Items Tagged ‘ActionNewsJax’

December 16th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Chicago Tribune
Is bone broth the next hot health trend?
by Alison Bowen

Jason Ewoldt, a dietitian at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program in Rochester, Minn., said patients often ask him about something new they've read about. People often think, he said, "if a little bit's good, maybe a lot is better." But far from assuming what's best is tripling your boneChicago Tribune Logo broth intake after reading about its benefits, he said, "that's not necessarily the case." He said some people consider bone broth a magic elixir, crediting it with improving joint function and gut health.

Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 384,000 and a weekend circulation of more than 686,000.

Context: Jason Ewoldt is a dietitian at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program, which is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

HealthDay
Was football safer back in the day?

In a finding that suggests football used to be a less dangerous sport, a small study shows that men who played in high school in the 1950s and Health Day Logo1960s may not be at increased risk for dementia or memory problems…"What we can say is, for that era, football did not increase the risks of neurodegenerative disease compared with other sports," said senior researcher Dr. Rodolfo Savica, a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: NWI Times, Healthline, KTTC, WebMD, KIMT, CBS News, Medical News TodayWTAJ Pennsylvania, MSN

Context: A Mayo Clinic study published online recently in Mayo Clinic Proceedings found that varsity football players from 1956 to 1970 did not have an increased risk of degenerative brain diseases compared with athletes in other varsity sports. The researchers reviewed all the yearbooks and documented team rosters for Mayo High School and Rochester High School, now called John Marshall High School. The high school football players were compared with non-football playing athletes who were swimmers, basketball players and wrestlers. More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Reuters
Rural U.S. babies hardest hit by opiate addiction at birth
by Lisa Rapaport

These babies may have central nervous system issues like seizures and tremors, gastrointestinal problems and feeding difficulties, breathing challenges, as well as unstable body temperatures. “It is clear that neonatal abstinence syndrome is a growing problem across the country,” saidReuters Logo Dr. William Carey, a pediatric researcher at Mayo Clinic Children’s Center in Rochester, Minnesota. “While some state-level data has suggested that neonatal abstinence syndrome disproportionately affected rural counties, this is the first study to show that rural communities throughout America are particularly affected by this epidemic,” Carey, who wasn’t involved in the study, added by email.

Reach: Reuters has 196 editorial bureaus in 130 countries and 2,400 editorial staff members and covers international news, regional news, politics, social issues, health, business, sports and media.

Additional coverage: Yahoo! Sports

Context: William Carey, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic pediatrician with Mayo Clinic Children's Center. Mayo Clinic Children's Center pediatric and adolescent medicine specialists provide comprehensive care for the diagnosis and treatment of a wide range of diseases and conditions.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Tonic
The First Legit Study of Stem Cells and Arthritis Had Surprising Results
by Evy Pitt Stoller

According to a study led by the Mayo Clinic's Shane Shapiro, an orthopedic and sports medicine physician, the recent use of bone marrow stem Tonic cells in painful, arthritic joints has dramatically increased, while exactly how well the treatment works—or how safe it is—has yet to be made clear. "So many of these therapies are going on without the science to back it up," he says. "We weren't comfortable offering this treatment to patients until we or someone else had studied it in a rigorous fashion."

Reach: Tonic is a website hosted by Vice covering health and wellness, science, health issues, world health news and other topics.

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida have conducted the world’s first prospective, blinded and placebo-controlled clinical study to test the benefit of using bone marrow stem cells, a regenerative medicine therapy, to reduce arthritic pain and disability in knees. The researchers say such testing is needed because there are at least 600 stem cell clinics in the U.S. offering one form of stem cell therapy or another to an estimated 100,000-plus patients, who pay thousands of dollars, out of pocket, for the treatment, which has not undergone demanding clinical study.“Our findings can be interpreted in ways that we now need to test — one of which is that bone marrow stem cell injection in one ailing knee can relieve pain in both affected knees in a systemic or whole-body fashion,” says the study’s lead author, Shane Shapiro, M.D., a Mayo Clinic orthopedic physician. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Twin Cities Business
Mayo Researchers Land Patent For Non-Invasive Pancreatic Cancer Test
by Don Jacobson

The same Mayo Clinic research team that developed the Cologuard DNA-based stool test for colorectal cancer has also been working on similar technology for the early detection of pancreatic cancer. After encouraging early studies, they have now landed a patent for their methods. Dr.Twin Cities Business Magazine Logo David Ahlquist, a Mayo Clinic medical professor and consultant in its division of gastroenterology and hepatology, led the team that, late in the last decade, developed the genomic science behind the Cologuard test, which Mayo licensed in 2009 to Exact Sciences Corp. (NASDAQ: EXAS) of Madison, Wisconsin. Now, in a patent dated November 29, Ahlquist and Mayo colleagues Dr. John Kisiel, William R. Taylor, Tracy Yab and Douglas Mahoney were also granted rights to their method of “Detecting Neoplasm,” through which bio-samples, such as those collected from stool, can be analyzed for pancreatic cancer-related DNA biomarkers.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Context:  David Ahlquist M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist and co-inventor of the Cologuard test.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

ActionNewsJax
Air Force veteran hopes to meet donor's family after lung transplant in Jacksonville — A Georgia Air Force veteran ActionNewsJaxgot a double lung transplant at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville hours after his wife was told he was going to die… An hour after doctors said he wasn’t going to make it, two healthy lungs became available. The 21-year-old woman’s lungs were a match for Terry Junn. Doctors flew them into Mayo Clinic from Mississippi and Terry Junn went into surgery.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Related coverage: 
ActionNewsJax, Veteran gets double lung transplant in Jacksonville hours after doctors said he was going to die

Context: A lung transplant is a surgical procedure to replace a diseased or failing lung with a healthy lung, usually from a deceased donor. A lung transplant is reserved for people who have tried other medications or treatments, but their conditions haven't sufficiently improved. At Mayo Clinic, a team of doctors and staff work together to evaluate and treat people who may need lung transplants. Mayo Clinic's Transplant Center staff at Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota works together to evaluate and treat people who may need a lung transplant. Mayo Clinic offers common recommendations, evaluation processes, treatment, post-surgical care and follow-up care for lung transplant candidates at Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. Mayo Clinic uses technology to help make patient information available as needed at all three locations.

Contact: Paul Scotti

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Tags: 3D labs, ABC15 Arizona, ActionNewsJax, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimer's disease, arthritis, Becker's ASC Review, Becker’s Hospital Review, blood donation, bone broth, Boston Globe, breast cancer screening


November 4th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik


Advisory Board
Mayo Clinic got 'five stars'—but its CEO still doesn't like how CMS rates hospitals

CMS' five-star rating system for overall hospital quality—and similar systems that purport to measure health care quality—are too reductionist and need to be changed, Mayo Clinic CEO John Noseworthy argues in a Modern Healthcare op-ed. You might think, given that CMS awardedAdvisory Board Mayo Clinic five stars, that Noseworthy would praise the ratings system. But Noseworthy argues that "many measurement programs currently in use ... do not differentiate complexity of patient conditions nor account for their settings of care, which results in inaccurate reports on value."

Reach: The Advisory Board Company is a global research, technology, and consulting firm partnering with more than 165,000 leaders in more than 4,100 organizations across health care and higher education.

Previous coverage in October 28, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Hospitals & Health Networks
Experts Take on the Big Picture of Value-Based Payment
by Brian Frankie

Value-based payment is coming to health care. And its complications are something we have to understand. That was the message of panelists Hospitals and Health NetworksWednesday during a session at the H&HN Executive Forum in Chicago on value-based payment and purchasing and what can make it successful…Much of the discussion, led by moderator Robert Nesse, M.D., senior medical adviser for payment reform to the Mayo Clinic Board of Governors and former Mayo Clinic Health System CEO, focused on leveraging data to track value.

Reach: Hospitals & Health Networks is a monthly magazine with a circulation of more than 77,000 that reports on and analyzes the social, political and economic forces that shape healthcare delivery. Its website has more than 21, 000 unique visitors each month. The publication targets health care executives and clinical leaders in hospitals and health systems.

Context: Robert Nesse, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic Health System family medicine physician in Lake City, Minn. and he also serves as senior medical director, Payment Reform at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Nesse is also former CEO of Mayo Clinic Health System, a network of clinics and hospitals serving more than 70 communities in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

TIME
You Asked: Should I Go Gluten Free?
by Markham Heid

Gluten is a type of elastic grain protein that helps wheat, rye and barley hold their shape. Because of its glue-like properties, gluten is often added to other food products—pasta, sauces, crackers, baked goods—to thicken or bind those products together. “These kinds of junk foods and refinedTime magazine logo carbohydrates promote weight gain and diabetes and disease,” says Dr. Joseph Murray, a professor of medicine and a gluten researcher at Mayo Clinic. So if you’re eating a lot of cookies, crackers and other grain-based snack foods, any diet that limits your intakes of them is bound to do your health some good. “But for those who don’t suffer from celiac disease, gluten isn’t inherently bad, and gluten-free foods aren’t inherently healthy,” he says.

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Joseph Murray, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist and hepatologist with the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. Dr. Murray's research interests focus in two distinct areas: celiac disease or gluten sensitivity and enteropathy; and esophageal disorders, particularly esophageal functional disorders, particularly reflux, and the detection of atypical reflux.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Florida Times-Union
Health Notes: Mayo Cancer Center at St. Vincent’s now open
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Cancer Center at St. Vincent’s has opened. The collaboration between Mayo Clinic’s Jacksonville campus and St. Vincent’s HealthCare Florida Times-Union newspaper logobrings Mayo Clinic’s cancer services to patients in a newly built 11,500-square-foot medical suite on the St. Vincent’s Medical Center Riverside campus. Mayo Clinic is staffing the facility with physicians from its Department of Hematology/Oncology. St. Vincent’s is assuming the remaining clinical and administrative responsibilities. The cancer services include medical oncology, an infusion center for chemotherapy, and multidisciplinary disease specialized care for various types of cancer. An official blessing and dedication ceremony will be held Monday.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Previous coverage in October 21, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: To deliver Mayo Clinic’s nationally ranked comprehensive cancer care to more people in Northeast Florida, the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center located at St. Vincent’s Riverside will open to patients on Oct. 17. The collaboration between Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus and St. Vincent’s HealthCare, a part ofAscension, the nation’s largest Catholic and non-profit health system, brings Mayo Clinic’s cancer services to patients in a newly built 11,500-square-foot medical suite on the campus of St. Vincent’s Riverside. “We are excited to launch this community collaboration and we look forward to further meeting the needs of cancer patients, right here in their own community,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., CEO, Mayo Clinic in Florida.  “This community collaboration will enable patients to receive cancer care at Mayo Clinic Cancer Center at St. Vincent’s and come to Mayo’s San Pablo Road campus when they need highly complex care, such as bone marrow transplants.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

Wall Street Journal
Boy’s Cardiac Death Led to Misuse of Genetic Test, Study Says
by Ron Winslow

A 13-year-old boy’s sudden cardiac death led doctors to wrongly diagnose more than 20 of his relatives with a potentially lethal heart disorder in a case that illustrates the potential for genetic testing to go wrong… The search for a genetic cause of the teenager’s death was done with “goodWSJ Banner intentions,” said Michael Ackerman, a cardiologist and director of the Windland Smith Rice Sudden Death Genomics Laboratory at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. But “the entire clinical evaluation was a train wreck, where wrong conclusions led to wrong turns and resulted in wrong therapies.”

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: The sudden death of a 13-year-old boy resulted in more than 20 relatives to be incorrectly diagnosed as having a potentially lethal heart rhythm condition. This erroneous diagnosis occurred as a result of inappropriate use of genetic testing and incorrect interpretation of genetic test results, according to Mayo Clinic research published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. This case highlights the potential danger of genetic testing when it is used incorrectly and the great need to not only use this powerful tool carefully and wisely but to scrutinize the results with great caution, says senior author Michael J. Ackerman, M.D., Ph.D., genetic cardiologist and director of Mayo Clinic’s Windland Smith Rice Sudden Death Genomics Laboratory. “While the technological advances in genetic sequencing have been exponential, our ability to interpret the results has not kept pace,” he says. More information cane be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Additional coverage: STAT, CNN, Immortal NewsKIMT, Raw Story, Science Daily, Cardiovascular Business, Healthcare Business News, GenomeWeb, FOX News, Motherboard, News4JaxBecker’s Health IT & CIO Review, The Scientist

Contact: Traci Klein

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Tags: ActionNewsJax, advisory board, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers, ASU, bad breath, Becker's ASC Review, Becker’s Health IT & CIO Review, caffeine, Cannon Falls Beacon, Cardiovascular Business


August 19th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Reuters
Can season and place of birth influence celiac disease risk?
by Lisa Rapaport

Winter babies and people born in places with shorter days and less sunlight might have a lower risk of developing celiac disease than peers born in warmer regions or seasons, a Swedish study suggests … Among other things, global warming, variation in the type of spring weather and the timing of changing seasons could potentially explain some of the differences in risk found in the study, said Dr. Joseph Murray, directorReuters Logo of the celiac disease program at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

Reach: Reuters has 196 editorial bureaus in 130 countries and 2,400 editorial staff members and covers international news, regional news, politics, social issues, health, business, sports and media.

Additional coverage: KFGO Fargo

Context: Joseph Murray, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist. Dr. Murray's research focuses in two distinct areas:  celiac disease or gluten sensitivity and enteropathy and esophageal disorders.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Outside magazine
Are Olympians Really Getting Older?
By Nicholas Hung

No, it’s not just you. From Michael Phelps to Kristin Armstrong, the 43-year-old American cyclist who just won her third gold in three consecutive Games, Olympic athletes really are getting older…To start, there’s Outsidethe physiological component, says Michael J. Joyner, a physician and researcher at the Mayo Clinic specializing in exercise physiology. Athletes are staying healthier longer due to improvements in training and recovery techniques. It’s different now, and somebody like Phelps can really cash in,” says Joyner. If someone stays healthy and stays motivated, he or she “can really compete into a late age.”

Reach: Outside Magazine has a monthly circulation of more than 688,000 and is geared toward the enthusiast of various outdoor activities. Its website receives more than 690,000 unique visitors each month.

Related coverage with Dr. Joyner:
Business Insider, 4 athletes show the perfect body types for Olympic sports
NY Magazine, Olympic Champions’ Minds Are Quieter Than Yours
TIME, The 5 Key Factors for Breaking Olympic Records
Sports IllustratedWhat does it take to break a world record at the Olympics?
New York magazine, Britain’s 42-Year-Old Distance Runner Is a Sign of Athletics to Come

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist.  Dr. Joyner's research team is interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

ActionNewsJax
Expert says federal funding for Zika vaccine falls short of what's needed in long run
by Samantha Manning

Dr. Greg Poland, a Zika vaccine researcher at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, told Action News Jax the federal funding falls far short. “It is a step in the right direction but terribly inadequate,” Poland saidActionNewsJax. “There needs to be a substantial and sustained commitment to dealing with the problem that is directly affecting the health of Americans and for which they themselves can’t do much to protect themselves against. This is the role of a federal government.” Poland said the phases for developing vaccines can take years and estimates roughly $1 billion is needed to fund a vaccine for this kind of a virus.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Context: Gregory Poland, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious disease expert. Dr. Poland and his team within the Vaccine Research Group aim to improve the health of individuals across the world by pursuing challenges posed by infectious diseases and bioterrorism through clinical, laboratory and epidemiologic vaccine research.

Contacts: Kevin PunksyBob Nellis

 

ABC 15 Arizona
Mayo Clinic offers tips to prevent atrial fibrillation (A-fib)

Todd Hurst, M.D., Mayo Clinic Cardiologist, joined the hosts of Sonoran Living Live to discuss the increasing prevalence of atrial fibrillation, the most common form of arrhythmia, and the dramatic impact that ABC affiliate, channel 15 in Arizonamodest weight loss and exercise can have on patient outcomes. Find out about more about heart disease and treatment by joining ABC15's Rally for Red, and from Mayo Clinic staff members each month on Sonoran Living Live.

Reach:  KNXV-TV, ABC 15, is the ABC television station affiliate in Phoenix, Arizona.

Context: R. Todd Hurst, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

KIMT-TV
Mayo Clinic working to advance research on aging
by DeeDee Stiepan

Mayo Clinic is hoping to speed up the pace at which interventions that could delay or prevent these diseases are discovered. They’re doing so by collaborating with academic aging centers around the world, KIMTincluding the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and University of Alabama at Birmingham. “So far, we’ve been going organ system by organ system saying can we generate enough proof of concept in experimental models, in cells and in mice to say, “yeah, we think this might actually improve a multitude of conditions that are associated with aging,” explains Jordan Miller, Ph. D. with the Cardiovascular Disease and Aging Lab. Dr. Miller says the next big step, is figuring out how to show those are safe for humans.

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Additional coverage: Siasat Daily

Context: Mayo Clinic, along with other members of the Geroscience Network, has published six manuscripts that map strategies for taking new drugs that target processes underlying aging into clinical trials. Researchers believe that these agents hold promise for treating multiple age-related diseases and disabilities. The articles appear today in The Journals of Gerontology: Series A – Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences. The Geroscience Network, formed by James Kirkland, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging; Steve Austad, Ph.D., University of Alabama at Birmingham; and Nir Barzilai, M.D., Albert Einstein College of Medicine, consists of 18 academic aging centers, along with the participation of more than 100 investigators from across the U.S. and Europe. The network is funded by the National Institutes of Health. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Megan Forliti

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Tags: ABC 15 Arizona, ActionNewsJax, aging, Alternet, alzheimers, Assurex, ASU, atheter-associated urinary tract infections, atrial fibrillation, Bioresorbable Stent, blood donation, blood shortage


July 29th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Washington Post
Complex jobs and social ties appear to help ward off Alzheimer’s, new research shows
by Tara Bahrampour

The studies support previous findings that more stimulating lifestyles are associated with better cognitive outcomes later in life, and bolster the importance of intellectual engagement, said Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging and the Mayo Alzheimer’s Research Center. “Physical activity has been reasonably well-documented, but with intellectual activity the data get pretty soft…these two studies speakWashington Post newspaper logo to that,” he said. “What it may mean is the development of Alzheimer’s Disease or cognitive change with aging need not be a passive process; you can do something about it…staying intellectually active whether it be your job or other kinds of activities may actually be beneficial.”

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: NBC News

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

CBS News
Memory loss is not necessarily the first sign of dementia
by Ruslan Guzov

Memory loss may not always be the first warning sign that dementia is brewing -- changes in behavior or personality might be an early clue…"It's important for us to recognize that not everything's forgetfulness," CBS News Logosaid Dr. Ron Petersen, the Mayo Clinic's Alzheimer's research chief. He wasn't involved in developing the behavior checklist but said it could raise awareness of the neuropsychiatric link with dementia.

Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

Additional coverage: Associated Press

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

 

Washington Post
Men may get Alzheimer’s as much as women; we just haven’t known how to spot it
by Tara Bahrampour

Looking at the State of Florida’s brain bank, researchers at the Mayo Clinic found Alzheimer’s in 1,625 of 2,809 people who had donated their brains for autopsies. The donors were almost equally divided: 51 percent men and 49 percent women. But contrary to what has been seen in the general population, the Alzheimer’s cases in the brain bank were much more evenly divided: 54 percent of cases were women and 46Washington Post newspaper logo percent were men… It is hard to diagnose the disease in people under 70, according to Melissa Murray, an assistant professor at the Mayo Clinic’s department of neuroscience, who presented the study. “If you don’t know what the disease is then you can’t give even the modicum of treatment that we have available,” Murray said, noting that symptoms in men are often mistaken for cortico-basal syndrome, frontotemporal dementia, or other conditions.

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:

CBS News, 1 in 5 Alzheimer's cases may be misdiagnosed

Florida Times-Union, Mayo clinic study finds mens Alzheimer' misdiagnosed more often than women

ABC News, HealthDay, Neurology Today, Telegraph UK, Express UK, Daily MailActionNewsJax

Context: Mayo neuroscientist Melissa E. Murray, Ph.D., led the study, which suggests a high number of men are not accurately diagnosed during their lifetime. The Alzheimer’s Association issued a news release today about the research findings, which Dr. Murray is presenting at the 2016 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Toronto. “While it is well accepted that age is the strongest risk factor for Alzheimer’s, there is an enormous need to understand interacting factors that contribute to the development of the disease,” says Dr. Murray, assistant professor of Neuroscience on Mayo’s Jacksonville campus. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Star Tribune (Associated Press)
Behavior changes offer clues that dementia could be brewing
by Lauran Neergaard

If validated, the checklist could help doctors better identify people at risk of brewing Alzheimer's and study changes over time. "It's important for us to recognize that not everything's forgetfulness," said Dr. Ron Star Tribune LogoPetersen, the Mayo Clinic's Alzheimer's research chief. He wasn't involved in developing the behavior checklist but said it could raise awareness of the neuropsychiatric link with dementia.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: Chicago Daily Herald, Post-Bulletin, Kansas City Star

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber LindquistDuska Anastasijevic

 

STAT
Promising Alzheimer’s treatment flops in new trial, crushing hopes
by Damian Garde

A closely watched treatment for Alzheimer’s disease came up short in a late-stage trial, marking the latest setback in a field wracked by years of failure. The drug, from biotech company TauRx, did no better than a sugar pill at improving patients’ scores on tests of cognitive and physical function, according to data presented early Wednesday at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Toronto. The studySTAT Logo of Boston Globe looked at roughly 900 patients with mild to moderate forms of Alzheimer’s. “I must say I’m disappointed by the results,” said Dr. David Knopman, a Mayo Clinic neurologist not involved with the study.

Reach: STAT covers the frontiers of health and medicine including science labs, hospitals, biotechnology board rooms, and political back rooms. Hosted by The Boston Globe, STAT launched on November 5, 2015. The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Additional coverage:

CNN, Does it pass the 'smell test'? Seeking ways to diagnose Alzheimer's early

Reuters, TauRx Alzheimer's drug fails in large study; some benefit seen

New York Times, USA Today, MedPage TodayFOX News, Huffington Post, NBC News

Contacts: Susan Barber LindquistDuska Anastasijevic

 

 

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic researcher wins international award
by Brett Boese

A Mayo Clinic scientist received a prestigious international award Monday at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference that's being hosted in Canada. Dr. Guojun Bu, a neuroscientist at Mayo's Florida Logo for Post-Bulletin newspapercampus, received the 2016 MetLife Foundation Major Award for Medical Research in Alzheimer's Disease, which is given annually to the top scientist in this field of study. Bu and his research lab have produced more than 220 peer-reviewed articles on Alzheimer's over the past 20 years that have been cited more than 10,000 times. That work is widely recognized as being some of the most significant in the field.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context:  Guojun Bu, Ph.D., a neuroscientist onMayo Clinic’s Florida campus, will receive the 2016 MetLife Foundation Major Award for Medical Research in Alzheimer’s Disease ─ one of the most prestigious awards given annually to the top scientist in this field of study. The award was presented to Dr. Bu today at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Toronto. Over the past 20 years, Dr. Bu and his medical research lab have produced more than 220 peer-reviewed articles that have been cited more than 10,000 times. Colleagues and other Alzheimer’s researchers say his team’s contributions to Alzheimer’s research rank among the most significant in the field. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

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Tags: "liquid biopsies", 9&10 News (Michigan), Abby Bartz, ABC News, ActionNewsJax, Adult coloring, Allie Wergin, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers, Amber Kohnhorst, Andra Palmer, Anesthesiology News


July 22nd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

New York Times
Fecal Transplants Can Be Life-Saving, but How?
by Carl Zimmer

Now scientists are testing fecal transplants against such diseases as ulcerative colitis, and even obesity and diabetes…The bacteria in stool seem to be particularly important. Dr. Sahil Khanna of the Mayo Clinic and his colleagues isolated the spores of about 50 different species of bacteriaThe New York Times newspaper logo found in stool samples donated by healthy people. They put the spores in pills, which they gave to 30 patients with C. difficile infections. As they reported in the July 15 issue of The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 29 of the patients recovered.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: Clostridium difficile (klos-TRID-e-um dif-uh-SEEL), often called C. difficile or C. diff, is a bacterium that can cause symptoms ranging from diarrhea to life-threatening inflammation of the colon. Mayo Clinic specializes in treating people with difficult cases of C. difficile who haven't responded to standard medical treatments or who have developed complications such as an inflamed colon. The Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, opened a C. difficile clinic that specializes in treating patients with C. difficile infection.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

New York Times
Pat Summitt’s Public Fight Spurs Research Support

Perhaps the most tangible evidence of the difference Summitt made is set to come in December with the opening of the Pat Summitt Alzheimer’s The New York Times newspaper logoClinic at the University of Tennessee Medical Center. “I think it’s going to become a real icon in the Southeastern part of the States for Alzheimer’s disease care and research,” said Ronald Petersen, the director of the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota…“People raved about her willingness to do this,” Petersen said. “She maintained a sense of humor as far into the disease as she could. She likened the battle to coaching basketball, and the way the players would react to a challenge on the court is the way she was reacting to dealing with this disease.”

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Post-Bulletin
Blue Cross honors Mayo's kidney donor program
by Brett Boese

An innovative Mayo Clinic program that pairs kidney donors with needy transplant patients was recognized Tuesday by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota's new Trailblazing Tour. It was one of 11 programs honored for its creative and forward-thinking methods, according to Blue Cross. Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperThe thought process behind Mayo's new donor program is simple, but it has drawn high praise while being hailed as revolutionary. "Mayo Clinic Living Donor Program's pioneering Paired Donation Program is evolving how patients receive transplants – in turn, proving how innovative trailblazers can accelerate the pace of improving health across Minnesota," said Garrett Black, senior vice president of health services at Blue Cross. "By recognizing the Mayo Clinic Living Donor Program, we hope to start a meaningful conversation and engage communities like Rochester throughout the state to reach their full potential and work together to transform health care."

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context: The Paired Donation Program came out of the knowledge that the current system simply wasn’t working as well as it could. Mayo Clinic – ranked number one in the nation for nephrology by US News & World Report –realized that by matching up people willing to donate a kidney with those in need of a transplant, they may be able to help someone else, if not their immediate friend or family member. A kidney from a living donor leads to better outcomes for the patients, and those that have had a friend or family member go through a kidney transplant tend to be more willing to be on the list to donate if a match arises. More information can be found here.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Chicago Tribune
How to shop for sunscreen
by Alison Bowen

Spray, stick or lotion? The Mayo Clinic lays out pros and cons. A stick might be easy to apply around the eye, or a gel might help with a hairy Chicago Tribune Logochest. Lotions are easy for large applications. And if you use a spray, stay away from the wind — spraying your limbs in the wind might not result in full coverage.

Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 384,000 and a weekend circulation of more than 686,000.

Context:  Mayo Clinic experts say the best sunscreen is one that you'll use generously and according to label directions. Here's help understanding sunscreen ingredients, types of sunscreen and more.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

ActionNewsJax
Expert weighs in possible Zika virus transmitted by mosquito in Miami
by Letisha Bereola

The first possible homegrown case of Zika transmitted by mosquito is being investigated in Miami. Action News Jax went to the Mayo Clinic to find out what health officials are zeroing in on. Dr. Vandana Bhide is an internist and pediatrician at the Mayo Clinic. She says a medical team will be examining the virus closely. “What are the DNA fingerprints of this particular infection? And we want to be sure it’s a recent infection ActionNewsJaxand not a similar infection like dengue fever,” she said.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Context: Vandana Bhide, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic internist and pediatrician.

Contact: Kevin Punksy

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June 17th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Huffington Post
8 Reasons You Can’t Get Rid Of Your Belly Fat
by Emily Haak

A lot of medications have weight gain as a potential side effect, but corticosteroids like prednisone (used to treat arthritis, multiple sclerosis and more) and cortisone (used for arthritis, ulcerative colitis, among other conditions) lead to pounds in your stomach, specifically, says Michael
Huffington Post LogoJensen, MD, an endocrinologist and obesity expert at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. They’re often used to treat asthma too.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique visitors.

Context:  Michael Jensen, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Jensen and his lab study the effects of obesity and how body fat (adipose tissue) and body fat distribution influence health. The regulated uptake, storage and release of fatty acids from adipose tissue play a major role in determining its health effects.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

MPR
Mayo Clinic touts planned bio-research campus

The next big phase of Rochester's transformation is getting underway. A few years ago, Mayo Clinic initiated a 20-year plan called the MPR News logoDestination Medical Center... Wednesday, Mayo is starting the process of finding a developer to start building one of those districts. It's called Discovery Square. It will be a big bio-research campus that will more than double the footprint Mayo currently has in Rochester. Tom Weber talked with Dr. John Noseworthy, President and CEO of Mayo Clinic.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Additional coverage:
KTTC-TV, Mayo's Discovery Square to bring big changes to downtown
Twin Cities Business magazine, Mayo’s ‘Transformational Centers’ Could Be First Beneficiaries Of DMC Build-Out
Sioux Falls Argus LeaderWest Central Tribune, NuJournal

Previous Discovery Square coverage in June 10, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Contact: Karl Oestreich

 

Forbes
Why Aren't Women Told About New, Better Way To Detect Breast Cancer? A Real Scandal
by Steve Forbes

Mammograms aren’t very good at discovering early-stage cancers in women who have dense breast tissue, which accounts for about 45% of all women. But there is a major advance whose efficacy has been confirmed in a study conducted by the Mayo Clinic . It’s called molecular breastForbes magazine logo imaging (MBI), and it vastly improves the chances of early detection.

Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Deborah Rhodes, M.D., is a physician with Mayo Clinic's Breast Diagnostic Clinic. Dr. Rhodes studies the application of a new breast imaging device, molecular breast imaging, to breast cancer screening. The long-term goal of Dr. Rhodes' research is to develop an individualized approach to breast cancer screening that incorporates breast density, age, and other factors that impact breast cancer risk and mammography sensitivity. Dr. Rhodes recently spoke at Forbes Women's Summit 2016.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
Mayo Clinic transplantation leader wins top honor
by Alexa Epitropoulos

A pioneer in transplantation at the Mayo Clinic has been awarded one of the top honors in his field. The American Society of Transplantation Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logogave its Lifetime Achievement Award to Dr. Thomas Gonwa, who has been working at Mayo's Jacksonville campus since 2001. Gonwa has, during his time at Mayo, worked to advance its organ transplant program, particularly liver transplantation, where he has done significant research on transplant patients who suffer from chronic kidney disease. He has had a particular focus on promoting regenerative medicine.

Reach:  The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals

Context: Thomas Gonwa, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic nephrologist at Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida. His primary research interests have been in the development of new immunosuppressive drug regimens in solid organ transplantation.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

ABC15 Arizona
Mayo Clinic discusses cholesterol and the importance of your numbers

Reza Arsanjani, M.D., Mayo Clinic Cardiologist, joined the hosts of Sonoran Living Live to discuss cholesterol and how important it is to know your cholesterol numbers.ABC affiliate, channel 15 in Arizona

Reach:  KNXV-TV, ABC 15, is the ABC television station affiliate in Phoenix, Arizona.

Additional coverage on ABC15 Arizona:

ABC15 Arizona, Want to be heart healthy? Go to sleep!

Context: Reza Arsanjani, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Mayo Clinic's top-ranked team of cardiologists diagnoses and treats many heart conditions, including many rare and complex disorders. Mayo Clinic's Division of Cardiovascular Diseases is one of the largest and most integrated in the United States, with locations in Arizona, Florida, Minnesota and several communities throughout Mayo Clinic Health System. Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota include more than 200 cardiologists and 1,100 allied health staff trained in caring for heart patients.

Contact:  Jim McVeigh

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March 25th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Forbes
What Science Tells Us Can Affect Our Risk Of Alzheimer's Disease
by Alice G. Walton

…But it’s not clear whether single components of the diet are enough to affect Alzheimer’s risk. I think the diet fads of blueberries, broccoli, coffee are all nonsense,” says David S. Knopman, researchForbes Pharma and Healthcare logoer at the Mayo Clinic. “No one eats food in isolation, and trying to disentangle associations between foods, especially when all the data is observational, is a hopeless and useless task.”

Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 million unique visitors each month.

Context:  David Knopman, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist. Dr. Knopman is involved in research in late-life cognitive disorders, such as mild cognitive impairment and dementia. Dr. Knopman's specific interests are in the very early stages of Alzheimer's disease, in cognitive impairment due to stroke (cerebrovascular disease) and in cognitive impairment due to frontotemporal degeneration.

Contacts: Traci Klein, Susan Barber Lindquist

 

US News & World Report
10 Most Competitive Medical Schools
by Delece Smith-Barrow

There's a strong demand for doctors in the workforce, but most people who apply to medical school don't get in…. But at some US News Education Logoinstitutions, hardly anyone gets an acceptance letter. The Mayo Medical School in Minnesota accepted only 1.8 percent of applicants – 81 out of the 4,616 who applied – for fall 2015. It had the lowest acceptance rate among all ranked medical schools.  Mayo accepted an even smaller percentage of applicants than it did in fall 2014​, when it admitted just 2 percent.

Reach: U.S. News & World Report is a multi-platform publisher of news and information, which includes http://www.usnews.comand http://www.rankingsandreviews.com.

Additional coverage:

Post Bulletin — Heard on the Street: Mayo health schools get good grades

Related coverage:

KTTC — Mayo Medical School's biggest graduating class matched into residency programs; Post Bulletin

Context: U.S. News & World Report recently released its 2017 rankings for Best Graduate Schools across the nation. Mayo Medical School and Mayo School of Health Sciences, two schools within Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, advanced significantly in the findings. “We are competing with some of the largest, well-known universities in the nation,” says Mark Warner, M.D., Juanita Waugh Executive Dean for Education, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. “These high ratings reflect the commitment of our faculty to deliver the highest quality education to the extraordinary students who come to our schools.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Deb Anderson

 

Wall Street Journal
The Healing Power of Forgiveness
by Diane Cole

A wealth of research has linked the isolation and loneliness that can result to increased health problems and higher mortality. It is tantamount to “suffocating” yourself emotionally, says Amit Sood, a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester,WSJ Banner Minn. The effects on one’s health from bottled-up anger and resentment can range from anxiety and depression to higher blood pressure and increased risk of heart attacks, he says.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Related coverage:

Business Insider — A doctor shares his No. 1 tip for tricking your mind into feeling happier

Cosmopolitan magazine — ​20 Ways to Reduce Work Stress in 1 Minute or Less

Context: Amit Sood, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in General Internal Medicine and the Cancer Center. The Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness combines wisdom from neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, and spirituality to help people choose contentment.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

NBC News
OpEd: Are You Getting Enough Vitamin D?
by Andrea King Collier

Donald Hensrud, MD, medical director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program says, at least 20-50 percent of adults have NBCNewsComsome form of low vitamin D values. "Low vitamin D is more common in winter months, because of less sunlight, but it is more common in African-Americans because they convert less vitamin D from one form to another in the skin," Dr. Hensrud says. According to Dr. Hensrud, vitamin D deficiencies are also more common in obese individuals and for people with kidney or liver disease.

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life. Donald Hensrud, M.D. is the program’s medical director.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Los Angeles Times
Intensive exercise may keep the aging mind sharp
by Melissa Healy

Mayo Clinic cardiologist Virend Somers said the new research may not illuminate direct relationships between exercise and cognitive aging, however. It may show, as many observational studies do, that cognitively healthier people are more likely toLos Angeles Times Science Now Logo engage in healthy behaviors, such as exercise, that in turn maintain their brain health… "Given its cost-free nature and the myriad other benefits of exercise, I think we should assume it helps until definitively shown otherwise," said Somers.

Reach:  The Los Angeles Times has a daily readership of 1.9 million and 2.9 million on Sunday, more than 8 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.5 million. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 128 years.

Context: Virend Somers, M.D., Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic physician with joint appointments in cardivascular diseases and nephrology and hypertension. Dr. Somers directs the Cardiovascular Facility and the Sleep Facility within Mayo Clinic's Center for Clinical and Translational Science.

Contacts: Traci Klein, Joe Dangor

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo opening lab for nanotech research

With support from the state of Florida, Mayo Clinic’s Jacksonville campus has opened a state-of-the-art laboratory for Florida Times-Union newspaper logonanotechnology research, an emerging field of science that studies and applies materials that are the size of an atom. The lab will be directed by Debabrata “Dev” Mukhopadhyay, a scientist in cancer and nanotechnology who was recruited by Mayo to open the lab with a $2 million grant from the state.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Previous coverage in March 19, 2016 Mayo Clinic in News Weekly Highlights

Context: With support from the state of Florida, Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus has opened a state-of-the-art laboratory for nanotechnology research, an emerging field of science that studies and applies materials that are the size of an atom. The laboratory is a key part of Mayo Clinic’s new Translational Nanomedicine Program. The goal is to develop, test and apply tiny materials in diagnosing and treating patients, particularly those with cancer. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Twin Cities Business
Mayo-Boston Scientific R&D Partnership Bridges Venture Capital Gap
by Don Jacobson

During the recent political debate over whether to repeal the federal excise tax on medical devices, manufacturers claimed part of the reason it was a bad policy is that it stifled research and development innovation. Now that the tax has been suspendedTwin Cities Business Magazine Logo for two years, Boston Scientific and Mayo Clinic say they’ve been freed to greatly expand a unique R&D collaboration. In December, device makers celebrated when the tax was suspended for two years, and last week Boston Scientific -- which employs about 5,000 people in Minnesota – announced it was using some of savings to ramp up a previously unrevealed scientific research collaboration with the Mayo Clinic.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Additional coverage:

Worcester Business Journal — Mayo Clinic helps Boston Scientific speed development; Cardiovascular Business, Qmed,DOTmed.com

Previous coverage in March 19, 2016 Mayo Clinic in News Weekly Highlights

Context: Boston Scientific Corporation (NYSE: BSX) and Mayo Clinic announced this week a continuing collaboration where the two organizations share intellectual property and stimulate the rapid development of medical devices to address unmet clinical needs. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

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August 27th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Daily Mail UK
Scientists discover how to 'switch off' cancer: Remarkable breakthrough means diseased cells can be made healthy again
by Fiona Macrae

Scientists have found a code for turning off cancer, it was announced today. In exciting experiments, they made cancerous breast and bladder cells benignDaily Mail UK again...The research, from the Mayo Clinic in Florida, showed it to be missing or faulty in a range of cancers. When this happens, key genetic instructions to the cells are scrambled and they turn cancerous. A research team, led by Panos Anastasiadis, was able to reset the instructions – turning off the cancer. Experiments in a dish showed that human cells from highly dangerous bladder cancers can be made normal again.

Reach: The Daily Mail has a circulation of more than 1.4 million.

Additional coverage: Florida Times-Union, Telegraph UK, BBC, RT America, Cape Times, Independent UK, Yahoo! Italia, New Zealand Herald, Middle East Post, 9News Australia, Talk Radio News, La Verdad, The Australian Business Review, Sydney Morning Herald, KTTCBBC NewsThe National Post, Quartz, Press TV, Consumer Affairs, Engadget, UPI, WiredNature World Report, First Coast NewsRochester Post-Bulletin.

Context:  Cancer researchers dream of the day they can force tumor cells to morph back to the normal cells they once were. Now, researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have discovered a way to potentially reprogram cancer cells back to normalcy. The finding, published in Nature Cell Biology, represents “an unexpected new biology that provides the code, the software for turning off cancer,” says the study’s senior investigator,Panos Anastasiadis, Ph.D., chair of the Department of Cancer Biology on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Anastasiadis, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

NY Times
Jet Lag ‘Cures’ Aplenty, but None That Work for All
by Joan Raymond

…Doctors do know that heading west is generally easier on the body than traveling The New York Times newspaper logoeast, because it requires a person’s internal clock to “set later, not earlier,” said Dr. R. Robert Auger, a sleep specialist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. But the more time zones crossed, the tougher the jet lag. The rule of thumb to get your body clocks back in sync is about one day per time zone change, making it “very difficult for real road warriors to get acclimated,” Dr. Auger said.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: R. Robert Auger, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic sleep specialist. Mayo Clinic doctors trained in sleep disorders evaluate and treat adults and children in the Center for Sleep Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. The Center for Sleep Medicine is one of the largest sleep medicine facilities in the United States. Staff in the center treats about 6,500 new people who have sleep disorders each year. The Center for Sleep Medicine is accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic doctor has your prescription for happiness
By Allie Shah

A doctor at Rochester’s Mayo Clinic believes that he has the prescription for happiness. He isn’t arguing that we can buy happiness, but that we can achieve it. WeStar Tribune newspaper logo can train our brains to feel less stressed and increase our inner bliss, overriding even genetic tendencies toward unhappiness, said Dr. Amit Sood, author of the new book “The Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Amit Sood, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in General Internal Medicine and the Cancer Center. The Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness combines wisdom from neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, and spirituality to help people choose contentment.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Atlanta Journal-Constitution — Melanoma a highly treatable cancer, doctors say by Virginia Anderson – Doctors who treat cancer said that some of the most Atlanta Journal-Consitution myAJC logo
important advances in their field in the past five years have come in the treatment of melanoma, which is a cancer of the skin. “When we look at the big cancer meetings we have every year, the most exciting news recently has been about melanoma,” said Dr. Alan Bryce, a medical oncologist at Mayo Clinic Arizona who treats melanoma.

Reach: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution has a daily circulation of more than 168,000. Its website has more than one million unique visitors each month.

Context: Alan Bryce, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic medical oncologist. Dr. Bryce studies cancer genetics and novel therapeutics with a focus on personalized medicine. His clinical practice centers on genitourinary malignancies (prostate, kidney, bladder, and testicular cancers) and melanoma.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

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