Items Tagged ‘ACA’

February 17th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Twin Cities Public Television (Almanac)
Head of Mayo Clinic: John Noseworthy

Interview with Dr. John Noseworthy begins at 12:14. Almanac is hosted by Cathy Wurzer and Eric Eskola. Mary Lahammer contributes political reporting on a weekly basis.

Reach:  Twin Cities Public Television's "Almanac" program is a Minnesota institution. It has occupied the 7 o'clock time slot on Friday nights for more than a quarter of a century. It is the longest-running prime time TV program ever in the region. "Almanac" is a time capsule, a program of TPTrecord that details our region's history and culture during the past twenty five years. The hour-long mix of news, politics and culture is seen live statewide on the six stations of the Minnesota Public Television Association. Almanac was the first Minnesota TV show that virtually everyone in the state could watch together. The program's unusual format has been copied by numerous PBS stations around the country and it has led to Almanac being honored with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting's award for Best Public Affairs Program.

Related coverage:
Post-Bulletin, Political Notebook: Noseworthy talked to White House officials about travel ban

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. 

Contacts:  Kelley Luckstein, Karl Oestreich

 

KSTP
Mayo Clinic Doctors Demonstrate Dangers of Ice Fishing

Ice fishing may be a favorite pastime of many Minnesotans, but doctors say it can also be more dangerous than some realize. Mayo Clinic doctors aimed to demonstrate those dangers with the help of a mannequin they call Gus. Gus has been dinged, dented and generally doomed in a series of Mayo Clinic public education videos. Previous installments include Gus being hit by a driver who's texting, suffering a fireworks injury and receiving the Heimlich.

Reach: KSTP-TV is the ABC affiliate in Minneapolis that broadcasts on channel 5. KSTP-TV Online has more than 503,000 unique visitors each month. It is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., and is the only locally-owned and operated broadcasting company in the Twin Cities. KSTP-TV first broadcast in April 1948, and was the first television station to serve the upper Midwest.

Additional coverage: 
La Crosse TribuneAnglers beware: Ice fishing more perilous than traditional methods
KAAL, Mayo Clinic Doctors Demonstrate Dangers of Ice Fishing
Star Tribune, Mayo study finds hazards of ice fishing are many and varied

Context: Ice fishing might seem like a benign sport – for everyone except the fish. Sitting in a cozy shanty waiting for a bite, what could go wrong? A lot, Mayo Clinic surgeons have found. The ice fishing injuries they have chronicled seem more like a casualty list from an extreme sport: burns, broken bones, concussions and more. The findings are published in the American Journal of Emergency Medicine. The study team analyzed data on emergency department visits between 2009 and 2014 obtained from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System ─ All Injury Program and found 85 patients hurt while ice fishing. There may be more cases than they could find; the database collects data on emergency room visits from a nationally representative sample of roughly 100 hospitals with six or more beds, and the researchers had to search case narratives to identify ice fishing injuries. More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Sharon Theimer,  Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

News4Jax
Thousands run marathon to support breast cancer research
by Ashley Mitchem

After a decade that included nearly 100,000 runners, the Donna 26.2 marathon has become more than just a run -- it's the only marathon in the United States dedicated to breast cancer research. Donations support breast cancer research at Mayo Clinic and provide financial assistance to
those living with breast cancer.

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville. This Week in Jacksonville is a weekly public affairs program on WJXT.

Additional coverage: Florida Times-Union, First Coast News

Context: The DONNA Foundation is a non-profit organization in Northeast Florida producing the only marathon in the U.S. dedicated to breast cancer research, awareness and care.  The DONNA Foundation has helped to develop and maintain the Mayo Clinic Breast Cancer Translational Genomics Program.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

Marketplace
Mayo Clinic's hometown looks to become the 'Silicon Valley of medicine'
by Catharine Richert

If you head directly south from St. Paul, Minnesota, you'll eventually find yourself in Rochester, home of the world-renowned Mayo Clinic. For NPR Marketplace Logomore than 100 years, the city and the hospital have been synonymous. And now, a massive economic development project backed by Mayo, the city and the state aims to transform the city of more than 100,000 into a magnet for startups and entrepreneurs in medicine and other fields. Mayo BioBusiness Center Chair Jim Rogers said Rochester’s transformation is already apparent. "I can count — just about every building has a new business in the last four of five years, it seems,” he said. "It's incredible what's occurring here."

Reach: Marketplace is produced and distributed by American Public Media (APM), in association with the University of Southern California. The Marketplace portfolio of programs includes Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal, Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio, Marketplace Weekend with Lizzie O'Leary, and Marketplace Tech with Ben Johnson. Marketplace programs are currently broadcast by nearly 800 public radio stations nationwide across the United States and are heard by more than 13 million weekly listeners.

Previous coverage in the January 13, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: With Mayo Clinic at its heart, the Destination Medical Center (DMC) initiative is the catalyst to position Rochester, Minnesota as the world’s premier destination for health and wellness; attracting people, investment opportunities, and jobs to America’s City for Health and supporting the economic growth of Minnesota, its bioscience sector, and beyond.

Contacts: Duska Anastasijevic, Bob Nellis

 

CNN
For decades, women had heart attacks in silence
by Michael Nedelamn

Sharonne Hayes, a cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic and founder of its Women's Heart Clinic, originally thought it was near-impossible to do research on SCAD. She expected to see no more than one or two cases in her career. "Most of the cases were in the pathology literature, so it wasCNN Logo (thought to be) almost universally fatal," said Hayes, who has educated patients through the advocacy organization WomenHeart for over 15 years. In 2009, a woman approached her at a WomenHeart conference and asked, "What is Mayo doing about research on SCAD?" "It's probably so rare," Hayes replied. "We could never research it."

Reach: Cable News Network (CNN) is a worldwide news and information network providing live, continuous coverage of news from around the globe, 24 hours a day. CNN online received more than 55 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Context:  Sharonne Hayes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Hayes studies cardiovascular disease and prevention, with a focus on sex and gender differences and conditions that uniquely or predominantly affect women. With a clinical base in the Women's Heart Clinic, Dr. Hayes and her research team utilize novel recruitment methods, social media and online communities, DNA profiling, and sex-specific evaluations to better understand several cardiovascular conditions. A major area of focus is spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD), an uncommon and under-recognized cause of acute coronary syndrome (heart attack) that occurs predominantly in young women.

Contacts: Traci Klein, Kelley Luckstein

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Tags: 26.2 with Donna Marathon, A Tu Salud, ACA, AccuWeather, Almanac, alzheimers, AMA, Ambient Clinical Analytics, antibacterial soap, arrhythmia, Associated Press, Barron News-Shield


February 3rd, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

CBS News
Busy minds may be better at fighting dementia

Mentally stimulating activities can protect your brain against aging, even if you’re genetically predisposed toward dementia or Alzheimer’s disease, a new study reports. Activities that keep the brain busy -- using a computer, crafting, playing games and participating in social activities -CBS News logo- appear to lower the risk of age-related mental decline in people 70 and older, the Mayo Clinic study found.

Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

Additional coverage:
HealthDay, Lexington Herald Leader, Mercury News, Associated Press, Live Science, Medical News Today, MedPage Today, UPI, Pulse Headlines, New York Times, Star Tribune, KTTC, Atlanta Journal-ConstitutionMiami Herald, News-medical.net, Globe and Mail, iTechPost, Kansas City StarFOX NewsIndian Express

Other Alzheimers' coverage:
USA Today, Trying to solve the Alzheimer's puzzle

Mayo Clinic researchers have found that engaging in mentally stimulating activities, even late in life, may protect against new-onset mild cognitive impairment, which is the intermediate stage between normal cognitive aging and dementia. The study found that cognitively normal people 70 or older who engaged in computer use, craft activities, social activities and playing games had a decreased risk of developing  mild cognitive impairment. The results are published in the Jan. 30 edition of JAMA Neurology. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

BuzzFeed
What Even Is Kombucha, Anyway?
by Anthony Rivas

Kombucha starts with a bologna-looking gelatinous thing called a SCOBY, which stands for Symbiotic Culture of Bacteria and Yeast. This can BuzzFeed News Logotake anywhere from 7-14 days, depending on the temperature of the environment, registered dietitian nutritionist Angie Murad, of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program, tells BuzzFeed Health. During that time, the yeast and bacteria feed off the sugar — and typically grow into a “daughter” SCOBY — making the tea carbonated and slightly alcoholic (store-bought kombucha should have less than 0.5% unless otherwise noted).

Reach: BuzzFeed receives more than 15.7 million unique visitors each month to its website and targets pop culture and social media enthusiasts.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Today.com
5 heart attack warning signs never to ignore
by A. Pawlowski

Almost two-thirds of women who die suddenly of coronary heart disease have no previous symptoms, according to the CDC. “Some people will say it was out of the blue, and that’s probably most people,” said Dr. Sharonne Hayes, director of the Women's Heart Clinic at the Mayo Clinic.  “A substantial minority of patients will have some symptoms that, had they paid attention to them or sought an outpatient evaluation, they might have had a different outcome.”

Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show.

Related coverage:
WebMD, SCAD: The Heart Attack That's Striking Young Women Context

Contact: Traci Klein

 

CNN
Former athlete helps truckers get healthy
by Alex Smith

On a chilly winter morning, dozens of truck driver trainees file into a classroom at the headquarters of Prime Inc., a trucking company based in Springfield, Mo. At the front is Siphiwe Baleka, an energetic former swimming champion in his mid-40s…The relatively small lifestyle changesCNN Logo that Baleka promotes could be enough to make a life-changing difference in the health of many truck drivers, says Dr. Clayton Cowl, chief of preventive, occupational and aerospace medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. "The drivers themselves -- they don't need to be running marathons, necessarily," Cowl says. "It's finding those times when there is some downtime, where they are able to find several days per week to do activities that they enjoy and find ways to reduce stress."

Reach: Cable News Network (CNN) is a worldwide news and information network providing live, continuous coverage of news from around the globe, 24 hours a day. CNN online received more than 55 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Previous coverage in January 27, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context:  Clayton Cowl, M.D. heads Mayo Clinic's preventive, occupational and aerospace medicine. The division consists of 22 physicians who have specialty training in internal medicine or family practice and a team of trained occupational health nurses. Several of our physicians are board-certified in preventive, occupational and/or aerospace medicine. Mayo Clinic's integrated group practice model makes consultation with any other medical specialists readily available.

Contact:  Kelly Reller

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Tags: ACA, alzheimers, Angie Murad, Associated Press, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Barron News-Shield, brain cancer, brain health, BuzzFeed, CBS News, Chicago Tribune, Chippewa Herald


January 20th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highhlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

CNBC
Important not to lose ground on ACA

Dr. John Noseworthy, Mayo Clinic president & CEO, and Bernard Tyson, Kaiser Permanente CEO, talks about implementing reforms in the health care system.

Reach: CNBC is a 24-hour cable television station offers business news and financial information. The channel provides real-time financialCNBC logo market coverage to an estimated 175 million homes worldwide. CNBC online receives more than 26 million unique visitors each month.

Additional CNBC coverage:
CNBC, Drug pricing and regulations: Mayo Clinic CEO — Dr. John Noseworthy, Mayo Clinic president & CEO, and Bernard Tyson, Kaiser Permanente CEO, talk about the rising cost of drugs.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

New York Times
Getting Older, Sleeping Less
by Jane E. Brody

Nonmedical causes of insomnia are often successfully treated by practicing “good sleep hygiene,” a concept developed by the late Peter J. Hauri, a sleep specialist at the Mayo Clinic. That means limiting naps to less than 30 minutes a day, preferably early in the afternoon; avoiding stimulants and sedatives; avoiding heavy meals and minimizing liquids within two to three hours of bedtime; getting moderate exercise daily, The New York Times newspaper logopreferably in the morning or early afternoon; maximizing exposure to bright light during the day and minimizing it at night; creating comfortable sleep conditions; and going to bed only when you feel sleepy.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: The Mayo Center for Sleep Medicine (CSM) is a multidisciplinary enterprise comprised of pulmonologists, neurologists, psychiatrists and pediatricians who — with the support of a physician assistant, nurses and polysomnographic technologists — are engaged in a vibrant array of clinical, educational and research activities. Mayo Clinic doctors trained in sleep disorders evaluate and treat adults and children in the Center for Sleep Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. The Center for Sleep Medicine is one of the largest sleep medicine facilities in the United States. Staff in the center treats about 6,500 new people who have sleep disorders each year. The Center for Sleep Medicine is accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Washington Post
Why the ‘gluten-free movement’ is less of a fad than we thought
by Caitlin Dewey

There’s growing evidence that severe gluten sensitivities exist outside the realm of celiac disease. And researchers simply don’t know how many of the people following a gluten-free diet may actually have a legitimate health complaint — as opposed to a baseless fear of all things gluten, or a misplaced desire to lose weight. “We have no real inkling from our results,” said Joseph Murray, a celiac researcher at the MayoWashington Post newspaper logo Clinic and one of the authors of the new research. “We didn’t think to ask why people avoid gluten. When we designed this study 10 years ago, no one avoided gluten without a celiac diagnosis.”

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Chicago Tribune, News Herald

Other recent coverage regarding celiac disease and Dr. Joseph Murray:
January 6, 2017 edition of Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
November 4, 2016 edition of Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Joseph Murray, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist. Dr. Murray's research interests focus in two distinct areas: celiac disease and esophageal disorders. To learn more about celiac disease, check out this Mayo Clinic radio interview with Dr. Murray.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Bloomberg
The Two-Day, $5,000 C-Suite Physical
by Sam Grobart

I am in good health. I am out of shape. These two facts—one I hoped to be true, and one I absolutely knew to be true—were delivered to me at the end of a thorough two-day medical exam in early November at the Bloomberg Business LogoMayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. I underwent this battery of tests not because I was at risk for any major illness, nor because I’m a hypochondriac (I mean, no more of one than any unfit 42-year-old man has a right to be), but because the renowned medical center offers something called the Executive Health Program, which sounded exceedingly fancy.

Reach: Bloomberg BusinessWeek has a weekly circulation of more than 990,000 and has more than six million unique visitors to its online site each month.

Context: For more than 40 years, the Mayo Clinic Executive Health Program has been leveraging our nationally recognized expertise to help executives, business owners and entrepreneurs maintain good health.

Contact:  Kelley Luckstein

 

 

KJZZ
Summit Features Experts Making Sense Of Health-Care Payments
by Steve Goldstein

Paying for health care is complicated and confusing. Does a provider accept your health plan? How many bills can you expect to receive after the fact? What about catastrophic care? Mayo Clinic and ASU’s School for the Science of Health Care Delivery have teamed up to host a Payment Reform Summit featuring a number of experts trying to figure out what makes sense in the realm of health-care payments. We talked aboutKJZZ NPR -AZ Logo some possible reforms with Dr. Lois Krahn of the Mayo Clinic and Dr. Victor Trastek, director of ASU’s School of Science and Health Care Delivery.

Reach: KJZZ-FM is a commercial station owned by Maricopa Community Colleges in Tempe, AZ. The format of the station is news and jazz. KJZZ-FM's target audience is news and jazz music listeners, ages 18 to 64, in the Tempe, AZ area.

Additional coverage: Fierce Healthcare

Context: The Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University Alliance for Health Care Payment Reform Summit convened subject matter experts from around the country, including the voice of patients, to inform the development of alternative payment models. With a focus on the needs of patients, the expert participants examined data drawn from a variety of sources to assess the impact of various payment models on patient access and patterns of health care use. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Jim McVeigh

 

WOKV Jacksonville
Mayo Clinic receives $1.6 million to fund Alzheimer’s research in Jacksonville
by John Engel

Eight programs at Mayo Clinic’s Jacksonville campus are receiving a total of $1.6 million in grants to fund Alzheimer’s research in Jacksonville. Kevin Bieniek, a post-doctoral research fellow at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, will benefit from this most recent round of grant funding from the state. His study examines the relationship between brain trauma and Alzheimer’s disease. “There are so many people that get Alzheimer’s disease that have no family history of this disorder,” Bieniek told WOKV. “It’s really a complex interaction of your genetics; the environment; your lifestyle; there are so many factors that come into play.”

Reach: WOKV-FM is Jacksonville's 24 hour news station.

Additional coverage: Healthcare Business News

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida were awarded eight grants from the Florida Department of Health to investigate the prevention or cure of Alzheimer’s disease. These awards followed a peer-reviewed and competitive grant application process, where the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Grant Advisory Board reviewed applications and selected 27 studies statewide. “Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus is home to international leaders in neuroscience research who are focused on addressing the unmet needs of patients,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., vice president, Mayo Clinic, and CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida. “We integrate basic and clinical research and immediately translate our findings into better patient care. We very much appreciate the state’s investment in finding solutions for Alzheimer’s disease.” More information about the grants can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Kevin Punsky

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Tags: "liquid biopsies", ACA, acupuncture, aging, alzheimers, Arizona Republic, baby powder, blood donation, Bloomberg, Bradly Prigge, breastfeeding, C. Difficile


August 28th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich


Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Star Tribune
Mayo offers at-home colon cancer test; stool sample goes in the mail
by Paul Walsh and Jeremy Olson

Patients often plead they’ll do anything to avoid a colonoscopy for cancer screening. Now doctors at the Mayo Clinic have an alternative that will put that sentiment to the test. Mayo officials announcedStar Tribune newspaper logo Monday they will be the first in the United States to offer patients the Cologuard test, by which patients collect their stool samples and mail them in sealed containers for DNA analysis of their colon cancer risks.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

 

KSTP
Mayo Offers At-Home Colonoscopy Alternative

It's the test no one wants but everyone needs, at least until now. Doctors at the Mayo Clinic will be the first to offer the Cologuard test, which they say is a new alternative to getting a colonoscopy. Basically, KSTP-TV Eyewitness News Logpatients taking the Cologuard test would collect their own stool samples and mail them in for analysis. "Patients can do this test in the comfort and convenience of their own home, and only those patients who have positive tests would be asked to undergo a follow-up diagnostic colonoscopy," said Dr. John Kisiel, a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist.

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

 

WCCO
Mayo Clinic To Offer At-Home Test For Colon Cancer

It’s called Cologuard and in the privacy of your bathroom at home, you can use it to collect a stool sample and mail it in for analysis. “The most important advance and why this test is really revolutionaryCBS Minnesota is that this will allow a larger percentage of the population that needs screening to undergo screening,” said Dr. Vijay Shah, a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist.

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

Additional Coverage:

Star Tribune, Steve Sack editorial cartoon: Mayo Clinic Home Colon Cancer Test

Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic to discuss new screening test, Mayo Clinic and Exact Sciences Corp. have scheduled a Monday audio conference with journalists to discuss a product called Cologuard "a stool DNA test for colorectal cancer screening."…Mayo gives no specifics about its Monday news conference. But it has previously noted online that an "ideal screening test would be noninvasive and affordable; require no bowel prep, medication restriction or diet change; and would detect neoplasms on both sides of the colorectum with high accuracy."

Post BulletinMayo Clinic first to offer screening for colorectal cancer, By Jeff Hansel, Mayo Clinic announced today that it will become the first health-care organization to offer newly FDA-approved screening tests for colorectal cancer, the second-leading cancer killer in the U.S.

BringMeTheNews, Quick Bite: 3 stories to read over lunch, The Mayo Clinic will be the first health center in the nation to offer patients a mail-in stool sample test that is an alternative to a colonoscopy. The new procedure, called the Cologuard test, got FDA approval earlier this month. It was co-invented by a Mayo gastroenterologist. The test will be available by prescription. 

Star Tribune, Readers Write: Mayo’s policy sensitive to conflicts of interest, In response to the Aug. 27 letter “Cologuard test isn’t just a Mayo product”: The Mayo Clinic receives no royalties when a Mayo patient is prescribed the Cologuard test. Mayo will receive royalties when other providers prescribe the test outside of the Mayo Clinic. This arrangement is consistent with our robust policies governing conflict of interest at Mayo.

Star Tribune, Reader’s Write: Cologuard test isn’t just a Mayo product,…The story also reported that a Mayo doctor is co-inventor of Cologuard. But it didn’t report that under a license agreement with Exact Sciences in Madison, Wis., the doctor and Mayo “share in equity and royalties” for the test kit. Mayo is a fine and respected clinic, but there are many quality primary-care doctors and centers far closer to interested patients that, unlike Mayo, don’t have a direct revenue motive for prescribing Cologuard.

Kansas City Star (AP), Mayo Clinic to offer at-home colon cancer test, Doctors at the Mayo Clinic are offering a new way for patients to be tested for colon cancer. The Star Tribune (http://strib.mn/1tPcCY3 ) reports officials announced Monday the Rochester clinic will be the nation's first to provide patients with a new at-home colon cancer test. The Cologuard test recently won government approval as the first such test that uses patients' DNA to detect warning signs in stool samples.

CBS DC, CBS Baltimore, Medical Product Outsourcing,KAAL, Twin Cities Business, AP, La Crosse Tribune, Wichita Eagle, MinnPost, Yahoo! NewsYahoo! Finance, Minneapolis St. Paul Business Journal, MarketWatch, StreetInsider, Wisconsin State JournalArizona Republic, Sacramento Bee, EndoNurse, Wisconsin Radio Network

Context: Exact Sciences Corp. (NASDAQ: EXAS) today announced that Mayo Clinic will be the first health system to offer Cologuard®, the first and only Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved, noninvasive stool DNA screening test for colorectal cancer. Cologuard will be available to patients through their primary care physicians at Mayo Clinic.

cologuardAvailable by prescription only, Cologuard offers people 50 years and older who are at average risk for colorectal cancer an easy to use screening test which they can do in the privacy of their own home. It is the first noninvasive screening test for colorectal cancer that analyzes both stool-based DNA and blood biomarkers to detect cancer and precancer. The Cologuard technology platform was co-developed by Exact Sciences Corp. and Mayo Clinic as part of a broad, exclusive collaboration. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Brian Kilen

 

KTTC
Mayo Clinic president and CEO accepts Ice Bucket Challenge

Mayo Clinic president and CEO, Dr. John Noseworthy, took part in the Ice Bucket Challenge this week after being nominated by KTTC reporter, Mike Sullivan. Video of Dr. Noseworthy accepting theKTTC TV logo challenge appeared on YouTube (http://youtu.be/OMq_Yrn2YYk). The Ice Bucket Challenge helps raise awareness and support for ALS research.

Reach: KTTC is an NBC affiliate that serves the Rochester, Minn. area including the towns of Austin, Mason City, Albert Lea and Winona. Its website receives more than 73,300 unique visitors each month.

Related Coverage:

KAAL, Amid Ice Bucket Challenges is the Real Challenge for Families Battling ALS by Jenna Lohse, Dumping cold water over your head to raise millions of dollars for ALS research seems to be all the rage in recent weeks, but sometimes we forget why we're doing things. What is ALS and how does it feel to live through it every day? Ernie Faulkner never would have dreamed to be taking care of his bed-ridden wife at just 63 years old…His wife Linda was diagnosed with ALS in 2011. They traveled from South Carolina to Mayo Clinic, but Linda is now in hospice care, with little time left. "It can't be long I don't see, unless there's a miracle of biblical proportions,” said Faulkner…"This disease is devastating, for individuals many of the people who it's affected are in the prime of their lives,” said Dr. Eric Sorensen, Medical Director of Mayo's ALS Center.

Context: To help raise awareness and support for ALS research, John Noseworthy, M.D.Mayo Clinic president and CEO, braved the shower of icy water and took part in the Ice Bucket Challenge this week. Dr. Noseworthy was nominated by reporter, Mike Sullivan, at KTTC News, the local NBC News affiliate in Rochester, Minn., to take part in the challenge. Though he was miles away in Canada on vacation, Dr. Noseworthy didn’t hesitate to pledge his support to ALS research and take the challenge. Learn more about ALS research at Mayo Clinic.

Other Dr. Noseworthy-Related Media Coverage:

Twin Cities Business, Three MN Leaders Among ‘Most Influential People In Health Care’ by Stephen Montemayor, Three Minnesotans this week made a publication’s annual “100 Most Influential People in Health Care” list, led by UnitedHealth Group CEO Stephen Hemsley ranking in the top five…The health care publication also ranked Mayo Clinic President and CEO Dr. John Noseworthy 16th while Rulon Stacey, president and CEO of Minneapolis-based Fairview Health Services, came in at 87th.

Post Bulletin, Magazine: Noseworthy 16th most influential in healthcare, Modern Healthcare magazine lists Dr. John Noseworthy, president and chief executive officer of Mayo Clinic, as one of the 100 most influential people in healthcare. It is the 13th annual publication of the list, which Modern Healthcare put together after receiving more than 15,000 nomination submissions this year. A story announcing the ranking was posted on the magazine's website Saturday.

Public Affairs Contacts: Kelley LucksteinDuska Anastasijevic, Karl Oestreich

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Tags: A.L.S., ACA, ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, AP, Arizona Republic, bladder cancer, BringMeTheNews, Business Insider, Cardio3, CBS Baltimore, CBS DC, CBS News


August 7th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Spokesman-Review
Kootenai Health Joins Mayo Network

Kootenai Health and Mayo Clinic leaders today announced Kootenai Health as a Spokesman-Review newspaper bannermember of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a national network of like-minded organizations that share a commitment to better serving patients and their families.

Reach: The Spokesman-Review is a daily newspaper in Spokane, Washington. The Coeur D'Alene Bureau of the Spokesman-Review is located in Coeur D'Alene, Idaho, and covers the news from the western part of the state. The daily circulation of the Spokesman Review is more than 100,000 and the weekend circulation is more than 131,000.

Additional coverage:

Coeur d' Alene Press, What Kootenai Health-Mayo partnership means to you, patients
Post-Bulletin, Spokesman-Review Wash., Boise Weekly, Coeur d’Alene Press, KROC AM Radio, WorldNews.com, KREM Wash. KREM-CBS Wash., News Medical, CDA Press

Context: Kootenai Health and Mayo Clinic leaders announced this week Kootenai Health as a member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a national network of like-minded organizations that share a commitment to better serving patients and their families. The network, which began in 2011, now includes 30 member organizations that are interested in working with Mayo Clinic to improve health care delivery by sharing knowledge and promoting collaboration between physicians. As part of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, Kootenai Health physicians now have access to Mayo Clinic’s knowledge and expertise when these additional resources will be helpful, allowing many patients to avoid unnecessary travel for answers to complex medical questions. “We are working with Mayo Clinic so our patients can benefit from leading medical expertise and physician collaboration without having to leave home,” says Jon Ness, Kootenai Health CEO. “Our two organizations share the same commitment that health care should be provided close to home whenever possible.” More information about the announcement can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

AARP
8 Ways to Shape Up for Your Surgery
by Elizabeth Agnvall

Jean Hanson needed a new hip. After years of teaching P.E. and tearing up ski slopes all over the world, AARP The Magazine Logothe Sedona, Arizona, resident was in so much pain that she relied on a walker. She finally decided to have surgery at the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix, but there was just one problem: Doctors there wouldn't do the operation unless she quit smoking.

Reach:  AARP, The Magazine, has a circulation of more than 22.2 million and is published every other month.

Context: The news that you will need surgery can prompt many questions and a lot of anxiety. Beyond details about your medical condition and treatment options, what should you ask your surgeon before the operation? Whatever you need to ask to be comfortable with the decisions you make about your care, says Robert Cima, M.D., a colon and rectal surgeon and chair of Mayo’s surgical quality subcommittee. To learn more about the five questions to ask your surgeon before an operation, please go to Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Entertainment Tonight
Country Legend Glen Campbell Refuses to be Silenced by Alzheimer's

Alzheimer's has made it difficult for Glen Campbell to remember names and people, but he has no problem performing on stage. We have a look at the new documentary about his diagnosis. TheEntertainment Tonight Logo Rhinestone Cowboy, who has inspired stars like Taylor Swift to Keith Urban, refused to let his debilitating disease slow him down, and went on a final tour of 151 shows. As an extra treat, Campbell invited award-winning filmmaker James Keach along to capture every moment for the documentary Glen Campbell: I'll Be Me. The segment includes video of Glen at Mayo Clinic and of his appointment with Dr. Ronald Peterson.

Reach: Entertainment Tonight reaches more than 12 million viewers in the US and 70 other countries.

Context: Glen Campbell: I'll Be Me opens October 24. Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Prevention
9 New Discoveries About Fat That Will Clarify A Lot

…9. The circumference of your waist can tell you your heart disease risk. Women with waists over 37 inches have an 80% higher risk of conditions like heart disease, lung problems or cancer compared toPrevention logo women whose waist span was under 27 inches, according to a Mayo Clinic review published…

Reach: Prevention is published monthly with a circulation of 2.8 million.  Prevention - Online has more than 1.1 million unique visitors each month and has 9.3 million average page views each month.

Context: Having a big belly has consequences beyond trouble squeezing into your pants. It’s detrimental to your health, even if you have a healthy body mass index (BMI), a new international collaborative study led by a Mayo Clinic researcher found. Men and women with large waist circumferences were more likely to die younger, and were more likely to die from illnesses such as heart diseaserespiratory problems, and cancer after accounting for body mass index, smokingalcohol use andphysical activity. The study is published in the March edition of Mayo Clinic Proceedings. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Alyson Gonzalez

 

MPR
Are doctors misdiagnosing children with ADHD?

MPR Daily Circuit Dr. Jyoti Bhagia, Assistant Professor of psychiatry at Mayo Clinic.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context:  Jyoti Bhagia, M.D., is a psychiatrist with Mayo Clinic Children's Center. Her interests include mood disorder, ADHD and obesity.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Post-Bulletin
Pulse On Health: Become one of thousands aiding research
by Jeff Hansel

Mayo Clinic Biobank leaders say they have surpassed 40,000 participants and are "moving quickly Logo for Post-Bulletin newspapertoward our goal of 50,000." I submitted blood samples many months ago and, by my own choice, essentially gave permission for use in perpetuity for anything from disease research to drug development.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context:  Mayo Clinic and the Center for Individualized Medicine have made a significant commitment to building a scalable biorepository infrastructure, which includes two specimen processing core laboratories and several large centralized biospecimen collections. One of these biospecimen collections is the Mayo Clinic Biobank, a collection of samples, including blood and blood derivatives, and health information donated by Mayo Clinic patients. Unlike many biobanks in existence at Mayo Clinic and elsewhere, the Mayo Clinic Biobank is not focused on any particular disease. Rather, the Biobank collects samples and health information from patients and other volunteers regardless of health history. Once a participant becomes a part of the Biobank, he or she becomes a part of ongoing health research. More information on Mayo Clinic Biobank can be found here

Public Affairs Contacts: Sam SmithBob Nellis

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April 4th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Fox Business
Part 1 -- Mayo Clinic CEO: We need to modernize the delivery system, Medicare  

Fox Business
Part 2 -- Top institutions squeezed by rising health-care costs 

Fox Business
Part 3 -- Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy, American Action Forum president Douglas Holtz-Eakin discuss health-care spending    

Reach: FoxNews.com has more than 13 million unique visitors each month. Fox Business Network is headquartered in News Corporation's
Fox Businessstudios in midtown Manhattan with bureaus in Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco (Silicon Valley), Washington, D.C. and London.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Dr. Noseworthy recently joined Maria Bartiromo on Fox Business’s “Opening Bell” to discuss the Affordable Care Act, the need to modernize the health care delivery system and Medicare and Mayo Clinic's role in health care innovation.

Dr. Noseworthy explained that the health care delivery system must be modernized. He highlighted three ways Mayo Clinic is doing this:

  1. Mayo Clinic’s focus on providing the highest quality and safest care
  2. Expanding Mayo’s reach through the Mayo Clinic Care Network
  3. Identifying and investing in what patients need in the future through research activities and work in the science of health care delivery, including Mayo’s strategic research alliance with Optum Labs

Public Affairs Contacts:  Chris Gade, Bryan Anderson

 

KMUW Wichita Public Radio
Topeka Hospital to Collaborate with Mayo Clinic

Topeka's Stormont-Vail HealthCare has become the first health system in Kansas to partner with the Mayo Clinic Care Network. The deal will give local patients access to the expertiseKMUW Wichita Public Radio of the medical staff at the Mayo Clinic.

 

Reach: KMUW-FM 89.1 is a non-commercial NPR News/Talk and Variety music public radio station out of Wichita State University in the Wichita, Kan. area.

Additional Coverage:
Topeka Capital-Journal
Editorial: Local health care community takes another big step

The health of the local health care community just keeps improving. The latest advancement on that front was revealed Tuesday when officials of Stormont-Vail HealthCare and the world-renown Mayo Clinic, based in Rochester, Minn., announced they had entered a partnership that will give local physicians access to the clinic’s physicians for consultations.

Post-BulletinMayo Clinic Care Network now in 14 states, Mexico; WIBW Kan.Wichita EagleTopeka Capital-JournalNews Medical

Context:  Stormont-Vail HealthCare and Mayo Clinic officials announced April 1 that the Topeka-based health system has become a member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a national network of like-minded organizations that share a commitment to better serving patients and families. Stormont-Vail HealthCare is the first health system in Kansas to join the network. The Mayo Clinic Care Network is a network of like-minded organizations which share a common commitment to improving the delivery of health care in their communities through high-quality, data-driven, evidence-based medical care. More information about the announcement can be found here on Mayo Clinic Care Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

KARE
Mayo Clinic patient celebrates junior prom bedside

KARE 11A heart transplant didn't stop Bree Hanson from celebrating her junior prom.

Reach: KARE is a an NBC affiliate in the Minneapolis-St.Paul market.

Context: At Mayo Clinic Transplant Center a team of doctors trained in heart and blood vessel disease (cardiologists), transplant surgery, infectious diseases, mental health conditions (psychiatrists) and other areas evaluate patients to determine if they are eligible for a heart transplant.

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

KPHO Ariz.
Looking inside Mayo Clinic's Proton Therapy Cancer Center by Greg Argos, Though it's not going to accept patients until 2016, CBS 5 News took an exclusive look inside the Mayo Clinic's $400 million dollar proton therapy center. "There are only about 12 sites in the country that will have proton beam therapy now, and this will be the only site in ArizonaCBS5AZ-KPHO that has proton therapy," explained Dr. Steve Schild, an Oncologist and the Department Chair for the Mayo Clinic's new center.

Reach: KPHO-5 is the CBS affiliate in Phoenix and is owned by Meredith Corporation.

Context: Mayo Clinic is launching a Proton Beam Therapy Program to provide the latest cancer treatment for Mayo patients. New treatment facilities will be built on the Minnesota and Arizona campuses. Treatment for patients will be available beginning in 2015 in Minnesota and 2016 in Arizona. Proton beam therapy will be used to treat many kinds of cancers located deep within the body and close to critical organs and body structures, especially in children and young adults.

Public Affairs Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

Post BulletinDr. John Noseworthy: Rochester, Mayo Clinic have grown up together
by Dr. John Noseworthy

For 150 years, the city of Rochester and Mayo Clinic have had a partnership like none other. We've grown up together. We could not have asked for a better place to call home throughout our history or a better place to invest in our future to benefit Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperour patients, employees and the community. During the last legislative session, Gov. Mark Dayton and the legislature determined there was a compelling public interest to authorize public investments in Rochester to help support the significant investments by Mayo Clinic to strengthen and secure Minnesota as a global destination medical center.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Additional Coverage:

Post Bulletin
, DMC special report: Road map to the future by Jay Furst, Twenty years from now, Rochester will have about 35,000 more people, the Rochester area will have 35,000 to 45,000 more jobs, and Mayo Clinic will remain a world-class destination for health care, according to Destination Medical Center promoters. How will this happen, and who's drawing up the plan? Today, in a 24-page special report called "DMC: Road Map to the Future," the Post-Bulletin lays out the plan envisioned by Mayo, city and county officials, and business leaders.

Post BulletinWhat is DMC: The facts, The concept of Destination Medical Center is simple — to transform Mayo Clinic and Rochester into a more attractive destination for medical patients and providers. But the structure of the $6 billion, 20-year public-private investment is not simple at all…The eight-member Destination Medical Center Corp. board will guide the use of all public funding, andwill oversee the operation of the nonprofit Destination Medical Center Corp. It's also responsible for approving the overall DMC Development Plan. Four members of the DMCC were chosen by the governor, three are representatives of local government and one is a Mayo Clinic representative.

Post BulletinA DMC magic wand by Jeff Hansel, Richard Dooley and his wife, Karol, have been staying at the Hope Lodge in Rochester while he undergoes prostate cancer therapy at Mayo Clinic. Dooley said he loves "everything" about Mayo Clinic and Rochester. "We both love the town. It's nice and clean and neat and everybody's respectful and nice," Dooley said…If Solis had a magic wand, he said, he would have Mayo introduce a "Louder than a Bomb" poetry program to both Mayo Clinic patients and to Rochester community members. That program has helped young people close to dropping out of school get energized, Solis said. He'd like to see local poets read to Mayo patients, and Mayo patients encouraged to write and read poetry.

Post BulletinMayo Clinic expansion already underway, more likely by Jeff Hansel, With the Destination Medical Center plan in the books, Mayo Clinic has already shifted into growth mode. The nonprofit has several projects underway, or planned in the near future. "There are current projects taking place at Mayo Clinic that will continue to enhance the patient experience and increase the quality of care delivered to patients for generations to come," said Mayo spokeswoman Kelley Luckstein. The latest is at Mayo Medical Laboratories which plans a 66,000-square-foot, two-story addition to the Superior Drive Support Center.

Post BulletinMayo reaching out in other areas by Jeff Hansel, Even as it is making plans to expand in Rochester, Mayo Clinic is reaching out elsewhere in an effort to connect with more patients. Among those efforts are a sports medicine and athletic training center called Mayo Clinic Square in downtown Minneapolis, the continued growth of the Mayo Clinic Care Network and even the recent purchase of 187 acres in Onalaska, Wis., for a possible new facility.

Post BulletinDEED, DMC job projections similar by Brent Pearson, he Mayo Clinic has a major effect on the economy of southeastern Minnesota, with a proposed $5 billion expansion of the world-renowned medical center likely to stimulate further growth. Destination Medical Center is a plan to expand the Mayo Clinic's Rochester campus and further enhance the region's position as a global destination for health-care services. Mayo officials estimate the expansion will create between 25,000 and 30,000 direct jobs, another 10,000 to 15,000 indirect jobs, and 1,800 to 2,200 construction jobs over the next 20 years.

BringMeTheNews, Construction jobs aplenty in southeast Minnesota by Jessica Mador, There are new signs of growth in Rochester this spring, partly spurred by the Mayo Clinic’s plans for a new $5 billion flagship campus makeover. The Mayo project calls for doubling the size of its existing Minnesota campus. According to Mayo, the clinic already employs 40,600 Minnesotans, 33,400 of whom work in Rochester. And as MPR News reports, the clinic’s makeover plan includes $327 million in state aid, largely to fund improvements to public facilities in the city.

Post Bulletin, DMC to bring thousands of jobs by Bryan Lund, The Destination Medical Center could have a significant impact on Rochester's employment landscape, if the estimates of Mayo Clinic officials come to fruition. The DMC initiative's website says the project will create thousands of permanent, well-paying jobs in the area over the next couple decades. Some of those are directly related to DMC, such as additional physicians and medical support staff, while others are predicted to come as a result of growth in the area's economy indirectly associated with DMC.

Post-Bulletin, Letter: DMC planners must consider needs of disabled, I hope the Destination Medical Center planners consider the needs of people with disabilities. The Mayo Clinic has restroom facilities for people with special needs. A few other places have them as well. Fortunately, the new senior center is planning to have companion restroom facilities for people who need assistance in a rest room.

MPR, More construction workers needed in Rochester as housing market recovers by Elizabeth Baier, It's a good time to be a construction worker in southeastern Minnesota. With home construction on the rise, the job forecast is good in the construction and trade industries. Over the next two decades, more workers will be needed to help Rochester keep pace with the expected growth. During that time, the city is expected to grow by 32,000 residents, in part because of Mayo Clinic's $5 billion plan to remake its flagship campus. The plan includes $327 million in state aid, largely to fund improvements to public facilities in the city. Additional coverage: St. Cloud Times

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March 21st, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

WCCO
Health Watch: A Promising At-Home Colon Cancer Test

A new at-home test to check for colon cancer is showing promising results. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic say the results are impressive. Colon cancer is preventable and curable ifCBS Minnesota caught early, yet millions of Americans don’t get screened. Now, the test, called the Cologuard, detects blood in a patient’s stool sample as well as DNA changes that can be a sign of cancer or precancerous polyps.

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

Additional coverage:
CBS News Morning RoundsNew DNA test may provide non-invasive alternative for colon cancer screening

Star TribuneAlternative to colonoscopy detects cancers – though it has its own 'ick' factor

Huffington Post
New Noninvasive Colorectal Cancer Screening Test Is Effective In Large Trial

HealthDayNew Stool Test Shows Promise as Colon Cancer Screen

BloombergExact Sciences’ Colon Cancer Test Detects More Tumors

Post-Bulletin, Heard on the Street: Exact Sciences treatment shows promise

BusinessweekExact Sciences’ Colon Cancer Test at Home Finds More Tumors

Washington Post, Markets EmergingThe Street

Context: A clinical trial of Cologuard shows unprecedented results for finding colorectal cancer with a noninvasive test. “Cologuard detection rates of early stage cancer and high-risk precancerous polyps validated in this large study were outstanding and have not been achieved by other noninvasive approaches,” says the study’s author David Ahlquist M.D., a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist and co-inventor of the Cologuard test. Colorectal cancer has become the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States, but it is highly treatable if found early. Cologuard uses a self-contained collection kit that allows patients to send stool samples to a high-tech lab for screening. More information, including an interview with Dr. Ahlquist, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Brian Kilen

Florida Times-Union
Lung transplant patients picking up harmonicas to improve breathing
by Meredith Rutland

It didn’t seem like the best instrument for a just-off-the-operating-table lung transplant patient like Larry Rawdon. He saw it as a challenge and, later, as way to help him breathe Florida Times-Union newspaper logoeasier. Rawdon, now 65 and living in Southside, had lost two sets of lungs — one given by birth and one by transplant — and was on his third when he picked up the harmonica.… Most days are tough when recovering from a transplant. Making silly sounds on the harmonica and laughing about it with other patients is a much-needed reprieve, said Dr. Cesar Keller, a Mayo Clinic pulmonary transplant doctor. “Sometimes, it’s nice to have something that’s fun to do and easy to do, and useful,” he said.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: After surviving two separate lung transplant procedures in 2005 and 2008, musician Larry Rawdon is sharing new ways of healing through music with other patients at Mayo Clinic in Florida. It was, after all, music that led him to Mayo Clinic and aided in his recovery after he was diagnosed in 2002 with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.  Read more in Sharing Mayo Clinic.

Public Affairs Contact: Paul Scotti

KAAL
Proton Beam Offers State-of-the-Art Cancer Treatment at Mayo
by Steph Crock

We've been following it since the groundbreaking, now the first ever look inside Mayo's nearly $200 million proton beam therapy building. It's the recipient of one of largest donations Mayo Clinic has ever received, the Richard O. Jacobson Building, home to the Mayo Clinic proton beam therapy program, is now complete… "This is a dream come true. Its' likeKAAL-TV 6 Christmas day for us," said Robert Foote, M.D. Mayo Clinic. Mayo doctors will now be able to treat cancer patients more effectively with fewer side effects. "Conventional radiation has an entrance dose and an exit does that causes side effects and complications," said Dr. Foote.

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Additional coverage:

Post-Bulletin, Our View: Critics of proton beam facility miss the point

Post-BulletinProton center begins process of "commissioning

Finance & CommerceStatus Report: Mayo proton therapy facility

Star Tribune, Mayo's proton beam therapy adds to debate over high-tech costs 

How it works: Star Tribune.

KTTCKIMTFOX47Twin Cities Business Magazine

Context: Construction on the Richard O. Jacobson Building, home to the Mayo Clinic proton beam therapy program, is now complete. Over the next 15 months, physicians, scientists and technicians will calibrate and test equipment in advance of the facility’s scheduled opening in the summer of 2015. More information on proton beam therapy can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Joe Dangor

USA TODAY
Lynx sign marquee jersey sponsorship w/Mayo Clinic

The Minnesota Lynx are cashing in on their recent run of success. The Lynx announced an expanded partnership with the Mayo Clinic on Monday that includes a new jersey that USA Today NEWfeatures the Mayo Clinic name across the front rather than the team's name. The Lynx and NBA's Timberwolves are also partnering with the health care provider on a new practice facility just across the street from their arena.

Reach: USA TODAY  has the highest daily circulation of any U.S. newspaper with a daily average circulation of 2.9 million, which includes print and various digital editions.

Additional coverage:
Post-BulletinOur View: Lynx jerseys shocking, but the right fit

MPR, Lynx out, Mayo in on team jerseys

Post-Bulletin, Answer Man: No Mayo-Cleveland tilts scheduled so far

KARE11KTTCStar TribunePioneer PressKSTPKSFY SDKDLH DuluthWDIO DuluthKMSPPost-BulletinESPNDarren Rovell TweetMinneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal , KTTCPost-BulletinStar Tribune

Context: This week, the 2013 Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA) Champion Minnesota Lynx announced a multi-year partnership with Mayo Clinic that includes marquee placement on the team’s home and away jerseys. The new agreement also designates Mayo Clinic as the exclusive presenting sponsor for the 2014 Lynx season, which kicks off on May 16. This agreement between the Lynx and Mayo Clinic is part of a previously announced strategic collaboration that includes the development of a new state-of-the-art training facility and sports medicine center in Mayo Clinic Square, formerly known as Block E in downtown Minneapolis. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

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November 22nd, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

 

 

November 22, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Bloomberg In The Loop:
What's the True Cost of U.S. Healthcare?

John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO, discusses the cost of U.S. healthcare with Betty Liu Bloomberg's The Year Ahead: 2014 conference at the Art Institute of Chicago.

Reach: Bloomberg has 2,300 media professionals in 146 bureaus across 72 countries. Bloomberg delivers its content across more than 400 publications, over 310 million households worldwide through Bloomberg Television and 500,000 in the New York metro area and 18.5 million subscribers through satellite radio.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Dr. Noseworthy participated this week in the Bloomberg Business Summit Panel on “The Real Price of Health Care” at The Art Institute of Chicago.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

Wall Street Journal
Mayo Clinic CEO: Health-Care Law Off to Rough Start

Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy talks to the WSJ’s Sara Murray about why Obamacare isn’t about guaranteeing better health care quality and how their company keeps employees healthy.

Circulation: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 2.23 million copies on week days. Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Dr. Noseworthy participated in The Wall Street Journal's CEO Council this past week in Washington, D.C.  where top global CEOs gathered for a series of meetings. Dr. Noseworthy co-chaired the Health Care Innovation Task Force.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Chris Gade

FOX Business
ObamaCare too focused on insurance
, rather than quality of care?

Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy on the need to improve quality of care under ObamaCare.

Reach: FoxNews.com has more than 13 million unique visitors each month. The Willis Report is hosted by Gerri Willis and airs from 6 p.m. & 9 p.m. ET on the Fox Business Network. FBN is headquartered in News Corporation's studios in midtown Manhattan with bureaus in Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco (Silicon Valley), Washington, D.C. and London.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bryan Anderson, Chris Gade

Wall Street Journal
Special Report: The Hospital Room of the Future
by Barbara Sadick

The hospital room may be due for a checkup. Doctors and nurses, architects and designers all say the room setting has an important but largely neglected role to play in the delivery of quality care and outcomes…"With all the knowledge we've gained," says Dr. Douglas Wood, director of the Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation, "we can increasingly create an environment in the hospital to minimize the transmission of bacteria, increase the circulation of air, and reduce pain, discomfort and poor clinical outcomes." Full Health Care Report.

Circulation: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 2.23 million copies on week days. Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

Pioneer Press
St. Paul gave to them, so John Nasseff and Helene Houle gave it right back
by Maja Beckstrom

…He has contributed more than $10 million to Mayo Clinic, primarily to support neurosurgery research. Like many of his donations, it can be traced to a personal connection. Long before he amassed his fortune -- while he was still riding the bus to work -- Nasseff's then 16-year-old son Art complained of headaches. After a local doctor brushed them off, Nasseff took the boy to Mayo, where he was diagnosed with a brain tumor. Nasseff was grateful to the young surgeon, Burton Onofrio.

Reach: The St. Paul Pioneer Press has a daily circulation of 208,280 and its Sunday newspaper circulation is 284,507. Its TwinCities.com website had approximately 20.4 million page views (March 2013). Mobile page views on smartphones and tablet computers totaled more than 11.4 million in March 2013.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

Additional Mayo Clinic News Highlights This Week:
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