have a great country if our citizens can’t get access to world class health care? It’s actually not a bad time to reassess.”

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Albuquerque Journal, The Journal

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Forbes
Are Naproxen and Ibuprofen Sometimes Risky? A Controversial Study Of Celebrex Raises Concerns
by Matthew Herper

A study released today may mean that the painkiller celecoxib, once sold under the brand name Celebrex, is safer than prescription doses of Forbes Pharma and Healthcare logoibuprofen or naproxen. That is if the study, which is already controversial, means anything at all. … “It’s fascinating that Celebrex is not worse, and may have a small trend to being better,” says Rekha Mankad, director of the cardio-rheumatology clinic at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester. “I as a cardiologist I would prefer that nobody take any of these drugs on a long-term basis ever.” Still she says, it’s better for patients to get non-steroidal drugs like these than opioids, which are often the next option.

Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: CBS News

Context: Rekha Mankad, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Mankad's interests include gender disparities that exist in regards to heart disease, the relationship between autoimmune diseases and coronary artery disease and gender differences in valvular heart disease.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

CNN
Crawling has some fitness experts going gaga
by Jacqueline Howard

On any given morning, as the sun peeks over the horizon, Danielle Johnson can be found crawling down the hallways of her Rochester, CNN LogoMinnesota, home. It may sound bizarre, but Johnson crawls every day to strengthen her core muscle groups. "You can crawl in many ways. You can crawl on your hands and knees. You can also prop up on your toes and just hover, one or two inches above the ground, which is really going to pull in those core muscles and work those muscles effectively," said Johnson, a physical therapist at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program.

Reach: Cable News Network (CNN) is a worldwide news and information network providing live, continuous coverage of news from around the globe, 24 hours a day. CNN online received more than 55 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Huffington Post
A Culture of Legacy
by Marcia McMullen

The recent passing of a cultural icon in health care revealed a rare glimpse into how a successful 150-year-old brand built on a clear mission and Huffington Post Logoexacting processes which ultimately became its culture. Dr. William J. Mayo’s clarity of mission, “The needs of the patient come first.” set into a motion a defining statement that would withstand not only time, but also cultural shifts and leadership changes. One of those change leaders, Sr. Generose Gervais, OSF, administrator and executive director emeritus, Saint Marys Campus-Mayo Clinic Hospital, recently passed away at the age of 97.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique visitors.

Previous coverage in the October 21, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Sister Generose Gervais, long-time administrator of Saint Marys Hospital and president of the Poverello Foundation, passed away peacefully recently in the hospital she served for many years. She was 97. Sister Generose will be remembered for her tireless work on behalf of patients and the staff of Saint Marys Hospital. Her hospital ministry focused on perpetuating the Franciscan legacy, specifically nurturing the values of respect, integrity, compassion, healing, teamwork, innovation, excellence and stewardship among all Mayo Clinic staff. “Sister Generose was known for her faith, her quiet leadership, her wise counsel, her dedication to patients and staff, her sense of humor and the example of service that she lived every day,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic. “Mayo Clinic was blessed by her presence for more than 60 years.” More information about Sister Generose can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network and Mayo Clinic in the Loop.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

New York Times
Q&A: A look at the cancer some believe linked to Vietnam War

…Bile duct cancer is unusual because it can be prevented in some cases. Pills can wipe out liver flukes early on, but the medicine is not effective in later stages after the worms have died and scarring has occurred. Surgery is possible in some cases, but the survivalThe New York Times newspaper logo rate is only about 30 percent for five years, said Dr. Gregory Gores, a gastroenterologist and executive dean of research at Mayo Clinic. Affected countries, such as Vietnam and Laos, have not conducted extensive research to determine the extent of the problem. The world’s highest rate of cholangiocarcinoma — about 84 new cases per 100,000 people — is found in northeastern Thailand where many people eat a popular raw fish dish.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Additional coverage: WTOP Washington, Star Tribune, Associated Press

Context: Gregory Gores, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist.  Dr. Gores research is focused on mechanisms of liver cell death, especially apoptosis. He employs disease-relevant models to unravel the fundamental cellular processes contributing to liver injury during cholestasis and fatty liver diseases. In addition, Dr. Gores' lab is also interested in the mechanisms by which cancer cells escape from cell death in order to undergo malignant transformation and metastases.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

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September 30th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

ABC News
9-Year-Old Twin Sisters Dance With Bone Marrow Donor Who Saved Them
by Nicole Pelletiere

A pair of identical twin sisters from Minnesota were able to thank the man whose life-saving donation gave them the ability to be kids again.  “They fell in love with him right away,” mom Michelle Girtler, 43, of Minnesota City told ABC News today. “They took to him like they knew him their entire life. It was emotional, all of us were emotional. Lots of tears, a lot of gratitude."… This year, Elizabeth and Kathryn's doctor,ABC News logo Dr. Shakila Khan of the Mayo Clinic, submitted their story to Be the Match in hopes of setting up a meeting between them and their then anonymous donor.  The man, Ingo Gruda of Munster, Germany, was flown to Minnesota to meet with the girls over four after their transplants, Be the Match confirmed to ABC News.

Reach: ABC News Online has more than 28.8 million unique visitors to its site each month. ABC’s World News Tonight with David Muir averages about 9.2 million viewers each night.

Additional coverage: Inside Edition, KVNU-AM

Previous coverage in September 23, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Shakila Khan, M.D., is a physician with Mayo Clinic Children's Center. Dr. Khan's collaborative clinical research efforts include the Children's Oncology Group and Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium (PBMTC). She has also has served as the Mayo Clinic principal investigator for a large number of Children's Oncology Group and PBMTC protocols, and she's also the Mayo Clinic principal investigator for PBMTC.

Contact:  Sharon Theimer

 

Wall Street Journal
Trying to Break Unhealthy Habits? There’s a Coach for That
by Barbara Sadick

Changing unhealthy habits is hard, doctors say. But with Americans suffering from chronic disease in epidemic proportions, a big push is under way to get more individuals to do just that. … A Mayo Clinic study of WSJ Banner100 participants who worked with a wellness coach found that a majority had lost weight, improved nutritional habits and increased their physical activity by the end of the 12-week program. While there was some slippage in healthy behaviors at a three-month follow-up, the participants were still in better shape than before the coaching started, the study found. “Many people can implement positive lifestyle changes, but maintaining change over time is extremely difficult,” says Matthew M. Clark, a clinical psychologist at Mayo Clinic and the lead author of the study.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Several national surveys have found that approximately 15 to 20 percent of adults in the U.S. will report high levels of stress. A new study by Mayo Clinic researchers identified stress and burnout as a major problem employees face within the medical industry, leading to negative health behaviors. With rising stress levels in the workplace for employees, many companies are looking to integrate, engage and enroll employees into wellness programs. “It’s important to teach individuals to monitor their stress levels over time and practice effective, ongoing stress-reduction strategies, such as getting involved in wellness programs, this will in-turn help health care employees live a happy and health life,” says Matthew Clark, Ph.D., lead author of the study and resiliency expert at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Wall Street Journal
The Revolution in EMS Care
by Laura Landro

Much of the best equipment—including a helicopter equipped as a mobile emergency room or intensive-care unit—can be found at the Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minn. Regarded as a leader in sophisticated onboard equipment and communications, Mayo often consults with other medical transport systems to share best patient care strategies, and works with U.S. military physicians to share expertise on WSJ Bannerhow treatment of battlefield wounds might apply to civilian medicine. Mayo provides increasingly advanced pre-hospital treatment, says Scott Zietlow, a trauma surgeon and medical director of the Mayo One trauma helicopter program.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Emergency Medicine specialists work at all three Mayo Clinic locations to treat life-threatening illnesses. Teams of board-certified physicians, registered nurses, and other specially trained staff are available at all times to treat anyone seeking emergency medical care. Each year Mayo emergency care physicians see more than 80,000 patients in the emergency care setting.  Mayo Clinic Medical Transport provides ground and air medical transport services from its base in Rochester:

Contact: Glenn Lyden

 

Modern Healthcare
Q&A: ‘If Mayo was a high-cost provider, we would be cut out of many of these networks’
by Bob Herman

Mayo Clinic, which has a 150-year history as a medical practice, now operates 22 hospitals and draws patients with complex needs from all over the world to its 1,243-bed flagship facility in Rochester, Minn. The Modern Healthcareorganization has also garnered praise for insulating clinical decisions from financial incentives by paying physicians under a salary model with no productivity bonuses. … Bob Herman, Modern Healthcare's Midwest bureau chief, interviewed Mayo President and CEO Dr. John Noseworthy while he was in Chicago as co-chair of a consortium of 12 health system CEOs convened with the American Medical Association to address physician burnout.

Reach: Modern Healthcare is the industry's leading source of healthcare business and policy news, research and information. The magazine covers health care policy, Medicare/Medicaid, and health care from a business perspective. Modern Healthcare magazine is ranked No. 1 in readership among healthcare executives and deemed a "must-read" by the who's who in healthcare. Modern Healthcare has more than 72,0000 paid magazine subscribers and its website receives more than 568,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Modern Healthcare (video)Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy on physician burnout and value-based care

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Mayo Clinic has taken a leadership role in identifying solutions to address the physician burnout issue. This research has been led by  Tait Shanaflet, M.D., a Mayo Clinic hematologist. He is the director of the Mayo Clinic Department of Medicine Program on Physician Well-being, a clinical laboratory evaluating personal and organizational factors that contribute to physician satisfaction. His research in this area has involved physicians at all stages of their career from medical school to practice had has include several multi-center and national studies. This research is intended to identify personal and organizational factors that can be modified in order to promote physician well-being and enhance the quality of care physicians deliver. More information on his physician burnout research can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: DuskaAnastasijevic, Karl Oestreich

 

Arizona Republic
Many people have expressed interest in wanting to learn what is their risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease
by Dr. Richard Caselli
— Question: What is Alzheimer’s disease and is it wise to get tested for risk? Answer: Alzheimer’s disease is a degenerative disease; brain cells slowly dying. We don’t fully understand why. To some degree, degeneration is a natural process, but this accelerates that process to a pathological degree. Many people have expressed interest in wanting to learn what is their risk for developing Alzheimer’s, and that’s whereArizona Republic newspaper logo the idea of predictive testing comes in, somebody who isn’t ill today but who wants to know am I going to get this in the future.…Dr. Richard Caselli is a neurologist specializing in behavioral disorders and serves as associate director of the Alzheimer’s Disease Center at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Reach: The Arizona Republic has daily circulation of more than 180,000 and its website azcentral.com has more than 2.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Richard Caselli, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist. Dr. Caselli's research focuses on cognitive aging and the changes that can be detected before the symptomatic onset of memory loss and related symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.

Contact:  Jim McVeigh

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September 9th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

 

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Star Tribune
Mortenson picked for Destination Medical Center's Discovery Square
By Nicole Norfleet

M.A. Mortenson Co. has been chosen as the developer for the research campus of Mayo Clinic’s Destination Medical Center (DMC) in downtown Rochester. The six-block subdistrict which will be called Discovery Square is supposed to “serve as a point where physicians and scientists willStar Tribune newspaper logo come together with businesses and entrepreneurs to accelerate advancements in medical research and technology for critical advances in patient care,” according to an announcement.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: Twin Cities Business, Post-Bulletin, KAAL-TV, Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal, KIMTConstruction DiveHealthcare DesignFinance & CommerceTwin Cities Business, Post-Bulletin, KAAL-TV, Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal, KIMT

Context: Mayo Clinic announced recently that it will collaborate with M.A. Mortenson Company, a real estate development firm for Destination Medical Center’s (DMC) Discovery Square. Discovery Square will serve as a point where physicians and scientists will come together with businesses and entrepreneurs to accelerate advancements in medical research and technology for critical advances in patient care. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

US News & World Report
At Mayo Clinic, Researchers Burrow Into Burnout
by Steve Sternberg

If the Mayo Clinic – widely regarded as one of the most enlightened health systems in the world – struggles with high rates of physician burnout, US News Logono health system is immune of its physicians suffer from burnout because they have created a team, led by Dr. Tait Shanafelt, that studies professional satisfaction among physicians and other health workers…Shanafelt's residency included a month devoted to a research topic of his choice. He described his observations to his research adviser, who theorized that the residents were suffering from burnout and said, "Let's put together a team and explore it." Their resulting study of residents at University of Washington-affiliated hospitals appeared in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine in 2002.

Reach: U.S. News & World Report is a multi-platform publisher of news and information, which includes http://www.usnews.com and http://www.rankingsandreviews.com.

Context: Tait Shanaflet, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic hematologist. He is the director of the Mayo Clinic Department of Medicine Program on Physician Well-being, a clinical laboratory evaluating personal and organizational factors that contribute to physician satisfaction. His research in this area has involved physicians at all stages of their career from medical school to practice had has include several multi-center and national studies. This research is intended to identify personal and organizational factors that can be modified in order to promote physician well-being and enhance the quality of care physicians deliver. More information on his physician burnout research can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Current
MPR and Mayo Clinic team up to offer classical soundtrack
by April Simpson

Minnesota Public Radio and the Mayo Clinic are promoting health and healing through a unique partnership that launched Thursday. Research has shown that the benefits of listening to music include improved pain control and lowered anxiety and blood pressure. So MPR will curate aCurrent news logo playlist of classical compositions for the listening pleasure of patients at Mayo Clinic hospitals in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota.

Reach: Current is the nonprofit news service for and about public media in the U.S. Current publishes online daily and in print - 16 issues in 2016.

Additional coverage: Malaysia SunTwin Cities Business

Context: Patients at Mayo Clinic hospitals in Rochester; Jacksonville, Florida; and Phoenix will be able to relax to a custom blend of classical music provided by Minnesota Public Radio (MPR), beginning Sept. 1. A new agreement calls for MPR’s national programming division, American Public Media (APM) — the largest provider of classical music programming in North America — to supply up to 17 hours of streaming classical music that Mayo Clinic can distribute at no charge to patients and visitors in patient rooms. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Deb Anderson

 

WJXT Jacksonville
Pediatricians say ‘no’ to FluMist
by Ashley Harding

Since it became available several years ago, the FluMist nasal spray was a big relief. But parents, be prepared for that dreaded trip to the doctor now because it's not an option this season. "It's believed that the shot News Jax 4 Logois actually more effective," said Dr. Vandana Bhide with Mayo Clinic. She says the reason why the FluMist isn't working as well is hard to explain. "I don't think we know exactly why. I think because the injectable one is seen by the entire body in the bloodstream, perhaps the immune system responds better," said Dr. Bhide.

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville. This Week in Jacksonville is a weekly public affairs program on WJXT.

Context: Vandana Bhide, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic internist and pediatrician.

Contact: Kevin Punksy

 

STAT
Raising an alarm, doctors fight to yank hospital ICUs into the modern era
by Usha Lee McFarling

In a modern ICU, a single patient can generate 2,000 data points per day, said Dr. Brian Pickering, an anesthesiologist and critical care physician at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. In a 24-bed ICU like his, that’s 50,000 data points a day. Important information is easily lost, or forgotten. Pickering joined the Mayo Clinic nine years ago from Ireland, where patient data was still logged on a paper chart at the end of theSTAT Logo of Boston Globe bed. He was overwhelmed, he said, by electronic records in the United States that had too many tabs and screens and were difficult to navigate. “Point. Click. Point. Click. Point. Click. Back and forth,” he said. “That may work if you’ve only got one patient. But I’ve got 24 in the ICU, and any one of them could be in crisis at any minute.” With colleagues, Pickering created an “electronic intern,” called AWARE, that identifies the most important information a physician needs and highlights it, organizing it around organ systems.

Reach: STAT covers the frontiers of health and medicine including science labs, hospitals, biotechnology board rooms, and political back rooms. Hosted by The Boston Globe, STAT launched on November 5, 2015. The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Context:  Brian Pickering, M.B., B.Ch., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist. Dr. Pickering has been involved in the development of novel electronic interfaces for use in the intensive care unit (ICU) that facilitate reduced cognitive load, medical errors and resource utilization. He has extensive experience in evaluating systems of health care delivery and in the delivery of quality improvements to those systems.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

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Tags: ABC News, alcohol, alzheimers, Arcadia, Becker’s Hospital Review, blood pressure, Bloomberg, Camp Oz, Constructive Dive, Consumer Reports, Current, destination medical center


August 26th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

 

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 


AP
Pros to Joes: Elite Athlete Training for the Corporate World
 by Dave Campbell

Kyle Rudolph's two most productive seasons for the Minnesota Vikings were also those in which he played every game, not coincidentally. After all the surgeries, crutches and rehab, Rudolph has found a training program to supplement team-supervised workouts that has contributed to theAssociated Press Wire Service Logo durability he's long sought to establish. The sturdiness of his body at age 26 has become equally important as the agility and strength needed to thrive as an NFL tight end in the prime of his career. "It's all about playing 16 games," said Rudolph, who found his happy place in downtown Minneapolis at the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center through a joint venture with the specialized performance training firm EXOS … "The elite athlete is the beacon that gets all the attention, but those same principles trickle down to how we treat every athlete," said Dr. Ed Laskowski, the co-director of Mayo's sports medicine operation.

Reach: The Associated Press is a not-for-profit news cooperative, owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members. News collected by the AP is published and republished by newspaper and broadcast outlets worldwide.

Additional coverage: FOX Sports, ABC News, USA Today, NY Times, Star Tribune, Washington Post, Salon, Centre Daily Times, Kansas City Star, Charlotte Observer, The Daily Progress

Context: Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center is a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, sports performance optimization, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries. Edward Laskowski, M.D. is co-director of Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Buzzfeed
How Katie Ledecky Stacks Up Against Male Swimmers
by Peter Aldhous

Katie Ledecky blew away the competition in Rio de Janeiro, and was the standout racer of the 2016 Olympics. She won three individual golds, BuzzFeed Logoplus another gold and a silver in the relays. But it was her world records, and the margins of her victories, that really got people talking. Ledecky set world-best times in the 400- and 800-meter freestyle finals — winning that second race by more than 11 seconds. As she cuts through the water, Ledecky’s form is close to perfection. “I think her stroke is just really, really good,” Michael Joyner, an exercise physiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, told BuzzFeed News. “Watch her hands: There are very few bubbles.”

Reach: BuzzFeed receives more than 15.7 million unique visitors each month to its website and targets pop culture and social media enthusiasts.

Additional coverage:

Business Insider, 8 of the most impressive Olympic feats of all time

Previous coverage in August 19, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in August 12, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist.  Dr. Joyner's research team is interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

 

12News Arizona
US swimmer ignites interest in unusual chest condition
by Pete Scholz

It was June 2016, right after Cody Miller, 24, qualified for the Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro. It was then he shared with the world what he had been dealing with for the past 10 years or so.   The pictures he posted showed his noticeably sunken sternum -- the telltale symptom of a!2 News Arizona Logo condition known as pectus excavatum --"pectus" for short. From an operating theater at Mayo Clinic in north Phoenix, Dr. Dawn Jaroszewski pointed to a screen with two CT scans. "If you look at the normal chest, you have this rounded curvature," she indicated, "and on the pectus patient, you can see how the front of the chest collapses down," she added.

Reach: 12 News is KPNX, Phoenix, an NBC affiliate in the 12th-largest market in the country. The newscasts reach about 2 million viewers each day.

Context: Dawn Jaroszewski, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiac surgeon. Pectus excavatum is a condition in which a person's breastbone is sunken into his or her chest. In severe cases, pectus excavatum can look as if the center of the chest has been scooped out, leaving a deep dent. Pectus excavatum can be surgically repaired, but surgery is usually reserved for people who have moderate to severe signs and symptoms. People who have mild signs and symptoms may be helped by physical therapy. Certain exercises can improve posture and increase the degree to which the chest can expand.

Contact:  Jim McVeigh

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Tags: 12News Arizona, ABC News, antibiotic resistance, AP, Assurex Health, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, back to school, blood sugar, Bradenton Herald, Business Insider, BuzzFeed, Cancer


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