Items Tagged ‘advisory board’

January 13th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

First Coast News
The Chat Wednesday January 11: Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa Part 1

First Coast News
The Chat Wednesday January 11: Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa Part 2

Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, Mayo Clinic neurosurgeon, joined “The Chat,” a live afternoon show on Jacksonville’s First Coast News. TheFirst Coast News Logo show’s web site breaks up the segments in two parts (see links below). The first segment focuses on his early life/career with images of his time at Johns Hopkins, and the second segment focuses on his role and work at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville.

Reach: First Coast News refers to two television stations in Jacksonville, Florida. WJXX, the ABC affiliate and WTLV, the NBC affiliate.

Previous coverage in September 23, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
Previous coverage in April 22, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, M.D., prominent neurosurgeon, researcher and educator, joined Mayo Clinic in 2016 as chair of the Department of Neurosurgery on the Florida campus, along with several members of his research team from Johns Hopkins Medicine. Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa is renown nationally and internationally as a surgeon, researcher, humanitarian and author. His laboratory has published many manuscripts and articles, submitted a number of patents and obtained three NIH grants. Students and fellows who worked with Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa have gone on to join leading neuroscience programs throughout the world. Mayo Clinic's world-renowned neurosurgeons perform more than 7,000 complex surgical procedures every year at campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota.

Contact: Kevin Punsky


Yahoo! News
Robert M. Jacobson stresses importance of flu vaccine

The Minnesota Department of Health released a report on Thursday on the increase of flu activity throughout the state. Friday afternoon, we Logo of Yahoo Newsspoke with a health professional at Mayo Clinic about the importance of getting the flu vaccine. According to the Minnesota Department of Health's report released on Thursday flu season is in full swing, and can indeed continue to increase in activity. In fact, Dr. Jacobson, a primary care physician and professor of pediatrics at Mayo Clinic, said in the last two weeks alone, there were 50 hospitalized patients in Minnesota from the flu.

Reach: Yahoo News receives more than 8.4 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: KTTC

Context:  Robert Jacobson, M.D. is a pediatrician with the Mayo Clinic Children's Center. Dr. Jacobson also serves as the medical director for the Population Health Science Program at Mayo Clinic's Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery. He also leads Mayo's Employee and Community Health (ECH) Research Initiative. You can read about his medical research here.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Wisconsin Public Radio
The Mayo Clinic Diet: Second Edition

It's the beginning of a new year, a time when many people resolve to make healthier choices--like eating a healthier diet. We learn how to improve health while losing weight with the medical editor of "The Mayo Clinic Diet." He says this plan is a lifestyle and not a diet in the traditional sense. We learn how it works.

Reach: Wisconsin Public Radio consists of 34 radio stations programmed by seven regional studios and carrying programming on three content networks: the Ideas Network, the NPR News and Classical Network and the All Classical Network.

Additional coverage: 

Post-Bulletin, The Mayo Clinic Diet earns top honor
KTTC, Mayo Clinic Diet is #1, according to U.S. News & World Report
KWLM Willmar Radio, KFGO Fargo-Moorhead, 104.7 DukeFM, WXOW La Crosse

Previous coverage in the January 6, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context:  As the second edition of The Mayo Clinic Diet hits store shelves, the diet plan has been named Best Commercial Diet by U.S. News & World Report.  “We are honored to be recognized for a weight-loss method that offers lasting results,” says Donald Hensrud, M.D., medical editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet and director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. Learn more about the Mayo Clinic by watching this Mayo Clinic Minute or read more about it on Mayo Clinic Network. “The Mayo Clinic Diet is much more than a diet,” Dr. Hensrud says. “It’s a lifestyle program in which people can eat great-tasting food and feel better right away ─ even while they lose weight. More importantly, these lifestyle changes are sustainable and can improve long-term health as people reach and maintain a healthy weight.”

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

MPR
For Rochester, becoming the 'Silicon Valley of Medicine' won't be easy
by Catharine Richert

The Destination Medical Center project wants to give Rochester a reputation for something it's never been: a magnet for tech start-ups and MPR News logoentrepreneurs. But turning the city into what the DMC calls the "Silicon Valley of Medicine" won't be easy. The DMC is a multibillion, 20-year economic development effort to remake Rochester so Mayo can better compete for both patients and top talent. It's also meant to help diversify the region's economy by attracting new businesses. But Rochester's risk-averse culture has held it back, said Jamie Sundsbak, an entrepreneur and former Mayo Clinic researcher. "When you have a large medical institution like the Mayo Clinic — a world renowned, top medical institution in the world — you get that way by eliminating risk," he said. "If you look at some of the entrepreneurial communities, risk is what they are excited about."

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: With Mayo Clinic at its heart, the Destination Medical Center (DMC) initiative is the catalyst to position Rochester, Minnesota as the world’s premier destination for health and wellness; attracting people, investment opportunities, and jobs to America’s City for Health and supporting the economic growth of Minnesota, its bioscience sector, and beyond.

Contacts: Duska AnastasijevicSusan Barber Lindquist

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Tags: 104.7 DukeFM, AccuWeather, advisory board, Albert Lea Tribune, Alzforum, apps, asthma, Austin Herald, Becker’s Hospital Review, Breast Cancer, breastfeeding, Brooke Werneburg


December 23rd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. This will be our last edition of 2016.  Look for us again on January 6, 2017. Thank you and happy holidays.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Los Angeles Times
A senior-friendly workout to improve movement and prevent injury

Jogging outdoors, running on a treadmill or lifting weights at the gym aren’t always practical — or enjoyable — activities for everyone. However, one type of exercise works for everyone, no matter your age or ability, because it relies on improving practical movements often involved inLogo for Los Angeles Times newspaper everyday activities. “Natural movement is universal, and it’s about bringing movement back to the basics,” says Bradly Prigge, wellness exercise specialist with the Mayo Clinic’s Healthy Living Program. “It’s not about following the latest fitness craze or learning the newest secret to weight loss. Natural movement is about connecting with your body and cultivating an awareness of your full abilities.”

Reach:  The Los Angeles Times has a daily readership of 1.9 million and 2.9 million on Sunday, more than 8 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.5 million. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 128 years.

Additional coverage: Mountain Grove News-Journal

Other recent coverage in the Los Angeles Times related to Mayo Clinic's Healthy Living Program

Cosmopolitan, Do You Really Need to Take Vitamins?
WTOP Washington, Mayo Clinic expert: 4 actions for a healthy holiday season
Yahoo! News, 9 Ways to Boost Your Immune System by Michael O Schroeder
WEAU Eau ClaireTODAY INTERVIEW: Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Recipes

Previous coverage related to Mayo Clinic's Healthy Living program in the December 2, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life.

Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Joe Dangor

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic in Rochester adds customized plane to air fleet

The Mayo Clinic in Rochester has unveiled a customized $8.5 million airplane to transport high-risk patients to its facilities. The fixed-wing aircraft adds to the Mayo One fleet that was created in 1984. The program began with a single helicopter based in Rochester and now boasts four — two in Rochester, one in Mankato and one in Eau Claire, Wisconsin.Star Tribune newspaper logo

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: KSTP, Becker’s Hospital Review, KIMT

Context: While a certain red sled usually owns the flight-related headlines this month, Santa's sleigh isn't the only one getting press this December. Several news outlets, it seems, are reporting on another vehicle taking flight. But instead of delivering toys to good girls and boys, the new Mayo One airplane delivers patients in need of immediate, advanced care to Mayo Clinic. And like Santa's ride, this one also has some pretty unique features, and the equipment, medication and staff to make it function as a sky-high Emergency Department. You can read more about the new Mayo one airplane in Mayo Clinic in the Loop.

Contact:  Glenn Lyden

 

KIMT
St. Mary’s nurse returns to work after hiking accident
by DeeDee Stiepan

It’s an incredible story of survival that we first brought you in May when a St. Mary’s nurse fell 100ft while hiking in Arizona. Amber Kohnhorst spent 24 hours in extreme pain, without food or water until she was KIMT LOGOrescued by helicopter. Now, the 25-year old is back in Rochester, and it’s been quite some time since she was working as a Registered Nurse on the 5th floor at St. Mary’s Hospital. “My last shift was Friday May 13th, she tells us. “I’ve never really believed in Friday the 13th but now it kind of freaks me out.”

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Previous coverage in December 2, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Amber Kohnhorst loves animals and adventure. The trip she'd planned to Best Friends Animal Sanctuary in Utah promised both. She'd spend time volunteering at the shelter and do some hiking in nearby Cane Beds, Arizona. But what sounded like a perfect vacation quickly became a nightmare when the 25-year-old Mayo Clinic nurse fell 100 feet down a cliff during what was supposed to be a short hike. You can read more about Amber's story on Mayo Clinic In the Loop.

Contacts:  Ginger Plumbo, Kelly Reller

 

NBC News
Why Heart Attacks Are Striking Healthy Young Women
by Lauren Dunn and Parminder Deo

Researchers are discovering that SCAD heart attacks occur more frequently than once thought..."SCAD is a type of heart attack, but completely NBC News Logodifferent than the one we normally think of," says cardiologist Dr. Sharonne Hayes of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. "It's caused by a split or tear in an otherwise healthy artery that leads to a drop in blood flow to the heart leading to a heart attack."

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Context:  Sharonne Hayes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Hayes studies cardiovascular disease and prevention, with a focus on sex and gender differences and conditions that uniquely or predominantly affect women. With a clinical base in the Women's Heart Clinic, Dr. Hayes and her research team utilize novel recruitment methods, social media and online communities, DNA profiling, and sex-specific evaluations to better understand several cardiovascular conditions. A major area of focus is spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD), an uncommon and under-recognized cause of acute coronary syndrome (heart attack) that occurs predominantly in young women.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic sees innovation as key to the future

Mayo Clinic recognizes the historic changes taking place in the health care landscape. The health care provider has become famous for treating the whole patient by integrating various specialties of care. Now Mayo is going to be using its of health care innovation system as a model for generating revenue. Mayo-Jacksonville is setting aside spaces for innovators and is taking part in more collaborations.Florida Times-Union newspaper logo

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Charles Bruce, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist and serves as medical director of Mayo Clinic Ventures at Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville, Florida. James (Jim) Rogers is chair of Mayo's newly formed Business Development Department, which combines the functions of Mayo Clinic Ventures and the Office of Business Development. The new department will oversee Mayo's partnerships with external organizations, spearhead new business opportunities and support the advancement of medical technology in conjunction with Mayo Clinic leaders, entrepreneurs and inventors.

Contacts: Kevin Punsky, Duska Anastasijevic

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Tags: ABC15 Arizona, AccuWeather.com, advisory board, Affordable care act, Alatus, alcohol, Amber Kohnhorst, American Medical Association, anesthesia, Angie Murad, antibiotics, antidepressants


November 4th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik


Advisory Board
Mayo Clinic got 'five stars'—but its CEO still doesn't like how CMS rates hospitals

CMS' five-star rating system for overall hospital quality—and similar systems that purport to measure health care quality—are too reductionist and need to be changed, Mayo Clinic CEO John Noseworthy argues in a Modern Healthcare op-ed. You might think, given that CMS awardedAdvisory Board Mayo Clinic five stars, that Noseworthy would praise the ratings system. But Noseworthy argues that "many measurement programs currently in use ... do not differentiate complexity of patient conditions nor account for their settings of care, which results in inaccurate reports on value."

Reach: The Advisory Board Company is a global research, technology, and consulting firm partnering with more than 165,000 leaders in more than 4,100 organizations across health care and higher education.

Previous coverage in October 28, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Hospitals & Health Networks
Experts Take on the Big Picture of Value-Based Payment
by Brian Frankie

Value-based payment is coming to health care. And its complications are something we have to understand. That was the message of panelists Hospitals and Health NetworksWednesday during a session at the H&HN Executive Forum in Chicago on value-based payment and purchasing and what can make it successful…Much of the discussion, led by moderator Robert Nesse, M.D., senior medical adviser for payment reform to the Mayo Clinic Board of Governors and former Mayo Clinic Health System CEO, focused on leveraging data to track value.

Reach: Hospitals & Health Networks is a monthly magazine with a circulation of more than 77,000 that reports on and analyzes the social, political and economic forces that shape healthcare delivery. Its website has more than 21, 000 unique visitors each month. The publication targets health care executives and clinical leaders in hospitals and health systems.

Context: Robert Nesse, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic Health System family medicine physician in Lake City, Minn. and he also serves as senior medical director, Payment Reform at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Nesse is also former CEO of Mayo Clinic Health System, a network of clinics and hospitals serving more than 70 communities in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

TIME
You Asked: Should I Go Gluten Free?
by Markham Heid

Gluten is a type of elastic grain protein that helps wheat, rye and barley hold their shape. Because of its glue-like properties, gluten is often added to other food products—pasta, sauces, crackers, baked goods—to thicken or bind those products together. “These kinds of junk foods and refinedTime magazine logo carbohydrates promote weight gain and diabetes and disease,” says Dr. Joseph Murray, a professor of medicine and a gluten researcher at Mayo Clinic. So if you’re eating a lot of cookies, crackers and other grain-based snack foods, any diet that limits your intakes of them is bound to do your health some good. “But for those who don’t suffer from celiac disease, gluten isn’t inherently bad, and gluten-free foods aren’t inherently healthy,” he says.

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Joseph Murray, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist and hepatologist with the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. Dr. Murray's research interests focus in two distinct areas: celiac disease or gluten sensitivity and enteropathy; and esophageal disorders, particularly esophageal functional disorders, particularly reflux, and the detection of atypical reflux.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Florida Times-Union
Health Notes: Mayo Cancer Center at St. Vincent’s now open
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Cancer Center at St. Vincent’s has opened. The collaboration between Mayo Clinic’s Jacksonville campus and St. Vincent’s HealthCare Florida Times-Union newspaper logobrings Mayo Clinic’s cancer services to patients in a newly built 11,500-square-foot medical suite on the St. Vincent’s Medical Center Riverside campus. Mayo Clinic is staffing the facility with physicians from its Department of Hematology/Oncology. St. Vincent’s is assuming the remaining clinical and administrative responsibilities. The cancer services include medical oncology, an infusion center for chemotherapy, and multidisciplinary disease specialized care for various types of cancer. An official blessing and dedication ceremony will be held Monday.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Previous coverage in October 21, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: To deliver Mayo Clinic’s nationally ranked comprehensive cancer care to more people in Northeast Florida, the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center located at St. Vincent’s Riverside will open to patients on Oct. 17. The collaboration between Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus and St. Vincent’s HealthCare, a part ofAscension, the nation’s largest Catholic and non-profit health system, brings Mayo Clinic’s cancer services to patients in a newly built 11,500-square-foot medical suite on the campus of St. Vincent’s Riverside. “We are excited to launch this community collaboration and we look forward to further meeting the needs of cancer patients, right here in their own community,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., CEO, Mayo Clinic in Florida.  “This community collaboration will enable patients to receive cancer care at Mayo Clinic Cancer Center at St. Vincent’s and come to Mayo’s San Pablo Road campus when they need highly complex care, such as bone marrow transplants.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

Wall Street Journal
Boy’s Cardiac Death Led to Misuse of Genetic Test, Study Says
by Ron Winslow

A 13-year-old boy’s sudden cardiac death led doctors to wrongly diagnose more than 20 of his relatives with a potentially lethal heart disorder in a case that illustrates the potential for genetic testing to go wrong… The search for a genetic cause of the teenager’s death was done with “goodWSJ Banner intentions,” said Michael Ackerman, a cardiologist and director of the Windland Smith Rice Sudden Death Genomics Laboratory at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. But “the entire clinical evaluation was a train wreck, where wrong conclusions led to wrong turns and resulted in wrong therapies.”

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: The sudden death of a 13-year-old boy resulted in more than 20 relatives to be incorrectly diagnosed as having a potentially lethal heart rhythm condition. This erroneous diagnosis occurred as a result of inappropriate use of genetic testing and incorrect interpretation of genetic test results, according to Mayo Clinic research published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. This case highlights the potential danger of genetic testing when it is used incorrectly and the great need to not only use this powerful tool carefully and wisely but to scrutinize the results with great caution, says senior author Michael J. Ackerman, M.D., Ph.D., genetic cardiologist and director of Mayo Clinic’s Windland Smith Rice Sudden Death Genomics Laboratory. “While the technological advances in genetic sequencing have been exponential, our ability to interpret the results has not kept pace,” he says. More information cane be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Additional coverage: STAT, CNN, Immortal NewsKIMT, Raw Story, Science Daily, Cardiovascular Business, Healthcare Business News, GenomeWeb, FOX News, Motherboard, News4JaxBecker’s Health IT & CIO Review, The Scientist

Contact: Traci Klein

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Tags: ActionNewsJax, advisory board, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers, ASU, bad breath, Becker's ASC Review, Becker’s Health IT & CIO Review, caffeine, Cannon Falls Beacon, Cardiovascular Business


September 23rd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Buzzfeed
27 College Health Tips They Won’t Teach You At Orientation
by Caroline Kee

Spoiler alert: it’s probably mono. BuzzFeed Health spoke to Dr. Pritish Tosh, infectious disease specialist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and germ expert Kelly Reynolds, PhD, director of environmental health sciences at the University of Arizona, about how collegeBuzzFeed Logo students can stay healthy when the odds (and germs) are against them.

Reach: BuzzFeed receives more than 15.7 million unique visitors each month to its website and targets pop culture and social media enthusiasts.

Context: Pritish Tosh, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist. Dr. Tosh is interested in emerging infections and preparedness activities related to them, ranging from collaborating with the Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group in basic science vaccine development to hospital systems research related to pandemic preparedness.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
Mayo Clinic sets schedule for $100M expansion — with work starting soon
by Alexa Epitropoulos

Mayo Clinic is beginning construction on the first building within its $100 million three-building expansion project in October – and it's setting its sights on more expansion in the future. The CEO of Mayo Clinic's Jacksonville campus, Dr. Gianrico Farrugia, said work on the 150,000-Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logosquare-foot destination medical center will have just under a two-year timeline, with the projected completion being summer 2018. That building has a number of unique features, including specialized care for patients with neurological problems, as well as patients who require neurosurgery, hematology and oncology. It will also have a chemotherapy section, which Farrugia says will be private and include an outdoor patio.

Additional coverage:
Becker’s Hospital Review, Jacksonville Mayo Clinic sets schedule for $100M expansion

Context: Gianrico Farrugia, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vice president and CEO of Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida. Earlier this year, Mayo Clinic announced that it will invest $100 million in major construction projects building on its 150-year history of transforming health care and the patient experience as the premier medical destination center for health care in the Southeast. 

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

WJCT Jacksonville
First Coast Connect: From Illegal Immigrant To Brain Surgeon
by Kevin Meerschaert

He jumped a California border fence in 1987, one day after his 19th birthday. Speaking no English and having no money, Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa spent the first years in this country working migrant jobs while raising the money for tuition at Joaquin Delta Community College. … screen-shot-2016-09-22-at-8-48-16-pmRecently Dr. Q joined the staff at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville as Chairman of Neurologic Surgery.

Reach: WJCT-FM is the NPR affiliate for the Jacksonville market. WJCT-FM Online has more than 259,000 unique visitors each month.

Previous coverage in April 22, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, prominent neurosurgeon, researcher and educator, recently joined Mayo Clinic as chair of the Department of Neurosurgery on the Florida campus, along with several members of his research team from Johns Hopkins Medicine. Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa is renown nationally and internationally as a surgeon, researcher, humanitarian and author. His laboratory has published many manuscripts and articles, submitted a number of patents and obtained three NIH grants. Students and fellows who worked with Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa have gone on to join leading neuroscience programs throughout the world. Mayo Clinic's world-renowned neurosurgeons perform more than 7,000 complex surgical procedures every year at campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

KSTP
10-Year-Old Minn. Girl Undergoes Facial Reconstructive Surgery after Near-Fatal Farm Accident

Doctor Uldis Bite, a plastic surgeon, took Amber Rose’s case. Now 10 years old, Amber Rose was about to embark on yet another journey; one her
KSTP-5 Twin Citiesfamily wanted to share and they invited 5 EYEWITNESS NEWS to come along. A 3-D model, made on the Mayo campus, helped Dr. Bite plan out the extensive facial reconstruction surgery Amber Rose was about to have. On an early July morning, almost exactly three years to the date of her accident, Amber Rose walked nervously into Mayo Clinic, her entire family by her side.

Reach: KSTP-TV is the ABC affiliate in Minneapolis that broadcasts on channel 5. KSTP-TV Online has more than 503,000 unique visitors each month. It is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., and is the only locally-owned and operated broadcasting company in the Twin Cities. KSTP-TV first broadcast in April 1948, and was the first television station to serve the upper Midwest.

Context: Last year, after receiving care at "numerous hospitals" and from "dozens of doctors," the Kordiaks were told nothing else could be done for their daughter. Then, "with fingers crossed, Jen reached out to Mayo Clinic," where a team led by Uldis Bite, M.D., came up with a new plan for Amber Rose. Dr. Bite used "a 3-D model, made on the Mayo campus" to help plan out the extensive facial reconstruction surgery. And last July — nearly three years to the day after the accident — Amber Rose underwent the 15-hour procedure. Six weeks later, at a follow-up appointment, Dr. Bite was pleased with the results. As was Amber Rose. "My nose looks way better," she said. "Nobody will stare at me." You can read more about Amber Rose's story at In the Loop.

Contact:  Sharon Theimer

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Tags: 873 AM, ABC15 Arizona, advisory board, aging, AIN Online, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers, American Trucker, Angie Murad, artificial Intelligence, AsiaOne, awake brain surgery


May 27th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Wall Street Journal
Shoulder Surgery Is the New Testing Ground for Painkiller Alternatives
by Laura Landro

Some of the techniques to control pain have been around in some form for years. But their use in combination, known as multimodal management, is gaining popularity amid mounting concern about an epidemic of opioid addiction. A July 2015 study in Mayo Clinic ProceedingsWSJ Banner found one in four people who were prescribed a narcotic painkiller for the first time progressed to long-term prescriptions, putting them at risk for dependence and dangerous side effects.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Opioid painkiller addiction and accidental overdoses have become far too common across the United States. To try to identify who is most at risk, Mayo Clinic researchers studied how many patients prescribed an opioid painkiller for the first time progressed to long-term prescriptions. The answer: 1 in 4. People with histories of tobacco use and substance abuse were likeliest to use opioid painkillers long-term. More information about the Mayo Clinic Proceedings study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

NBC News
At-Home Test Could Help in Colon Cancer Battle

Millions of Americans who have avoided colonoscopies in the past can now get a home test to screen for colon cancer, the second leading cause of nbcnews.comcancer-related deaths in the U.S.

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Context: An endoscopist’s knowledge of a positive Cologuard test improves colonoscopy performance, according to a poster presentation at last week’s Digestive Disease Week conference. Cologuard is an at-home, stool-DNA colorectal cancer screening test that has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. This test, available by prescription only, is reimbursed by Medicare and covered by an increasing number of commercial health care plans. Researchers from Mayo Clinic compared results of colonoscopies following a positive result from Cologuard (unblinded) with colonoscopies performed by those who were not aware of the Cologuard result (blinded).  Unblinded endoscopists found polyps or hemorrhagic lesions 83 percent of the time and precancerous polyps in 70 percent of patients, compared to 68 and 53 percent of blinded endoscopists, respectively. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

CBS News
What is altitude sickness and why is it so dangerous?
by Mary Brophy Marcus

Altitude sickness is actually a constellation of different conditions that occur when the body doesn't have enough time to adapt to the lower air pressure and lower oxygen level at high altitudes, explains Dr. Clayton Cowl, chair of the division of preventive, occupational and aerospaceCBS News Logo medicine at the Mayo Clinic. "The body doesn't like things to be out of kilter," Cowl, who's also a pulmonologist, told CBS News.

Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

Context:  Clayton Cowl, M.D. heads Mayo Clinic's preventive, occupational and aerospace medicine. The division consists of 22 physicians who have specialty training in internal medicine or family practice and a team of trained occupational health nurses. Several of our physicians are board-certified in preventive, occupational and/or aerospace medicine. Mayo Clinic's integrated group practice model makes consultation with any other medical specialists readily available.

Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

News4Jax
This Week In Jacksonville: Mayo Clinic

Interview with Dr. Gianrico Farrugia.

News Jax 4 LogoReach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville. This Week in Jacksonville is a weekly public affairs program on WJXT.

Context: Gianrico Farrugia, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vice president and CEO of Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
The big problems with obesity
by Jill Daly

There’s been a steep increase in the prevalence of obesity in the United States since 2011, according to Ursula Bauer, director of the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, speaking before journalists in a National Press Foundation program earlier thisPittsburgh Post-Gazette Logo year. Treating people who are obese for pneumonia and the flu has been challenging, according to vaccine researcher Gregory Poland of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who also spoke at the journalists program this year. He said people who are obese often develop low-grade chronic inflammation, so their immune system cannot respond well to antibiotics and vaccines. Normal immune responses are interfered with, on a cellular level.

Reach: The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette has a daily circulation of more than 140,00 readers. It's website has more than 1 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Gregory Poland, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious disease expert. Dr. Poland and his team within the Vaccine Research Group aim to improve the health of individuals across the world by pursuing challenges posed by infectious diseases and bioterrorism through clinical, laboratory and epidemiologic vaccine research.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

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Tags: AccuWeather, advisory board, aging, AJMC.com, altitude sickness, Amber Kohnhorst, Angie Puffer, Baxalta, Beacon Health System, Becker's Hospital News, Becker’s Hospital Review, Biostage Inc.


May 13th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic in race for Florida patients
by Christopher Snowbeck

Like college kids at spring break, the nation’s biggest names in health care are spending some serious coin in Florida. In March, the Mayo Clinic said it would spend $100 million at its hospital in Jacksonville to better position the medical center as a health care destinatioStar Tribune Logon for the southeastern U.S. It was the latest move by Mayo in Florida, where the Rochester-based clinic isn’t the only out-of-town operator that’s growing in the state.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

Becker’s Hospital Review, What is drawing Cleveland Clinic, Mayo Clinic and other AMCs to Florida?

Context: Advancing its position as the premier medical destination center for health care in the Southeast, Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida will invest $100 million in major construction projects building on its 150-year history of transforming health care and the patient experience. This summer, Mayo Clinic will begin constructing an innovative destination medical building that will provide integrated services needed for complex cancer, as well as neurologic and  neurosurgical care. Initially rising four stories, the 150,000-square-foot building has the potential for 11 more stories. More than 126,000 patients are expected to visit the first year the building opens.  More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

 

KARE11-TV
New Mayo Clinic book offers women menopause solutions

Menopause expert Dr. Stephanie Faubion, M.D., has written a new book. “The Menopause Solution: A Doctor’s Guide to: Relieving Hot Flashes,
KARE-11 LogoEnjoying Better Sex, Sleeping Well, Controlling Your Weight and Being Happy.” The book is available now at major bookstores everywhere. Dr. Faubion, Director of the Mayo Clinic’s Women’s Health Clinic, appeared on KARE 11 News to talk about her book, which covers everything from perimenopause to post-menopause, debunks common myths, uses the most up-to -date research and confronts the controversial topic of hormone therapy.

Reach: KARE-TV is the NBC affiliate serving the Minneapolis-Saint Paul market.

Additional coverage: KCTV Kansas City, A menopause expert shares ways to be happy during and after menopause; KGUN-TV Tucson, National Radio

Context: As preteens, girls often take health classes to teach them about their changing bodies during puberty. For moms-to-be, classes deal with pregnancy and newborn care. Yet, few classes are offered about menopause, a part of life that 6,000 U.S. women reach every day. A new book released today aims to address that gap. Mayo Clinic The Menopause Solution is subtitled A Doctor’s Guide to Relieving Hot Flashes, Enjoying Better Sex, Sleeping Well, Controlling Your Weight and Being Happy! “This book serves to inform women about what’s happening to their bodies, what treatment options are available and how to remain healthy in the years past menopause,” says Stephanie Faubion, M.D., medical editor of The Menopause Solution and director of the Women’s Health Clinic and Office of Women’s Health at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Faubion, a North American Menopause Society-certified menopause practitioner, is one of the nation’s leading experts on menopause and regularly treats women with menopause-related conditions. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

 

USA Today
Study: Swaddling babies may increase risk of SIDS
by Mary Bowerman

An infant that is unable to flip from his or her back to their side or stomach can safely be swaddled, according to Chris Colby, division chair of neonatology at Mayo Clinic, who is not associated with the study. He notes that swaddling is used to mirror the constricted nature of the wombUSA Today newspaper logo and promotes the baby falling asleep more quickly. "The concern is that as babies get older – even tho swaddled -- they could wiggle around and end up in a prone position, face-down, looking at the mattress," Colby said. "You have to be mindful as your baby gets older, and assess if swaddling your baby tight at 2-3 months if still a safe practice."

Reach: USA TODAY  has an average daily circulation of 4.1 million which includes print, various digital editions and other papers that use their branded content.

Context: Christopher Colby, M.D., is affiliated with Mayo Clinic Children's Center.  At Mayo Clinic Children's Center, more than 200 medical providers in 40 medical and surgical specialties offer integrated care to over 50,000 children and teenagers every year, inspiring hope and providing healing.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Rapid City Journal
Mayo oncologist pioneer in new protocols
by Tom Griffith

Talk to a patient of pioneering Mayo Clinic oncologist Dr. Mark Truty, or even the doctor himself, and you’ll find he has a tendency to deflect Rapids City Journal Logocredit for advancements in the treatment of pancreatic cancer that have changed what was once a near-certain death sentence into real hope for survival. “Subconsciously, it’s probably been a huge motivator,” Truty admitted last week. “He went through the old approach. He was diagnosed, was in terrible shape, had an operation by a surgeon who was inexperienced, suffered complications, was in the hospital for three months, and died six months later. It was a pointless exercise, and it’s a problem that continues to happen on a daily basis around the world.”

Reach: Rapid City Journal is published daily for residents of Rapid City, SD and surrounding areas. The circulation is more than 23, 200 daily and its online version has nearly 129,000 unique visitors each month.

Related coverage: 

Rapid City Journal, Spearfish man defies odds, survives bout with pancreatic cancer by Tom Griffith — Tom Hoffman will never forget the day he received his death sentence…Following nine days of tests that confirmed the diagnosis, Hoffman was introduced to Dr. Mark Truty, assistant professor and section chair of hepatoeiliary and pancreatic surgery at the famed clinic in Rochester, Minn. The doctor, part of a team of Mayo oncologists developing pioneering protocols in the treatment of pancreatic cancer, was blunt.

Context: Mark Truty, M.D., who treated Tom Hoffman of Spearfish, leads a surgical team at the Mayo Clinic that is pioneering new protocols in the treatment of pancreatic cancer that have resulted in vastly improved survival rates.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Las Vegas Review-Journal
Sleep apnea causes problems from fatigue to traffic accidents
by Apt Nadler

People with sleep apnea are more prone to become a Type 2 diabetic, because of developing a resistance to insulin. Individuals with sleep apnea are also at risk for a stroke and depression. “Sleep apnea is one of our focuses in primary care management,” said Dr. Martina Mookadam, a family medicine physician at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. “It creates a very strong physical stress on the body. If your primary careLas Vegas Review-Journal Newspaper Logo doctor fails to ask you if you have symptoms, you should bring it up. Sleep apnea can happen at any age.”

Reach: Las Vegas Review-Journal is a daily newspaper written for the residents of Las Vegas.

Context: Martina Mookadam, M.D.  is a family medicine physician at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Mayo Clinic Family Medicine doctors in Arizona provide comprehensive care for individuals of all ages at facilities in Arrowhead (Glendale) and Thunderbird (Scottsdale).

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

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Tags: advisory board, Aiden Remme, Angie Gullicksrud, Arizona Republic, Aspirin, asthma, atrial fibrillation, Becker’s Hospital Review, Bend Bulletin, brain tumor, Camp Wabi, Captain Kids Program


October 22nd, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would   like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.  Thank you.

Editor, Karl OestreichAssistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Harvard Business Review
Getting Rid of “Never Events” in Hospitals
by Timothy Morgenthaler, M.D., chief patient safety officer at Mayo Clinic, and Charles Harper, M.D., executive dean for practice at Mayo Clinic

Harvard Business Review Logo… A number of techniques and process-improvement tools from inside and outside the industry have been brought to bear: lean engineering to simplify and standardize care, Crew Resource Management to improve teamwork, checklists to help teams focus and improve reliability, and so on. Human factors science, which studies the relationship between human beings and systems in order to improve efficiency, safety, and effectiveness is now being applied broadly in health care in everything from information management to the design of operating rooms.

Reach: Harvard Business Review – Online provides editorial content designed to complement the coverage found in its parent print publication, which focuses on business management. The site receives more than 232,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: Timothy Morgenthaler, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine physician who also practices in Mayo Clinic's Center for Sleep Medicine. Intrinsic in Dr. Morgenthaler's  work in his role as chief safety officer is developing the capability to measure important components of patient safety, such as preventable harm, aggregated near-miss analysis, and relationship between risk conditions and serious harm events. Charles (Michel) Harper, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist who also serves as executive dean for practice at Mayo Clinic. In his role as chair of Mayo Clinic's Clinical Practice Committee, Dr. Harper and the committee's key role in not only sharing, but implementing best practices and outcomes across sites.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

NPR
Forget Last Year's Hiccups, Go Get Your Flu Shot
by Pattie Neighmond

Last year, public health officials were taken by surprise when new strains of the flu virus appeared. Not so this year and they advise everyone six nprmonths or older to get vaccinated against the flu…For scientists, every year presents a new challenge to predict exactly which strains of the flu will be powerful enough to make people sick. Pritish Tosh is an infectious disease doctor and researcher at the Mayo Clinic. He says there are dozens of different flu strains.

Reach: National Public Radio, NPR,  creates and distributes news, information, and music programming to a network of 975 independent stations and reaches 26 million listeners every week.

Context: Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist Pritish Tosh, M.D. says,"There’s a lot of research going on looking at some of these other options, in terms of our target for the influenza vaccine." Dr. Tosh, who is also a member of the Vaccine Research Group at Mayo Clinic, says the new avenues of investigation are definitely needed. However, he cautions, the single flu vaccine has only been tested in animals and is not yet available. So, he urges everyone to get immunized with the safe and proven vaccines that we already have. "Influenza is a real killer. It kills tens of thousands of Americans each year, either directly or through its complications. And we really only have one great way in terms of prevention and that is with [the current] influenza vaccine." More information, including a video interview with Dr. Tosh, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

US News & World Report
Improving Hospital Quality and Reducing Costs
by Kimberly Leonard

… Sunday at the U.S. News Hospital of Tomorrow conference in the nation's capital, hospital executives discussed how the act has changed the way they do business and deliver care. They discussed the impacts of innovation, coverage and how to reduceUS News Health Logo waste in the system.  Dr. John Noseworthy, president and CEO for the Mayo Clinic, opened the conference with a keynote speech on "The Faces of High-Value Health Care: People and Processes." He highlighted a few ways the Mayo Clinic has better coordinated care, including the creation of "Ask Mayo Expert," which allows patients to avoid a trip to the hospital by allowing them to connect with a health care professional online.

Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Previous coverage in Mayo Clinic in the News

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Dr. Noseworthy was the U.S. News Hospital of Tomorrow keynote speaker.

Contacts: Traci Klein, Karl Oestreich 

 

RobbReport
The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program Pampers Guests While Promoting Good Health
by Janice O’Leary

Can a wellness boot camp at a medical center feel like a luxury retreat? Upon entering the center where the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is headquartered, in Robb Report Health & Wellness LogoRochester, Minn., it is hard to remember that the building belongs to a medical center. Designed to maximize open space and sunlight, the architecture itself conveys a sense of health and well-being. Sun streams into stairwells, making them more appealing than the elevator. Seamless windows wrap around the fitness studios, so they have the feel of a luxury athletic club. The equipment in the strength-training area is top notch. This feels like the perfect place to hit reset.

Reach: The Robb Report publishes it's Health & Wellness publication quarterly. The magazine targets affluent individuals interested in health and wellness topics. The Robb Report Online has more than 648,900 unique visitor to its site each month.

Additional coverage in The Robb Report:

Robb Report — The Truth About Organic Food Labeling [Q&A] 

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

WQOW Eau Claire
Car Control Class prepares teens for emergency driving situations

Instructors said giving teens the practice they need for keeping control in emergencies is key. "The bigger crash comes from someone panicking or over-correcting orWQOW TV Logo overreacting, and if you have not felt those things with the car, what the car can do, you're likely to panic and overreact," Dr. Lee Mayer, Mayo Clinic Health Systems Orthopedic Surgeon said. Mayer played a key role in starting the Car Control Classes eight years ago.

Context: The car control classes held at Chippewa Valley Technical College & sponsored by Mayo Clinic Health System.

Reach: WQOW is an ABC affiliate serving the Eau Claire, Wis. area.

Contact: Kristin Everett

 

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Tags: 'Pregnancy Blues', ‘Women Rock’ event, "Feel the Beat", A.L.S., ABC15 Ariz., ABC15 Arizona, ACS mammography guidelines, addiction psychiatry, adenoma detection, ADHD, advisory board, Affordable care act


January 15th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

TODAY
A walk a day may keep early death away
by Bill Briggs

…An adult with a BMI of 30 or higher is considered obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. An adult Today Show Healthwith a BMI between 25 and 29.9 is considered overweight. "This study adds to the mounting evidence that movement and activity makes a difference in your health, even if you are not at your ideal weight," said Dr. Edward Laskowski, a professor in the department of physical medicine and rehabilitation at the Mayo Clinic, and co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center.

Reach: The TODAY Show reaches an average daily audience of 4.25 million viewers each week. Today Health is the online portal of the Today Show.

Context: Edward Laskowski, M.D., co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

HealthDay
Study Says Biopsies Are Safe
by Robert Preidt

Cancer biopsies do not cause the disease to spread, says a new study that dispels a common myth. "This study shows that physicians and patients should feel reassured that a biopsy is very safe," said study senior investigator Dr. Michael Wallace, aHealth Day Logo gastroenterologist and professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Vancouver Desi, Science Daily, Science Codex, Medical Xpress, HON.ch, Houston Northwest Medical Center, Noticia al Dia, Oncology Nurse Advisor, Stone Hearth News, Science Newsline, HealthCanal, Transplant Views, Dallas Sun, Winnipeg Free Press, Science Blog, Examiner Toronto

Context:  A study of more than 2,000 patients by researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville, Florida, has dispelled the myth that cancer biopsies cause cancer to spread. In the Jan. 9 online issue of Gut, they show that patients who received a biopsy had a better outcome and longer survival than patients who did not have a biopsy. The researchers studied pancreatic cancer, but the findings likely apply to other cancers because diagnostic technique used in this study — fine needle aspiration — is commonly used across tumor types, says the study’s senior investigator and gastroenterologist Michael Wallace, M.D., M.P.H., professor of medicine. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

WEAU Eau Claire
Half Moon Dragon Boat Festival in Eau Claire to benefit hospice
How do you tame a dragon? You can't do it without a paddle. At least, that's according to Mayo Clinic Health System. The Half WEAU Eau Claire LogoMoon Dragon Boat Festival is coming to Eau Claire on Saturday, August 8th, 2015 at Half Moon Beach. Proceeds will help families dealing with the loss of loved ones through hospice care.… John Dickey is the Chief Administrative Officer of Mayo Clinic Health System's northwest region. He said the event will raise awareness of hospice care for people in the final stages of life.

Reach: WEAU-TV is the NBC affiliate for much of western Wisconsin, including Eau Claire and La Crosse.

Additional coverage:WQOW Eau ClaireHospice care to benefit from dragon boat races
held in Eau Claire

Eau Claire Leader-Telegram, Health system plans boat festival to raise funds for bereavement services

Context: Mayo Clinic Health System is sponsoring its inaugural Half Moon Dragon Boat Festival on Saturday, Aug. 8, to raise awareness for hospice care for people at the end of their life. Funds raised will support a bereavement program for families and all community members following the loss of a loved one. For more information, visit mayoclinichealthsystem.org/halfmoondragon.

Public Affairs Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

KPHO Phoenix
Free help offered to free yourself from cancer by Juan Magana. The Mayo Clinic wrapped up a weekend-long event in north Phoenix to help patients and family members, who are currently fighting cancer or have been cured, deal with the emotional rollercoaster. The Living With and Overcoming My Cancer CBS5AZ-KPHOSymposium brought out cancer experts to answer questions people had. "We're thrilled to put this on and to give them a sense of community," said Dr. Ruben Mesa, the director of the Mayo Cancer Clinic. "

Reach: KPHO-5 is the CBS affiliate in Phoenix and is owned by Meredith Corporation.

Additional coverage: WBRC Alabama

Context: Ruben Mesa, M.D., is a chair of Hematology/Oncology at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center is a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center with a multisite presence. Its three campuses — in Scottsdale, Ariz., Jacksonville, Fla., and Rochester, Minn. — give the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center a broad geographic reach, enabling it to serve diverse patient populations around the world.  Eunice Nishimura is a Mayo Clinic patient and is a a stage 4 lung cancer survivor. You can read more about her cancer journey on Sharing Mayo Clinic.

Public Affairs Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
New CEO for Mayo Clinic Health System in Waycross by Colleen Michele Jones

Mayo Clinic has named Dr. John Presutti as chief executive officer of Mayo Clinic Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logoHealth System in Waycross, effective March 2, 2015. Presutti succeeds Kenneth Calamia, who will retire from Mayo Clinic at the end of 2015.

Reach: The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Context: Mayo Clinic has named John Presutti, D.O., as chief executive officer of Mayo Clinic Health System in Waycross (Georgia), effective March 2, 2015. Dr. Presutti succeeds Kenneth Calamia, M.D., who will retire from Mayo Clinic at the end of 2015. “Dr. Presutti is a wonderfully gifted and proven physician leader,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., chief executive officer of Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville, Florida. “He brings energy and passion to his work and is committed to building upon Dr. Calamia’s successful leadership and involvement in the Waycross community.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Yahoo! Health
Got The Flu? Here's When To Head To The ER… It’s important to be aware of what can happen if an illness progresses, according to a new overview in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. In the piece, senior author Steve Peters, M.D., a pulmonary and critical care doctor at the Mayo Clinic, says that deadlyYahoo Health Logo sepsis is a very real risk in infections such as the flu. We caught up with him for a download on sepsis and other common flu complications — and when to get yourself or a loved one to the ER, stat.

Reach: Yahoo! reaches more than a half a billion across devices and around the globe. According to news sources roughly 700 million people visit Yahoo websites every month.

Context: Sepsis can be a dangerous complication of almost any type of infection, including influenza, pneumonia and food poisoningurinary tract infections; bloodstream infections from wounds; and abdominal infections. Steve Peters, M.D., a pulmonary and critical care physician at Mayo Clinic and senior author of a recent sepsis overview in the medical journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, explains sepsis symptoms and risk factors, the difference between severe sepsis and septic shock, and how sepsis is typically treated. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

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Tags: 2014 Mankato Meltdown, 26.2 with Donna Marathon, 4029 TV, 5 KJZZ, ABC News, ABC15 Phoenix, Acento Veintiuno, advisory board, aging, American College of Cardiology, American Spectator, Anesthesia News


December 18th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

This will be our last installment of our weekly highlights in 2014. We'll be back in early January 2015. Happy Holidays.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

NY Times
Ask Well: Why Do My Knees Make Noise When I Squat?
By Anahad O’Connor

That noise coming from your knees can be unnerving. But unless it is accompanied by pain, discomfort or swelling, there is no need to worry about it, New York Times Well Blogsaid Dr. Michael Stuart, a professor of orthopedic surgery and co-director of sports medicine at the Mayo Clinic.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Context:  Michael Stuart, M.D. is co-director, Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

MPR
John Noseworthy on the future of Mayo Clinic, health care

John Noseworthy, president and CEO of Mayo Clinic, joins The Daily Circuit to talk about the future of Mayo, the future of health care and how the two MPR Daily Circuit Logointersect.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Other Coverage with Dr. Noseworthy:

Dalhousie University
John Noseworthy (MD’75, PGM’78): Digital Doctoring
by Mark Campbell

Dalhousie University AlumniIn 2007, Mayo Clinic approached Dr. John Noseworthy (MD’75, PGM’78), then medical director of its Department of Development, and a team of leaders with a question: what would the world’s largest, integrated, nonprofit medical group look like in the year 2020? “We spent almost a year looking into that,” recalls Dr. Noseworthy. “We came back and said Mayo Clinic is known for caring for the sick face-to-face – for patients coming to us. As we enter a digital world, how are we going to extend our reach to serve people who do not need, or cannot come, to see us?”

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contacts: Duska Anastasijevic, Karl Oestreich

 

MPR
Mayo Clinic expansion plan is a vision for urban and walkable development
by Liz Baier

When planners of Minnesota's largest economic development project unveil a final draft this afternoon of the city's massive expansion project, they will present a new vision for downtown city life. The $6 billion Destination Medical Center aims to make Rochester a global health care hub. But it alsoMPR News Logo would make big changes to the city, among them.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Related Coverage:
KAAL, DMC Plans for Downtown Rochester Unveiled

KSTP, KAAL, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal

Context: The development plan proposed at the DMCC Board meeting  Dec. 17 is a BIG PLAN (694 pages) in support of a bold vision. And what everyone wants to know is: What’s going to happen and how much will it cost? More information can be found on the DMC blog.

Public Affairs Contact: Jamie Rothe

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
Attorney Christina Zorn appointed Mayo Florida chief administrative officer
by John Burr

Mayo Clinic has appointed an attorney,Christina Zorn, as chief administrative officer and vice chair of administration at Mayo's Jacksonville campus. Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logoShe will serve as administrative partner to Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., the incoming vice president of Mayo Clinic and CEO of the Jacksonville campus, according to a news release. Zorn begins work Jan. 1.

Reach: The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Additional coverage: Florida Times-Union

Related Coverage:Jacksonville Business Journal, 2014's retirement of the year: Bill Rupp by Colleen Jones. Mayo Clinic will have a new leader to start the new year. Bill Rupp, who has led the institution's Jacksonville campus since 2008, announced in August that he will retire from his post as vice president and CEO Dec. 31.

Context: Mayo Clinic recently appointed Christina Zorn, J.D., as chief administrative officer of its campus in Jacksonville, Fla., and vice chair of Administration, Mayo Clinic. She will serve as administrative partner to Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., incoming vice president of Mayo Clinic and chief executive officer of the Jacksonville campus, as previously announced. Zorn assumes her new role on Jan. 1. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

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Tags: 2014 William L. McGuire Memorial Lecture Award, 3D-printed implants, ABC News, ABC13 Ohio, ABC15 Ariz., advisory board, Albany Enterprise, Albert Lea Tribune, Allyn Mahowald, alzheimer's disease, AP, Arizona Republic


October 9th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Reuters TV
Scrambling away pain for cancer patients

Researchers are testing a device called the Scrambler which ''re-trains'' the brain to alleviate chronic pain caused by chemotherapy Reuters VIdeo logotreatment… Dr. Charles Loprinzi of the Mayo Clinic says peripheral neuropathy occurs when the brain sends pain signals to damaged nerves in a constant cycle.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world news, business newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile, and interactive television platforms.

Context: Charles Loprinzi, M.D., is the Regis Professor of Breast Cancer Research and a Mayo Clinic medical oncologist.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Huffington Post
Your Perpetually Stuffed Nose Is Just Your Body Fighting The Good Fight
by Sarah Klein

…When we're sick, our bodies get busy fighting off the infection -- and some of that fighting manifests as the very symptoms we associate witHuff Post Health and Fitness Logoh our maladies. "Some part of why we feel sick when we have an infection is actually the body's immune response," says Mayo Clinic infectious diseases physician and researcher Pritish Tosh, M.D.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique viewers.

Context: Pritish Tosh, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases expert.

Public Affairs Contact: Alyson Gonzalez

 

Star Tribune
Medica makes MNsure play in Rochester
by Christopher Snowbeck

Medica is launching a new health insurance plan in the Rochester area that offers lower premiums if people primarily get their health care from the Mayo Clinic. For years, insurers have blamed high costs at Mayo for above-average insurance premiums across southeastern Minnesota, but Medica says good care Star Tribune Business section logocoordination by Mayo doctors will let the insurer charge less for the new product, called “Medica With Mayo Clinic.” “Premiums long have been higher in the Rochester area, and that’s really been driven by the providers in that area,” said Dannette Coleman, a senior vice president with Medica.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

Modern Healthcare, Narrow network plan with Mayo to debut on Minnesota exchange by Bob Herman, Health insurer Medica is rolling out a new narrow-network plan in Minnesota, an increasingly common option, and Mayo Clinic will be the enticement to draw in potential enrollees. The plan, which will be offered both off and on Minnesota's exchange established by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, will include only specific providers in southern Minnesota. But the insurer said monthly premiums and copayments will be affordable for those who choose the plan.

MinnPost, Northfield News, Post-Bulletin, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal, Republican EagleCNBC, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal, KTTC, MPR 

Context: Medica and Mayo Clinic today announced a new health plan for individuals and families in southern Minnesota that comes at a lower cost than other available options. The plan, Medica with Mayo Clinic, is available for a January 1, 2015, effective date and can be purchased both on and off MNSure, Minnesota’s public health insurance exchange.  This health plan expands options for consumers seeking Mayo Clinic care in Rochester and throughout southern Minnesota at a lower cost than other available options and at the lowest price in southeast Minnesota on the MNsure exchange. More information can be found in the news release.

Public Affairs Contact: Adam Brase

 

KSTP
INTERVIEW: Making Strides Against Breast Cancer
by Cassie Hart

… Just two months ago a new law went into effect in Minnesota to bring those numbers down. Doctors are KSTP-TV Eyewitness News Lognow required to notify women if they have dense breast tissue. Mayo Clinic Dr. Sandhya Pruthi, a lead breast cancer researcher, stopped by KSTP to talk more about it. Meanwhile, this weekend more than 1,000 people will join together to walk in the fight against breast cancer.

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Context: October is Breast Cancer Awareness MonthSandhya Pruthi, M.D. is the principal investigator at Mayo Clinic for several nationwide multicenter breast cancer chemoprevention trials; these are interdisciplinary efforts with the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. She is also actively involved in cancer education for both patients and health care providers.

Public Affairs Contact: Joe Dangor

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