Items Tagged ‘Action News Jax’

March 3rd, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

USA Today
Having a baby past 35: What women should know
by Ashley May

Have a plan, and the money to execute it, before 35. Fertility doctors say women approaching 35 who want children but aren’t yet ready should look into egg or embryo freezing. Charles Coddington, professor and OB/GYN for Mayo Medical School, also advises getting a full checkup for reproductive health. After age 35, pregnancy is more difficult because of less frequent ovulation. Also, women 35-45 have aUSA Today newspaper logo 20-35% chance of miscarriage, compared with women under 35 that average a 15-20% chance of miscarriage, according to the American Pregnancy Association. … Frozen eggs of a woman younger than 35 have a greater than 50% chance of producing a live birth. Past age 40, freezing eggs or embryos will not have a great success – less than 9 percent result in live birth, Coddington said.

Reach: USA TODAY  has an average daily circulation of 4.1 million which includes print, various digital editions and other papers that use their branded content.

Context: Charles Coddington, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic ObGyn. The Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota supports women throughout their lifelong journey from childbearing age to menopause and beyond. You can learn more about Dr. Coddington's research interests here.

Contact:  Kelley Luckstein

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic investing $70 million in Mankato hospital
by Christopher Snowbeck

Mayo Clinic’s regional network of medical centers is investing $70 million to expand and renovate the surgery suite and orthopedic clinic at its hospital in Mankato. The project includes a $65 million upgrade to the Star Tribune newspaper logohospital’s surgery facilities that is part of a broader plan to better link the Mankato campus with Mayo Clinic’s headquarters in Rochester, according to details released Friday. “Mayo Clinic is committed to the needs of patients in Mankato and the surrounding communities we serve,” said Dr. James Hebl, vice president of Mayo Clinic Health System in southwest Minnesota, in a statement.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: KROC AM, KEYC Mankato, Minneapolis/St. Paul Business, Journal, Post-Bulletin, Healthcare Dive, Germany Sun, Becker’s ASC ReviewMankato Free Press

Context:  Mayo Clinic Health System today announced plans for a $65 million hospital surgical suite expansion in Mankato. Construction is expected to begin later this year. “Mayo Clinic is committed to the needs of patients in Mankato and the surrounding communities we serve,” says James Hebl, M.D., vice president of Mayo Clinic Health System in Southwest Minnesota. “The projects are an investment in our patients, our staff and the needs of our communities. Providing access to outstanding care in state-of-the-art facilities closer to where patients live is of paramount importance, and is the driving force behind the decision to dedicate substantial resources to these initiatives.” More information about the expansion can be found here.

Contact:  Micah Dorfner

 

Star Tribune
Mayo earnings hit by Medicaid, labor costs
by Christopher Snowbeck

Mayo Clinic's net income slipped last year as the Rochester-based health care giant spent more on staffing for growth initiatives, and saw more losses on patients with Medicaid coverage. Even so, the overall results being released Monday show "it was a strong year," said Kedrick Adkins Jr., the clinic's chief financial officer. Mayo posted $475 million in net income on $11 billion in revenue, down about 10 percent from 2015Star Tribune newspaper logo net income of $526.4 million, according to the clinic's latest financial report.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: KTTC, Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal, Dotmed.comBecker’s Hospital Review, Healthcare Dive

Context: With more than 1.3 million patients seeking Mayo Clinic’s expertise yearly, the institution continues its work to provide the best care to every patient through integrated clinical practice, education and research. Mayo Clinic reported a strong financial position in 2016, with contributions of $466 million to its pension plan for staff and more than $600 million in capital projects. “The outstanding work of Mayo Clinic employees is the engine that drives our mission to our patients, advances important research and educational initiatives, and positions our institution as a key voice for the future of health care,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic. “Our strong financial performance enables Mayo to hire and retain the best talent, and invest in technology, facilities and our staff as we strive to deliver the best outcomes and service to our patients.”

Contact:  Susan Barber Lindquist

 

 

KAAL
Mayo Clinic Performs Rare In-Womb Surgery to Give Baby New Chance at Life
by Marissa Collins

An Austin mom and her baby are doing well after her pregnancy took an unexpected turn. Nineteen weeks in, doctors told her something was wrong with her unborn baby … Her baby was diagnosed with a severe KAAL 6 News Rochester Logoform of Spina Bifida halfway through her pregnancy. “Once the baby is being formed the babies back does not close. The spine does not close, so the nerves can be open," says Dr. Rodrigo Ruano, Director at Mayo Clinic Fetal Diagnostic and Intervention Center.

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Context: The Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota supports women throughout their lifelong journey from childbearing age to menopause and beyond. The Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine staff care for women experiencing high-risk pregnancies related to obstetric, medical, surgical or genetic complications.

Contact:  Kelley Luckstein

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Tags: AccuWeather, Action News Jax, acupuncture, Albert Lea Tribune, allergies, alzheimers, Andy Sandness, Anya Guy, ASH Clinical News, Associated Press, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Austin Daily Herald


February 10th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Neurology Today
The Neurologist as National Health Care Leader: Mayo Clinic's John H. Noseworthy, MD, FAAN
by Gina Shaw

John H. Noseworthy, MD, discusses his pathway from a passion in multiple sclerosis research and clinical practice to heading up the Mayo Clinic enterprise as its president and chief executive officer…Today, the world of health care knows John H. Noseworthy, MD, FAAN, as the influentialNeurology Today Logo president and chief executive officer (CEO) of the Mayo Clinic. But the world of neurology, and of multiple sclerosis (MS) research, might be very different today had Dr. Noseworthy elected to pursue the medical specialty he had originally planned on: cardiology.

Reach:  Neurology Today is the official publication of the American Academy of Neurology. The magazine is published monthly and has a circulation of more than 24,000.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

NBC News
Doctors Push for Flu Immunizations After Surge of Cases Nationwide

According to the Centers for Disease Control, 40 states are reporting widespread flu activity — with more than 30,000 reported cases in the U.S. NBC News LogoInterview with Dr. Pritish Tosh, Infectious Diseases, Mayo Clinic.

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Context: Pritish Tosh, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist. Dr. Tosh is interested in emerging infections and preparedness activities related to them, ranging from collaborating with the Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group in basic science vaccine development to hospital systems research related to pandemic preparedness. Influenza is a viral infection that attacks your respiratory system — your nose, throat and lungs. Influenza, commonly called the flu, is not the same as stomach "flu" viruses that cause diarrhea and vomiting.

Contacts: Bob Nellis, Sharon Theimer

 

Today
Red Dress Awards: Meet two women who’ve made heart-healthy changes

The Woman’s Day Red Dress Awards, the premiere event to spotlight the fight against heart disease among women, are Tuesday night, and Hoda Kotb will be a presenter. Nutritionist Joy Bauer and cardiologist Dr. Sharonne Hayes are joined on TODAY by two women who will be honored at the awards for meeting the challenge of making heart-healthy changes to their lives.

Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show.

Context:  Sharonne Hayes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Hayes studies cardiovascular disease and prevention, with a focus on sex and gender differences and conditions that uniquely or predominantly affect women. With a clinical base in the Women's Heart Clinic, Dr. Hayes and her research team utilize novel recruitment methods, social media and online communities, DNA profiling, and sex-specific evaluations to better understand several cardiovascular conditions. A major area of focus is spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD), an uncommon and under-recognized cause of acute coronary syndrome (heart attack) that occurs predominantly in young women.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Action News Jax
Mayo Clinic to test vaccine to prevent, treat precancerous breast lesions
by Jenna Bourne

Mayo Clinic doctors will test a vaccine to prevent women from developing precancerous breast lesions. It could someday become part of routine vaccinations for women, but the Mayo Clinic has to first put it through extensive clinical trials. The hospital is able to do that because of a $3.7 million grant from the U.S. Department of Defense…Mayo Clinic immunology professor Dr. Keith Knutson has been working on a vaccine for nearly a decade. Knutson hoped it will help hundreds of thousands of women avoid surgeries and radiation treatments. “That’s been a big problem, because treatments have side effects. And that’s something that we may be able to eliminate by boosting the body’s own natural drug making machinery, which is the immune system,” said Knutson.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Context: Researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have been awarded a $13.3 million, five-year federal grant to test a vaccine designed to prevent the recurrence of triple-negative breast cancer, a subset of breast cancer for which there are no targeted therapies. The grant, the Breakthrough Award from the U.S. Department of Defense’s Breast Cancer Research Program, will fund a national, phase II clinical trial testing the ability of a folate receptor alpha vaccine to prevent recurrence of this aggressive cancer following initial treatment. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Knutson, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Wall Street Journal
A New Device May Mean Fewer Breast-Cancer Surgeries
by Lucette Lagnado

Viewing low re-excision rates as a key indicator of quality, other institutions are highlighting their techniques to reduce second surgeries. At Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., breast surgeons point to their method of having pathologists nearby in the operating suite to examine frozen tissue samples while the patient is in surgery. Their second-surgery rates are 3.6%, though the technique is a century old, says Dr. Judy Boughey, Mayo’s surgical-research chair.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: When diagnosed with breast cancer, women may have thousands of questions running through their minds, but one they may not have immediately is: Will my choice of provider save me time and money? Mayo Clinic researchers have answered this question with what they believe are compelling statistics that may encourage women and their doctors — and the health care system at large — to consider a different way of doing business, specifically with respect to lumpectomies as a treatment for early-stage breast cancer.  The different way would be to use intraoperative frozen section analysis to determine whether the tumor was removed completely during the first surgery. Doing this in a widespread manner could save untold hours of lost work, anxiety and more for women and tens of millions of dollars.  “With the routine use of frozen section analysis of margins on Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus, we rarely — in only 3 to 5 percent of cases — require a second operation for margin re-excision,” says first author Judy Boughey, M.D., a breast surgeon in the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. “So, for over 95 percent of patients undergoing lumpectomy, only one operation is required.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Phoenix magazine
School of Doc
by Jessie Martin
This summer, the University of Arizona College of Medicine’s 50-year run as the only M.D.-granting institution in Arizona will come to an end with the debut Phoenix magazine logoof the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine in Scottsdale. It will be the third branch of the medical college, which was founded in 1972 in Rochester, Minn., followed by a sister campus in Jacksonville, Fla. Lois Krahn, a Mayo Clinic physician of 22 years, says a common misconception of this partnership is that ASU and Mayo Clinic are opening a joint medical school. “It’s important to note that we are not partnering with ASU in the legal sense. We have a very rich and productive collaboration with ASU that dates back over a decade,” Krahn says.

Reach:  Written for the residents of and visitors to the metropolitan Phoenix area, Phoenix magazine has a monthly circulation of more than 70,000.  Phoenix magazine online has more than 43,000 unique visitors each month.

Related coverage:
AMA blog, Not your grandfather’s med school: Changes trending in med ed

Context: Mayo Medical School announced that its planned expansion in Scottsdale, has received licensure by the Arizona State Board for Private Postsecondary Education, the group responsible for regulating private postsecondary degree-granting institutions within the state of Arizona will open with its first class of students this year. "This is a major milestone in our journey to open a full four-year branch campus of Mayo Medical School in Scottsdale,” says Wyatt Decker, M.D., CEO of Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Earlier this month, Mayo Medical School leaders announced they had also received endorsement for the expansion from the Liaison Committee for Medical Education (LCME), the accrediting body for medical education. More information about the medical school can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network and on the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine's website.

Contacts:  Jim McVeigh, Deborah Anderson

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Tags: ABC News, Action News Jax, Alatus development, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimers, AMA, Answer Man, Associated Press, autoimmune disease, BBC Mundo, birth control, blood pressure


April 15th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

New York Times
Millions With Leg Pain Have Peripheral Artery Disease
by Jane Brody

More than eight million older Americans have a condition that can cause leg pain when they walk even short distances. The condition, called peripheral artery disease, or P.A.D., is marked by diseased or blocked arteries in the legs. More than half of those with such circulatory problems in the extremities also have coronary or cerebral artery disease, noted Dr. Iftikhar J. Kullo, The New York Times newspaper logoa cardiovascular specialist at the Mayo Clinic, in The New England Journal of Medicine in March.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: Iftikar Kullo is a Mayo Clinic cardiovascular specialist. Dr. Kullo's research interests include investigating the use of new methodologies in refining cardiovascular risk stratification. These include genetic markers, circulating biomarkers, and noninvasive tests of arterial function and structure.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Star Tribune
Mayo, GE Ventures launch technology firm near San Francisco
by Christopher Snowbeck

Mayo Clinic and GE Ventures are launching a new company near San Francisco to sell software and manufacturing services to firms developing cell and gene therapies. Pharmaceutical Star Tribune Business section logocompanies, biotech firms and health care providers are among the potential customers for Vitruvian Networks Inc., company officials said during interviews on Monday...Mayo Clinic is the largest private employer in Minnesota. Last year, the system posted $526 million in income on $10.3 billion in revenue across operations that span six states.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Other coverage:

Silicon Valley Business JournalBloomberg, Canada StandardTwin Cities BusinessHIT Consultant, Healthcare DiveBecker’s Hospital ReviewNasdaq, Fierce Pharma

Context:  GE Ventures and Mayo Clinic announced the launch of Vitruvian Networks, Inc., an independent platform company committed to accelerating access to cell and gene therapies through advanced, cloud-ready software systems and manufacturing services. Cell and gene therapy involve time and resource-intense processes to provide personalized therapies to patients. Efficient and cost-effective solutions are required to expedite the transition of promising and potentially curative therapies from early clinical trials to a portfolio of products that advances medical care. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

US News & World Report
Too Fat for Surgery
by Anna Medaris Miller

Ever since Phyllis Warr was about 10 years old, doctors told her she'd drop dead if she didn't lose weight. They told her she wouldn't be able to walk at 35. They told her weight-loss surgery was her only hope. Warr is among the more than one-third ofUS News Heath Logo Americans who are obese – a height-weight combination that makes surgeries more complicated for surgeons, more risky for patients and more costly for the health care system, according to Dr. Robert Cima, a colorectal surgeon and chair of surgical quality at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. "Across all surgical specialties, obesity is associated with increased length of hospital stay, increased readmissions, decreased rate of dismissals to home and increased cost," he said to a group of journalists attending an obesity research fellowship program in February.

Reach: U.S. News & World Report is a multi-platform publisher of news and information, which includes http://www.usnews.com and http://www.rankingsandreviews.com.

Additional coverage: Yahoo! Finance

Context: Robert Cima, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic colorectal surgeon. Mayo Clinic surgeons helped develop minimally invasive (laparoscopic) colon and rectal surgery and use these techniques on almost all surgeries. Laparoscopic procedures use smaller incisions than conventional surgery, which decreases bleeding, lessens pain and shortens both expected hospital stays and overall recovery times. They are also skilled in robotic surgery, a specialized form of laparoscopic surgery, and ileoanal anastomosis surgery that avoids the need for a permanent colostomy.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

STAT
Records found in dusty basement undermine decades of dietary advice
by Sharon Begley

Dr. Robert Frantz, a physician at the Mayo Clinic, drove 90 minutes to his childhood home, to search file cabinets. On his third trip he spied moldering, unlabeled boxes in the far corner of the basement. Inside were ancient magnetic computer tapes and STAT Logo of Boston Globereams of yellowed documents. The subject line in his email to Ramsden was “Eureka.” After getting the tapes translated into formats that modern computers can read, Ramsden and his colleagues discovered what had been hidden for nearly half a century: records on 9,423 study participants, ages 20 to 97, all living in state mental hospitals or a nursing home. It was the largest experiment of its kind.

Reach: STAT covers the frontiers of health and medicine including science labs, hospitals, biotechnology board rooms, and political back rooms. Hosted by The Boston Globe, STAT launched on November 5, 2015. The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Additional coverage: New York Times

Context: Robert Frantz, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Frantz's research is centered on the varied forms of pulmonary hypertension, pulmonary vascular disease and right heart failure, including pathophysiology, hemodynamics, causes of exercise limitation and optimal management strategies. Dr. Frantz's research includes defining best strategies for management of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Action News Jax
Mayo Clinic Jacksonville completes 3,000 liver transplants

April is Organ Donor Month, and the Mayo Clinic Jacksonville just completed its 3,000th liver transplant. The program started back in 1998. The Mayo Clinic Jacksonville is the seventh center to reach the milestone out of about 120 in the nation.ActionNewsJax

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Context: The liver transplant team at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, recently completed the 3,000th transplant since the liver program started in 1998. Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus is only the seventh transplant center in the country to complete 3,000 adult liver transplants. Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus has one of the largest liver transplant programs in the country. The combined volume of theliver transplant program at Mayo Clinic’s campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota makes it the largest overall program in the country. To date, 6,681 liver transplants have been completed at Mayo Clinic’s campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. The Florida campus leads the way with the most liver transplants. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

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September 25th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor: Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

MPR
Ceiling cracks: Women step into Mayo Clinic's top academic posts
by Elizabeth Baier

Heidi Nelson still remembers the doubters after she became Mayo Clinic's first female surgeon a quarter century ago. She haMPR2d to win credibility with colleagues — and find ways to convince patients she was the surgeon. "I had to develop a strategy where I'd walk into a room with my card, and I would engage them with eye contact and with verbal presence ... I'm Dr. Heidi Nelson, I'm a colorectal surgeon on staff. I'm here to answer questions and care for you. Here's my card,'" she recalled recently.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Sharonne Hayes, M.D., Mayo Clinic Director of Diversity and Inclusion, says encouraging and including contributions from diverse individuals is critical to Mayo's future. Mayo will be better positioned to reach its full potential and to better serve its patients when we actively bring together individuals with diverse thoughts, ideas and backgrounds; and put them to work to help create better solutions. Heidi Nelson, M.D., is chair of Mayo Clinic's Department of Surgery. Claudia Lucchinetti, M.D., is chair of Mayo Clinic's Department of Neurology.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

News4Jax
'Success Kid' helps save his father's life
by Vic Micolucci

…Besides the money, Justin says more than 500 strangers contacted Mayo Clinic to be News Jax 4 Logopotential donors. And in August, the Griner family got the call they had been waiting for: the kidney was available. It came from a matching organ donor who recently passed away. Hours later, Justin arrived at Jacksonville's Mayo Clinic and got the transplant he so desperately needed. "He's had a very good result at this point in time," said Kris Croome, MD, transplant surgeon with Mayo Clinic Jacksonville. "His kidneys started working right away."

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville.

Context: Success Kid was first chronicled in an ABCNews.com story (via “Good Morning America”) about raising money via GoFundMe for a kidney transplant for his dad and recently having that transplant at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. Mayo Clinic doctors and surgeons have experience diagnosing and treating people who have kidney disease. Each year doctors and surgeons care for more than 30,000 people who have kidney disease.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

MedCity News
Mayo Clinic’s Farrugia on the future of precision medicine: Patients are ready to engage
by Meghana Keshavan

Gianrico Farrugia, CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida, laid out his vision of the immediate future of precision medicine at this week’s Individualizing Medicine Conference inMedCity News Minnesota. He discussed the issues around patient engagement, reimbursement, data security and salience of President Barack Obama’s Precision Medicine Initiative. In terms of immediate potential, Farrugia said there are five fields worth watching: Pharmacogenomics, Liquid biopsy, Non-invasive prenatal testing, Whole genome sequencing, Microbiome.

Reach: MedCity News focuses on business, innovation and influence in healthcare. Its websites has more than 72,000 unique visitors each month.

Related coverage:

KTTC — Health specialists talk 'Precision Medicine' at conference held at Mayo Civic Center 

Medical Daily — From Preventing Side Effects To Sequencing Babies, 5 Ways Precision Medicine Will Change How Doctors Treat Patients 

MedCity News — Illumina launching ‘PopArray’ consortium to develop population health genomics test

Context: Mayo Clinic Vice President Gianrico Farrugia, M.D. addressed participants in his keynote address at the 4th annual Individualizing Medicine Conference. The core of his talk highlighted five areas in which the knowledge and know-how from the human genome will be most impactful in patient care, not just at Mayo Clinic, but anywhere in the nation and globally. “What’s in it for you?” he asked the crowd of health providers at the Mayo Civic Center in Rochester, Minn. “Individualized or precision medicine offers help for your medical practice today. You can take advantage of these advances to help your patients, to better diagnose, treat or prevent illness right now.” More information, including a video interview with Dr. Farrugia, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Action News Jax
Doctors hope new breast cancer vaccine will save lives
by Brittany Jones

Part of a nearly $13.3 million Department of Defense grant will used  in our area to develop a vaccine for breast cancer. Currently, 280 patients are participating in the trial. Dr. ActionNewsJaxKeith Knutson has been working with breast cancer patients for about ten years. "In addition to me being touched, the burden breast cancer has on society keeps me going," said Knutson.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Context: Researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have been awarded a $13.3 million, five-year federal grant to test a vaccine designed to prevent the recurrence of triple-negative breast cancer, a subset of breast cancer for which there are no targeted therapies. The clinical trial, which will enroll 280 patients at multiple clinical sites, is expected to begin early in 2016. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Knutson, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

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September 4th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

New York Times
New Alternatives to Statins Add to a Quandary on Cholesterol
By Gina Kolata

Doctors have long faced a conundrum in prescribing statins to lower cholesterol and heart attack risk: The drugs are cheap and effective for most people, and large, rigorous clinical trials have found minimal side effects. But as many as 25 percent of those who try them complain of muscle The New York Times newspaper logopain. Others stop taking the drugs because, they say, they cause a hazy memory or sleep problems, among other side effects not documented in studies...At the Mayo Clinic here, Dr. Stephen L. Kopecky, who directs a program for statin-intolerant patients, says he is well aware that middle-age and older adults who typically need statins may blame the drugs for aches, pains and memory losses that have other causes. He also knows his patients peruse the Internet, which is replete with horror stories about the dangers of statins.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Additional coverage:
Star Tribune  — Pricey new cholesterol drugs pose new dilemma in treatment; Houston Chronicle, Massachusetts TelegramNewsmax Health 

Related coverage:
The Science Times — New Drug To Lower Bad Cholesterol Levels; Healthcare Business Daily News

Context: Doctors in the Statin Intolerance Service within the Cardiovascular Health Clinic at Mayo Clinic's campus in Minnesota treat people who have statin side effects or a family history of statin intolerance. Steven Kopecky, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. His research interests include cardiovascular clinical trials primarily in coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndromes.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Reuters
New guidelines for cancer doctors aim to make sense of gene tests
by Julie Steenhuysen

"It's like having an all-you-can-eat buffet, and is that a good thing?" said Dr. Noralane Lindor, an oncologist and geneticist from Mayo Clinic Reuters LogoCenter for Individualized Medicine and an ASCO Prevention Committee member. Lindor was one of several authors of the guidelines issued on Monday by ASCO and published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world newsbusiness newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile and interactive television platforms.

Context: Noralane Lindor, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic oncologist and genticist. Her research interests include cancer genetics, with an emphasis on hereditary predisposition to cancers, as well as the clinical translation of genetic findings to medical care.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

KIMT
Do you have good posture?
by DeeDee Stiepan

The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is offering posture screenings for people to see how good or bad their posture is and how poor posture can take its toll. “YouKIMT know, our body is kind of like a stack of Jenga blocks and as we lean forward we’re putting a lot of strain on our back and that creates chronic back pain. It actually creates compression into our organs as well and so we’re not breathing as effectively,” explains Jane Hein, a Wellness Physical Therapist at The Healthy Living Center.

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Additional coverage:  Arizona Daily Sun

Related coverage:
Fox 2 St. Louis — The Mayo Clinic’s “Healthy Living Program; KITV, NC8 Washington D.C., Fox 2 News Detroit

Context: Jane Hein is a wellness physical therapist with the Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Arizona Republic’s Living Well
Proton Beam Therapy at Mayo Clinic
by Susan Lynne Fuchs

The first services – adult and pediatric radiation oncology – have been launched at the Valley’s newest cancer center, a $310 million, 400,000-Arizona Republic newspaper logosquare-foot facility rising on Mayo Clinic’s northeast Phoenix campus.

Reach: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday and has an average daily circulation of more than 261,000 readers. The newspaper’s website Arizona Republic - Online, averages more than 5.4 million unique visitors each month.

Related coverage:
Arizona Republic — Arizona Cancer Center faces crowded cancer-care market by Ken Alltucker – The five-story, 220,000-square-foot center, which opened to patients Aug. 24, follows the path of other major cancer-care providers whose facilities have sprouted in metro Phoenix in recent years. Banner MD Anderson, Mayo Clinic and Cancer Treatment Centers of America all have poured tens of millions of dollars into openings or expansions.

Context:  Mayo Clinic introduced its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota this past June and in Arizona in spring 2016. Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients — especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures — proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Jim McVeigh, Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

Rochester Magazine
Mayo's "renegade" research team
by Paul Scott

Montori’s think-tank-within-a-clinic is known as the Knowledge and Encounter Research Unit, or KER Unit, for short. It’s the sort of official sounding name that nearly begs for a disco ball until you realize it’s actually pronounced “Care Unit,” and that it has been responsible for aRochester Magazine logo globally-contagious shift in thinking about what matters the most in medicine.

Reach: Rochester Magazine is a monthly publication that serves the residents and visitors of Rochester, Minnesota. The magazine averages more than 56,000 readers each month.

Context: Victor Montori, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Montori's research takes place in the Knowledge and Evaluation Research Unit at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Montori is interested in how knowledge is produced, disseminated and taken up in practice — and how this leads to optimal health care delivery and patient outcomes. Dr. Montori also serves as director of community engagement and of late stage translational research for the Mayo Clinic Center for Clinical and Translational Science.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

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Tags: "Viagra for women, “Healthy Trails” walks, 20 Minutos, 2015 job market, 8-ounce glasses of water a day, AAAS Science, AAAS's EntryPoint!, ABC 15 Arizona, Action News Jax, acute coronary syndromes, airport plans for DMC, airway morphogenesis.


July 17th, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

 

 

July 19, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations 

NBC News
Memory loss worries may indicate Alzheimer’s risk

Dr. Ronald Petersen is interviewed as well as a Mayo Clinic patient. Researchers at Brigham and Women’s hospital in Boston asked 200 healthy volunteers to report concerns about their own memory and then received a brain scan looking for build up of amyloid plaque, a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. Those most anxious about their memory also had the highest levels of plaque. NBC’s Dr. Nancy Snyderman reports.

Reach:  NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams continues to be the top rated evening newscast with more than 7.9 million viewers each night.

Additional Coverage:

Reuters
Some, mild slips of memory may be very early Alzheimer's

AP, NECN, FOX News

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Nick Hanson

NY Times
Dementia’s Signs May Come Early
by Pam Belluck

…And, in a significant shift highlighted at the conference, leading Alzheimer’s researchers are identifying a new category called “subjective cognitive decline,” which is people’s own sense that their memory and thinking skills are slipping even before others have noticed.  “The whole field now is moving to this area, and saying ‘Hey, maybe there is something to this, and maybe we should pay attention to these people,’ ” said Dr. Ronald C. Petersen, chairman of the advisory panel to the federal government’s new National Alzheimer’s Project. Dr. Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic’s Alzheimer’s center, said preliminary results of a Mayo study of healthy older adults in Minnesota suggested something similar.

Circulation: The New York Times has the third highest circulation nationally, behind USA Today (2nd) and The Wall Street Journal (1st) with 1,150,589 weekday copies circulated and 1,645,152 circulated on Sundays.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services. Richard Caselli, M.D. is a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Dr. Caselli's research focuses on cognitive aging and the changes that can be detected before the symptomatic onset of memory loss and related symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Nick Hanson, Jim McVeigh, Lynn Closway

NPR
Patients Seek A Different Approach To Hip Replacement Surgery
by Pattie Neighmond

Every year more than a quarter of a million Americans have total hip replacement surgery. It's almost always a successful operation that frees patients from what's often described as disabling pain…Critics say the increased interest in anterior approach surgery may be more due to marketing from doctors, hospitals and companies that sell specialized operating tables and other gear rather than any benefits to patients. Clinical trials comparing the two methods are underway at the Mayo Clinic and at the Hospital for Special Surgery, but it may well be five years before that data is available. In the meantime, doctors says it's important to look at the big picture. Today "most healthy patients recover quickly, no matter which surgical technique is used," says orthopedic surgeon Mark Pagnano with the Mayo Clinic.

Reach: The NPR Shots Blog covers news about health and medicine. It is written and reported by NPR’s Science Desk.

Context: Mark Pagnano, M.D. is an orthopedic surgeon who also has an appointment with Mayo Clinic's Young Hip Clinic. The Young Hip Clinic at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota evaluates and treats young people who have hip pain. The clinic focuses on alternatives to hip replacement or joint preservation surgery.

Public Affairs Contacts: Dana Sparks, Brian Kilen

NBCNews.com
Can Big Data solve the mystery of suicide?
By Helen Popkin

Everywhere on the Internet, we're trailed by bots that inspect our searches and social chatter, attempting to predict what we're going to buy, watch or who we might date next. But in the middle of all that commerce-friendly jibber jabber, some people are saying, in not so many words, "I am going to kill myself." What if a computer program could spot those cries for help as well?... Even outside the military population, doctors miss cues. A review of studies by the Mayo Clinic found approximately 44 percent of people who commit suicide visited their primary care physician, and 20 percent visited a mental health care worker in the month before their deaths.

Reach: NBC News Digital reaches an audience of more than 58 million unique visitors.

Context: Suicide is the 11th leading cause of death in the United States. Every year, millions of Americans think about taking their own lives. Sadly, each year tens of thousands die by suicide. While suicides can be a shock to family and friends, some warning signs exist. Often a simple question from a family doctor can be enough to start a person toward help and treatment. A review in the August issue 2011 issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings by researchers at Mayo Clinic and the University of Washington, Seattle highlights the opportunity that primary care physicians have to establish a successful treatment plan for these patients. Dr. Timothy Lineberry is a Mayo Clinic suicide prevention expert.

News Release: Mayo Clinic: Primary Physicians May Hold Key to Suicide Prevention

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Everyday Health
Need a New Hip? Press 'Print'
by Dr. Sanjay Gupta

Thousands of hip replacements are performed every year. These operations are life-changers for people with osteoarthritis and other conditions, ridding them of pain and returning them to an active life…Brooke was born with a misshapen pelvis. By the time she was in her 20’s, she was already severely debilitated by arthritis in her hips…Her doctors at Mayo Clinic were able to spare Brooke all those surgeries by turning to a new technology: 3-D printing…“You press print and a 3-D model is made,” says orthopedic surgeon Christopher Beauchamp, MD.

Reach: Everyday Health Media, LLC is a provider of online consumer health content across a broad portfolio of over 25 websites that span the health spectrum — from lifestyle offerings in pregnancy, diet and fitness to in-depth medical content for condition prevention and management.

Context: Joint replacements have been around for a long time. Most people with conditions such as osteoarthritis can expect good results if they have one. But what about those who have complicated cases or unusual deformities that a standard replacement can’t fix? In the past that’s meant few options, but now, doctors at Mayo Clinic in Arizona are using 3D printers to enable customized joint replacement surgeries. Many patients, who were previously out of luck, can now have a successful surgery and better quality of life.

Mayo Clinic News Network Package: 3D Printer Uses CT Scan to Print Out Model of Hip Joint Before Surgery (pkg)

Public Affairs Contact: Dana Sparks

Everyday Health
Stem Cells Heal a Damaged Heart
by Dr. Sanjay Gupta

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have made a breakthrough in doing that. They have trained stem cells harvested from a person’s bone marrow to become heart cells, by treating them with certain proteins that trigger heart development. They refer to these stem cells as “smart” stem cells. “This study helps us move beyond the science fiction notion of research,” said Andre Terzic, MD, PhD of Mayo Clinic, the study’s senior author.

Context: Physicians and researchers in the Center for Regenerative Medicine at Mayo Clinic say their work is developing completely new ways to treat and manage chronic diseases like diabetes, heart failure, or even degenerative nerve, bone and joint conditions. And in December, international experts will meet at the World Stem Cell Summit, to continue exploring and sharing ideas about the future of regenerative medicine. Here are some 101 basics of how this science benefits patients.

Mayo Clinic News Network Package: Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine 101 (Medical Edge TV)

Public Affairs Contact: Dana Sparks

US News & World Report
The Personalization of Medicine
by Katherine Hobson

…Just this past May, the Food and Drug Administration approved two drugs for advanced melanoma driven by certain mutations that join a crop of new therapies approved in the last few years. Also, in May, the Mayo Clinic launched an Individualized Medicine Clinic at its three locations in Minnesota, Arizona and Florida aimed at getting cutting-edge guidance to cancer patients who have failed standard treatments and to people with mysterious ailments that may have a genetic cause.

Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Context:  Mayo Clinic has always been a destination for patients seeking answers. Now, Mayo is taking that concept to the next level with the public launch of its Individualized Medicine Clinic — at all three of its campuses, in Minnesota, Florida and Arizona.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Launches Individualized Medicine Consulting Clinic

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

Pioneer Press (AP)
Mayo Clinic gets a silver in US News ranking

Johns Hopkins Hospital has regained its place atop U.S. News & World Report's annual rankings of the nation's best hospitals, one year after its 21-year stint at the top of the rakings was broken… The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., was ranked third, followed by the Cleveland Clinic and UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles.

Reach: The Associated Press is a not-for-profit news cooperative, owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members. News collected by the AP is published and republished by newspaper and broadcast outlets worldwide.

KEYC Mankato
Mayo Clinic Health System Mankato Ranked High in State
Mayo Clinic Health System Mankato is ranked 14th among the state's hospitals according to a U.S. News and World Report released today. With nearly 160 hospitals in Minnesota, the report came as good news to the hospital staff.

Reach: KEYC-12, is a Fox affiliate whcih broadcasts from Mankato, Minn.

WEAU Eau Claire
Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire ranked among best in state

Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire is ranked No. 4 in Wisconsin and is recognized among the Best Hospitals in northwest Wisconsin in the newly released 24th U.S. News & World Report annual America’s Best Hospitals list… “This national recognition from U.S. News underscores the commitment our staff makes to care for patients,” says Randall Linton, M.D., president and CEO of Mayo Clinic Health System’s northwest Wisconsin region.

Reach: WEAU-TV is the NBC affiliate for much of western Wisconsin, including Eau Claire and La Crosse. WEAU is licensed to Eau Claire and its transmitter is located in Fairchild, Wisc.

Phoenix Business Journal
13 Phoenix-area hospitals ranked as best by U.S. News & World Report
by Angela Gonzales

Of all 56 hospitals in the Phoenix metro area, 13 were named best regional hospitals by U.S. News & World Report. At the top of the list was Mayo Clinic, which touts 10 nationally ranked specialties and three high-performing specialties.

Reach: The Phoenix Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Jacksonville Business Journal
Baptist, Mayo Clinic among top 5 hospitals in Florida
by Michael Clinton

Several of Jacksonville’s hospital systems ranked among the best in Florida in an annual ranking of the best hospitals in the nation. Baptist Medical Center and Mayo Clinic tied as the No. 1 hospitals in Jacksonville and No. 4 in Florida on the U.S. News & World Report annual Best Hospitals study, released today.

Reach: The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Nephrology News
Cleveland Clinic loses #1 ranking to Mayo for nephrology care

Medscape Today
Mayo Clinic Keeps Top Spot for Diabetes in US News Rankings

Additional US News Best Hospitals Coverage: MSNBC, Star Tribune, KARE 11, CNN, Chicago Tribune, Twin Cities Business, FierceHealthcare, Post-Bulletin, FOX47, KTTC, Action News Jax, Huffington Post, Health Leaders Media, Arizona Daily Star, CBS News, KTLA, WXOW, Action News Jax

Context: Mayo Clinic was highly rated in the 24th U.S. News & World Report annual America's Best Hospitals list released today. As in 2012, Mayo earned the No. 3 overall spot on the "Best Hospitals" list. Mayo ranked No. 1 in the nation in five clinical areas — gynecology, diabetes and endocrinology, gastroenterology, nephrology and pulmonology. In addition, Mayo is ranked No. 2 in five additional specialties — cardiology & heart surgery, ear, nose & throat, geriatrics, neurology & neurosurgery and orthopedics. Mayo Clinic earned the No. 1 spot in Minnesota, ranked No. 1 in Arizona and specifically in the Phoenix metro area, and earned the No. 1 rank as best hospital in the Jacksonville area.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Lauded in Quality Rankings, Most Recently by U.S. News & World Report

News Release: Mayo Clinic Ranked No. 1 in Arizona and Phoenix by U.S. News & World Report

News Release: U.S. News & World Report Ranks Mayo Clinic No. 1 in Jacksonville and a Leading Cancer Hospital Nationally

News Release: Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire, Mankato rank among best in Wisconsin, Minnesota regions

Public Affairs Contacts: Nick Hanson (Mayo Clinic in Rochester), Jim McVeigh (Mayo Clinic in Arizona), Kevin Punsky (Mayo Clinic in Florida), Micah Dorfner (Mayo Clinic Health System in Mankato, Minn.), Susan Barber-Lindquist (Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Clarie, Wisc.)

KSTP
Doctors, Deputies Warn Against Cliff Jumping
by Josh Rosenthal

…That's largely because the water below the cliff is a maximum of 14-feet deep, and it's only three-feet deep close to shore. Deputies have handed out more than 100 citations to people jumping off the cliff, which is on private property, in just the last month. "We had 18 just yesterday," Englund said. "This is a big problem for us out here." It's a big problem at the Mayo Clinic Health System in Cannon Falls, too. "This is very dangerous," Trauma Program Coordinator Angela Schrader said. "The impact can be lifetime on a lot of these patients."

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Context: Angela Schraeder is the Trauma Program coordinator at Mayo Clinic Health System in Cannon Falls, Minn.

Public Affairs Contact: Kristy Jacobson

Post-Bulletin
Destination Medical Center: Hold on to your hats
by Jeff Hansel

The Minnesota Legislature's passage of Destination Medical Center means the project no longer belongs to Mayo Clinic. In many ways, it belongs as much to Rochester residents themselves, who, through their votes, control the Rochester City Council. City Council members will measure, critique and approve expansion proposals submitted by Mayo and private developers over the next 20 years. 

Additional stories from Post-Bulletin Related to DMC Report:
A new model of health care — for the well, Pediatrics a key part of Mayo Clinic's Destination Medical Center The affluent will be big part of Destination Medical Center, Rochester seeks to become biotech destination  

Circulation: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: Destination Medical Center (DMC), an economic development initiative designed to secure Mayo Clinic and Minnesota’s future as a global medical destination, passed on May 20 as part of the Minnesota Legislature’s tax bill. It will help fund the public infrastructure required to keep pace with an estimated $5 billion private investment by Mayo Clinic and other private entities over the next 20 years.

Destination Medical Center Website

Public Affairs Contacts: Bryan Anderson, Karl Oestreich

Bloomberg
U.S. Blood Supply Threatened as Donors Face Iron Losses
by Michelle Cortez

…In the U.S., 70 percent of the blood supply comes from repeat donors. Limiting their giving may hamper a system that already suffers shortages. The Mayo Clinic predicts a 10 percent drop in its supply from its restrictions on donors after finding that one-third had iron deficiency. “We want to make sure we don’t have a group of people walking around being iron deficient,” said Manish Gandhi, the medical director of the Mayo Clinic’s blood donation center. “Blood donation in the U.S. is an altruistic thing. We need to focus on what we should be doing to protect these wonderful donors.”

Circulation: Bloomberg has 2,300 media professionals in 146 bureaus across 72 countries. Bloomberg delivers its content across more than 400 publications, over 310 million households worldwide through Bloomberg Television and 500,000 in the New York metro area and 18.5 million subscribers through satellite radio.

Context: Manish Gandhi, M.D. is medical director of the Blood Donor Center at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Approximately 80,000 units of blood products are transfused at Mayo Clinic in Rochester annually. For more interesting facts about donating blood, click here.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

Action News Jax
Mayo Clinic CEO talks about health care
by Catherine Varnum

The CEO of the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville talked one on one with Action News about the proposed health care reform plan. "We can't continue as we are," said Dr. William Rupp. He's the CEO of the Mayo Clinic in Florida. He's been watching the news closely over the last few months, trying to figure out how the Mayo Clinic will be affected by Obama's proposed health care plan. "I think there's still a lot of confusion about what actually is going to come out," said Dr. Rupp.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Fla.

Context: William Rupp, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vice president and CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

WEAU
Mechanical heart gives local man a second chance
by Courtney Everett

In our Health Alert, according to the Centers for Disease Control, about 5.7 million people in the United States have heart failure. But, a mechanical device is giving people with heart failure a new chance at life…Many hospitals don't have the capability to do this surgery, but Mayo Clinic Health System is helping patients with the devices and plans to open a special center this fall. "We will be a share cared center and what that means is that we will care for the patient in conjunction with the center that put the device,” said Dr. Kincaid.

Reach: WEAU-TV is the NBC affiliate for much of western Wisconsin, including Eau Claire and La Crosse. WEAU is licensed to Eau Claire and its transmitter is located in Fairchild, Wisc.

Context: Cardiologist Daniel Kincaid, M.D., discusses how the ventricular assist device --VAD -- works. Beginning this fall, patients will be able to receive follow-up VAD care at the Cardiac Center at Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire, Wisc. For patient David Evans, this partial mechanical heart is a lifesaver until he hopefully receives a heart transplant someday.

Public Affairs Contact: Susan Barber-Lindquist

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Tags: 3-D printing, Action News Jacksonville, Action News Jax, Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, alzheimer's disease, American City Business Journals, Angela Schraeder, AP, Arizona Daily Star, Associated Press, Barb Spurrier, Best Hospitals


May 23rd, 2012

Mayo Clinic Expanding, Adding Roughly 400 Jobs

By

Patients come from all over the world to Jacksonville's Mayo Clinic. So much so, it's running out of space. Now, an expansion is in the works to bring more room and jobs.  "Each morning we find that the number of patients waiting to get in sometimes exceeds the bed capacity we have," said Chief Administration Officer Bob Brigham.

Also in Sunshine State News, Trim Body MD Las Vegas, Jacksonville Daily Record

 

Action News Jax by Kristen Sell

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Tags: Action News Jax, Bob Brigham, job growth


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