Items Tagged ‘ABC15 Arizona’

December 23rd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. This will be our last edition of 2016.  Look for us again on January 6, 2017. Thank you and happy holidays.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Los Angeles Times
A senior-friendly workout to improve movement and prevent injury

Jogging outdoors, running on a treadmill or lifting weights at the gym aren’t always practical — or enjoyable — activities for everyone. However, one type of exercise works for everyone, no matter your age or ability, because it relies on improving practical movements often involved inLogo for Los Angeles Times newspaper everyday activities. “Natural movement is universal, and it’s about bringing movement back to the basics,” says Bradly Prigge, wellness exercise specialist with the Mayo Clinic’s Healthy Living Program. “It’s not about following the latest fitness craze or learning the newest secret to weight loss. Natural movement is about connecting with your body and cultivating an awareness of your full abilities.”

Reach:  The Los Angeles Times has a daily readership of 1.9 million and 2.9 million on Sunday, more than 8 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.5 million. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 128 years.

Additional coverage: Mountain Grove News-Journal

Other recent coverage in the Los Angeles Times related to Mayo Clinic's Healthy Living Program

Cosmopolitan, Do You Really Need to Take Vitamins?
WTOP Washington, Mayo Clinic expert: 4 actions for a healthy holiday season
Yahoo! News, 9 Ways to Boost Your Immune System by Michael O Schroeder
WEAU Eau ClaireTODAY INTERVIEW: Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Recipes

Previous coverage related to Mayo Clinic's Healthy Living program in the December 2, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life.

Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Joe Dangor

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic in Rochester adds customized plane to air fleet

The Mayo Clinic in Rochester has unveiled a customized $8.5 million airplane to transport high-risk patients to its facilities. The fixed-wing aircraft adds to the Mayo One fleet that was created in 1984. The program began with a single helicopter based in Rochester and now boasts four — two in Rochester, one in Mankato and one in Eau Claire, Wisconsin.Star Tribune newspaper logo

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: KSTP, Becker’s Hospital Review, KIMT

Context: While a certain red sled usually owns the flight-related headlines this month, Santa's sleigh isn't the only one getting press this December. Several news outlets, it seems, are reporting on another vehicle taking flight. But instead of delivering toys to good girls and boys, the new Mayo One airplane delivers patients in need of immediate, advanced care to Mayo Clinic. And like Santa's ride, this one also has some pretty unique features, and the equipment, medication and staff to make it function as a sky-high Emergency Department. You can read more about the new Mayo one airplane in Mayo Clinic in the Loop.

Contact:  Glenn Lyden

 

KIMT
St. Mary’s nurse returns to work after hiking accident
by DeeDee Stiepan

It’s an incredible story of survival that we first brought you in May when a St. Mary’s nurse fell 100ft while hiking in Arizona. Amber Kohnhorst spent 24 hours in extreme pain, without food or water until she was KIMT LOGOrescued by helicopter. Now, the 25-year old is back in Rochester, and it’s been quite some time since she was working as a Registered Nurse on the 5th floor at St. Mary’s Hospital. “My last shift was Friday May 13th, she tells us. “I’ve never really believed in Friday the 13th but now it kind of freaks me out.”

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Previous coverage in December 2, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Amber Kohnhorst loves animals and adventure. The trip she'd planned to Best Friends Animal Sanctuary in Utah promised both. She'd spend time volunteering at the shelter and do some hiking in nearby Cane Beds, Arizona. But what sounded like a perfect vacation quickly became a nightmare when the 25-year-old Mayo Clinic nurse fell 100 feet down a cliff during what was supposed to be a short hike. You can read more about Amber's story on Mayo Clinic In the Loop.

Contacts:  Ginger Plumbo, Kelly Reller

 

NBC News
Why Heart Attacks Are Striking Healthy Young Women
by Lauren Dunn and Parminder Deo

Researchers are discovering that SCAD heart attacks occur more frequently than once thought..."SCAD is a type of heart attack, but completely NBC News Logodifferent than the one we normally think of," says cardiologist Dr. Sharonne Hayes of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. "It's caused by a split or tear in an otherwise healthy artery that leads to a drop in blood flow to the heart leading to a heart attack."

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Context:  Sharonne Hayes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Hayes studies cardiovascular disease and prevention, with a focus on sex and gender differences and conditions that uniquely or predominantly affect women. With a clinical base in the Women's Heart Clinic, Dr. Hayes and her research team utilize novel recruitment methods, social media and online communities, DNA profiling, and sex-specific evaluations to better understand several cardiovascular conditions. A major area of focus is spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD), an uncommon and under-recognized cause of acute coronary syndrome (heart attack) that occurs predominantly in young women.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic sees innovation as key to the future

Mayo Clinic recognizes the historic changes taking place in the health care landscape. The health care provider has become famous for treating the whole patient by integrating various specialties of care. Now Mayo is going to be using its of health care innovation system as a model for generating revenue. Mayo-Jacksonville is setting aside spaces for innovators and is taking part in more collaborations.Florida Times-Union newspaper logo

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Charles Bruce, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist and serves as medical director of Mayo Clinic Ventures at Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville, Florida. James (Jim) Rogers is chair of Mayo's newly formed Business Development Department, which combines the functions of Mayo Clinic Ventures and the Office of Business Development. The new department will oversee Mayo's partnerships with external organizations, spearhead new business opportunities and support the advancement of medical technology in conjunction with Mayo Clinic leaders, entrepreneurs and inventors.

Contacts: Kevin Punsky, Duska Anastasijevic

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Tags: ABC15 Arizona, AccuWeather.com, advisory board, Affordable care act, Alatus, alcohol, Amber Kohnhorst, American Medical Association, anesthesia, Angie Murad, antibiotics, antidepressants


December 16th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Chicago Tribune
Is bone broth the next hot health trend?
by Alison Bowen

Jason Ewoldt, a dietitian at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program in Rochester, Minn., said patients often ask him about something new they've read about. People often think, he said, "if a little bit's good, maybe a lot is better." But far from assuming what's best is tripling your boneChicago Tribune Logo broth intake after reading about its benefits, he said, "that's not necessarily the case." He said some people consider bone broth a magic elixir, crediting it with improving joint function and gut health.

Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 384,000 and a weekend circulation of more than 686,000.

Context: Jason Ewoldt is a dietitian at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program, which is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

HealthDay
Was football safer back in the day?

In a finding that suggests football used to be a less dangerous sport, a small study shows that men who played in high school in the 1950s and Health Day Logo1960s may not be at increased risk for dementia or memory problems…"What we can say is, for that era, football did not increase the risks of neurodegenerative disease compared with other sports," said senior researcher Dr. Rodolfo Savica, a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: NWI Times, Healthline, KTTC, WebMD, KIMT, CBS News, Medical News TodayWTAJ Pennsylvania, MSN

Context: A Mayo Clinic study published online recently in Mayo Clinic Proceedings found that varsity football players from 1956 to 1970 did not have an increased risk of degenerative brain diseases compared with athletes in other varsity sports. The researchers reviewed all the yearbooks and documented team rosters for Mayo High School and Rochester High School, now called John Marshall High School. The high school football players were compared with non-football playing athletes who were swimmers, basketball players and wrestlers. More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Reuters
Rural U.S. babies hardest hit by opiate addiction at birth
by Lisa Rapaport

These babies may have central nervous system issues like seizures and tremors, gastrointestinal problems and feeding difficulties, breathing challenges, as well as unstable body temperatures. “It is clear that neonatal abstinence syndrome is a growing problem across the country,” saidReuters Logo Dr. William Carey, a pediatric researcher at Mayo Clinic Children’s Center in Rochester, Minnesota. “While some state-level data has suggested that neonatal abstinence syndrome disproportionately affected rural counties, this is the first study to show that rural communities throughout America are particularly affected by this epidemic,” Carey, who wasn’t involved in the study, added by email.

Reach: Reuters has 196 editorial bureaus in 130 countries and 2,400 editorial staff members and covers international news, regional news, politics, social issues, health, business, sports and media.

Additional coverage: Yahoo! Sports

Context: William Carey, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic pediatrician with Mayo Clinic Children's Center. Mayo Clinic Children's Center pediatric and adolescent medicine specialists provide comprehensive care for the diagnosis and treatment of a wide range of diseases and conditions.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Tonic
The First Legit Study of Stem Cells and Arthritis Had Surprising Results
by Evy Pitt Stoller

According to a study led by the Mayo Clinic's Shane Shapiro, an orthopedic and sports medicine physician, the recent use of bone marrow stem Tonic cells in painful, arthritic joints has dramatically increased, while exactly how well the treatment works—or how safe it is—has yet to be made clear. "So many of these therapies are going on without the science to back it up," he says. "We weren't comfortable offering this treatment to patients until we or someone else had studied it in a rigorous fashion."

Reach: Tonic is a website hosted by Vice covering health and wellness, science, health issues, world health news and other topics.

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida have conducted the world’s first prospective, blinded and placebo-controlled clinical study to test the benefit of using bone marrow stem cells, a regenerative medicine therapy, to reduce arthritic pain and disability in knees. The researchers say such testing is needed because there are at least 600 stem cell clinics in the U.S. offering one form of stem cell therapy or another to an estimated 100,000-plus patients, who pay thousands of dollars, out of pocket, for the treatment, which has not undergone demanding clinical study.“Our findings can be interpreted in ways that we now need to test — one of which is that bone marrow stem cell injection in one ailing knee can relieve pain in both affected knees in a systemic or whole-body fashion,” says the study’s lead author, Shane Shapiro, M.D., a Mayo Clinic orthopedic physician. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Twin Cities Business
Mayo Researchers Land Patent For Non-Invasive Pancreatic Cancer Test
by Don Jacobson

The same Mayo Clinic research team that developed the Cologuard DNA-based stool test for colorectal cancer has also been working on similar technology for the early detection of pancreatic cancer. After encouraging early studies, they have now landed a patent for their methods. Dr.Twin Cities Business Magazine Logo David Ahlquist, a Mayo Clinic medical professor and consultant in its division of gastroenterology and hepatology, led the team that, late in the last decade, developed the genomic science behind the Cologuard test, which Mayo licensed in 2009 to Exact Sciences Corp. (NASDAQ: EXAS) of Madison, Wisconsin. Now, in a patent dated November 29, Ahlquist and Mayo colleagues Dr. John Kisiel, William R. Taylor, Tracy Yab and Douglas Mahoney were also granted rights to their method of “Detecting Neoplasm,” through which bio-samples, such as those collected from stool, can be analyzed for pancreatic cancer-related DNA biomarkers.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Context:  David Ahlquist M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist and co-inventor of the Cologuard test.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

ActionNewsJax
Air Force veteran hopes to meet donor's family after lung transplant in Jacksonville — A Georgia Air Force veteran ActionNewsJaxgot a double lung transplant at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville hours after his wife was told he was going to die… An hour after doctors said he wasn’t going to make it, two healthy lungs became available. The 21-year-old woman’s lungs were a match for Terry Junn. Doctors flew them into Mayo Clinic from Mississippi and Terry Junn went into surgery.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Related coverage: 
ActionNewsJax, Veteran gets double lung transplant in Jacksonville hours after doctors said he was going to die

Context: A lung transplant is a surgical procedure to replace a diseased or failing lung with a healthy lung, usually from a deceased donor. A lung transplant is reserved for people who have tried other medications or treatments, but their conditions haven't sufficiently improved. At Mayo Clinic, a team of doctors and staff work together to evaluate and treat people who may need lung transplants. Mayo Clinic's Transplant Center staff at Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota works together to evaluate and treat people who may need a lung transplant. Mayo Clinic offers common recommendations, evaluation processes, treatment, post-surgical care and follow-up care for lung transplant candidates at Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. Mayo Clinic uses technology to help make patient information available as needed at all three locations.

Contact: Paul Scotti

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Tags: 3D labs, ABC15 Arizona, ActionNewsJax, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimer's disease, arthritis, Becker's ASC Review, Becker’s Hospital Review, blood donation, bone broth, Boston Globe, breast cancer screening


November 23rd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

STAT
Mayo leaders: A nine-fold path to preventing burnout

We’ve talked about burnout before, and it seems like lots of hospitals have ideas to combat it. Well, Mayo Clinic has some more ideas – nine of them, to be precise. In the issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings released today, Dr. Tait Shanafelt, director of Mayo’s Program on Physician Well-STAT Logo of Boston Globebeing, and Dr. John Noseworthy, Mayo’s CEO, say administrators can’t force doctors to fight this battle on their own. “Burnout is a system issue, and addressing it is the shared responsibility of both the individuals and health care organizations,” Shanafelt writes.

Reach: STAT covers the frontiers of health and medicine including science labs, hospitals, biotechnology board rooms, and political back rooms. Hosted by The Boston Globe, STAT launched on November 5, 2015. The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Additional coverage: News-Medical.net, Cardiovascular Business, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, FierceHealthcare

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic have been documenting the rise and costs of physician burnout for more than a decade. Now, they are proposing nine strategies that health care organizations can use to reverse the trend and limit the risk to patients and their medical staff. Tait Shanafelt, M.D., director of Mayo Clinic’s Program on Physician Well-being, and John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic, offer the nine-point plan in the current issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings“Research has shown that more than half of U.S. physicians are experiencing symptoms of burnout, and the rate is increasing,” says Dr. Shanafelt, first author of the article. “Unfortunately, many organizations see burnout as a personal problem to be addressed by the individual physician. It is clear, however, that burnout is a system issue, and addressing it is the shared responsibility of both the individuals and health care organizations.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Washington Post
A non-pill treatment for many chronic illnesses: Exercise

Exercise isn’t good only for building muscle and losing weight. “If a pill could give you all benefits of exercise, it would be the best pill around,” Washington Post newspaper logosays Edward Laskowski, co-director of Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine and a specialist in physical medicine and rehabilitation. Yet doctors underprescribe exercise, even though research shows that it can deliver comparable benefits to drugs and surgery with fewer side effects, according to a recent review in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. Here’s how to safely get the disease-fighting benefits of exercise…

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Edward Laskowski, M.D., co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center, a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, sports performance optimization, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Huffington Post
Why You Might Be Losing Your Sense of Taste As You Age
by Bill Ward

Our mouths perceive just five elements — sweet, sour, bitter, salt and umami (glutamate). They also can tell if there’s fat in food, said Dr. Erin O’Brien, a rhinologist in the Mayo Clinic’s Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Rochester, Minn. “As you chew food, the flavor is released andHuffington Post Logo you smell it through the back of the nose,” O’Brien said. “If you’re eating strawberry ice cream, your tongue will tell you it’s sweet, but it won’t know the flavor. The nose tells you it’s strawberry. That’s the difference between taste and flavor.”

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique viewers.

Context: Erin O'Brien, M.D, is a Mayo Clinic otorhinolaryngology (ENT). The Department of Otorhinolaryngology (ear, nose and throat or ENT) at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota provides a full range of medical and surgical services for pediatric and adult patients with head and neck disorders and diseases.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

FirstCoastNews
A day in the life of a cancer survivor; Judi Zitiello
by Keitha Nelson-Williams

Eighty-five percent of people diagnosed with pancreatic cancer will die with-in six months. Judi Zitiello was diagnosed in 2014, and she's still First Coast News Logoliving to this day. But every three months, as she goes to the Mayo Clinic for a CT scan, life stands still for the mother of four and grandmother of seven with one on the way…FCN sat down with Dr. Pashtoon Kasi, M.D. Assistant Professor, GI Oncology at the Mayo Clinic to discuss the lethal cancer and why there are so few survivors. "The tumor itself it's a pretty unforgiving disease," said Kasi. "Unlike some of the other tumors this causes a lot of dense fibrous tissue around it. So a lot of the drugs are not able to get to it."

Reach: First Coast News refers to two television stations in Jacksonville, Florida. WJXX, the ABC affiliate and WTLV, the NBC affiliate.

Context: Pashtoon Kasi, M.B.B.S. is a Mayo Clinic oncologist and hematologist. An avid runner, Judi Zitiello, 66, was forced into a six-week hiatus when she developed a meniscus tear in early 2014. The retired financial executive was always active – exercising, hosting dinner parties, and volunteering to run the JT Townsend Foundation, a Jacksonville, Florida, philanthropic organization. Judi wasn’t too concerned about the downtime at first. She knew her body would take time to heal. But the pain lingered. Then Judi began losing weight and her energy waned. "I didn't have the energy to get off the couch. I didn’t feel well. I was just not myself," Judi recalls. Still, she thought it must be related to her knee injury. But when she began experiencing severe itching on her arms and torso, and her stool turned a clay color, Judi knew it was time to see someone other than the physical therapist. Little did she realize she would be starting a fight against pancreatic cancer. You can read more about Judi's story on Sharing Mayo Clinic and Mayo Clinic in the Loop.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

Arizona Republic
Ask a Doc: Making surgery safer for high-risk bleeders

Question: What research is underway to help those at high risk for bleeding during medical procedures? Answer: As Arizona Republic newspaper logoa vascular interventional radiologist at Mayo Clinic, I treat patients with a wide range of vascular diseases and disorders. When I’m not performing procedures, I’m in the lab researching ways to improve current therapies, making the experience even safer and more effective for our patients, especially those who are at high risk for bleeding… — Dr. Rahmi Oklu

Reach: The Arizona Republic has daily circulation of more than 180,000 and its website azcentral.com has more than 2.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic, Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are developing a biomaterial that has potential to protect patients at high risk for bleeding in surgery. The Nov. 16 cover article, “An Injectable Shear-Thinning Biomaterial for Endovascular Embolization,” in the journal Science Translational Medicine reports on a universal shear-thinning biomaterial that may provide an alternative for treating vascular bleeding. The study’s lead co-author Rahmi Oklu, M.D., Ph.D., a vascular interventional radiologist at Mayo Clinic’s Arizona campus, explains shear-thinning biomaterial offers many advantages over metallic coils, the current gold standard. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

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Tags: ABC15 Arizona, acupuncture, Affordable care act, aging, alcohol, Alzforum, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers, Aneurysm, Arizona Republic, Becker’s Hospital Review, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine


October 28th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Modern Healthcare
Commentary: Why Mayo Clinic wants to rethink how hospital quality is graded
by Dr. John Noseworthy

You may have seen the news: Mayo Clinic was one of a small number of hospitals in the country awarded a five-star rating by the CMS on its Hospital Compare website when the ratings were released in July. Mayo was also named the top hospital in the country by U.S. News and World Report in its annual Best Hospitals Honor Roll. What may be surprising, in light of these accolades, is our concern about the wayModern Healthcare value is being measured.

Reach: Modern Healthcare is the industry's leading source of healthcare business and policy news, research and information. The magazine covers health care policy, Medicare/Medicaid, and health care from a business perspective. Modern Healthcare magazine is ranked No. 1 in readership among healthcare executives and deemed a "must-read" by the who's who in healthcare. Modern Healthcare has more than 72,0000 paid magazine subscribers and its website receives more than 568,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

KSTP
Targeted Therapy Means Lung Cancer Doesn’t Have to be a Death Sentence
by Kevin Doran

…Katherine Bensen has a charmed life. A wonderful marriage and four beautiful kids. But it all changed December 31, 2014. "And I was diagnosed with Adenocarcinoma of the lungs, which is stage 4, and a KSTP-5 Twin Citiesnonsmoking lung cancer."…Initially, Katherine was told her only option was chemo, and she had 6 to 12 months to live. But, then she discovered she was a candidate for targeted therapy, which she received at Mayo Clinic.

Reach: KSTP-TV is the ABC affiliate in Minneapolis that broadcasts on channel 5. KSTP-TV Online has more than 503,000 unique visitors each month. It is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., and is the only locally-owned and operated broadcasting company in the Twin Cities. KSTP-TV first broadcast in April 1948, and was the first television station to serve the upper Midwest.

Context: Julian Molina,M.D., Ph.D, is an oncologist with the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. Dr. Molina's research focuses on drug development/phase I clinical trials, lung cancer, and head and neck malignancies including thyroid cancer.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

MPR
Photos: A walk through Mayo Clinic's healing art
by Catharine Richert

Auguste Rodin, Andy Warhol and Alexander Calder never trained a doctor, performed surgery or cured a disease. But their timeless art, on display around Mayo Clinic, still offers a kind of medicine. "The arts do have a healing aspect. They improve the quality of experience for patients," Dr. Paul Scanlon, a specialist in pulmonary and critical care medicine, said as he walked a reporter and photographer recently aroundMPR News logo some of Mayo's most notable pieces.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Art is an important part of the Mayo Clinic healing environment. Mayo's history is also vital to the foundation of the clinic and an integral part of the patient-focused care model. Tour guides and greeters in these areas serve by sharing their love of history and art to enhance patients' care experience at Mayo Clinic. Mayo Clinic Center for Humanities in Medicine supports the primary value of Mayo Clinic, the needs of the patient come first, by integrating the arts and expressions of human culture into the healing environment. Paul Scanlon, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic specialist in pulmonary and critical care medicine. Dr. Scanlon also chairs Mayo's Humanities in Medicine Committee, which provides leadership for integrating the arts, history and ethics in the medical environment to support the Mayo Clinic ideal that the needs of the patient come first. The Center`s programs and research in the humanities serve patients, families, caregivers and the larger community, promoting the compassionate delivery of healthcare.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Arizona Republic
Our View: Mayo Clinic and ASU are rethinking the best doctor you've ever had

"Innovative" is one of those words that gets overused. But it fits when Arizona State University and the Mayo Clinic describe their new team effort. This partnership not only offers Arizona an innovative way to run Arizona Republic newspaper logoa medical school, it brings prestige to the Valley and the state. Most importantly, it focuses on preparing doctors for changes -- known and unknown -- that will affect their patients in the future.

Reach: The Arizona Republic has daily circulation of more than 180,000 and its website azcentral.com has more than 2.6 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:

Phoenix Business Journal, ASU, Mayo to build $200M innovation center in Phoenix

Arizona Republic, Mayo, ASU join forces on new medical school

Arizona Republic, Mayo, ASU team up on Scottsdale med school

Modern Healthcare, ASU, Mayo Clinic recruit students for new med school, training program

Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, 5 things to know about ASU, the Mayo Clinic partnership to transform healthcare education KJZZ

ABC15 Arizona, News-medical.net, KTAR-Radio, TriValley Central, Arizona Daily Star, FierceHealthcareKJZZ

Context:  Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University have announced the launch of a comprehensive new model for health care education and research: the Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University Alliance for Health Care. The goal of the alliance is to innovate health care delivery to improve patient care, accelerate cutting-edge research discoveries, and transform medical education. The alliance further links two of the Phoenix area’s most recognizable institutions. ASU recently was named the nation’s No. 1 “most innovative” university by U.S. News & World Report.Mayo Clinic earned the No. 1 top ranking nationally on 2016 U.S. News & World Report's Honor Roll of America's Best Hospitals, as well as the No. 1 spots for top hospitals in Arizona and Phoenix, Minnesota and Florida. The formalized alliance provides cohesion to a collection of joint projects, which have evolved over the past decade and sets the stage for many more. This expansion promises growing impact and scale. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic New Network and on Mayo Medical School's website.

Contact:  Jim McVeigh

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Tags: ABC15 Arizona, Albert Lea Tribune, alcohol consumption, AliveCor, AllAfrica.com, Alzforum, alzheimers, Anesthesiology News, Arizona Daily Star, Arizona Republic, Arizona State University, Artificial pancreas


September 23rd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Buzzfeed
27 College Health Tips They Won’t Teach You At Orientation
by Caroline Kee

Spoiler alert: it’s probably mono. BuzzFeed Health spoke to Dr. Pritish Tosh, infectious disease specialist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and germ expert Kelly Reynolds, PhD, director of environmental health sciences at the University of Arizona, about how collegeBuzzFeed Logo students can stay healthy when the odds (and germs) are against them.

Reach: BuzzFeed receives more than 15.7 million unique visitors each month to its website and targets pop culture and social media enthusiasts.

Context: Pritish Tosh, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist. Dr. Tosh is interested in emerging infections and preparedness activities related to them, ranging from collaborating with the Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group in basic science vaccine development to hospital systems research related to pandemic preparedness.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
Mayo Clinic sets schedule for $100M expansion — with work starting soon
by Alexa Epitropoulos

Mayo Clinic is beginning construction on the first building within its $100 million three-building expansion project in October – and it's setting its sights on more expansion in the future. The CEO of Mayo Clinic's Jacksonville campus, Dr. Gianrico Farrugia, said work on the 150,000-Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logosquare-foot destination medical center will have just under a two-year timeline, with the projected completion being summer 2018. That building has a number of unique features, including specialized care for patients with neurological problems, as well as patients who require neurosurgery, hematology and oncology. It will also have a chemotherapy section, which Farrugia says will be private and include an outdoor patio.

Additional coverage:
Becker’s Hospital Review, Jacksonville Mayo Clinic sets schedule for $100M expansion

Context: Gianrico Farrugia, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vice president and CEO of Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida. Earlier this year, Mayo Clinic announced that it will invest $100 million in major construction projects building on its 150-year history of transforming health care and the patient experience as the premier medical destination center for health care in the Southeast. 

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

WJCT Jacksonville
First Coast Connect: From Illegal Immigrant To Brain Surgeon
by Kevin Meerschaert

He jumped a California border fence in 1987, one day after his 19th birthday. Speaking no English and having no money, Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa spent the first years in this country working migrant jobs while raising the money for tuition at Joaquin Delta Community College. … screen-shot-2016-09-22-at-8-48-16-pmRecently Dr. Q joined the staff at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville as Chairman of Neurologic Surgery.

Reach: WJCT-FM is the NPR affiliate for the Jacksonville market. WJCT-FM Online has more than 259,000 unique visitors each month.

Previous coverage in April 22, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, prominent neurosurgeon, researcher and educator, recently joined Mayo Clinic as chair of the Department of Neurosurgery on the Florida campus, along with several members of his research team from Johns Hopkins Medicine. Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa is renown nationally and internationally as a surgeon, researcher, humanitarian and author. His laboratory has published many manuscripts and articles, submitted a number of patents and obtained three NIH grants. Students and fellows who worked with Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa have gone on to join leading neuroscience programs throughout the world. Mayo Clinic's world-renowned neurosurgeons perform more than 7,000 complex surgical procedures every year at campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

KSTP
10-Year-Old Minn. Girl Undergoes Facial Reconstructive Surgery after Near-Fatal Farm Accident

Doctor Uldis Bite, a plastic surgeon, took Amber Rose’s case. Now 10 years old, Amber Rose was about to embark on yet another journey; one her
KSTP-5 Twin Citiesfamily wanted to share and they invited 5 EYEWITNESS NEWS to come along. A 3-D model, made on the Mayo campus, helped Dr. Bite plan out the extensive facial reconstruction surgery Amber Rose was about to have. On an early July morning, almost exactly three years to the date of her accident, Amber Rose walked nervously into Mayo Clinic, her entire family by her side.

Reach: KSTP-TV is the ABC affiliate in Minneapolis that broadcasts on channel 5. KSTP-TV Online has more than 503,000 unique visitors each month. It is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., and is the only locally-owned and operated broadcasting company in the Twin Cities. KSTP-TV first broadcast in April 1948, and was the first television station to serve the upper Midwest.

Context: Last year, after receiving care at "numerous hospitals" and from "dozens of doctors," the Kordiaks were told nothing else could be done for their daughter. Then, "with fingers crossed, Jen reached out to Mayo Clinic," where a team led by Uldis Bite, M.D., came up with a new plan for Amber Rose. Dr. Bite used "a 3-D model, made on the Mayo campus" to help plan out the extensive facial reconstruction surgery. And last July — nearly three years to the day after the accident — Amber Rose underwent the 15-hour procedure. Six weeks later, at a follow-up appointment, Dr. Bite was pleased with the results. As was Amber Rose. "My nose looks way better," she said. "Nobody will stare at me." You can read more about Amber Rose's story at In the Loop.

Contact:  Sharon Theimer

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July 22nd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

New York Times
Fecal Transplants Can Be Life-Saving, but How?
by Carl Zimmer

Now scientists are testing fecal transplants against such diseases as ulcerative colitis, and even obesity and diabetes…The bacteria in stool seem to be particularly important. Dr. Sahil Khanna of the Mayo Clinic and his colleagues isolated the spores of about 50 different species of bacteriaThe New York Times newspaper logo found in stool samples donated by healthy people. They put the spores in pills, which they gave to 30 patients with C. difficile infections. As they reported in the July 15 issue of The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 29 of the patients recovered.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: Clostridium difficile (klos-TRID-e-um dif-uh-SEEL), often called C. difficile or C. diff, is a bacterium that can cause symptoms ranging from diarrhea to life-threatening inflammation of the colon. Mayo Clinic specializes in treating people with difficult cases of C. difficile who haven't responded to standard medical treatments or who have developed complications such as an inflamed colon. The Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, opened a C. difficile clinic that specializes in treating patients with C. difficile infection.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

New York Times
Pat Summitt’s Public Fight Spurs Research Support

Perhaps the most tangible evidence of the difference Summitt made is set to come in December with the opening of the Pat Summitt Alzheimer’s The New York Times newspaper logoClinic at the University of Tennessee Medical Center. “I think it’s going to become a real icon in the Southeastern part of the States for Alzheimer’s disease care and research,” said Ronald Petersen, the director of the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota…“People raved about her willingness to do this,” Petersen said. “She maintained a sense of humor as far into the disease as she could. She likened the battle to coaching basketball, and the way the players would react to a challenge on the court is the way she was reacting to dealing with this disease.”

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Post-Bulletin
Blue Cross honors Mayo's kidney donor program
by Brett Boese

An innovative Mayo Clinic program that pairs kidney donors with needy transplant patients was recognized Tuesday by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota's new Trailblazing Tour. It was one of 11 programs honored for its creative and forward-thinking methods, according to Blue Cross. Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperThe thought process behind Mayo's new donor program is simple, but it has drawn high praise while being hailed as revolutionary. "Mayo Clinic Living Donor Program's pioneering Paired Donation Program is evolving how patients receive transplants – in turn, proving how innovative trailblazers can accelerate the pace of improving health across Minnesota," said Garrett Black, senior vice president of health services at Blue Cross. "By recognizing the Mayo Clinic Living Donor Program, we hope to start a meaningful conversation and engage communities like Rochester throughout the state to reach their full potential and work together to transform health care."

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context: The Paired Donation Program came out of the knowledge that the current system simply wasn’t working as well as it could. Mayo Clinic – ranked number one in the nation for nephrology by US News & World Report –realized that by matching up people willing to donate a kidney with those in need of a transplant, they may be able to help someone else, if not their immediate friend or family member. A kidney from a living donor leads to better outcomes for the patients, and those that have had a friend or family member go through a kidney transplant tend to be more willing to be on the list to donate if a match arises. More information can be found here.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Chicago Tribune
How to shop for sunscreen
by Alison Bowen

Spray, stick or lotion? The Mayo Clinic lays out pros and cons. A stick might be easy to apply around the eye, or a gel might help with a hairy Chicago Tribune Logochest. Lotions are easy for large applications. And if you use a spray, stay away from the wind — spraying your limbs in the wind might not result in full coverage.

Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 384,000 and a weekend circulation of more than 686,000.

Context:  Mayo Clinic experts say the best sunscreen is one that you'll use generously and according to label directions. Here's help understanding sunscreen ingredients, types of sunscreen and more.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

ActionNewsJax
Expert weighs in possible Zika virus transmitted by mosquito in Miami
by Letisha Bereola

The first possible homegrown case of Zika transmitted by mosquito is being investigated in Miami. Action News Jax went to the Mayo Clinic to find out what health officials are zeroing in on. Dr. Vandana Bhide is an internist and pediatrician at the Mayo Clinic. She says a medical team will be examining the virus closely. “What are the DNA fingerprints of this particular infection? And we want to be sure it’s a recent infection ActionNewsJaxand not a similar infection like dengue fever,” she said.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Context: Vandana Bhide, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic internist and pediatrician.

Contact: Kevin Punksy

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June 17th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Huffington Post
8 Reasons You Can’t Get Rid Of Your Belly Fat
by Emily Haak

A lot of medications have weight gain as a potential side effect, but corticosteroids like prednisone (used to treat arthritis, multiple sclerosis and more) and cortisone (used for arthritis, ulcerative colitis, among other conditions) lead to pounds in your stomach, specifically, says Michael
Huffington Post LogoJensen, MD, an endocrinologist and obesity expert at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. They’re often used to treat asthma too.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique visitors.

Context:  Michael Jensen, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Jensen and his lab study the effects of obesity and how body fat (adipose tissue) and body fat distribution influence health. The regulated uptake, storage and release of fatty acids from adipose tissue play a major role in determining its health effects.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

MPR
Mayo Clinic touts planned bio-research campus

The next big phase of Rochester's transformation is getting underway. A few years ago, Mayo Clinic initiated a 20-year plan called the MPR News logoDestination Medical Center... Wednesday, Mayo is starting the process of finding a developer to start building one of those districts. It's called Discovery Square. It will be a big bio-research campus that will more than double the footprint Mayo currently has in Rochester. Tom Weber talked with Dr. John Noseworthy, President and CEO of Mayo Clinic.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Additional coverage:
KTTC-TV, Mayo's Discovery Square to bring big changes to downtown
Twin Cities Business magazine, Mayo’s ‘Transformational Centers’ Could Be First Beneficiaries Of DMC Build-Out
Sioux Falls Argus LeaderWest Central Tribune, NuJournal

Previous Discovery Square coverage in June 10, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Contact: Karl Oestreich

 

Forbes
Why Aren't Women Told About New, Better Way To Detect Breast Cancer? A Real Scandal
by Steve Forbes

Mammograms aren’t very good at discovering early-stage cancers in women who have dense breast tissue, which accounts for about 45% of all women. But there is a major advance whose efficacy has been confirmed in a study conducted by the Mayo Clinic . It’s called molecular breastForbes magazine logo imaging (MBI), and it vastly improves the chances of early detection.

Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Deborah Rhodes, M.D., is a physician with Mayo Clinic's Breast Diagnostic Clinic. Dr. Rhodes studies the application of a new breast imaging device, molecular breast imaging, to breast cancer screening. The long-term goal of Dr. Rhodes' research is to develop an individualized approach to breast cancer screening that incorporates breast density, age, and other factors that impact breast cancer risk and mammography sensitivity. Dr. Rhodes recently spoke at Forbes Women's Summit 2016.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
Mayo Clinic transplantation leader wins top honor
by Alexa Epitropoulos

A pioneer in transplantation at the Mayo Clinic has been awarded one of the top honors in his field. The American Society of Transplantation Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logogave its Lifetime Achievement Award to Dr. Thomas Gonwa, who has been working at Mayo's Jacksonville campus since 2001. Gonwa has, during his time at Mayo, worked to advance its organ transplant program, particularly liver transplantation, where he has done significant research on transplant patients who suffer from chronic kidney disease. He has had a particular focus on promoting regenerative medicine.

Reach:  The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals

Context: Thomas Gonwa, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic nephrologist at Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida. His primary research interests have been in the development of new immunosuppressive drug regimens in solid organ transplantation.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

ABC15 Arizona
Mayo Clinic discusses cholesterol and the importance of your numbers

Reza Arsanjani, M.D., Mayo Clinic Cardiologist, joined the hosts of Sonoran Living Live to discuss cholesterol and how important it is to know your cholesterol numbers.ABC affiliate, channel 15 in Arizona

Reach:  KNXV-TV, ABC 15, is the ABC television station affiliate in Phoenix, Arizona.

Additional coverage on ABC15 Arizona:

ABC15 Arizona, Want to be heart healthy? Go to sleep!

Context: Reza Arsanjani, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Mayo Clinic's top-ranked team of cardiologists diagnoses and treats many heart conditions, including many rare and complex disorders. Mayo Clinic's Division of Cardiovascular Diseases is one of the largest and most integrated in the United States, with locations in Arizona, Florida, Minnesota and several communities throughout Mayo Clinic Health System. Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota include more than 200 cardiologists and 1,100 allied health staff trained in caring for heart patients.

Contact:  Jim McVeigh

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May 20th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Forbes
How Women Are Leading The Charge In Changing Healthcare
by Sarah Hedgecock

“We’re transforming from a passive patient to an empowered patient,” MedImmune head Bahija Jallal said by way of introduction. And in the new world of patient empowerment, that could mean anything from finding your own doctor to taking on decades of standard healthcareForbes Pharma and Healthcare logo practice. Deborah Rhodes, an associate medical professor at Mayo Clinic, is undertaking the latter. She is disturbed by the fact that mammograms are not an effective way to find tumors in dense breasts, despite the fact that about half of all women have dense breasts. “Trying to find a tumor in a dense breast on a mammogram is like looking through a periscope trying to find enemy ships in dense water,” she said. “The problem is you don’t know how many enemy ships you’re failing to see until you use a better tool to spot them.”

Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Deborah Rhodes, M.D., is a physician with Mayo Clinic's Breast Diagnostic Clinic. Dr. Rhodes studies the application of a new breast imaging device, molecular breast imaging, to breast cancer screening. The long-term goal of Dr. Rhodes' research is to develop an individualized approach to breast cancer screening that incorporates breast density, age, and other factors that impact breast cancer risk and mammography sensitivity. Dr. Rhodes recently spoke at Forbes Women's Summit 2016.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

NBC News
White House Goes With Its Gut, Backs New Microbiome Project
by Maggie Fox

Anyone who watched "The Martian" learned that crops cannot grow without partner organisms in the soil. Now the White House wants to NBCNewsComencourage research into the microbiome: the microbes living in and on animals, the dirt, oceans and the atmosphere...The Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine says it will open a $1.4 million Microbiome Clinic offering whole-genome sequencing, checking patients to see if their bodies harbor antibiotic-resistant "superbugs, and offering fecal transplants — the experimental new way of cleaning out killer Clostridium infections with transplants of "healthy" poop from donors.

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:

STAT, Obama administration to launch microbiome initiative, heeding scientists’ calls
KAAL-TV, Mayo Clinic Creating New "Microbiome Clinic"
KTTC-TVFederal government to back microbiome research

Context: The Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine joined the National Microbiome Initiative sponsored by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). More than 100 institutions committed to advance microbiome research in areas such as health care, food safety and security, environmental protection, and bioenergy production. In support of the National Microbiome Initiative Mayo Clinic is committed to establishing a Microbiome Clinic, offering clinical services, diagnostics and patient education. “The new clinic will focus on improving the care of the individual patient through knowledge of the human microbiome,” says Purna Kashyap, M.B.B.S. , consultant in gastroenterology, associate director of the Mayo Clinic Microbiome Program. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Colette Gallagher

 

Chicago Tribune
Looking beyond the obvious superfoods
by Bill Daley

Dr. Donald Hensrud, medical director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program in Rochester, Minn., said people should Chicago Tribune Logotry to focus on "patterns of eating" rather than specific foods themselves. To focus on the blueberry — as one of his patients did, going so far as to ask how many to eat each day — means excluding the benefits of other berries out there. Variety means obtaining different nutrients, as each food has its own nutritional profile, Hensrud says.

Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of nearly 385,000 and its website has more than 13.5 million unique visitors each month.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life. Donald Hensrud, M.D. is the program’s medical director.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Prevention magazine
"I Got Lung Cancer Even Though I Never Smoked"
by Hallie Levine

Linda Wortman was perfectly healthy, athletic, and enjoying her work as a flight attendant when she found out she had lung cancer….The next Prevention logofew weeks were agony. So when I got a call from the Mayo Clinic asking if I wanted to join a research study on meditation and paced breathing, I agreed. I would have done anything at that point to feel better. Dr. Amit Sood sent me a DVD with instructions to do 15 minutes of breathing exercises in the morning and another 15 at night, but I ended up doing them for hours at a time. Meditating calmed my mind and body; I really feel like it saved me.

Reach:  Prevention magazine has a monthly circulation of more than 1.5 million readers and covers practical health information and ideas on healthy living. Its website has nearly 1.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Amit Sood, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in General Internal Medicine and the Cancer Center. Dr. Sood is editor of the  Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness and The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

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December 18th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in tMayo Clinic in the News Logohe News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Note:  This edition of Mayo Clinic in the News will be the last issue of 2015. We will see you again in early 2016.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Wall Street Journal
Is Lab Testing the ‘Wild West’ of Medicine?
by Thomas Burton

Descending in darkness, a FedEx cargo jet touched down on a runway at 5:44 a.m., filled with hundreds of identical, raspberry-colored boxes. A truWSJ Bannerck painted the same color soon sped the boxes, all human blood and cell samples, to more than 40 laboratories at the nearby Mayo Clinic, based here…Dr. Michael O’Sullivan, creator of Mayo Medical Laboratories, the operation that tests outside samples, also was its original delivery network. He drove around southern Minnesota to pick up vials and slides. Before long, the business grew large enough to support a fleet of vans. A sales force was added by 1986 and now has more than 100 employees.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Additional coverage:

Wall Street Journal — Video: Inside the Mayo Clinic Diagnostic Testing Labs; Yahoo! Health Canada

Becker’s Hospital Review — FDA wants to crack down on lab-developed tests: 3 things to know by Emily Rappleye…2. Cost

Context: Mayo Medical Laboratories is a global reference laboratory operating within Mayo Clinic's Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology. Mayo Medical Laboratories staff collaborates with clinicians to provide knowledge of, and access to, the latest testing and treatment guidance. We provide clinical laboratory testing to support health care systems, hospitals, specialty clinics, and other clinical laboratories all working toward expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

USA Today
Study suggests link between flavor in e-cigarettes and lung disease
by Mary Bowerman

Researchers at the Harvard University T.H. Chan USA Today newspaper logoSchool of Public Health
tested 51 types of flavored e-cigarettes and flavor canisters for diacetyl, acetoin, and 2,3-pentanedione; three chemicals known to cause respiratory problems in factory workers…With around 7,000 e-cigarette flavors on the market, consumers are essentially at the mercy of the manufacturers, with little hope of knowing what chemicals are used in the products, according to Taylor Hays, director of Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center. “There are no FDA regulations on these products. It’s the Wild West of e-cigarettes,” Hays told USA TODAY Network.

Reach: USA TODAY  has an average daily circulation of 4.1 million which includes print, various digital editions and other papers that use their branded content.

Additional coverage:
USA TODAY — Survey: Teens still intrigued by e-cigarettes; KARE11Times of India

Context: Dr. Taylor Hays is director of the Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center. The Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center (NDC) was one of the first centers in the country to focus exclusively on treatments for tobacco dependence. The NDC's model of care has now become the standard in many medical centers around the United States. The treatment team at the center offers you support and works with you to help develop the motivation and skills needed to stop using tobacco.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein


Wisconsin Public Radio
Physician Burnout Is Bad For Patients

A new study by the Mayo Clinic shows that burnout among physicians is bad, and getting worse. We find out how that affects patients, and what needs to change. Host:Wisconsin Public Radio  Veronica Rueckert Guest(s):  Tait Shanafelt Producer(s): Judith Siers-Poisson.

Reach: Wisconsin Public Radio consists of 34 radio stations programmed by seven regional studios and carrying programming on three content networks: the Ideas Network, the NPR News and Classical Network and the All Classical Network.

Additional coverage: Healthcare Dive

Context: Burnout among U.S. physicians is getting worse. An update from a three-year study evaluating burnout and work-life balance shows that American physicians are worse off today than they were three years earlier. These dimensions remained largely unchanged among U.S. workers in general, resulting in a widening gap between physicians and U.S. workers in other fields. The study conducted by Mayo Clinic researchers in partnership with the American Medical Association compared data from 2014 to metrics they collected in 2011 and found that now more than half of U.S. physicians are experiencing professional burnout. The findings appear in Mayo Clinic Proceedings“Burnout manifests as emotional exhaustion, loss of meaning in work, and feelings of ineffectiveness,” says Tait Shanafelt, M.D., “What we found is that more physicians in almost every specialty are feeling this way and that’s not good for them, their families, the medical profession, or patients.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Washington Post
Don’t forget about vaccinations, even if you think you’re too old for them
by Emily Sohn

R.D. Zimmerman had been to northern Africa and the Caribbean, spent lots of time in Russia, and visited Mexico multiple times.Washington Post newspaper logo But a couple of weeks after returning home to Minneapolis in April from a visit to Cabo, on the southern tip of Baja California, he developed a persistent cough that landed him in the emergency room with an unexpected diagnosis: hepatitis A…But anecdotal evidence suggests that Zimmerman’s experience is common, says Greg Poland, director of the Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group in Rochester, Minn. He sees patients every week who come home from trips with illnesses they could have avoided, including hep A, which often comes from consuming contaminated food or water.

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post averages 518,700, and Sunday circulation averages 736,800.

Context: Gregory Poland, M.D. is director of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. The Vaccine Research Group works to improve the health of individuals across the world by pursuing challenges posed by infectious diseases and bioterrorism through clinical, laboratory and epidemiologic vaccine research.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Washington Post
Proposed budget for Alzheimer’s research may rise by over 50 percent
by Tara Bahrampour

The spending deal Congress reached Tuesday night includes an unprecedented increase in funding for Alzheimer’s rWashington Post newspaper logoesearch: $350 million in fiscal 2016. If approved by the White House, it will increase government spending on the disease by over 50 percent… “It’s perhaps some of the most encouraging news we’ve had on Alzheimer’s disease in several years,” said Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging and the Mayo Alzheimer’s Research Center. “This is truly very, very exciting in the field.”

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post averages 518,700, and Sunday circulation averages 736,800.

Context: Under the federal spending bill, released this week, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) would receive $200 million for President Obama’s Precision Medicine initiative and a $350 million increase for Alzheimer’s research funding in 2016. “We applaud the agreement for the first increase in research funding for the NIH in over a decade. This significant act recognizes the importance of funding research and innovation in our nation,” says Gregory Gores, M.D., executive dean for Research at Mayo Clinic. “The increase in funding and commitment to research in areas such as precision medicine and Alzheimer’s disease would support discovery and translation to bring forward new treatments for our patients.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Susan Barber Lindquist, Sharon Theimer

 

News4Jax
Flu deaths reported; Doctors urge people get shot
by Ashley Mitchem

Doctors are encouraging people to get the flu shot as new details emerge about some of the first flu deaths of the season… Vandana Bhide with News Jax 4 LogoMayo Clinic believes the flu is just beginning to spread this season. “I think it's early in the season, so we're going to see more activity in January and February,” said Bhide.

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville.

Context: Vandana Bhide, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic Hospital Internal Medicine physician. More information on flu shots can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

ABC15 Arizona
Mayo Clinic Cardiologist talks about blood pressure

Todd Hurst, M.D., Mayo Clinic Cardiologist, joined the hosts of Sonoran Living Live to discuss the prevalence of high blood pressure is in theABC affiliate, channel 15 in Arizona U.S., simple life style changes that can help lower blood pressure and how you can easily monitor your blood pressure at home.

Reach:  KNXV-TV, ABC 15, is the ABC television station affiliate in Phoenix, Arizona.

Additional coverage on ABC15:

ABC15 Arizona — Rally for Red: You've seen the commercials, but what is A-fib?

ABC15 Arizona  — Mayo Clinic News Network: Reduce your blood pressure with these 10 tips from the Mayo Clinic 

Context: R. Todd Hurst, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Mayo Clinic's Division of Cardiovascular Diseases is one of the largest and most integrated in the United States, with locations in Arizona, Florida, Minnesota and several communities throughout Mayo Clinic Health System. Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota include more than 200 cardiologists and 1,100 allied health staff trained in caring for heart patients.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

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October 22nd, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would   like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.  Thank you.

Editor, Karl OestreichAssistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Harvard Business Review
Getting Rid of “Never Events” in Hospitals
by Timothy Morgenthaler, M.D., chief patient safety officer at Mayo Clinic, and Charles Harper, M.D., executive dean for practice at Mayo Clinic

Harvard Business Review Logo… A number of techniques and process-improvement tools from inside and outside the industry have been brought to bear: lean engineering to simplify and standardize care, Crew Resource Management to improve teamwork, checklists to help teams focus and improve reliability, and so on. Human factors science, which studies the relationship between human beings and systems in order to improve efficiency, safety, and effectiveness is now being applied broadly in health care in everything from information management to the design of operating rooms.

Reach: Harvard Business Review – Online provides editorial content designed to complement the coverage found in its parent print publication, which focuses on business management. The site receives more than 232,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: Timothy Morgenthaler, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine physician who also practices in Mayo Clinic's Center for Sleep Medicine. Intrinsic in Dr. Morgenthaler's  work in his role as chief safety officer is developing the capability to measure important components of patient safety, such as preventable harm, aggregated near-miss analysis, and relationship between risk conditions and serious harm events. Charles (Michel) Harper, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist who also serves as executive dean for practice at Mayo Clinic. In his role as chair of Mayo Clinic's Clinical Practice Committee, Dr. Harper and the committee's key role in not only sharing, but implementing best practices and outcomes across sites.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

NPR
Forget Last Year's Hiccups, Go Get Your Flu Shot
by Pattie Neighmond

Last year, public health officials were taken by surprise when new strains of the flu virus appeared. Not so this year and they advise everyone six nprmonths or older to get vaccinated against the flu…For scientists, every year presents a new challenge to predict exactly which strains of the flu will be powerful enough to make people sick. Pritish Tosh is an infectious disease doctor and researcher at the Mayo Clinic. He says there are dozens of different flu strains.

Reach: National Public Radio, NPR,  creates and distributes news, information, and music programming to a network of 975 independent stations and reaches 26 million listeners every week.

Context: Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist Pritish Tosh, M.D. says,"There’s a lot of research going on looking at some of these other options, in terms of our target for the influenza vaccine." Dr. Tosh, who is also a member of the Vaccine Research Group at Mayo Clinic, says the new avenues of investigation are definitely needed. However, he cautions, the single flu vaccine has only been tested in animals and is not yet available. So, he urges everyone to get immunized with the safe and proven vaccines that we already have. "Influenza is a real killer. It kills tens of thousands of Americans each year, either directly or through its complications. And we really only have one great way in terms of prevention and that is with [the current] influenza vaccine." More information, including a video interview with Dr. Tosh, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

US News & World Report
Improving Hospital Quality and Reducing Costs
by Kimberly Leonard

… Sunday at the U.S. News Hospital of Tomorrow conference in the nation's capital, hospital executives discussed how the act has changed the way they do business and deliver care. They discussed the impacts of innovation, coverage and how to reduceUS News Health Logo waste in the system.  Dr. John Noseworthy, president and CEO for the Mayo Clinic, opened the conference with a keynote speech on "The Faces of High-Value Health Care: People and Processes." He highlighted a few ways the Mayo Clinic has better coordinated care, including the creation of "Ask Mayo Expert," which allows patients to avoid a trip to the hospital by allowing them to connect with a health care professional online.

Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Previous coverage in Mayo Clinic in the News

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Dr. Noseworthy was the U.S. News Hospital of Tomorrow keynote speaker.

Contacts: Traci Klein, Karl Oestreich 

 

RobbReport
The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program Pampers Guests While Promoting Good Health
by Janice O’Leary

Can a wellness boot camp at a medical center feel like a luxury retreat? Upon entering the center where the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is headquartered, in Robb Report Health & Wellness LogoRochester, Minn., it is hard to remember that the building belongs to a medical center. Designed to maximize open space and sunlight, the architecture itself conveys a sense of health and well-being. Sun streams into stairwells, making them more appealing than the elevator. Seamless windows wrap around the fitness studios, so they have the feel of a luxury athletic club. The equipment in the strength-training area is top notch. This feels like the perfect place to hit reset.

Reach: The Robb Report publishes it's Health & Wellness publication quarterly. The magazine targets affluent individuals interested in health and wellness topics. The Robb Report Online has more than 648,900 unique visitor to its site each month.

Additional coverage in The Robb Report:

Robb Report — The Truth About Organic Food Labeling [Q&A] 

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

WQOW Eau Claire
Car Control Class prepares teens for emergency driving situations

Instructors said giving teens the practice they need for keeping control in emergencies is key. "The bigger crash comes from someone panicking or over-correcting orWQOW TV Logo overreacting, and if you have not felt those things with the car, what the car can do, you're likely to panic and overreact," Dr. Lee Mayer, Mayo Clinic Health Systems Orthopedic Surgeon said. Mayer played a key role in starting the Car Control Classes eight years ago.

Context: The car control classes held at Chippewa Valley Technical College & sponsored by Mayo Clinic Health System.

Reach: WQOW is an ABC affiliate serving the Eau Claire, Wis. area.

Contact: Kristin Everett

 

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