Items Tagged ‘Affordable care act’

January 27th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik


CBS News
Healthcare providers on how healthcare may change under Trump

The CEOs of the Mayo Clinic, Cleveland Clinic and New York-Presbyterian Hospital sat down with CBS News at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. They offered their thoughts on how healthcare may change in the incoming Trump administration.CBS News Logo

Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

Related coverage in the January 20, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Star Tribune
Aging boomers, lack of funding for Alzheimer's may lead to 'major social and economic crisis'
by Allie Shah

Do we cure cancer, heart disease or diabetes? No, but we can make significant progress," said Dr. Ron Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Star Tribune newspaper logoAlzheimer's disease Research Center. "So if I'm destined to develop Alzheimer's disease-related changes in the brain at age 75, and I can push that to age 78 or 80, that's a big deal. That's why I say delaying onset and slowing progression is a more realistic goal than a cure." Petersen will participate in a panel discussion, hosted by TPT Tuesday, on the state of Alzheimer's disease in Minnesota. The event is sold out.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

NPR
Athlete-Turned-Trucker Works To Improve Truckers' Health
by Alex Smith

On a chilly winter morning, dozens of truck driver trainees file into a classroom at the headquarters of Prime Inc., a trucking company based in Springfield, Mo. At the front is Siphiwe Baleka, an energetic former swimming champion in his mid-40s. He delivers grim news about trucker
health to the new recruits. "If you haven't started to think about this, you need to start right now," Baleka says. ..The relatively small lifestyle changes that Baleka promotes could be enough to make a life-changing difference in the health of many truck drivers, says Dr. Clayton Cowl, chief of preventive, occupational and aerospace medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. "The drivers themselves — they don't need to be running marathons, necessarily," Cowl says.

Reach: Shots is the online channel for health stories from the NPR Science Desk.

Context:  Clayton Cowl, M.D. heads Mayo Clinic's preventive, occupational and aerospace medicine. The division consists of 22 physicians who have specialty training in internal medicine or family practice and a team of trained occupational health nurses. Several of our physicians are board-certified in preventive, occupational and/or aerospace medicine. Mayo Clinic's integrated group practice model makes consultation with any other medical specialists readily available.

Contact:  Kelly Reller

 

Star Tribune
Filmmaker Ken Burns on Mayo Clinic: 'One of the most amazing medical places on Earth'
by Neal Justin

Ever since a Mayo Clinic newsletter mentioned this past October that Ken Burns' production company was spending time on the Rochester Star Tribune newspaper logocampus for an upcoming documentary, details have been sketchy…On a website for the Better Angels Society, the foundation that supports Burns' work and raises funds for them, it categorizes "The Mayo Clinic" under "Ken Burns Presents: The Next Generation," a division dedicated to a new generation of filmmakers with their boss lending his reputation and guidance as an executive producer.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: City Pages

Context:  To learn more about the Ken Burns' film, check out this story in Mayo Clinic in the Loop.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

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Tags: ABC News, Affordable care act, ALN magazine, alzheimers, Apple, apps, Associated Press, Becker’s Hospital Review, blisters, Boston Scientific, Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer News


January 6th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik


Reuters

‘Hidden’ celiac disease less common now in U.S.
by Shereen Lehman

Fewer people in the U.S. have celiac disease without realizing it, a new study finds. The actual proportion of people with celiac disease in the United States has not changed since 2009, researchers say. “The total prevalence is stable,” Dr. Joseph Murray told Reuters Health in a phone interview. But there are fewer people walking around with “hidden” celiac disease. “When you look at the proportion that are diagnosedReuters Logo versus undiagnosed, that's gone up dramatically. Go back six years and most patients were undiagnosed, with only about one in five getting diagnosed,” said Murray, a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota who was part of the study team.

Reach: Reuters has 196 editorial bureaus in 130 countries and 2,400 editorial staff members and covers international news, regional news, politics, social issues, health, business, sports and media.

Context: Joseph Murray, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist. Dr. Murray's research interests focus in two distinct areas: celiac disease and esophageal disorders. To learn more about celiac disease, check out this Mayo Clinic radio interview with Dr. Murray.

Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Joe Dangor

 

Today.com
The real brain food could be fresh veggies and olive oil, study finds
by Maggie Fox

People got points for light to moderate drinking — in this case about a third of drink a day to no more than three drinks a day on average for men and two for women. Dr. David Knopman, a professor of neurology TODAY Showat the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota who was not involved in the study, said this could translate to real-life benefits. “Loss of brain volume is an inevitable part of the aging process,” Knopman told NBC News. “A bigger brain is in general better for you because at least in late life, it makes a person more resistant to the effects of brain diseases,” he added.

Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show.

Context: David Knopman, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist.  Dr. Knopman is involved in research in late-life cognitive disorders, such as mild cognitive impairment and dementia. Dr. Knopman's specific interests are in the very early stages of Alzheimer's disease, in cognitive impairment due to stroke (cerebrovascular disease) and in cognitive impairment due to frontotemporal degeneration.

Contacts: Susan Barber Lindquist, Traci Klein

 

Post-Bulletin
Brewer has FAITH in Rochester
by Brett Boese

When Mayo Clinic Dr. LaPrincess Brewer took the stage last month in Charlotte, N.C., Jackie Johnson couldn't help beaming with pride. Johnson, a vocal advocate within Rochester's Black community, hasn't stopped singing Brewer's praises as the Brewer's success has resonated across the country, even as it flies under the radar locally. Brewer's FAITH program, an acronym for Fostering African-AmericanLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaper Improvement in Total Health, was among the featured attractions at the 28th annual Healthy Churches 2020 National Conference that was held in her hometown. Its initial success in Baltimore and the ensuing impact in Minnesota since Brewer arrived at Mayo in 2013 has prompted significant accolades for the charismatic 35-year-old cardiologist.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context: LaPrincess Brewer, M.D., M.P.H., has a primary research focus in developing strategies to reduce and ultimately eliminate cardiovascular disease health disparities in racial and ethnic minority populations and in underserved communities through health promotion and community-based participatory research. Dr. Brewer also has special interest in increasing minority and women's participation in cardiovascular clinical trials through mobile health (mHealth) interventions. Additionally, she has published work on faith-based interventions for cardiovascular disease prevention, racial differences in weight maintenance and psychosocial factors influencing cardiac risk factors.

Contact: Ethan Grove

 

ABC News
US News and World Report Releases List of Best Diets
by Gillian Mohney

Every year many Americans make a New Year's resolution to lose weight, but finding ways to drop pounds and keep them off is difficult. Today, U.S. News and World Report released its annual list of the best diets, ABC News logoaccording to nutrition and medical experts. The diets were chosen by a panel of nutritionists, dietary consultants, physicians and other experts convened by U.S News and World Report. Mayo Clinic Diet: This diet is broken into two parts. The first part requires no calorie counting, but dieters are stuck with meals made up of healthy foods including whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and healthy fats, as well as at least 30 minutes of physical activity a day.

Reach: ABC News Online has more than 28.8 million unique visitors to its site each month. ABC’s World News Tonight with David Muir averages about 9.2 million viewers each night.

Additional coverage:
HealthDay, Plant-Based Diets Score Big for Healthy Weight Loss
WATE6 Knoxville, U.S. News and World Report ranks top diets
FOX News, US News ranks best diet plans for 2017
Atlanta Journal-ConstitutionWant to lose weight? Experts say these are the best diets of 2017
FOX4 Dallas, Lose weight faster by tracking habits

Context:  As the second edition of The Mayo Clinic Diet hits store shelves, the diet plan has been named Best Commercial Diet by U.S. News & World Report.  “We are honored to be recognized for a weight-loss method that offers lasting results,” says Donald Hensrud, M.D., medical editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet and director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. Learn more about the Mayo Clinic by watching this Mayo Clinic Minute or read more about it on Mayo Clinic Network. “The Mayo Clinic Diet is much more than a diet,” Dr. Hensrud says. “It’s a lifestyle program in which people can eat great-tasting food and feel better right away ─ even while they lose weight. More importantly, these lifestyle changes are sustainable and can improve long-term health as people reach and maintain a healthy weight.”

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

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Tags: ABC News, Affordable care act, Albert Lea Tribune, alternative medicine, anxiety, arthritis, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Attn:, Baltimore Sun, Becker’s Hospital Review, Beloit Daily News, Billings Gazette


December 23rd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. This will be our last edition of 2016.  Look for us again on January 6, 2017. Thank you and happy holidays.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Los Angeles Times
A senior-friendly workout to improve movement and prevent injury

Jogging outdoors, running on a treadmill or lifting weights at the gym aren’t always practical — or enjoyable — activities for everyone. However, one type of exercise works for everyone, no matter your age or ability, because it relies on improving practical movements often involved inLogo for Los Angeles Times newspaper everyday activities. “Natural movement is universal, and it’s about bringing movement back to the basics,” says Bradly Prigge, wellness exercise specialist with the Mayo Clinic’s Healthy Living Program. “It’s not about following the latest fitness craze or learning the newest secret to weight loss. Natural movement is about connecting with your body and cultivating an awareness of your full abilities.”

Reach:  The Los Angeles Times has a daily readership of 1.9 million and 2.9 million on Sunday, more than 8 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.5 million. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 128 years.

Additional coverage: Mountain Grove News-Journal

Other recent coverage in the Los Angeles Times related to Mayo Clinic's Healthy Living Program

Cosmopolitan, Do You Really Need to Take Vitamins?
WTOP Washington, Mayo Clinic expert: 4 actions for a healthy holiday season
Yahoo! News, 9 Ways to Boost Your Immune System by Michael O Schroeder
WEAU Eau ClaireTODAY INTERVIEW: Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Recipes

Previous coverage related to Mayo Clinic's Healthy Living program in the December 2, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life.

Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Joe Dangor

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic in Rochester adds customized plane to air fleet

The Mayo Clinic in Rochester has unveiled a customized $8.5 million airplane to transport high-risk patients to its facilities. The fixed-wing aircraft adds to the Mayo One fleet that was created in 1984. The program began with a single helicopter based in Rochester and now boasts four — two in Rochester, one in Mankato and one in Eau Claire, Wisconsin.Star Tribune newspaper logo

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: KSTP, Becker’s Hospital Review, KIMT

Context: While a certain red sled usually owns the flight-related headlines this month, Santa's sleigh isn't the only one getting press this December. Several news outlets, it seems, are reporting on another vehicle taking flight. But instead of delivering toys to good girls and boys, the new Mayo One airplane delivers patients in need of immediate, advanced care to Mayo Clinic. And like Santa's ride, this one also has some pretty unique features, and the equipment, medication and staff to make it function as a sky-high Emergency Department. You can read more about the new Mayo one airplane in Mayo Clinic in the Loop.

Contact:  Glenn Lyden

 

KIMT
St. Mary’s nurse returns to work after hiking accident
by DeeDee Stiepan

It’s an incredible story of survival that we first brought you in May when a St. Mary’s nurse fell 100ft while hiking in Arizona. Amber Kohnhorst spent 24 hours in extreme pain, without food or water until she was KIMT LOGOrescued by helicopter. Now, the 25-year old is back in Rochester, and it’s been quite some time since she was working as a Registered Nurse on the 5th floor at St. Mary’s Hospital. “My last shift was Friday May 13th, she tells us. “I’ve never really believed in Friday the 13th but now it kind of freaks me out.”

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Previous coverage in December 2, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Amber Kohnhorst loves animals and adventure. The trip she'd planned to Best Friends Animal Sanctuary in Utah promised both. She'd spend time volunteering at the shelter and do some hiking in nearby Cane Beds, Arizona. But what sounded like a perfect vacation quickly became a nightmare when the 25-year-old Mayo Clinic nurse fell 100 feet down a cliff during what was supposed to be a short hike. You can read more about Amber's story on Mayo Clinic In the Loop.

Contacts:  Ginger Plumbo, Kelly Reller

 

NBC News
Why Heart Attacks Are Striking Healthy Young Women
by Lauren Dunn and Parminder Deo

Researchers are discovering that SCAD heart attacks occur more frequently than once thought..."SCAD is a type of heart attack, but completely NBC News Logodifferent than the one we normally think of," says cardiologist Dr. Sharonne Hayes of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. "It's caused by a split or tear in an otherwise healthy artery that leads to a drop in blood flow to the heart leading to a heart attack."

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Context:  Sharonne Hayes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Hayes studies cardiovascular disease and prevention, with a focus on sex and gender differences and conditions that uniquely or predominantly affect women. With a clinical base in the Women's Heart Clinic, Dr. Hayes and her research team utilize novel recruitment methods, social media and online communities, DNA profiling, and sex-specific evaluations to better understand several cardiovascular conditions. A major area of focus is spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD), an uncommon and under-recognized cause of acute coronary syndrome (heart attack) that occurs predominantly in young women.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic sees innovation as key to the future

Mayo Clinic recognizes the historic changes taking place in the health care landscape. The health care provider has become famous for treating the whole patient by integrating various specialties of care. Now Mayo is going to be using its of health care innovation system as a model for generating revenue. Mayo-Jacksonville is setting aside spaces for innovators and is taking part in more collaborations.Florida Times-Union newspaper logo

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Charles Bruce, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist and serves as medical director of Mayo Clinic Ventures at Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville, Florida. James (Jim) Rogers is chair of Mayo's newly formed Business Development Department, which combines the functions of Mayo Clinic Ventures and the Office of Business Development. The new department will oversee Mayo's partnerships with external organizations, spearhead new business opportunities and support the advancement of medical technology in conjunction with Mayo Clinic leaders, entrepreneurs and inventors.

Contacts: Kevin Punsky, Duska Anastasijevic

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Tags: ABC15 Arizona, AccuWeather.com, advisory board, Affordable care act, Alatus, alcohol, Amber Kohnhorst, American Medical Association, anesthesia, Angie Murad, antibiotics, antidepressants


November 23rd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

STAT
Mayo leaders: A nine-fold path to preventing burnout

We’ve talked about burnout before, and it seems like lots of hospitals have ideas to combat it. Well, Mayo Clinic has some more ideas – nine of them, to be precise. In the issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings released today, Dr. Tait Shanafelt, director of Mayo’s Program on Physician Well-STAT Logo of Boston Globebeing, and Dr. John Noseworthy, Mayo’s CEO, say administrators can’t force doctors to fight this battle on their own. “Burnout is a system issue, and addressing it is the shared responsibility of both the individuals and health care organizations,” Shanafelt writes.

Reach: STAT covers the frontiers of health and medicine including science labs, hospitals, biotechnology board rooms, and political back rooms. Hosted by The Boston Globe, STAT launched on November 5, 2015. The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Additional coverage: News-Medical.net, Cardiovascular Business, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, FierceHealthcare

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic have been documenting the rise and costs of physician burnout for more than a decade. Now, they are proposing nine strategies that health care organizations can use to reverse the trend and limit the risk to patients and their medical staff. Tait Shanafelt, M.D., director of Mayo Clinic’s Program on Physician Well-being, and John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic, offer the nine-point plan in the current issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings“Research has shown that more than half of U.S. physicians are experiencing symptoms of burnout, and the rate is increasing,” says Dr. Shanafelt, first author of the article. “Unfortunately, many organizations see burnout as a personal problem to be addressed by the individual physician. It is clear, however, that burnout is a system issue, and addressing it is the shared responsibility of both the individuals and health care organizations.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Washington Post
A non-pill treatment for many chronic illnesses: Exercise

Exercise isn’t good only for building muscle and losing weight. “If a pill could give you all benefits of exercise, it would be the best pill around,” Washington Post newspaper logosays Edward Laskowski, co-director of Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine and a specialist in physical medicine and rehabilitation. Yet doctors underprescribe exercise, even though research shows that it can deliver comparable benefits to drugs and surgery with fewer side effects, according to a recent review in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. Here’s how to safely get the disease-fighting benefits of exercise…

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Edward Laskowski, M.D., co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center, a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, sports performance optimization, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Huffington Post
Why You Might Be Losing Your Sense of Taste As You Age
by Bill Ward

Our mouths perceive just five elements — sweet, sour, bitter, salt and umami (glutamate). They also can tell if there’s fat in food, said Dr. Erin O’Brien, a rhinologist in the Mayo Clinic’s Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Rochester, Minn. “As you chew food, the flavor is released andHuffington Post Logo you smell it through the back of the nose,” O’Brien said. “If you’re eating strawberry ice cream, your tongue will tell you it’s sweet, but it won’t know the flavor. The nose tells you it’s strawberry. That’s the difference between taste and flavor.”

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique viewers.

Context: Erin O'Brien, M.D, is a Mayo Clinic otorhinolaryngology (ENT). The Department of Otorhinolaryngology (ear, nose and throat or ENT) at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota provides a full range of medical and surgical services for pediatric and adult patients with head and neck disorders and diseases.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

FirstCoastNews
A day in the life of a cancer survivor; Judi Zitiello
by Keitha Nelson-Williams

Eighty-five percent of people diagnosed with pancreatic cancer will die with-in six months. Judi Zitiello was diagnosed in 2014, and she's still First Coast News Logoliving to this day. But every three months, as she goes to the Mayo Clinic for a CT scan, life stands still for the mother of four and grandmother of seven with one on the way…FCN sat down with Dr. Pashtoon Kasi, M.D. Assistant Professor, GI Oncology at the Mayo Clinic to discuss the lethal cancer and why there are so few survivors. "The tumor itself it's a pretty unforgiving disease," said Kasi. "Unlike some of the other tumors this causes a lot of dense fibrous tissue around it. So a lot of the drugs are not able to get to it."

Reach: First Coast News refers to two television stations in Jacksonville, Florida. WJXX, the ABC affiliate and WTLV, the NBC affiliate.

Context: Pashtoon Kasi, M.B.B.S. is a Mayo Clinic oncologist and hematologist. An avid runner, Judi Zitiello, 66, was forced into a six-week hiatus when she developed a meniscus tear in early 2014. The retired financial executive was always active – exercising, hosting dinner parties, and volunteering to run the JT Townsend Foundation, a Jacksonville, Florida, philanthropic organization. Judi wasn’t too concerned about the downtime at first. She knew her body would take time to heal. But the pain lingered. Then Judi began losing weight and her energy waned. "I didn't have the energy to get off the couch. I didn’t feel well. I was just not myself," Judi recalls. Still, she thought it must be related to her knee injury. But when she began experiencing severe itching on her arms and torso, and her stool turned a clay color, Judi knew it was time to see someone other than the physical therapist. Little did she realize she would be starting a fight against pancreatic cancer. You can read more about Judi's story on Sharing Mayo Clinic and Mayo Clinic in the Loop.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

Arizona Republic
Ask a Doc: Making surgery safer for high-risk bleeders

Question: What research is underway to help those at high risk for bleeding during medical procedures? Answer: As Arizona Republic newspaper logoa vascular interventional radiologist at Mayo Clinic, I treat patients with a wide range of vascular diseases and disorders. When I’m not performing procedures, I’m in the lab researching ways to improve current therapies, making the experience even safer and more effective for our patients, especially those who are at high risk for bleeding… — Dr. Rahmi Oklu

Reach: The Arizona Republic has daily circulation of more than 180,000 and its website azcentral.com has more than 2.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic, Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are developing a biomaterial that has potential to protect patients at high risk for bleeding in surgery. The Nov. 16 cover article, “An Injectable Shear-Thinning Biomaterial for Endovascular Embolization,” in the journal Science Translational Medicine reports on a universal shear-thinning biomaterial that may provide an alternative for treating vascular bleeding. The study’s lead co-author Rahmi Oklu, M.D., Ph.D., a vascular interventional radiologist at Mayo Clinic’s Arizona campus, explains shear-thinning biomaterial offers many advantages over metallic coils, the current gold standard. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

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Tags: ABC15 Arizona, acupuncture, Affordable care act, aging, alcohol, Alzforum, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers, Aneurysm, Arizona Republic, Becker’s Hospital Review, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine


November 18th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Washington Post
The one thing missing from the debate over Obamacare, according to a top doctor
by Carolyn Y. Johnson

President-elect Donald Trump’s promise to repeal the Affordable Care Act while preserving some key elements has triggered rampant speculation about the future of American health care — and plunged millions of patients who benefit from the law into deep uncertainty aboutWashington Post newspaper logo the future of their coverage. Little is known about the replacement plan that will ultimately emerge. But one voice angling to shape future policy is the leader of the Mayo Clinic, neurologist John Noseworthy. “Patients are getting frustrated and fearful and anxious that they can’t have access to the care that’s best suited for them,” Noseworthy said. “How can you have a great country if our citizens can’t get access to world class health care? It’s actually not a bad time to reassess.”

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Albuquerque Journal, The Journal

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Forbes
Are Naproxen and Ibuprofen Sometimes Risky? A Controversial Study Of Celebrex Raises Concerns
by Matthew Herper

A study released today may mean that the painkiller celecoxib, once sold under the brand name Celebrex, is safer than prescription doses of Forbes Pharma and Healthcare logoibuprofen or naproxen. That is if the study, which is already controversial, means anything at all. … “It’s fascinating that Celebrex is not worse, and may have a small trend to being better,” says Rekha Mankad, director of the cardio-rheumatology clinic at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester. “I as a cardiologist I would prefer that nobody take any of these drugs on a long-term basis ever.” Still she says, it’s better for patients to get non-steroidal drugs like these than opioids, which are often the next option.

Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: CBS News

Context: Rekha Mankad, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Mankad's interests include gender disparities that exist in regards to heart disease, the relationship between autoimmune diseases and coronary artery disease and gender differences in valvular heart disease.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

CNN
Crawling has some fitness experts going gaga
by Jacqueline Howard

On any given morning, as the sun peeks over the horizon, Danielle Johnson can be found crawling down the hallways of her Rochester, CNN LogoMinnesota, home. It may sound bizarre, but Johnson crawls every day to strengthen her core muscle groups. "You can crawl in many ways. You can crawl on your hands and knees. You can also prop up on your toes and just hover, one or two inches above the ground, which is really going to pull in those core muscles and work those muscles effectively," said Johnson, a physical therapist at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program.

Reach: Cable News Network (CNN) is a worldwide news and information network providing live, continuous coverage of news from around the globe, 24 hours a day. CNN online received more than 55 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Huffington Post
A Culture of Legacy
by Marcia McMullen

The recent passing of a cultural icon in health care revealed a rare glimpse into how a successful 150-year-old brand built on a clear mission and Huffington Post Logoexacting processes which ultimately became its culture. Dr. William J. Mayo’s clarity of mission, “The needs of the patient come first.” set into a motion a defining statement that would withstand not only time, but also cultural shifts and leadership changes. One of those change leaders, Sr. Generose Gervais, OSF, administrator and executive director emeritus, Saint Marys Campus-Mayo Clinic Hospital, recently passed away at the age of 97.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique visitors.

Previous coverage in the October 21, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Sister Generose Gervais, long-time administrator of Saint Marys Hospital and president of the Poverello Foundation, passed away peacefully recently in the hospital she served for many years. She was 97. Sister Generose will be remembered for her tireless work on behalf of patients and the staff of Saint Marys Hospital. Her hospital ministry focused on perpetuating the Franciscan legacy, specifically nurturing the values of respect, integrity, compassion, healing, teamwork, innovation, excellence and stewardship among all Mayo Clinic staff. “Sister Generose was known for her faith, her quiet leadership, her wise counsel, her dedication to patients and staff, her sense of humor and the example of service that she lived every day,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic. “Mayo Clinic was blessed by her presence for more than 60 years.” More information about Sister Generose can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network and Mayo Clinic in the Loop.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

New York Times
Q&A: A look at the cancer some believe linked to Vietnam War

…Bile duct cancer is unusual because it can be prevented in some cases. Pills can wipe out liver flukes early on, but the medicine is not effective in later stages after the worms have died and scarring has occurred. Surgery is possible in some cases, but the survivalThe New York Times newspaper logo rate is only about 30 percent for five years, said Dr. Gregory Gores, a gastroenterologist and executive dean of research at Mayo Clinic. Affected countries, such as Vietnam and Laos, have not conducted extensive research to determine the extent of the problem. The world’s highest rate of cholangiocarcinoma — about 84 new cases per 100,000 people — is found in northeastern Thailand where many people eat a popular raw fish dish.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Additional coverage: WTOP Washington, Star Tribune, Associated Press

Context: Gregory Gores, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist.  Dr. Gores research is focused on mechanisms of liver cell death, especially apoptosis. He employs disease-relevant models to unravel the fundamental cellular processes contributing to liver injury during cholestasis and fatty liver diseases. In addition, Dr. Gores' lab is also interested in the mechanisms by which cancer cells escape from cell death in order to undergo malignant transformation and metastases.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

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Tags: ABC News, Affordable care act, aging, Albuquerque Journal, AliveCor, alzheimer's disease, Angela Lunde, Arizona Daily Sun, Associated Press, Attn:, AZ Big Media, Baltimore Sun


July 15th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik


Today.com
12-year-old boy finally goes home — with a new heart
by Gabrielle Frank

For three years, the Panama native had suffered from dilated cardiomyopathy, a condition that affects the heart's ability to pump blood. Gonzalez-Salas received his new heart last July, but because transplant surgeries are not done in Panama, doctors at the Mayo Clinic requestedToday Show Health & Wellness Logo he and his parents stay in Rochester, Minnesota for a year…"Speaking for our surgeons, cardiologists, nurses, and the whole care team, it has been an honor to care for Joseph and his family over the last two years," said Dr. Jonathan Johnson, Gonzalez-Salas' pediatric cardiologist.

Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show.

Previous Coverage in July 8, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Jonathan Johnson, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic pediatric cardiologist and hear transplant surgeon. Dr. Johnson's research encompasses several different areas of pediatric cardiology. Dr. Johnson's primary focus is researching clinical outcomes in pediatric patients with congenital heart disease, as well as those with cardiomyopathy or heart failure, or those who have required heart transplantation or ventricular assist device (VAD) placement. Dr. Johnson is also interested in cardiac imaging, including fetal, transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, and studies how these imaging modalities can be used to improve patient outcomes.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

Huffington Post
Mayo Clinic Putting a Spin on the Typical Pitch Competition
by Jason Grill

It’s hard to imagine that any American has not heard of the Mayo Clinic. However, if you have not, it’s a nonprofit that is heavily Huffington Post Logoinvolved in clinical practice, education and research that works with individuals who need medical care or healing. The Mayo Clinic is based in Rochester, Minnesota. Now what many, if not all Americans, don’t know is the Mayo Clinic has a Center of Innovation and a Mayo Clinic Ventures operation that is turning pitch competitions upside down with the Think Big Challenge. Talk about flying under the radar.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique viewers.

Additional coverage: Twin Cities Business

Context: The Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation and Mayo Clinic Ventures today announced the second Mayo Clinic Think Big Challenge, a national competition for innovators and entrepreneurs. This year, one business or entrepreneur will earn the opportunity to license Mayo Clinic technology, lead a team and score a $50,000 cash prize. The 2016 Mayo Clinic Think Big Challenge opens today at transformconference.mayo.edu/thinkbig. Application deadline is Aug. 15. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Live Science
Everything You Need to Know About Flexibility Exercise
by Rachael Rettner

Flexibility exercises stretch your muscles and may improve your range of motion at your joints…Dynamic stretches are intended to get your muscles used to the types of movement you'll be doing during some other part of your workout, said Dr. Edward Laskowski, co-director of the LiveScience LogoMayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center in Rochester, Minnesota. For example, if you plan to do an aerobic activity such as running, warm up with some dynamic stretches for your legs (see some examples below).

 

Live Science
The 4 Types of Exercise You Need to Be Healthy
by Rachael Rettner

When you think of exercise, you may imagine strenuous activities such as running or biking — the ones that make you breathe hard, turn flush and drip with sweat. But aerobic activity is only one type of exercise, and although it is critical for boosting fitness, there are actually three other types of exercise that are also important: strength training, balance training and flexibility training. "While aerobic exercise is very important, it's not as effective for overall health" when done alone compared with when people include all four types of exercise in their routine, said Dr. Edward Laskowski, co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center in Rochester, Minnesota. "They all kind of go together" and complement each other, Laskowski said.

 

Live Science
Aerobic Exercise: Everything You Need to Know
by Rachel Rettner

Doing aerobic exercise can also have other long-term advantages. A recent study of 1.4 million people in the United States and Europe found that LiveScience Logohigh amounts of aerobic exercise were linked with a reduced risk of 13 types of cancer… Dr. Edward Laskowski, co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center in Rochester, Minnesota, recommended that people use the mantra, "start out low, and progress slow." This means starting with a level of activity that's fairly light, and gradually increasing the duration and intensity of your exercise sessions.

 

LiveScience
Strength Exercise: Everything You Need to Know
by Rachel Rettner

Strength exercise, or resistance training, works your muscles by using resistance, like a dumbbell or your own body weight. This type of exercise increases lean muscle mass, which is particularly important for weight loss, because lean muscle burns more calories than other types of tissue. … It's very important that you have the correct form and body position when you do resistance training. "If you do some of these exercises poorly, with bad technique, you can injure yourself," said Dr. Edward Laskowski, co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center in Rochester, Minnesota. You may need to work with a professional trainer, or watch exercise videos online, to make sure you use the correct technique.

 

LiveScience
Balance Exercise: Everything You Need to Know
by Rachel Rettner

…These exercises are also important for reducing injury risk. For example, if you sprain your ankle, you could be at risk for reinjury if you don't retrain your balance, said Dr. Edward Laskowski, co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center in Rochester, Minnesota. That's LiveScience Logobecause when you sprain your ankle, the muscles around the joint stop contracting in a coordinated fashion, and this destabilizes the joint, Laskowski said. If you do balance exercises after the injury, it retrains the muscles to contract together, which better stabilizes the joint during movements and prevents reinjury, he said.

Reach: LiveScience has more than 9.7 million unique visitors to its site each month. Geared toward a general consumer audience, LiveScience addresses the intellectually curious audience hungry for ideas, events, culture and things that cross the line from being merely academic to being cool, engaging and relevant in their lives.

Context: Edward Laskowski, M.D., co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center, a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, sports performance optimization, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

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Tags: aerobic exercise, Affordable care act, Aries Merr, Associated Press, balance, balance exercise, BCIndian.com, Boston Scientific, BuzzFeed, cancer moonshoot, Center for Individualized Medicine, Center of Innovation


October 22nd, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would   like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.  Thank you.

Editor, Karl OestreichAssistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Harvard Business Review
Getting Rid of “Never Events” in Hospitals
by Timothy Morgenthaler, M.D., chief patient safety officer at Mayo Clinic, and Charles Harper, M.D., executive dean for practice at Mayo Clinic

Harvard Business Review Logo… A number of techniques and process-improvement tools from inside and outside the industry have been brought to bear: lean engineering to simplify and standardize care, Crew Resource Management to improve teamwork, checklists to help teams focus and improve reliability, and so on. Human factors science, which studies the relationship between human beings and systems in order to improve efficiency, safety, and effectiveness is now being applied broadly in health care in everything from information management to the design of operating rooms.

Reach: Harvard Business Review – Online provides editorial content designed to complement the coverage found in its parent print publication, which focuses on business management. The site receives more than 232,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: Timothy Morgenthaler, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine physician who also practices in Mayo Clinic's Center for Sleep Medicine. Intrinsic in Dr. Morgenthaler's  work in his role as chief safety officer is developing the capability to measure important components of patient safety, such as preventable harm, aggregated near-miss analysis, and relationship between risk conditions and serious harm events. Charles (Michel) Harper, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist who also serves as executive dean for practice at Mayo Clinic. In his role as chair of Mayo Clinic's Clinical Practice Committee, Dr. Harper and the committee's key role in not only sharing, but implementing best practices and outcomes across sites.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

NPR
Forget Last Year's Hiccups, Go Get Your Flu Shot
by Pattie Neighmond

Last year, public health officials were taken by surprise when new strains of the flu virus appeared. Not so this year and they advise everyone six nprmonths or older to get vaccinated against the flu…For scientists, every year presents a new challenge to predict exactly which strains of the flu will be powerful enough to make people sick. Pritish Tosh is an infectious disease doctor and researcher at the Mayo Clinic. He says there are dozens of different flu strains.

Reach: National Public Radio, NPR,  creates and distributes news, information, and music programming to a network of 975 independent stations and reaches 26 million listeners every week.

Context: Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist Pritish Tosh, M.D. says,"There’s a lot of research going on looking at some of these other options, in terms of our target for the influenza vaccine." Dr. Tosh, who is also a member of the Vaccine Research Group at Mayo Clinic, says the new avenues of investigation are definitely needed. However, he cautions, the single flu vaccine has only been tested in animals and is not yet available. So, he urges everyone to get immunized with the safe and proven vaccines that we already have. "Influenza is a real killer. It kills tens of thousands of Americans each year, either directly or through its complications. And we really only have one great way in terms of prevention and that is with [the current] influenza vaccine." More information, including a video interview with Dr. Tosh, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

US News & World Report
Improving Hospital Quality and Reducing Costs
by Kimberly Leonard

… Sunday at the U.S. News Hospital of Tomorrow conference in the nation's capital, hospital executives discussed how the act has changed the way they do business and deliver care. They discussed the impacts of innovation, coverage and how to reduceUS News Health Logo waste in the system.  Dr. John Noseworthy, president and CEO for the Mayo Clinic, opened the conference with a keynote speech on "The Faces of High-Value Health Care: People and Processes." He highlighted a few ways the Mayo Clinic has better coordinated care, including the creation of "Ask Mayo Expert," which allows patients to avoid a trip to the hospital by allowing them to connect with a health care professional online.

Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Previous coverage in Mayo Clinic in the News

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Dr. Noseworthy was the U.S. News Hospital of Tomorrow keynote speaker.

Contacts: Traci Klein, Karl Oestreich 

 

RobbReport
The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program Pampers Guests While Promoting Good Health
by Janice O’Leary

Can a wellness boot camp at a medical center feel like a luxury retreat? Upon entering the center where the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is headquartered, in Robb Report Health & Wellness LogoRochester, Minn., it is hard to remember that the building belongs to a medical center. Designed to maximize open space and sunlight, the architecture itself conveys a sense of health and well-being. Sun streams into stairwells, making them more appealing than the elevator. Seamless windows wrap around the fitness studios, so they have the feel of a luxury athletic club. The equipment in the strength-training area is top notch. This feels like the perfect place to hit reset.

Reach: The Robb Report publishes it's Health & Wellness publication quarterly. The magazine targets affluent individuals interested in health and wellness topics. The Robb Report Online has more than 648,900 unique visitor to its site each month.

Additional coverage in The Robb Report:

Robb Report — The Truth About Organic Food Labeling [Q&A] 

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

WQOW Eau Claire
Car Control Class prepares teens for emergency driving situations

Instructors said giving teens the practice they need for keeping control in emergencies is key. "The bigger crash comes from someone panicking or over-correcting orWQOW TV Logo overreacting, and if you have not felt those things with the car, what the car can do, you're likely to panic and overreact," Dr. Lee Mayer, Mayo Clinic Health Systems Orthopedic Surgeon said. Mayer played a key role in starting the Car Control Classes eight years ago.

Context: The car control classes held at Chippewa Valley Technical College & sponsored by Mayo Clinic Health System.

Reach: WQOW is an ABC affiliate serving the Eau Claire, Wis. area.

Contact: Kristin Everett

 

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Tags: 'Pregnancy Blues', ‘Women Rock’ event, "Feel the Beat", A.L.S., ABC15 Ariz., ABC15 Arizona, ACS mammography guidelines, addiction psychiatry, adenoma detection, ADHD, advisory board, Affordable care act


July 3rd, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editors: Carmen Zwicker, Emily Blahnik

 

Boston Globe
Destination for reluctant but hopeful travelers
By Robert Weisman

They arrive in all seasons and from every corner of the earth: the chronically ill, the suddenly stricken, the worried well. They come seeking answers, guidance, and healing at this medical oasis in the Minnesota cornfields. Monica Robles, a copy center supervisorBoston Globe Logo from Arrada, Colo., was referred to Mayo Clinic to be treated by a top specialist in her rare heart condition. Vicky Wright, who organizes marriage workshops in Austin, Texas, flew in for a complicated biopsy. Kuwaiti aviation official Abdullah Al Obaid is spending four or five months in this small city south of Minneapolis so Mayo neurologists can adjust and monitor his multiple sclerosis treatments.

Reach: The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Context: For more than a century, people from all walks of life have found answers at Mayo Clinic.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Arizona Horizon (PBS)
Nationwide Melanoma Clinical Trials

A Stand Up to Cancer (SU2C) Melanoma Dream Team, led by TGen President Dr. Jeffrey Trent of Phoenix, is launching a set of nationwide Arizona PBSclinical trials on a form of melanoma skin cancer that affects about half of all people who get the disease. Mayo Clinic in Arizona is the only clinical trial location in our state. Dr. Trent and Dr. Alex Sekulic of Mayo Clinic will discuss the melanoma clinical trials.

Reach: Eight, Arizona PBS is a PBS station that has focused on educating children, reporting in-depth on public affairs, fostering lifelong learning and celebrating arts and culture. Its signal reaches 86 percent of the homes in Arizona. With more than 1 million viewers weekly, Eight consistently ranks among the most-viewed public television stations per capita in the country. Eight is a member-supported service of Arizona State University.

Additional coverage: San Angelo Standard-Times, Frederick News-Post Online

Previous Coverage in June 26, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Mayo Clinic and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) are helping launch a national clinical trial that will apply the latest in precision medicine to treat advanced melanoma skin cancer. The study leverages advances in genomics, informatics, and health information technology, yielding more precise medical treatments for patients with this devastating disease. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

KTTC
Mayo Clinic's first proton beam therapy patient receives treatment
by Kimberly Davis

The first patient to receive proton beam radiation therapy allowed KTTC to sit in on her session at Mayo Clinic Thursday morning. Thursday was Jessie Brentholt's fourth proton beam treatment of her six week process. Her mother tells News Center's Kimberly Davis she will come to theKTTC TV logo Jacobson building every day to receive treatment until August 3.

Reach: KTTC is an NBC affiliate that serves the Rochester, Minn. area including the towns of Austin, Mason City, Albert Lea and Winona. Its website receives more than 73,300 unique visitors each month.

Previous Coverage in June 26, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage in June 12, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage in June 4, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context:  Mayo Clinic introduces its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota beginning this June and Arizona in spring 2016. Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients — especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures — proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

WCCO-AM
MAYO CLINIC SQUARE-The WCCO Morning News with Dave Lee.

Dr. John Noseworthy is interviewed (see 6-17-15 segment)

WCCO-AM Dave LeeReach: WCCO radio, a CBS owned and operated affiliate in Minneapolis, boasts one of the largest coverage areas in the country as it reaches into portions of North and South Dakota during the day. At night, the station’s signal typically reaches across many U.S. states and Canadian provinces.

Previous Coverage in Jun 18, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Dignitaries from the worlds of medicine, sports, business and politics hit the court June 17 to dedicate Mayo Clinic Square in downtown Minneapolis. The event was the first in a series of grand-opening events marking the strategic collaboration of Mayo Clinic, the Minnesota Timberwolves and Minnesota Lynx. "At Mayo Clinic we pride ourselves in teamwork," said John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO of Mayo Clinic. "We are proud to be part of the team that made this day possible." More information about Mayo Clinic Square can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

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Tags: Addie Sylvester, Affordable care act, Albuquerque Journal, All4Women, alzheimer's disease, American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, anorexia, Arizona Daily Star, Arizona Horizon, Arizona Republic, Asian Age, assisted living facilities


February 6th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, director, media relations

 

AP
Obama Proposes 'Precision Medicine' To End One-Size-Fits-All
by Lauran Neergaard

President Barack Obama is calling for an investment to move away from one-size-fits-all-medicine, toward an approach that tailors treatment to your genes…People with aAssociated Press Wire Service Logo rare form of cystic fibrosis now can choose a drug designed specifically to target the genetic defect causing their illness. Some medical centers, such as the Mayo Clinic, have opened "individualized medicine clinics."

Additional coverage: NY Times, WAVY Va., Star Tribune, KTTC, KMSP, ABC News, Bloomberg, Politico, Daily Mail UK

 

Florida Times-Union
New approach enables Mayo Clinic neurologist to diagnose a rare genetic condition
by Charlie Patton

When Dustin Bennett was 18 months old, his mother realized there was something wrong with him, that he was suddenly having a hard time keeping his balance when he stood upright…Finally, at the suggestion of one of the many physicians she consulted, the Bennetts made the trip from their home in Pearson, Ga., Florida Times-Union newspaper logoto Jacksonville so they could consult with Mayo Clinic neurologist Zbigniew Wszolek.

Additional coverage on this topic: Medical Xpress

Reach: 
The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Florida Times-Union
Guest column: Precision medicine is future of health care
by Physician Gianrico Farrugia, CEO of Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville

Florida Times UnionMayo Clinic has built a national research program and a national referral medical clinic to advance the benefits of these discoveries, which already are beginning to benefit patients on our Jacksonville campus. We consider precision medicine a priority and an essential part of the future of medical practice.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

 

Bloomberg
Obama Plans $215 Million Precision Medicine Effort for Cures
by Caroline Chen

Obama’s proposed funding may not be enough to support the project. “I think the polite way to say it is that it’s a good start,” said Gianrico Farrugia, chief executive Bloomberg news logoofficer of Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus and former director of Mayo’s Center for Individualized Medicine. “It is certainly really encouraging that there is alignment between the NIH and the White House, and it kick starts the thing we need to do, but it’s an initial investment just to start things,” Farrugia said by telephone.

Reach: Bloomberg has 2,300 media professionals in 146 bureaus across 72 countries. Bloomberg delivers its content across more than 400 publications, over 310 million households worldwide through Bloomberg Television and 500,000 in the New York metro area and 18.5 million subscribers through satellite radio.

Additional coverage: International Business Times, com, HealthData Management, HealthDay, FOX News, ABC News, KAAL, KMSP, Star Tribune, Chicago Tribune, Al Jazeera America

 

Star Tribune
Mayo genetic data bank could boost Obama's new 'precision medicine initiative'
by Jim Spencer

…“If we have a big data set, a big pool of people that’s varied, then that allows us to really map out not only the genome of one person, but now we can start seeing Star Tribune newspaper logoconnections and patterns and correlations that helps us refine exactly what it is that we’re trying to do with respect to treatment,” the president said at a White House ceremony, attended by Mayo Vice President Dr. Gianrico Farrugia.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Individualized medicine, also known as personalized medicine or precision medicine, means tailoring diagnosis and treatment to each patient to optimize care. Patients have experienced this kind of care for 150 years at Mayo Clinic, where teams of specialists have always worked together to find answers. More information about the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Mayo Clinic's response to President Obama's precision medicine initiative can be found here.

Previous Coverage on Precision Medicine in January, 22, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Bob Nellis, Sam Smith, Kevin Punsky

 

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November 6th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Boston Globe
Yes, sitting at work is bad, but is standing actually better?
By Deborah Kotz

…In a June study, 28 office workers who were given a sit/stand desk for a month reduced their time spent in a sedentary position by 38 Boston Globe Logominutes a day compared to when they used a traditional desk. They also reported a mood boost, increased energy, and reduced fatigue. “I think it’s correct to say we’re in the middle of a ‘stand up movement,’ but the emphasis needs to be on movement,” said the study author Dr. James Levine, director of the Mayo Clinic/Arizona State University Obesity Solutions Initiative. “I don’t want people to think that they should stand up like still soldiers. That is not a good idea.”

Reach: The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 215,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Additional coverage: Boston Globe10 ways companies can encourage workers to move

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob NellisJim McVeigh

 

MPR
Glen Campbell's public decline with Alzheimer's documented in new film

…MPR's Cathy Wurzer spoke with Kim Campbell and Dr. Ronald Petersen, Director of the Mayo Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. He was one of MPR News logoGlen Campbell's doctors.  A new documentary about the life and career of music icon Glen Campbell opens in theaters  nationwide. "I'll Be Me" is not an ordinary music biopic because Campbell was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in 2011 and decided to deal with it publicly. The film documents his emotional "Goodbye Tour" and how his wife Kim became his caregiver.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Additional Coverage:

Post-Bulletin, Glen Campbell film called touching

KTTC, Country star Glen Campbell's family and doctor talk about Mayo's role in fight with Alzheimer's

Pioneer Press'Glen Campbell: I'll Be Me' is moving, funny portrait of country star's struggle with Alzheimer's

Context: This film will increase awareness of Alzheimer’s impact on patients and their caregivers and is a call to action for our nation to find a cure for this disease.  Our future depends on us pushing the boundaries of knowledge and discovery of cures for this and other devastating diseases,” says John Noseworthy, MD, president and CEO of Mayo Clinic. Dr. Ronald Petersen is director of the Mayo Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. The Mayo Alzheimer's Disease Research Center is part of a network of 28 centers around the country sponsored by the National Institute on Aging.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Prevention
8 Things Your Sleep Habits Say About You

by Jordan Davidson…The symptom: You slept your way through 3 ham sandwiches and an entire pound cPrevention logoake. What it might mean: Parasomnia and REM Behavior Disorder (RBD). Erik St. Louis, a Mayo Clinic sleep physician, recently ended up with a patient who spread jelly on his Nook and left it in the fridge. Sleepwalkers may make a snack, take a walk, and then return to bed with no idea they ever left. The really scary ones drive.

Reach: Prevention is published monthly with a circulation of 2.8 million.  Prevention - Online has more than 1.1 million unique visitors each month and has 9.3 million average page views each month.

Context: Erik St. Louis, M.D. is a physician with the Mayo Clinic Center for Sleep Medicine. Mayo Clinic doctors trained in sleep disorders evaluate and treat adults and children in the Center for Sleep Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. The Center for Sleep Medicine is one of the largest sleep medicine facilities in the United States. Staff in the center treat about 6,500 new people who have sleep disorders each year. The Center for Sleep Medicine is accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Public Affairs Contact: Alyson Gonzalez

 

Wall Street Journal
Just How Fast a Marathoner Could Wozniacki Be?
By Matthew Futterman

Tennis star Caroline Wozniacki stunned the endurance world Sunday when she finished the New York City Marathon in 3 hours 26 minutes 33 The Wall Street Journal Logoseconds. It was her first marathon. She never did a training run longer than 13 miles, and she played in the WTA Tour Finals in Singapore the previous weekend. How fast would Woz be if she tried? Pretty darn fast. Michael Joyner, a physician at the Mayo Clinic aWSJ Daily Fixnd veteran marathoner who specializes in time extrapolations, posited that at 5 feet 10, Wozniacki would most likely be better suited to swimming or rowing. Still, Joyner added, Wozniacki could get 10% better from training and another 10% better by getting super-skinny. Or, “if she was a closet aerobic animal you might get 25%,” he wrote in an email.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist. Dr. Joyner and his lab team are interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

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