Items Tagged ‘AccuWeather’

March 3rd, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

USA Today
Having a baby past 35: What women should know
by Ashley May

Have a plan, and the money to execute it, before 35. Fertility doctors say women approaching 35 who want children but aren’t yet ready should look into egg or embryo freezing. Charles Coddington, professor and OB/GYN for Mayo Medical School, also advises getting a full checkup for reproductive health. After age 35, pregnancy is more difficult because of less frequent ovulation. Also, women 35-45 have aUSA Today newspaper logo 20-35% chance of miscarriage, compared with women under 35 that average a 15-20% chance of miscarriage, according to the American Pregnancy Association. … Frozen eggs of a woman younger than 35 have a greater than 50% chance of producing a live birth. Past age 40, freezing eggs or embryos will not have a great success – less than 9 percent result in live birth, Coddington said.

Reach: USA TODAY  has an average daily circulation of 4.1 million which includes print, various digital editions and other papers that use their branded content.

Context: Charles Coddington, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic ObGyn. The Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota supports women throughout their lifelong journey from childbearing age to menopause and beyond. You can learn more about Dr. Coddington's research interests here.

Contact:  Kelley Luckstein

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic investing $70 million in Mankato hospital
by Christopher Snowbeck

Mayo Clinic’s regional network of medical centers is investing $70 million to expand and renovate the surgery suite and orthopedic clinic at its hospital in Mankato. The project includes a $65 million upgrade to the Star Tribune newspaper logohospital’s surgery facilities that is part of a broader plan to better link the Mankato campus with Mayo Clinic’s headquarters in Rochester, according to details released Friday. “Mayo Clinic is committed to the needs of patients in Mankato and the surrounding communities we serve,” said Dr. James Hebl, vice president of Mayo Clinic Health System in southwest Minnesota, in a statement.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: KROC AM, KEYC Mankato, Minneapolis/St. Paul Business, Journal, Post-Bulletin, Healthcare Dive, Germany Sun, Becker’s ASC ReviewMankato Free Press

Context:  Mayo Clinic Health System today announced plans for a $65 million hospital surgical suite expansion in Mankato. Construction is expected to begin later this year. “Mayo Clinic is committed to the needs of patients in Mankato and the surrounding communities we serve,” says James Hebl, M.D., vice president of Mayo Clinic Health System in Southwest Minnesota. “The projects are an investment in our patients, our staff and the needs of our communities. Providing access to outstanding care in state-of-the-art facilities closer to where patients live is of paramount importance, and is the driving force behind the decision to dedicate substantial resources to these initiatives.” More information about the expansion can be found here.

Contact:  Micah Dorfner

 

Star Tribune
Mayo earnings hit by Medicaid, labor costs
by Christopher Snowbeck

Mayo Clinic's net income slipped last year as the Rochester-based health care giant spent more on staffing for growth initiatives, and saw more losses on patients with Medicaid coverage. Even so, the overall results being released Monday show "it was a strong year," said Kedrick Adkins Jr., the clinic's chief financial officer. Mayo posted $475 million in net income on $11 billion in revenue, down about 10 percent from 2015Star Tribune newspaper logo net income of $526.4 million, according to the clinic's latest financial report.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: KTTC, Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal, Dotmed.comBecker’s Hospital Review, Healthcare Dive

Context: With more than 1.3 million patients seeking Mayo Clinic’s expertise yearly, the institution continues its work to provide the best care to every patient through integrated clinical practice, education and research. Mayo Clinic reported a strong financial position in 2016, with contributions of $466 million to its pension plan for staff and more than $600 million in capital projects. “The outstanding work of Mayo Clinic employees is the engine that drives our mission to our patients, advances important research and educational initiatives, and positions our institution as a key voice for the future of health care,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic. “Our strong financial performance enables Mayo to hire and retain the best talent, and invest in technology, facilities and our staff as we strive to deliver the best outcomes and service to our patients.”

Contact:  Susan Barber Lindquist

 

 

KAAL
Mayo Clinic Performs Rare In-Womb Surgery to Give Baby New Chance at Life
by Marissa Collins

An Austin mom and her baby are doing well after her pregnancy took an unexpected turn. Nineteen weeks in, doctors told her something was wrong with her unborn baby … Her baby was diagnosed with a severe KAAL 6 News Rochester Logoform of Spina Bifida halfway through her pregnancy. “Once the baby is being formed the babies back does not close. The spine does not close, so the nerves can be open," says Dr. Rodrigo Ruano, Director at Mayo Clinic Fetal Diagnostic and Intervention Center.

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Context: The Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota supports women throughout their lifelong journey from childbearing age to menopause and beyond. The Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine staff care for women experiencing high-risk pregnancies related to obstetric, medical, surgical or genetic complications.

Contact:  Kelley Luckstein

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Tags: AccuWeather, Action News Jax, acupuncture, Albert Lea Tribune, allergies, alzheimers, Andy Sandness, Anya Guy, ASH Clinical News, Associated Press, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Austin Daily Herald


February 17th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Twin Cities Public Television (Almanac)
Head of Mayo Clinic: John Noseworthy

Interview with Dr. John Noseworthy begins at 12:14. Almanac is hosted by Cathy Wurzer and Eric Eskola. Mary Lahammer contributes political reporting on a weekly basis.

Reach:  Twin Cities Public Television's "Almanac" program is a Minnesota institution. It has occupied the 7 o'clock time slot on Friday nights for more than a quarter of a century. It is the longest-running prime time TV program ever in the region. "Almanac" is a time capsule, a program of TPTrecord that details our region's history and culture during the past twenty five years. The hour-long mix of news, politics and culture is seen live statewide on the six stations of the Minnesota Public Television Association. Almanac was the first Minnesota TV show that virtually everyone in the state could watch together. The program's unusual format has been copied by numerous PBS stations around the country and it has led to Almanac being honored with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting's award for Best Public Affairs Program.

Related coverage:
Post-Bulletin, Political Notebook: Noseworthy talked to White House officials about travel ban

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. 

Contacts:  Kelley Luckstein, Karl Oestreich

 

KSTP
Mayo Clinic Doctors Demonstrate Dangers of Ice Fishing

Ice fishing may be a favorite pastime of many Minnesotans, but doctors say it can also be more dangerous than some realize. Mayo Clinic doctors aimed to demonstrate those dangers with the help of a mannequin they call Gus. Gus has been dinged, dented and generally doomed in a series of Mayo Clinic public education videos. Previous installments include Gus being hit by a driver who's texting, suffering a fireworks injury and receiving the Heimlich.

Reach: KSTP-TV is the ABC affiliate in Minneapolis that broadcasts on channel 5. KSTP-TV Online has more than 503,000 unique visitors each month. It is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., and is the only locally-owned and operated broadcasting company in the Twin Cities. KSTP-TV first broadcast in April 1948, and was the first television station to serve the upper Midwest.

Additional coverage: 
La Crosse TribuneAnglers beware: Ice fishing more perilous than traditional methods
KAAL, Mayo Clinic Doctors Demonstrate Dangers of Ice Fishing
Star Tribune, Mayo study finds hazards of ice fishing are many and varied

Context: Ice fishing might seem like a benign sport – for everyone except the fish. Sitting in a cozy shanty waiting for a bite, what could go wrong? A lot, Mayo Clinic surgeons have found. The ice fishing injuries they have chronicled seem more like a casualty list from an extreme sport: burns, broken bones, concussions and more. The findings are published in the American Journal of Emergency Medicine. The study team analyzed data on emergency department visits between 2009 and 2014 obtained from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System ─ All Injury Program and found 85 patients hurt while ice fishing. There may be more cases than they could find; the database collects data on emergency room visits from a nationally representative sample of roughly 100 hospitals with six or more beds, and the researchers had to search case narratives to identify ice fishing injuries. More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Sharon Theimer,  Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

News4Jax
Thousands run marathon to support breast cancer research
by Ashley Mitchem

After a decade that included nearly 100,000 runners, the Donna 26.2 marathon has become more than just a run -- it's the only marathon in the United States dedicated to breast cancer research. Donations support breast cancer research at Mayo Clinic and provide financial assistance to
those living with breast cancer.

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville. This Week in Jacksonville is a weekly public affairs program on WJXT.

Additional coverage: Florida Times-Union, First Coast News

Context: The DONNA Foundation is a non-profit organization in Northeast Florida producing the only marathon in the U.S. dedicated to breast cancer research, awareness and care.  The DONNA Foundation has helped to develop and maintain the Mayo Clinic Breast Cancer Translational Genomics Program.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

Marketplace
Mayo Clinic's hometown looks to become the 'Silicon Valley of medicine'
by Catharine Richert

If you head directly south from St. Paul, Minnesota, you'll eventually find yourself in Rochester, home of the world-renowned Mayo Clinic. For NPR Marketplace Logomore than 100 years, the city and the hospital have been synonymous. And now, a massive economic development project backed by Mayo, the city and the state aims to transform the city of more than 100,000 into a magnet for startups and entrepreneurs in medicine and other fields. Mayo BioBusiness Center Chair Jim Rogers said Rochester’s transformation is already apparent. "I can count — just about every building has a new business in the last four of five years, it seems,” he said. "It's incredible what's occurring here."

Reach: Marketplace is produced and distributed by American Public Media (APM), in association with the University of Southern California. The Marketplace portfolio of programs includes Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal, Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio, Marketplace Weekend with Lizzie O'Leary, and Marketplace Tech with Ben Johnson. Marketplace programs are currently broadcast by nearly 800 public radio stations nationwide across the United States and are heard by more than 13 million weekly listeners.

Previous coverage in the January 13, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: With Mayo Clinic at its heart, the Destination Medical Center (DMC) initiative is the catalyst to position Rochester, Minnesota as the world’s premier destination for health and wellness; attracting people, investment opportunities, and jobs to America’s City for Health and supporting the economic growth of Minnesota, its bioscience sector, and beyond.

Contacts: Duska Anastasijevic, Bob Nellis

 

CNN
For decades, women had heart attacks in silence
by Michael Nedelamn

Sharonne Hayes, a cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic and founder of its Women's Heart Clinic, originally thought it was near-impossible to do research on SCAD. She expected to see no more than one or two cases in her career. "Most of the cases were in the pathology literature, so it wasCNN Logo (thought to be) almost universally fatal," said Hayes, who has educated patients through the advocacy organization WomenHeart for over 15 years. In 2009, a woman approached her at a WomenHeart conference and asked, "What is Mayo doing about research on SCAD?" "It's probably so rare," Hayes replied. "We could never research it."

Reach: Cable News Network (CNN) is a worldwide news and information network providing live, continuous coverage of news from around the globe, 24 hours a day. CNN online received more than 55 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Context:  Sharonne Hayes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Hayes studies cardiovascular disease and prevention, with a focus on sex and gender differences and conditions that uniquely or predominantly affect women. With a clinical base in the Women's Heart Clinic, Dr. Hayes and her research team utilize novel recruitment methods, social media and online communities, DNA profiling, and sex-specific evaluations to better understand several cardiovascular conditions. A major area of focus is spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD), an uncommon and under-recognized cause of acute coronary syndrome (heart attack) that occurs predominantly in young women.

Contacts: Traci Klein, Kelley Luckstein

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Tags: 26.2 with Donna Marathon, A Tu Salud, ACA, AccuWeather, Almanac, alzheimers, AMA, Ambient Clinical Analytics, antibacterial soap, arrhythmia, Associated Press, Barron News-Shield


January 13th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

First Coast News
The Chat Wednesday January 11: Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa Part 1

First Coast News
The Chat Wednesday January 11: Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa Part 2

Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, Mayo Clinic neurosurgeon, joined “The Chat,” a live afternoon show on Jacksonville’s First Coast News. TheFirst Coast News Logo show’s web site breaks up the segments in two parts (see links below). The first segment focuses on his early life/career with images of his time at Johns Hopkins, and the second segment focuses on his role and work at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville.

Reach: First Coast News refers to two television stations in Jacksonville, Florida. WJXX, the ABC affiliate and WTLV, the NBC affiliate.

Previous coverage in September 23, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
Previous coverage in April 22, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, M.D., prominent neurosurgeon, researcher and educator, joined Mayo Clinic in 2016 as chair of the Department of Neurosurgery on the Florida campus, along with several members of his research team from Johns Hopkins Medicine. Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa is renown nationally and internationally as a surgeon, researcher, humanitarian and author. His laboratory has published many manuscripts and articles, submitted a number of patents and obtained three NIH grants. Students and fellows who worked with Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa have gone on to join leading neuroscience programs throughout the world. Mayo Clinic's world-renowned neurosurgeons perform more than 7,000 complex surgical procedures every year at campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota.

Contact: Kevin Punsky


Yahoo! News
Robert M. Jacobson stresses importance of flu vaccine

The Minnesota Department of Health released a report on Thursday on the increase of flu activity throughout the state. Friday afternoon, we Logo of Yahoo Newsspoke with a health professional at Mayo Clinic about the importance of getting the flu vaccine. According to the Minnesota Department of Health's report released on Thursday flu season is in full swing, and can indeed continue to increase in activity. In fact, Dr. Jacobson, a primary care physician and professor of pediatrics at Mayo Clinic, said in the last two weeks alone, there were 50 hospitalized patients in Minnesota from the flu.

Reach: Yahoo News receives more than 8.4 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: KTTC

Context:  Robert Jacobson, M.D. is a pediatrician with the Mayo Clinic Children's Center. Dr. Jacobson also serves as the medical director for the Population Health Science Program at Mayo Clinic's Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery. He also leads Mayo's Employee and Community Health (ECH) Research Initiative. You can read about his medical research here.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Wisconsin Public Radio
The Mayo Clinic Diet: Second Edition

It's the beginning of a new year, a time when many people resolve to make healthier choices--like eating a healthier diet. We learn how to improve health while losing weight with the medical editor of "The Mayo Clinic Diet." He says this plan is a lifestyle and not a diet in the traditional sense. We learn how it works.

Reach: Wisconsin Public Radio consists of 34 radio stations programmed by seven regional studios and carrying programming on three content networks: the Ideas Network, the NPR News and Classical Network and the All Classical Network.

Additional coverage: 

Post-Bulletin, The Mayo Clinic Diet earns top honor
KTTC, Mayo Clinic Diet is #1, according to U.S. News & World Report
KWLM Willmar Radio, KFGO Fargo-Moorhead, 104.7 DukeFM, WXOW La Crosse

Previous coverage in the January 6, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context:  As the second edition of The Mayo Clinic Diet hits store shelves, the diet plan has been named Best Commercial Diet by U.S. News & World Report.  “We are honored to be recognized for a weight-loss method that offers lasting results,” says Donald Hensrud, M.D., medical editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet and director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. Learn more about the Mayo Clinic by watching this Mayo Clinic Minute or read more about it on Mayo Clinic Network. “The Mayo Clinic Diet is much more than a diet,” Dr. Hensrud says. “It’s a lifestyle program in which people can eat great-tasting food and feel better right away ─ even while they lose weight. More importantly, these lifestyle changes are sustainable and can improve long-term health as people reach and maintain a healthy weight.”

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

MPR
For Rochester, becoming the 'Silicon Valley of Medicine' won't be easy
by Catharine Richert

The Destination Medical Center project wants to give Rochester a reputation for something it's never been: a magnet for tech start-ups and MPR News logoentrepreneurs. But turning the city into what the DMC calls the "Silicon Valley of Medicine" won't be easy. The DMC is a multibillion, 20-year economic development effort to remake Rochester so Mayo can better compete for both patients and top talent. It's also meant to help diversify the region's economy by attracting new businesses. But Rochester's risk-averse culture has held it back, said Jamie Sundsbak, an entrepreneur and former Mayo Clinic researcher. "When you have a large medical institution like the Mayo Clinic — a world renowned, top medical institution in the world — you get that way by eliminating risk," he said. "If you look at some of the entrepreneurial communities, risk is what they are excited about."

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: With Mayo Clinic at its heart, the Destination Medical Center (DMC) initiative is the catalyst to position Rochester, Minnesota as the world’s premier destination for health and wellness; attracting people, investment opportunities, and jobs to America’s City for Health and supporting the economic growth of Minnesota, its bioscience sector, and beyond.

Contacts: Duska AnastasijevicSusan Barber Lindquist

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Tags: 104.7 DukeFM, AccuWeather, advisory board, Albert Lea Tribune, Alzforum, apps, asthma, Austin Herald, Becker’s Hospital Review, Breast Cancer, breastfeeding, Brooke Werneburg


July 22nd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

New York Times
Fecal Transplants Can Be Life-Saving, but How?
by Carl Zimmer

Now scientists are testing fecal transplants against such diseases as ulcerative colitis, and even obesity and diabetes…The bacteria in stool seem to be particularly important. Dr. Sahil Khanna of the Mayo Clinic and his colleagues isolated the spores of about 50 different species of bacteriaThe New York Times newspaper logo found in stool samples donated by healthy people. They put the spores in pills, which they gave to 30 patients with C. difficile infections. As they reported in the July 15 issue of The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 29 of the patients recovered.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: Clostridium difficile (klos-TRID-e-um dif-uh-SEEL), often called C. difficile or C. diff, is a bacterium that can cause symptoms ranging from diarrhea to life-threatening inflammation of the colon. Mayo Clinic specializes in treating people with difficult cases of C. difficile who haven't responded to standard medical treatments or who have developed complications such as an inflamed colon. The Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, opened a C. difficile clinic that specializes in treating patients with C. difficile infection.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

New York Times
Pat Summitt’s Public Fight Spurs Research Support

Perhaps the most tangible evidence of the difference Summitt made is set to come in December with the opening of the Pat Summitt Alzheimer’s The New York Times newspaper logoClinic at the University of Tennessee Medical Center. “I think it’s going to become a real icon in the Southeastern part of the States for Alzheimer’s disease care and research,” said Ronald Petersen, the director of the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota…“People raved about her willingness to do this,” Petersen said. “She maintained a sense of humor as far into the disease as she could. She likened the battle to coaching basketball, and the way the players would react to a challenge on the court is the way she was reacting to dealing with this disease.”

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Post-Bulletin
Blue Cross honors Mayo's kidney donor program
by Brett Boese

An innovative Mayo Clinic program that pairs kidney donors with needy transplant patients was recognized Tuesday by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota's new Trailblazing Tour. It was one of 11 programs honored for its creative and forward-thinking methods, according to Blue Cross. Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperThe thought process behind Mayo's new donor program is simple, but it has drawn high praise while being hailed as revolutionary. "Mayo Clinic Living Donor Program's pioneering Paired Donation Program is evolving how patients receive transplants – in turn, proving how innovative trailblazers can accelerate the pace of improving health across Minnesota," said Garrett Black, senior vice president of health services at Blue Cross. "By recognizing the Mayo Clinic Living Donor Program, we hope to start a meaningful conversation and engage communities like Rochester throughout the state to reach their full potential and work together to transform health care."

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context: The Paired Donation Program came out of the knowledge that the current system simply wasn’t working as well as it could. Mayo Clinic – ranked number one in the nation for nephrology by US News & World Report –realized that by matching up people willing to donate a kidney with those in need of a transplant, they may be able to help someone else, if not their immediate friend or family member. A kidney from a living donor leads to better outcomes for the patients, and those that have had a friend or family member go through a kidney transplant tend to be more willing to be on the list to donate if a match arises. More information can be found here.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Chicago Tribune
How to shop for sunscreen
by Alison Bowen

Spray, stick or lotion? The Mayo Clinic lays out pros and cons. A stick might be easy to apply around the eye, or a gel might help with a hairy Chicago Tribune Logochest. Lotions are easy for large applications. And if you use a spray, stay away from the wind — spraying your limbs in the wind might not result in full coverage.

Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 384,000 and a weekend circulation of more than 686,000.

Context:  Mayo Clinic experts say the best sunscreen is one that you'll use generously and according to label directions. Here's help understanding sunscreen ingredients, types of sunscreen and more.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

ActionNewsJax
Expert weighs in possible Zika virus transmitted by mosquito in Miami
by Letisha Bereola

The first possible homegrown case of Zika transmitted by mosquito is being investigated in Miami. Action News Jax went to the Mayo Clinic to find out what health officials are zeroing in on. Dr. Vandana Bhide is an internist and pediatrician at the Mayo Clinic. She says a medical team will be examining the virus closely. “What are the DNA fingerprints of this particular infection? And we want to be sure it’s a recent infection ActionNewsJaxand not a similar infection like dengue fever,” she said.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Context: Vandana Bhide, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic internist and pediatrician.

Contact: Kevin Punksy

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Tags: ABC15 Arizona, AccuWeather, ActionNewsJax, ALS News Today, alzheimer's disease, anesthesia, back surgery, Becker’s Hospital Review, blood donation, blood donors, Blue Cross, Business Standard


May 27th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Wall Street Journal
Shoulder Surgery Is the New Testing Ground for Painkiller Alternatives
by Laura Landro

Some of the techniques to control pain have been around in some form for years. But their use in combination, known as multimodal management, is gaining popularity amid mounting concern about an epidemic of opioid addiction. A July 2015 study in Mayo Clinic ProceedingsWSJ Banner found one in four people who were prescribed a narcotic painkiller for the first time progressed to long-term prescriptions, putting them at risk for dependence and dangerous side effects.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Opioid painkiller addiction and accidental overdoses have become far too common across the United States. To try to identify who is most at risk, Mayo Clinic researchers studied how many patients prescribed an opioid painkiller for the first time progressed to long-term prescriptions. The answer: 1 in 4. People with histories of tobacco use and substance abuse were likeliest to use opioid painkillers long-term. More information about the Mayo Clinic Proceedings study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

NBC News
At-Home Test Could Help in Colon Cancer Battle

Millions of Americans who have avoided colonoscopies in the past can now get a home test to screen for colon cancer, the second leading cause of nbcnews.comcancer-related deaths in the U.S.

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Context: An endoscopist’s knowledge of a positive Cologuard test improves colonoscopy performance, according to a poster presentation at last week’s Digestive Disease Week conference. Cologuard is an at-home, stool-DNA colorectal cancer screening test that has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. This test, available by prescription only, is reimbursed by Medicare and covered by an increasing number of commercial health care plans. Researchers from Mayo Clinic compared results of colonoscopies following a positive result from Cologuard (unblinded) with colonoscopies performed by those who were not aware of the Cologuard result (blinded).  Unblinded endoscopists found polyps or hemorrhagic lesions 83 percent of the time and precancerous polyps in 70 percent of patients, compared to 68 and 53 percent of blinded endoscopists, respectively. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

CBS News
What is altitude sickness and why is it so dangerous?
by Mary Brophy Marcus

Altitude sickness is actually a constellation of different conditions that occur when the body doesn't have enough time to adapt to the lower air pressure and lower oxygen level at high altitudes, explains Dr. Clayton Cowl, chair of the division of preventive, occupational and aerospaceCBS News Logo medicine at the Mayo Clinic. "The body doesn't like things to be out of kilter," Cowl, who's also a pulmonologist, told CBS News.

Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

Context:  Clayton Cowl, M.D. heads Mayo Clinic's preventive, occupational and aerospace medicine. The division consists of 22 physicians who have specialty training in internal medicine or family practice and a team of trained occupational health nurses. Several of our physicians are board-certified in preventive, occupational and/or aerospace medicine. Mayo Clinic's integrated group practice model makes consultation with any other medical specialists readily available.

Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

News4Jax
This Week In Jacksonville: Mayo Clinic

Interview with Dr. Gianrico Farrugia.

News Jax 4 LogoReach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville. This Week in Jacksonville is a weekly public affairs program on WJXT.

Context: Gianrico Farrugia, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vice president and CEO of Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
The big problems with obesity
by Jill Daly

There’s been a steep increase in the prevalence of obesity in the United States since 2011, according to Ursula Bauer, director of the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, speaking before journalists in a National Press Foundation program earlier thisPittsburgh Post-Gazette Logo year. Treating people who are obese for pneumonia and the flu has been challenging, according to vaccine researcher Gregory Poland of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who also spoke at the journalists program this year. He said people who are obese often develop low-grade chronic inflammation, so their immune system cannot respond well to antibiotics and vaccines. Normal immune responses are interfered with, on a cellular level.

Reach: The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette has a daily circulation of more than 140,00 readers. It's website has more than 1 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Gregory Poland, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious disease expert. Dr. Poland and his team within the Vaccine Research Group aim to improve the health of individuals across the world by pursuing challenges posed by infectious diseases and bioterrorism through clinical, laboratory and epidemiologic vaccine research.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

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