Items Tagged ‘aging’

March 10th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Wall Street Journal

Zika Linked to Heart Problems
by Betsy McKay

In a study conducted at the Institute of Tropical Medicine in Caracas, Venezuela, researchers identified nine patients who developed heart rhythm disorders and other serious cardiovascular complications while they had Zika. “While we anticipated that we would see cardiovascular effects from Zika, we were surprised at the severity of the findings,” said Karina Gonzalez Carta, a cardiologist and research fellow at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who led the study. She provided details of the findings to reporters ahead of the American College of Cardiology’s Annual Scientific Session in Washington where the findings will be presented.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Additional coverage: New York Times, HealthDay, ABC News, Associated Press, Star Tribune, KTTC, TIME, FOX News, Twin Cities Business, WebMD, Medical Xpress

Context: Zika also may have serious effects on the heart, new research shows in the first study to report cardiovascular complications related to this virus, according to data being presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 66th Annual Scientific Session. In a study at the Institute of Tropical Medicine in Caracas, Venezuela, of nine adult patients with Zika and no previous history of cardiovascular disease, all but one developed a heart rhythm problem and two-thirds had evidence of heart failure. It is known that Zika can cause microcephaly, a severe birth defect in babies born to women infected with the virus, and Guillain-Barré syndrome, a neurological condition that can lead to muscle weakness and, in severe cases, paralysis. “We know that other mosquito-borne diseases, such as dengue fever and chikungunya virus, can affect the heart, so we thought we might see the same with Zika. But we were surprised by the severity, even in this small number of patients,” says Karina Gonzalez Carta, M.D., cardiologist and research fellow at Mayo Clinic and the study’s lead author. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Traci Klein

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
Mayo Clinic announces $70.5 million expansion in Jacksonville
by Derek Gilliam

Mayo Clinic took another step toward becoming the "premier destination medical center in the Southeast" with an $70.5 million expansion plan. That follows an already active development cycle for Mayo Clinic's Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logoFlorida Campus that's located in Jacksonville. The hospital has invested more than $300 million in expanding its hospital campus. That has allowed for the global hospital system to grow their employee base to 5,900 in Jacksonville, according to Mayo Clinic. “We are extremely grateful to the family of Dan and Brenda Davis for their generous and unyielding support for Mayo Clinic,” said Dr. Gianrico Farrugia, vice president of Mayo Clinic and CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Reach:  The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals

Additional coverage:
First Coast News, Mayo Clinic continues rapid expansion with two new projects announced Tuesday
WOKV JacksonvilleMayo Clinic plans $70 million construction project
Florida Times-UnionMayo Clinic continues rapid expansion with two new projects announced Tuesday
Jacksonville Business Journal, How Mayo Clinic plans to make Jacksonville a medical destination

Context: Over the past two years Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus has erupted with substantial growth in major construction projects and new staff to serve a fast-growing patient population, especially those who require complex medical care. During this time, Mayo Clinic has invested more than $300 million in major construction projects and added 900 new staff as it advances its status as the premier destination medical center in the Southeast. Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus now has about 5,900 employees and contributes roughly $2 billion to the Florida economy. As part of this economic boom, Mayo Clinic today announced another major construction project on its Florida campus – an investment of $70.5 million to add four floors for a total of five to Mayo Building South and remodel existing space in the Davis Building. The project will add 80,000 new square feet and renovate 40,000 existing square feet. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

 

Star Tribune
Mayo spending $217 million on construction in Rochester
by Christopher Snowbeck

Mayo Clinic plans to spend $217 million on construction projects at its St. Marys hospital campus in Rochester. The project, announced Thursday, would help the clinic grow its patient volume and provide those patients better service in more efficient facilities, said Dr. Robert Cima, medical director for the Rochester hospital operations at the Mayo Clinic. “We anticipate continued growth in our patient visits,” Cima said inStar Tribune newspaper logo an interview. “We’ve been seeing that steadily year after year. This is really a commitment to providing access to as many patients as possible.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:
KAALMayo Clinic Giving Saint Marys Campus $217 Million Expansion, Upgrade
KTTCMayo Clinic approves $217 million expansion for its Saint Marys Campus
KIMTMayo Clinic unveils $217 million construction project
KAAL,  In-Depth at 6:30: Impact of Saint Marys
Twin Cities BusinessMayo Clinic Spending $458M To Renovate, Expand Its MN, FL Campuses
Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic to invest $217M to expand, upgrade Saint Marys

Context: The Mayo Clinic Board of Trustees approved plans for enhanced and increased procedural and patient-dedicated facilities at Mayo Clinic Hospital – Rochester, Saint Marys Campus. Mayo Clinic will invest $217 million in the growth and modernization of Saint Marys Campus, while also relocating and upgrading its Cardiac Surgery facilities. Both sets of projects will address the needs of an increasingly complex patient population, rising inpatient volume and innovative practice, while providing the highest level of safe, efficient and affordable care. “These enhancements further Mayo Clinic’s mission of advancing the practice by investing in our facilities to help ensure we provide the best possible care for our patients,” says C. Michel Harper, M.D., executive dean for practice at Mayo Clinic. “The improvement of our facilities is a natural extension of Mayo Clinic’s efforts to provide both a modern and coordinated health care environment.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Kelly Reller

 

CNN
Interval training exercise could be a fountain of youth
by Susan Scutti

Looking for a fountain of youth? You may need to search no further than your sneakers. "Any exercise is better than being sedentary," said Dr. Sreekumaran Nair, senior author of the study and a diabetes CNN Logoresearcher at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. However, Nair noted that high-intensity interval training (HIIT), in particular, is "highly efficient" when it comes to reversing many age-related changes.

Reach: Cable News Network (CNN) is a worldwide news and information network providing live, continuous coverage of news from around the globe, 24 hours a day. CNN online received more than 55 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional coverage: Daily Mail, New Scientist, Express UK, Ask Men, FOX News

Context:  Everyone knows that exercise is good for you, but what type of training helps most, especially when you’re older - say over 65? A Mayo Clinic study says it’s high-intensity aerobic exercise, which can reverse some cellular aspects of aging. The findings appear in Cell Metabolism. Mayo researchers compared high-intensity interval training, resistance training and combined training. All training types improved lean body mass and insulin sensitivity, but only high-intensity and combined training improved aerobic capacity and mitochondrial function for skeletal muscle. Decline in mitochondrial content and function are common in older adults. High-intensity intervals also improved muscle protein content that not only enhanced energetic functions, but also caused muscle enlargement, especially in older adults. The researchers emphasized an important finding: Exercise training significantly enhanced the cellular machinery responsible for making new proteins. That contributes to protein synthesis, thus reversing a major adverse effect of aging. However, adding resistance training is important to achieve significant muscle strength. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Woman’s Day
10 Simple Tips That Will Help You Prevent Alzheimer's Disease
by Stacey Colino

Many women fear losing their mental faculties as they age, and consider the future to be the luck of the draw. In fact, 44% of 1,200 adults surveyed by the Marist Institute for Public Opinion were more scared of getting Alzheimer's disease than cancer, stroke, heart disease or diabetes. What you may not realize is just how much you can protect yourself. "We all have the power to influence how our brains age," says RonWoman's Day Logo
Petersen, MD, PhD, director of Mayo Clinic's Alzheimer's Disease Research Center in Rochester, MN. "What you do at midlife will have late-life benefits on the health of your brain and heart." Know the facts, then take simple steps to get on track.

Reach: Woman’s Day reaches a monthly audience of more than 3.3 million. Its website receives more than 4.7 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Today.com
5 steps that helped this woman shed 68 pounds and transform her life

When Jacqueline Gilmore-Jackson’s mother passed away, she turned to food for comfort. It wasn’t uncommon for her to snack mindlessly and eat at odd hours, even enjoying dinner at midnight. Since that sad time in 2010, her weight slowly increased. In March, she applied to participate in the Woman’s Day Live Longer and Stronger Challenge. The magazine selected five women from across the country to receive nutrition and exercise counseling from Joy Bauer and guidance from experts at Mayo Clinic to lose weight and improve their health.

Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show.

Context: The Live Longer & Stronger challenge—headed by Joy Bauer, RDN, with guidance from experts at Mayo Clinic—is about more than just lowering the numbers on the scale. Some of these women walked more steps than they'd ever dreamed possible, while others cut out medications they'd been taking for years, leading to greater happiness and healthier hearts.

Contact:  Traci Klein

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Tags: 1011 News Nebraska, ABC News, ACL, aging, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimer's disease, Andy Sandness, Ask Men, Associated Press, athletes, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, blood pressure


January 20th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highhlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

CNBC
Important not to lose ground on ACA

Dr. John Noseworthy, Mayo Clinic president & CEO, and Bernard Tyson, Kaiser Permanente CEO, talks about implementing reforms in the health care system.

Reach: CNBC is a 24-hour cable television station offers business news and financial information. The channel provides real-time financialCNBC logo market coverage to an estimated 175 million homes worldwide. CNBC online receives more than 26 million unique visitors each month.

Additional CNBC coverage:
CNBC, Drug pricing and regulations: Mayo Clinic CEO — Dr. John Noseworthy, Mayo Clinic president & CEO, and Bernard Tyson, Kaiser Permanente CEO, talk about the rising cost of drugs.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

New York Times
Getting Older, Sleeping Less
by Jane E. Brody

Nonmedical causes of insomnia are often successfully treated by practicing “good sleep hygiene,” a concept developed by the late Peter J. Hauri, a sleep specialist at the Mayo Clinic. That means limiting naps to less than 30 minutes a day, preferably early in the afternoon; avoiding stimulants and sedatives; avoiding heavy meals and minimizing liquids within two to three hours of bedtime; getting moderate exercise daily, The New York Times newspaper logopreferably in the morning or early afternoon; maximizing exposure to bright light during the day and minimizing it at night; creating comfortable sleep conditions; and going to bed only when you feel sleepy.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: The Mayo Center for Sleep Medicine (CSM) is a multidisciplinary enterprise comprised of pulmonologists, neurologists, psychiatrists and pediatricians who — with the support of a physician assistant, nurses and polysomnographic technologists — are engaged in a vibrant array of clinical, educational and research activities. Mayo Clinic doctors trained in sleep disorders evaluate and treat adults and children in the Center for Sleep Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. The Center for Sleep Medicine is one of the largest sleep medicine facilities in the United States. Staff in the center treats about 6,500 new people who have sleep disorders each year. The Center for Sleep Medicine is accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Washington Post
Why the ‘gluten-free movement’ is less of a fad than we thought
by Caitlin Dewey

There’s growing evidence that severe gluten sensitivities exist outside the realm of celiac disease. And researchers simply don’t know how many of the people following a gluten-free diet may actually have a legitimate health complaint — as opposed to a baseless fear of all things gluten, or a misplaced desire to lose weight. “We have no real inkling from our results,” said Joseph Murray, a celiac researcher at the MayoWashington Post newspaper logo Clinic and one of the authors of the new research. “We didn’t think to ask why people avoid gluten. When we designed this study 10 years ago, no one avoided gluten without a celiac diagnosis.”

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Chicago Tribune, News Herald

Other recent coverage regarding celiac disease and Dr. Joseph Murray:
January 6, 2017 edition of Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
November 4, 2016 edition of Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Joseph Murray, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist. Dr. Murray's research interests focus in two distinct areas: celiac disease and esophageal disorders. To learn more about celiac disease, check out this Mayo Clinic radio interview with Dr. Murray.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Bloomberg
The Two-Day, $5,000 C-Suite Physical
by Sam Grobart

I am in good health. I am out of shape. These two facts—one I hoped to be true, and one I absolutely knew to be true—were delivered to me at the end of a thorough two-day medical exam in early November at the Bloomberg Business LogoMayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. I underwent this battery of tests not because I was at risk for any major illness, nor because I’m a hypochondriac (I mean, no more of one than any unfit 42-year-old man has a right to be), but because the renowned medical center offers something called the Executive Health Program, which sounded exceedingly fancy.

Reach: Bloomberg BusinessWeek has a weekly circulation of more than 990,000 and has more than six million unique visitors to its online site each month.

Context: For more than 40 years, the Mayo Clinic Executive Health Program has been leveraging our nationally recognized expertise to help executives, business owners and entrepreneurs maintain good health.

Contact:  Kelley Luckstein

 

 

KJZZ
Summit Features Experts Making Sense Of Health-Care Payments
by Steve Goldstein

Paying for health care is complicated and confusing. Does a provider accept your health plan? How many bills can you expect to receive after the fact? What about catastrophic care? Mayo Clinic and ASU’s School for the Science of Health Care Delivery have teamed up to host a Payment Reform Summit featuring a number of experts trying to figure out what makes sense in the realm of health-care payments. We talked aboutKJZZ NPR -AZ Logo some possible reforms with Dr. Lois Krahn of the Mayo Clinic and Dr. Victor Trastek, director of ASU’s School of Science and Health Care Delivery.

Reach: KJZZ-FM is a commercial station owned by Maricopa Community Colleges in Tempe, AZ. The format of the station is news and jazz. KJZZ-FM's target audience is news and jazz music listeners, ages 18 to 64, in the Tempe, AZ area.

Additional coverage: Fierce Healthcare

Context: The Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University Alliance for Health Care Payment Reform Summit convened subject matter experts from around the country, including the voice of patients, to inform the development of alternative payment models. With a focus on the needs of patients, the expert participants examined data drawn from a variety of sources to assess the impact of various payment models on patient access and patterns of health care use. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Jim McVeigh

 

WOKV Jacksonville
Mayo Clinic receives $1.6 million to fund Alzheimer’s research in Jacksonville
by John Engel

Eight programs at Mayo Clinic’s Jacksonville campus are receiving a total of $1.6 million in grants to fund Alzheimer’s research in Jacksonville. Kevin Bieniek, a post-doctoral research fellow at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, will benefit from this most recent round of grant funding from the state. His study examines the relationship between brain trauma and Alzheimer’s disease. “There are so many people that get Alzheimer’s disease that have no family history of this disorder,” Bieniek told WOKV. “It’s really a complex interaction of your genetics; the environment; your lifestyle; there are so many factors that come into play.”

Reach: WOKV-FM is Jacksonville's 24 hour news station.

Additional coverage: Healthcare Business News

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida were awarded eight grants from the Florida Department of Health to investigate the prevention or cure of Alzheimer’s disease. These awards followed a peer-reviewed and competitive grant application process, where the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Grant Advisory Board reviewed applications and selected 27 studies statewide. “Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus is home to international leaders in neuroscience research who are focused on addressing the unmet needs of patients,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., vice president, Mayo Clinic, and CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida. “We integrate basic and clinical research and immediately translate our findings into better patient care. We very much appreciate the state’s investment in finding solutions for Alzheimer’s disease.” More information about the grants can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Kevin Punsky

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Tags: "liquid biopsies", ACA, acupuncture, aging, alzheimers, Arizona Republic, baby powder, blood donation, Bloomberg, Bradly Prigge, breastfeeding, C. Difficile


November 23rd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

STAT
Mayo leaders: A nine-fold path to preventing burnout

We’ve talked about burnout before, and it seems like lots of hospitals have ideas to combat it. Well, Mayo Clinic has some more ideas – nine of them, to be precise. In the issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings released today, Dr. Tait Shanafelt, director of Mayo’s Program on Physician Well-STAT Logo of Boston Globebeing, and Dr. John Noseworthy, Mayo’s CEO, say administrators can’t force doctors to fight this battle on their own. “Burnout is a system issue, and addressing it is the shared responsibility of both the individuals and health care organizations,” Shanafelt writes.

Reach: STAT covers the frontiers of health and medicine including science labs, hospitals, biotechnology board rooms, and political back rooms. Hosted by The Boston Globe, STAT launched on November 5, 2015. The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Additional coverage: News-Medical.net, Cardiovascular Business, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, FierceHealthcare

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic have been documenting the rise and costs of physician burnout for more than a decade. Now, they are proposing nine strategies that health care organizations can use to reverse the trend and limit the risk to patients and their medical staff. Tait Shanafelt, M.D., director of Mayo Clinic’s Program on Physician Well-being, and John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic, offer the nine-point plan in the current issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings“Research has shown that more than half of U.S. physicians are experiencing symptoms of burnout, and the rate is increasing,” says Dr. Shanafelt, first author of the article. “Unfortunately, many organizations see burnout as a personal problem to be addressed by the individual physician. It is clear, however, that burnout is a system issue, and addressing it is the shared responsibility of both the individuals and health care organizations.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Washington Post
A non-pill treatment for many chronic illnesses: Exercise

Exercise isn’t good only for building muscle and losing weight. “If a pill could give you all benefits of exercise, it would be the best pill around,” Washington Post newspaper logosays Edward Laskowski, co-director of Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine and a specialist in physical medicine and rehabilitation. Yet doctors underprescribe exercise, even though research shows that it can deliver comparable benefits to drugs and surgery with fewer side effects, according to a recent review in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. Here’s how to safely get the disease-fighting benefits of exercise…

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Edward Laskowski, M.D., co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center, a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, sports performance optimization, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Huffington Post
Why You Might Be Losing Your Sense of Taste As You Age
by Bill Ward

Our mouths perceive just five elements — sweet, sour, bitter, salt and umami (glutamate). They also can tell if there’s fat in food, said Dr. Erin O’Brien, a rhinologist in the Mayo Clinic’s Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Rochester, Minn. “As you chew food, the flavor is released andHuffington Post Logo you smell it through the back of the nose,” O’Brien said. “If you’re eating strawberry ice cream, your tongue will tell you it’s sweet, but it won’t know the flavor. The nose tells you it’s strawberry. That’s the difference between taste and flavor.”

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique viewers.

Context: Erin O'Brien, M.D, is a Mayo Clinic otorhinolaryngology (ENT). The Department of Otorhinolaryngology (ear, nose and throat or ENT) at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota provides a full range of medical and surgical services for pediatric and adult patients with head and neck disorders and diseases.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

FirstCoastNews
A day in the life of a cancer survivor; Judi Zitiello
by Keitha Nelson-Williams

Eighty-five percent of people diagnosed with pancreatic cancer will die with-in six months. Judi Zitiello was diagnosed in 2014, and she's still First Coast News Logoliving to this day. But every three months, as she goes to the Mayo Clinic for a CT scan, life stands still for the mother of four and grandmother of seven with one on the way…FCN sat down with Dr. Pashtoon Kasi, M.D. Assistant Professor, GI Oncology at the Mayo Clinic to discuss the lethal cancer and why there are so few survivors. "The tumor itself it's a pretty unforgiving disease," said Kasi. "Unlike some of the other tumors this causes a lot of dense fibrous tissue around it. So a lot of the drugs are not able to get to it."

Reach: First Coast News refers to two television stations in Jacksonville, Florida. WJXX, the ABC affiliate and WTLV, the NBC affiliate.

Context: Pashtoon Kasi, M.B.B.S. is a Mayo Clinic oncologist and hematologist. An avid runner, Judi Zitiello, 66, was forced into a six-week hiatus when she developed a meniscus tear in early 2014. The retired financial executive was always active – exercising, hosting dinner parties, and volunteering to run the JT Townsend Foundation, a Jacksonville, Florida, philanthropic organization. Judi wasn’t too concerned about the downtime at first. She knew her body would take time to heal. But the pain lingered. Then Judi began losing weight and her energy waned. "I didn't have the energy to get off the couch. I didn’t feel well. I was just not myself," Judi recalls. Still, she thought it must be related to her knee injury. But when she began experiencing severe itching on her arms and torso, and her stool turned a clay color, Judi knew it was time to see someone other than the physical therapist. Little did she realize she would be starting a fight against pancreatic cancer. You can read more about Judi's story on Sharing Mayo Clinic and Mayo Clinic in the Loop.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

Arizona Republic
Ask a Doc: Making surgery safer for high-risk bleeders

Question: What research is underway to help those at high risk for bleeding during medical procedures? Answer: As Arizona Republic newspaper logoa vascular interventional radiologist at Mayo Clinic, I treat patients with a wide range of vascular diseases and disorders. When I’m not performing procedures, I’m in the lab researching ways to improve current therapies, making the experience even safer and more effective for our patients, especially those who are at high risk for bleeding… — Dr. Rahmi Oklu

Reach: The Arizona Republic has daily circulation of more than 180,000 and its website azcentral.com has more than 2.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic, Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are developing a biomaterial that has potential to protect patients at high risk for bleeding in surgery. The Nov. 16 cover article, “An Injectable Shear-Thinning Biomaterial for Endovascular Embolization,” in the journal Science Translational Medicine reports on a universal shear-thinning biomaterial that may provide an alternative for treating vascular bleeding. The study’s lead co-author Rahmi Oklu, M.D., Ph.D., a vascular interventional radiologist at Mayo Clinic’s Arizona campus, explains shear-thinning biomaterial offers many advantages over metallic coils, the current gold standard. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

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Tags: ABC15 Arizona, acupuncture, Affordable care act, aging, alcohol, Alzforum, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers, Aneurysm, Arizona Republic, Becker’s Hospital Review, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine


November 18th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Washington Post
The one thing missing from the debate over Obamacare, according to a top doctor
by Carolyn Y. Johnson

President-elect Donald Trump’s promise to repeal the Affordable Care Act while preserving some key elements has triggered rampant speculation about the future of American health care — and plunged millions of patients who benefit from the law into deep uncertainty aboutWashington Post newspaper logo the future of their coverage. Little is known about the replacement plan that will ultimately emerge. But one voice angling to shape future policy is the leader of the Mayo Clinic, neurologist John Noseworthy. “Patients are getting frustrated and fearful and anxious that they can’t have access to the care that’s best suited for them,” Noseworthy said. “How can you have a great country if our citizens can’t get access to world class health care? It’s actually not a bad time to reassess.”

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Albuquerque Journal, The Journal

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Forbes
Are Naproxen and Ibuprofen Sometimes Risky? A Controversial Study Of Celebrex Raises Concerns
by Matthew Herper

A study released today may mean that the painkiller celecoxib, once sold under the brand name Celebrex, is safer than prescription doses of Forbes Pharma and Healthcare logoibuprofen or naproxen. That is if the study, which is already controversial, means anything at all. … “It’s fascinating that Celebrex is not worse, and may have a small trend to being better,” says Rekha Mankad, director of the cardio-rheumatology clinic at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester. “I as a cardiologist I would prefer that nobody take any of these drugs on a long-term basis ever.” Still she says, it’s better for patients to get non-steroidal drugs like these than opioids, which are often the next option.

Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: CBS News

Context: Rekha Mankad, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Mankad's interests include gender disparities that exist in regards to heart disease, the relationship between autoimmune diseases and coronary artery disease and gender differences in valvular heart disease.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

CNN
Crawling has some fitness experts going gaga
by Jacqueline Howard

On any given morning, as the sun peeks over the horizon, Danielle Johnson can be found crawling down the hallways of her Rochester, CNN LogoMinnesota, home. It may sound bizarre, but Johnson crawls every day to strengthen her core muscle groups. "You can crawl in many ways. You can crawl on your hands and knees. You can also prop up on your toes and just hover, one or two inches above the ground, which is really going to pull in those core muscles and work those muscles effectively," said Johnson, a physical therapist at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program.

Reach: Cable News Network (CNN) is a worldwide news and information network providing live, continuous coverage of news from around the globe, 24 hours a day. CNN online received more than 55 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Huffington Post
A Culture of Legacy
by Marcia McMullen

The recent passing of a cultural icon in health care revealed a rare glimpse into how a successful 150-year-old brand built on a clear mission and Huffington Post Logoexacting processes which ultimately became its culture. Dr. William J. Mayo’s clarity of mission, “The needs of the patient come first.” set into a motion a defining statement that would withstand not only time, but also cultural shifts and leadership changes. One of those change leaders, Sr. Generose Gervais, OSF, administrator and executive director emeritus, Saint Marys Campus-Mayo Clinic Hospital, recently passed away at the age of 97.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique visitors.

Previous coverage in the October 21, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Sister Generose Gervais, long-time administrator of Saint Marys Hospital and president of the Poverello Foundation, passed away peacefully recently in the hospital she served for many years. She was 97. Sister Generose will be remembered for her tireless work on behalf of patients and the staff of Saint Marys Hospital. Her hospital ministry focused on perpetuating the Franciscan legacy, specifically nurturing the values of respect, integrity, compassion, healing, teamwork, innovation, excellence and stewardship among all Mayo Clinic staff. “Sister Generose was known for her faith, her quiet leadership, her wise counsel, her dedication to patients and staff, her sense of humor and the example of service that she lived every day,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic. “Mayo Clinic was blessed by her presence for more than 60 years.” More information about Sister Generose can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network and Mayo Clinic in the Loop.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

New York Times
Q&A: A look at the cancer some believe linked to Vietnam War

…Bile duct cancer is unusual because it can be prevented in some cases. Pills can wipe out liver flukes early on, but the medicine is not effective in later stages after the worms have died and scarring has occurred. Surgery is possible in some cases, but the survivalThe New York Times newspaper logo rate is only about 30 percent for five years, said Dr. Gregory Gores, a gastroenterologist and executive dean of research at Mayo Clinic. Affected countries, such as Vietnam and Laos, have not conducted extensive research to determine the extent of the problem. The world’s highest rate of cholangiocarcinoma — about 84 new cases per 100,000 people — is found in northeastern Thailand where many people eat a popular raw fish dish.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Additional coverage: WTOP Washington, Star Tribune, Associated Press

Context: Gregory Gores, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist.  Dr. Gores research is focused on mechanisms of liver cell death, especially apoptosis. He employs disease-relevant models to unravel the fundamental cellular processes contributing to liver injury during cholestasis and fatty liver diseases. In addition, Dr. Gores' lab is also interested in the mechanisms by which cancer cells escape from cell death in order to undergo malignant transformation and metastases.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

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Tags: ABC News, Affordable care act, aging, Albuquerque Journal, AliveCor, alzheimer's disease, Angela Lunde, Arizona Daily Sun, Associated Press, Attn:, AZ Big Media, Baltimore Sun


September 23rd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Buzzfeed
27 College Health Tips They Won’t Teach You At Orientation
by Caroline Kee

Spoiler alert: it’s probably mono. BuzzFeed Health spoke to Dr. Pritish Tosh, infectious disease specialist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and germ expert Kelly Reynolds, PhD, director of environmental health sciences at the University of Arizona, about how collegeBuzzFeed Logo students can stay healthy when the odds (and germs) are against them.

Reach: BuzzFeed receives more than 15.7 million unique visitors each month to its website and targets pop culture and social media enthusiasts.

Context: Pritish Tosh, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist. Dr. Tosh is interested in emerging infections and preparedness activities related to them, ranging from collaborating with the Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group in basic science vaccine development to hospital systems research related to pandemic preparedness.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
Mayo Clinic sets schedule for $100M expansion — with work starting soon
by Alexa Epitropoulos

Mayo Clinic is beginning construction on the first building within its $100 million three-building expansion project in October – and it's setting its sights on more expansion in the future. The CEO of Mayo Clinic's Jacksonville campus, Dr. Gianrico Farrugia, said work on the 150,000-Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logosquare-foot destination medical center will have just under a two-year timeline, with the projected completion being summer 2018. That building has a number of unique features, including specialized care for patients with neurological problems, as well as patients who require neurosurgery, hematology and oncology. It will also have a chemotherapy section, which Farrugia says will be private and include an outdoor patio.

Additional coverage:
Becker’s Hospital Review, Jacksonville Mayo Clinic sets schedule for $100M expansion

Context: Gianrico Farrugia, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vice president and CEO of Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida. Earlier this year, Mayo Clinic announced that it will invest $100 million in major construction projects building on its 150-year history of transforming health care and the patient experience as the premier medical destination center for health care in the Southeast. 

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

WJCT Jacksonville
First Coast Connect: From Illegal Immigrant To Brain Surgeon
by Kevin Meerschaert

He jumped a California border fence in 1987, one day after his 19th birthday. Speaking no English and having no money, Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa spent the first years in this country working migrant jobs while raising the money for tuition at Joaquin Delta Community College. … screen-shot-2016-09-22-at-8-48-16-pmRecently Dr. Q joined the staff at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville as Chairman of Neurologic Surgery.

Reach: WJCT-FM is the NPR affiliate for the Jacksonville market. WJCT-FM Online has more than 259,000 unique visitors each month.

Previous coverage in April 22, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, prominent neurosurgeon, researcher and educator, recently joined Mayo Clinic as chair of the Department of Neurosurgery on the Florida campus, along with several members of his research team from Johns Hopkins Medicine. Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa is renown nationally and internationally as a surgeon, researcher, humanitarian and author. His laboratory has published many manuscripts and articles, submitted a number of patents and obtained three NIH grants. Students and fellows who worked with Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa have gone on to join leading neuroscience programs throughout the world. Mayo Clinic's world-renowned neurosurgeons perform more than 7,000 complex surgical procedures every year at campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

KSTP
10-Year-Old Minn. Girl Undergoes Facial Reconstructive Surgery after Near-Fatal Farm Accident

Doctor Uldis Bite, a plastic surgeon, took Amber Rose’s case. Now 10 years old, Amber Rose was about to embark on yet another journey; one her
KSTP-5 Twin Citiesfamily wanted to share and they invited 5 EYEWITNESS NEWS to come along. A 3-D model, made on the Mayo campus, helped Dr. Bite plan out the extensive facial reconstruction surgery Amber Rose was about to have. On an early July morning, almost exactly three years to the date of her accident, Amber Rose walked nervously into Mayo Clinic, her entire family by her side.

Reach: KSTP-TV is the ABC affiliate in Minneapolis that broadcasts on channel 5. KSTP-TV Online has more than 503,000 unique visitors each month. It is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., and is the only locally-owned and operated broadcasting company in the Twin Cities. KSTP-TV first broadcast in April 1948, and was the first television station to serve the upper Midwest.

Context: Last year, after receiving care at "numerous hospitals" and from "dozens of doctors," the Kordiaks were told nothing else could be done for their daughter. Then, "with fingers crossed, Jen reached out to Mayo Clinic," where a team led by Uldis Bite, M.D., came up with a new plan for Amber Rose. Dr. Bite used "a 3-D model, made on the Mayo campus" to help plan out the extensive facial reconstruction surgery. And last July — nearly three years to the day after the accident — Amber Rose underwent the 15-hour procedure. Six weeks later, at a follow-up appointment, Dr. Bite was pleased with the results. As was Amber Rose. "My nose looks way better," she said. "Nobody will stare at me." You can read more about Amber Rose's story at In the Loop.

Contact:  Sharon Theimer

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Tags: 873 AM, ABC15 Arizona, advisory board, aging, AIN Online, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers, American Trucker, Angie Murad, artificial Intelligence, AsiaOne, awake brain surgery


September 2nd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

 

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

WESA Pittsburgh
St. Clair Hospital Brings A Virtual Mayo Clinic To Its Patients
by Mark Nootbaar

The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. is known for employing doctors with highly refined subspecialties, and now St. Clair Hospital doctors can tap into that expertise. An agreement between the two hospitals, finalized this week, will allow St. Clair doctors to access eTumor Boards – a virtual version of tumor board reviews, in which multiple doctors brainstorm ways to treat an individual patient.  “There are certainlyPittsburgh NPR station cancers that affect millions of people in the United States but there are also cancers like sarcoma, which might be more on the order of a couple thousand a year,” said Mayo Clinic Medical Director of Provider Relations Ryan Uitti.

Reach:  WESA is a southwestern Pennsylvania’s only independent public radio news and information station. The station targets listeners, ages 18 to 64 and its website receives more than 171,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Post BulletinKROC AMMSN, Pittsburgh Business Times, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Tribune-Review, Observer-Reporter, seattlepi.com, KDKA Pittsburgh, Washington Times

Context:  St. Clair Hospital is the newest member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a growing national network of independent health care providers committed to serving patients and their families through clinical collaboration. St. Clair Hospital remains independent and locally governed. Under this formal agreement, St. Clair Hospital has access to the latest Mayo Clinic knowledge and promotes clinical collaboration between physicians to benefit patients. The goal of St. Clair Hospital and Mayo Clinic is to help patients get answers to complex medical questions while staying close to home. “St. Clair is proud to be selected as the newest member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network,” says James M. Collins, president and CEO of St. Clair Hospital. “This clinical collaboration with Mayo – unique in western Pennsylvania – is rooted in our common philosophy. It will provide our physicians the expertise of Mayo Clinic to assist them as they treat challenging medical cases – at no additional cost to patients and insurers.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Huffington Post

Why Aren’t More Parents Vaccinating Their Kids Against Cancer?
by Erin Schumaker

The HPV vaccine got off to a rough start. For starters, the vaccine was originally only tested on and approved for girls and women. The vaccine wasn’t approved for boys until 2009, three years after it was Huffington Post Logointroduced, and wasn’t recommended for boys until 2011, according to NPR. “That was a terrible mistake,” Dr. Gregory Poland, who heads up Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group and serves as editor-in-chief of the journal Vaccine, told The Huffington Post. “It pretends that only women get or acquire the disease and that simply isn’t true.”

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique viewers.

Context: Gregory Poland, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious disease expert. Dr. Poland and his team within the Vaccine Research Group aim to improve the health of individuals across the world by pursuing challenges posed by infectious diseases and bioterrorism through clinical, laboratory and epidemiologic vaccine research.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Twin Cities Business
Mayo’s Kogod Center On Aging Spawning Spinoffs, Breakthrough Research
by Don Jacobson

The same Mayo Clinic lab that earlier this year spawned a buzzworthy anti-aging startup firm has recorded another research breakthrough connecting “senescent” human cells to age-related maladies—in this case, osteoarthritis. The Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging at Mayo Clinic is the home of researchers Jan van Deursen and Dr. James Kirkland (its director). They and colleagues have been investigating the roleTwin Cities Business Magazine Logo played in the aging process by senescent cells—living cells that have stopped reproducing due to age or damage.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Context:  Researchers at Mayo Clinic have shown that senescent cells – cells that no longer divide and accumulate with age – negatively impact health and shorten lifespan by as much as 35 percent in normal mice. The results, which appear today in Nature, demonstrate that clearance of senescent cells delays tumor formation, preserves tissue and organ function, and extends lifespan without observed adverse effects. “Cellular senescence is a biological mechanism that functions as an ‘emergency brake’ used by damaged cells to stop dividing,” says Jan van Deursen, Ph.D., Chair of Biochemistry and Molecular biology at Mayo Clinic, and senior author of the paper. “While halting cell division of these cells is important for cancer prevention, it has been theorized that once the ‘emergency brake’ has been pulled, these cells are no longer necessary.” More information on Mayo Clinic's aging research can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Megan Forliti

 

News4Jax
Father with ALS hopes 'Ice Bucket Challenge' continues
by Joy Purdy

The millions of people who helped participate in the 2014 "Ice Bucket Challenge" helped raise more than a $100 million to fund ALS research. Since that summer of 2014, two major discoveries have brought News Jax 4 Logoresearchers like Mayo Clinic's local Neurogeneticist Dr. Rosa Rademakers closer to understanding how the disease attacks the body. The more dollars donated will allow for more extensive the research, like ways to predict the disease before it strikes. "Identify individuals who are at risk of developing the disease, even before they have any symptoms," explained Rademakers. "Or, it will allow us to be able to say who will have a fast disease progression or slow disease progression. These are very important things that we're still working on."

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville. This Week in Jacksonville is a weekly public affairs program on WJXT.

Context: Rosa Rademakers, Ph.D., a neurogeneticist on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus,  receiveed one of the highest honors in neuroscience: the 2016 Potamkin Prize for Research in Pick’s, Alzheimer’s and Related Diseases. The $100,000 prize is an internationally recognized tribute for advancing dementia research. It recognizes major contributions to the understanding of the causes, prevention, treatment and cure for Pick's, Alzheimer's and related diseases. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Wall Street Journal
Don’t Wait Until You’re Older to Fight Getting Old
by Sumathi Reddy

One of the hallmarks of aging is sarcopenia, which is the progressive loss of skeletal muscle that starts in the 30s, says Nathan LeBrasseur, associate professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.  It becomes noticeable in the late 30s and early 40s, when losing weight often becomes more difficult, he says. The loss of muscle mass happens at a rate of about 10% per decade, he says, whileWSJ Banner muscle strength and power—the ability to generate force over time—declines even more dramatically. Dr. LeBrasseur says this may go beyond muscle loss, and be related to impaired brain signals and changes to the circulatory system.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Nathan LeBrasseur, Ph.D. is a Mayo Clinic researcher and is affiliated with Mayo Clinic's Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging and Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. More information about his work can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

WCCO CBS
Good Question: Why Are Knee Injuries So Common?
By Heather Brown

The Minnesota Vikings announced Tuesday that starting quarterback Teddy Bridgewater has a complete tear in his ACL— the anterior cruciate ligament. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons says it is WCCO logothe most common kind of knee injury, with more than 200,000 of them reported every year. “The knee is particularly vulnerable because it transmits all of the forces from the ground up to the body,” said Dr. Nancy Cummings, an orthopedic surgeon at the Mayo Clinic.

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

Additional Coverage:

KARE11, What is the anterior cruciate ligament, ACL? by Adrienne Broaddus — Dr. Nancy Cummings,  Mayo Clinic's Orthopedic surgeon and head physician for the Minnesota Lynx says the , restrains the knee from going into an abnormal position where other structures can get injured in the knee. "The ACL's purpose is to prevent your lower leg from moving forward on your upper leg when you do motion with your knee," she said. "A tear to your ACL is pretty serious. What it does is it puts other structures in knee at risk. It increases your risk of arthritis down the line."

Context: Nancy Cummings, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine physician.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

MPR
Mayo Clinic surgeon: Vikings' Bridgewater faces long recovery from knee injury

The Minnesota Vikings play the Los Angeles Rams Thursday night in a preseason game. It will be the team's first game since starting quarterback Teddy Bridgewater was injured during practice this week. Bridgewater dislocated his left knee and tore his ACL during non-contact drills on Tuesday. He'll have surgery soon and is expected to miss the remainder of the season. To find out more about the injury andMPR News logo how an athlete recovers from it, MPR's Cathy Wurzer spoke with Dr. Michael Stuart. He's an orthopedic surgeon specializing in knee injuries at the Mayo Clinic and the co-director of their sports medicine.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context:  Michael Stuart, M.D. is co-director, Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center, a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, sports performance optimization, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Star Tribune
NFL players with ACL injuries face uncertain recovery, shortened careers
by Jeremy Olson

Medical advances have made it possible for injured athletes such as Vikings quarterback Teddy Bridgewater to return from dislocated knees and ligament tears, according to physicians interviewed Wednesday, but Star Tribune Logothey nonetheless face long and uncertain roads to recovery… Improvements in surgical techniques and post-surgery rehab have turned a surefire career-ending injury into something that athletes such as Bridgewater can overcome, said Timothy Hewett, who directs the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Research Center. “Twenty-five years ago, they would have cast him and he would have come back with a bunch of scarring, and it would have taken months to decrease the stiffness in the joint. We know now that you immediately move it.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Tim Hewett, Ph.D. is Mayo Clinic sports medicine director of research, biomechanics. Dr. Hewett's research optimizes sports performance through a three-prong model he has developed. He expects to refine it at Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center so that it can be applied across the life span, from grade-school children to pro athletes to senior citizens.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

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Tags: Ability Learning Center, ACL, actigraphy, aging, Alzforum, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers, American Journal of Managed Care, AZ Big Media, back to school, Becker’s Hospital Review, body donation


August 19th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Reuters
Can season and place of birth influence celiac disease risk?
by Lisa Rapaport

Winter babies and people born in places with shorter days and less sunlight might have a lower risk of developing celiac disease than peers born in warmer regions or seasons, a Swedish study suggests … Among other things, global warming, variation in the type of spring weather and the timing of changing seasons could potentially explain some of the differences in risk found in the study, said Dr. Joseph Murray, directorReuters Logo of the celiac disease program at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

Reach: Reuters has 196 editorial bureaus in 130 countries and 2,400 editorial staff members and covers international news, regional news, politics, social issues, health, business, sports and media.

Additional coverage: KFGO Fargo

Context: Joseph Murray, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist. Dr. Murray's research focuses in two distinct areas:  celiac disease or gluten sensitivity and enteropathy and esophageal disorders.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Outside magazine
Are Olympians Really Getting Older?
By Nicholas Hung

No, it’s not just you. From Michael Phelps to Kristin Armstrong, the 43-year-old American cyclist who just won her third gold in three consecutive Games, Olympic athletes really are getting older…To start, there’s Outsidethe physiological component, says Michael J. Joyner, a physician and researcher at the Mayo Clinic specializing in exercise physiology. Athletes are staying healthier longer due to improvements in training and recovery techniques. It’s different now, and somebody like Phelps can really cash in,” says Joyner. If someone stays healthy and stays motivated, he or she “can really compete into a late age.”

Reach: Outside Magazine has a monthly circulation of more than 688,000 and is geared toward the enthusiast of various outdoor activities. Its website receives more than 690,000 unique visitors each month.

Related coverage with Dr. Joyner:
Business Insider, 4 athletes show the perfect body types for Olympic sports
NY Magazine, Olympic Champions’ Minds Are Quieter Than Yours
TIME, The 5 Key Factors for Breaking Olympic Records
Sports IllustratedWhat does it take to break a world record at the Olympics?
New York magazine, Britain’s 42-Year-Old Distance Runner Is a Sign of Athletics to Come

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist.  Dr. Joyner's research team is interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

ActionNewsJax
Expert says federal funding for Zika vaccine falls short of what's needed in long run
by Samantha Manning

Dr. Greg Poland, a Zika vaccine researcher at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, told Action News Jax the federal funding falls far short. “It is a step in the right direction but terribly inadequate,” Poland saidActionNewsJax. “There needs to be a substantial and sustained commitment to dealing with the problem that is directly affecting the health of Americans and for which they themselves can’t do much to protect themselves against. This is the role of a federal government.” Poland said the phases for developing vaccines can take years and estimates roughly $1 billion is needed to fund a vaccine for this kind of a virus.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Context: Gregory Poland, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious disease expert. Dr. Poland and his team within the Vaccine Research Group aim to improve the health of individuals across the world by pursuing challenges posed by infectious diseases and bioterrorism through clinical, laboratory and epidemiologic vaccine research.

Contacts: Kevin PunksyBob Nellis

 

ABC 15 Arizona
Mayo Clinic offers tips to prevent atrial fibrillation (A-fib)

Todd Hurst, M.D., Mayo Clinic Cardiologist, joined the hosts of Sonoran Living Live to discuss the increasing prevalence of atrial fibrillation, the most common form of arrhythmia, and the dramatic impact that ABC affiliate, channel 15 in Arizonamodest weight loss and exercise can have on patient outcomes. Find out about more about heart disease and treatment by joining ABC15's Rally for Red, and from Mayo Clinic staff members each month on Sonoran Living Live.

Reach:  KNXV-TV, ABC 15, is the ABC television station affiliate in Phoenix, Arizona.

Context: R. Todd Hurst, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

KIMT-TV
Mayo Clinic working to advance research on aging
by DeeDee Stiepan

Mayo Clinic is hoping to speed up the pace at which interventions that could delay or prevent these diseases are discovered. They’re doing so by collaborating with academic aging centers around the world, KIMTincluding the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and University of Alabama at Birmingham. “So far, we’ve been going organ system by organ system saying can we generate enough proof of concept in experimental models, in cells and in mice to say, “yeah, we think this might actually improve a multitude of conditions that are associated with aging,” explains Jordan Miller, Ph. D. with the Cardiovascular Disease and Aging Lab. Dr. Miller says the next big step, is figuring out how to show those are safe for humans.

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Additional coverage: Siasat Daily

Context: Mayo Clinic, along with other members of the Geroscience Network, has published six manuscripts that map strategies for taking new drugs that target processes underlying aging into clinical trials. Researchers believe that these agents hold promise for treating multiple age-related diseases and disabilities. The articles appear today in The Journals of Gerontology: Series A – Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences. The Geroscience Network, formed by James Kirkland, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging; Steve Austad, Ph.D., University of Alabama at Birmingham; and Nir Barzilai, M.D., Albert Einstein College of Medicine, consists of 18 academic aging centers, along with the participation of more than 100 investigators from across the U.S. and Europe. The network is funded by the National Institutes of Health. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Megan Forliti

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Tags: ABC 15 Arizona, ActionNewsJax, aging, Alternet, alzheimers, Assurex, ASU, atheter-associated urinary tract infections, atrial fibrillation, Bioresorbable Stent, blood donation, blood shortage


July 1st, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

NBC News
Google Partners With Harvard, Mayo Clinic for Symptom Search Feature

Google is rolling out a new health feature called symptom search, which is designed to pinpoint a potential problem when you search symptoms — from your mobile device.nbcnews.com

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: KAAL-TV

Previous coverage in June 24, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: When people seek information on health-related symptoms, many turn to the internet, and Google in particular, as the first stop. Now, when consumers access Google’s mobile search for information about certain symptoms, they will get facts on relevant related medical conditions up front on their smartphone or other mobile device. For example, a symptom search — even one using common language free of medical terminology like “my tummy hurts” or “nose blocked” — will show a list of related conditions. For individual symptoms like “headache,” searchers will see overview information as well as have the ability to view self-treatment options and suggestions of when to seek help from a healthcare professional.  To ensure quality and accuracy, teams of doctors, including expert clinicians at Mayo Clinic, have written or reviewed individual symptom information and evaluated related conditions. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

WCCO-TV
Doctors At Mayo Clinic Using Viruses To Fight Cancer

Doctors at Mayo Clinic are using deadly viruses to fight a deadly disease. Just last month, the Food and Drug Administration gave breakthrough status to a cancer therapy that uses the polio virus to combat brain WCCO-TV 4tumors. “We do have one of the oldest programs, not just in this country, but in the world,” Dr. Eva Galanis said. Galanis leads the Mayo’s virus therapy program, which started in 1994. It uses a number of viruses to attack cancer cells.

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

Additional coverage: MSN.com

Context: Evanthia "Eva" Galanis, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic is an orthopedic oncologist with Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. Dr. Galanis has a long-standing interest in developing novel therapeutic approaches for cancer treatment. The focus of her laboratory is to develop and optimize novel virotherapy approaches with special emphasis on paramyxoviruses. A number of different strategies are tested, including use of therapeutic transgenes; trackable markers; combinations with small molecules, cytotoxic agents and radiation therapy; re-targeting of viral strains against tumor-specific antigens; development of novel viral delivery approaches; and exploration of immunomodulatory methods to modify humoral and innate immunity as a means of optimizing virotherapy efficacy.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Florida Times-Union
'Giving my kidney a send-off:' Jacksonville woman starts a kidney donation chain stretching to 9 people
by Matt Soergel

Jennifer Tamol was plenty nervous the evening before she went to the hospital to donate one of her kidneys to a complete stranger, someone in Minnesota who was awaiting his or her chance for a new, better life…She decided four years ago to donate a kidney, and reached out to Mayo Clinic. She took a week’s worth of vacation then to go through a battery of tests, and was tested periodically after that. There were a couple of Florida Times-Union newspaper logofalse alarms where she thought there was a suitable recipient, though something went awry each time.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Martin Mai, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic nephrologist and also chair of the division of transplant medicine at Mayo Clinic in Florida.  Mayo Clinic's kidney transplant doctors and surgeons use proven innovations to successfully treat people with kidney failure and complications of diabetes and other diseases. Their experience in using minimally invasive surgery, new medicines to prevent organ rejection and specialized procedures makes Mayo Clinic a leader in transplant outcomes. Mayo Clinic surgeons perform more than 600 kidney transplants a year, including for people with very challenging kidney conditions who need special solutions and surgeries. And Mayo Clinic kidney transplant teams in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota are leaders in living-donor kidney transplants. People who receive a kidney from a living donor usually have fewer complications than those who receive a kidney from a deceased donor.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

TIME
Electronic health records and digital clerical work are strongly linked to burnout
by Mandy Oaklander

Of all professionals in the U.S., doctors experience some of the highest rates of burnout: the feeling of being so emotionally exhausted from work that you start to feel indifferent about those you’re serving. Time magazine logoResearchers at the Mayo Clinic looked at several months of 2014 survey data from 6,560 U.S. physicians measuring features of work life, including burnout and electronic use. Even after controlling for factors like age, sex, specialty and the number of hours doctors work per week, the researchers found a strong link between burnout and time spent doing digital work.

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:
ReutersBecker’s Orthopedic & Spine, HealthLeaders Media, KAAL-TV, KIMT-TVKTTC-TV, HealthDay, Health Data Management, Deccan Chronicle, Science Daily, Headlines & Global NewsFOX News, Tech Times, Doctors Lounge

Context: The growth and evolution of the electronic environment in health care is taking a toll on U.S. physicians. That’s according to a national study of physicians led by Mayo Clinic which shows the use of electronic health records and computerized physician order entry leads to lower physician satisfaction and higher rates of professional burnout. The findings appear in Mayo Clinic Proceedings“Electronic health records hold great promise for enhancing coordination of care and improving quality of care,” says Tait Shanafelt, M.D., Mayo Clinic physician and lead author of the study. “In their current form and implementation, however, they have had a number of unintended negative consequences including reducing efficiency, increasing clerical burden and increasing the risk of burnout for physicians.” In collaboration with investigators from the American Medical Association (AMA), researchers from Mayo Clinic assembled a national sample of U.S. physicians using the AMA Physician Masterfile, a near complete record of alMl U.S. physicians. The survey included validated instruments to assess burnout, as well as items developed specifically for the study to evaluate the electronic practice environment of the participating physicians. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Wall Street Journal
How Telemedicine Is Transforming Health Care
by Melinda Beck

At the Mayo Clinic, doctors who treat out-of-state patients can follow up with them via phone, email or web chats when they return home, but they can only discuss the conditions they treated in person. “If the patient wants to talk about a new problem, the doctor has to be licensed in that state to discuss it. If not, the patient should talk to his primary-care physician about it,” says Steve Ommen, a cardiologist whoWSJ Banner runs Mayo’s Connected Care program.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Steve Ommen, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist and is also medical director of Connected Care. Telehealth is simply using digital information and communication technologies, such as computers and mobile devices, to manage your health and well-being. Telehealth, also called e-health or m-health (mobile health), includes a variety of health care services, including but not limited to:

  • Online support groups
  • Online health information and self-management tools
  • Email and online communication with health care providers
  • Electronic health records
  • Remote monitoring of vital signs, such as blood pressure, or symptoms
  • Video or online doctor visits

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Huffington Post
This Is What A Poop Transplant Actually Looks Like
by Anna Almendrala

The procedure might sound disgusting and messy, but as the video clip from VICE shows, the procedure typically takes place in an extremely well-controlled and sterile hospital environment, and takes less than 10 minutes to complete. In the clip, doctors from the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota inject a mix of healthy poop and saline into a patient suffering from C-diff, and you won’t feel like gagging even once.Huffington Post Logo

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique visitors.

Context: Stephanie Bennett chronicle's her story in an In the Loop feature and her physician Sahil Khanna, M.B.B.S., a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist, discusses fecal transplant treatment of C. difficile at Mayo.

Contact: Joe Dangor

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Tags: ABC13 Houston, African American women, aging, alzheimer's disease, Austin Herald, autoimmune neurological disorders, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, brain waves, Brain-eating amoeba, Bring Me the News, bronchopleural fistulas, C. diff


June 17th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Huffington Post
8 Reasons You Can’t Get Rid Of Your Belly Fat
by Emily Haak

A lot of medications have weight gain as a potential side effect, but corticosteroids like prednisone (used to treat arthritis, multiple sclerosis and more) and cortisone (used for arthritis, ulcerative colitis, among other conditions) lead to pounds in your stomach, specifically, says Michael
Huffington Post LogoJensen, MD, an endocrinologist and obesity expert at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. They’re often used to treat asthma too.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique visitors.

Context:  Michael Jensen, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Jensen and his lab study the effects of obesity and how body fat (adipose tissue) and body fat distribution influence health. The regulated uptake, storage and release of fatty acids from adipose tissue play a major role in determining its health effects.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

MPR
Mayo Clinic touts planned bio-research campus

The next big phase of Rochester's transformation is getting underway. A few years ago, Mayo Clinic initiated a 20-year plan called the MPR News logoDestination Medical Center... Wednesday, Mayo is starting the process of finding a developer to start building one of those districts. It's called Discovery Square. It will be a big bio-research campus that will more than double the footprint Mayo currently has in Rochester. Tom Weber talked with Dr. John Noseworthy, President and CEO of Mayo Clinic.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Additional coverage:
KTTC-TV, Mayo's Discovery Square to bring big changes to downtown
Twin Cities Business magazine, Mayo’s ‘Transformational Centers’ Could Be First Beneficiaries Of DMC Build-Out
Sioux Falls Argus LeaderWest Central Tribune, NuJournal

Previous Discovery Square coverage in June 10, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Contact: Karl Oestreich

 

Forbes
Why Aren't Women Told About New, Better Way To Detect Breast Cancer? A Real Scandal
by Steve Forbes

Mammograms aren’t very good at discovering early-stage cancers in women who have dense breast tissue, which accounts for about 45% of all women. But there is a major advance whose efficacy has been confirmed in a study conducted by the Mayo Clinic . It’s called molecular breastForbes magazine logo imaging (MBI), and it vastly improves the chances of early detection.

Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Deborah Rhodes, M.D., is a physician with Mayo Clinic's Breast Diagnostic Clinic. Dr. Rhodes studies the application of a new breast imaging device, molecular breast imaging, to breast cancer screening. The long-term goal of Dr. Rhodes' research is to develop an individualized approach to breast cancer screening that incorporates breast density, age, and other factors that impact breast cancer risk and mammography sensitivity. Dr. Rhodes recently spoke at Forbes Women's Summit 2016.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
Mayo Clinic transplantation leader wins top honor
by Alexa Epitropoulos

A pioneer in transplantation at the Mayo Clinic has been awarded one of the top honors in his field. The American Society of Transplantation Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logogave its Lifetime Achievement Award to Dr. Thomas Gonwa, who has been working at Mayo's Jacksonville campus since 2001. Gonwa has, during his time at Mayo, worked to advance its organ transplant program, particularly liver transplantation, where he has done significant research on transplant patients who suffer from chronic kidney disease. He has had a particular focus on promoting regenerative medicine.

Reach:  The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals

Context: Thomas Gonwa, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic nephrologist at Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida. His primary research interests have been in the development of new immunosuppressive drug regimens in solid organ transplantation.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

ABC15 Arizona
Mayo Clinic discusses cholesterol and the importance of your numbers

Reza Arsanjani, M.D., Mayo Clinic Cardiologist, joined the hosts of Sonoran Living Live to discuss cholesterol and how important it is to know your cholesterol numbers.ABC affiliate, channel 15 in Arizona

Reach:  KNXV-TV, ABC 15, is the ABC television station affiliate in Phoenix, Arizona.

Additional coverage on ABC15 Arizona:

ABC15 Arizona, Want to be heart healthy? Go to sleep!

Context: Reza Arsanjani, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Mayo Clinic's top-ranked team of cardiologists diagnoses and treats many heart conditions, including many rare and complex disorders. Mayo Clinic's Division of Cardiovascular Diseases is one of the largest and most integrated in the United States, with locations in Arizona, Florida, Minnesota and several communities throughout Mayo Clinic Health System. Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota include more than 200 cardiologists and 1,100 allied health staff trained in caring for heart patients.

Contact:  Jim McVeigh

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Tags: 2Paragraphs, ABC News, ABC15 Arizona, ActionNewsJax, active shooter, aging, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimers, Amber Kohnhorst, atrial fibrillation, Audio Boom WJR News/Talk, baby shower


May 27th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Wall Street Journal
Shoulder Surgery Is the New Testing Ground for Painkiller Alternatives
by Laura Landro

Some of the techniques to control pain have been around in some form for years. But their use in combination, known as multimodal management, is gaining popularity amid mounting concern about an epidemic of opioid addiction. A July 2015 study in Mayo Clinic ProceedingsWSJ Banner found one in four people who were prescribed a narcotic painkiller for the first time progressed to long-term prescriptions, putting them at risk for dependence and dangerous side effects.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Opioid painkiller addiction and accidental overdoses have become far too common across the United States. To try to identify who is most at risk, Mayo Clinic researchers studied how many patients prescribed an opioid painkiller for the first time progressed to long-term prescriptions. The answer: 1 in 4. People with histories of tobacco use and substance abuse were likeliest to use opioid painkillers long-term. More information about the Mayo Clinic Proceedings study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

NBC News
At-Home Test Could Help in Colon Cancer Battle

Millions of Americans who have avoided colonoscopies in the past can now get a home test to screen for colon cancer, the second leading cause of nbcnews.comcancer-related deaths in the U.S.

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Context: An endoscopist’s knowledge of a positive Cologuard test improves colonoscopy performance, according to a poster presentation at last week’s Digestive Disease Week conference. Cologuard is an at-home, stool-DNA colorectal cancer screening test that has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. This test, available by prescription only, is reimbursed by Medicare and covered by an increasing number of commercial health care plans. Researchers from Mayo Clinic compared results of colonoscopies following a positive result from Cologuard (unblinded) with colonoscopies performed by those who were not aware of the Cologuard result (blinded).  Unblinded endoscopists found polyps or hemorrhagic lesions 83 percent of the time and precancerous polyps in 70 percent of patients, compared to 68 and 53 percent of blinded endoscopists, respectively. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

CBS News
What is altitude sickness and why is it so dangerous?
by Mary Brophy Marcus

Altitude sickness is actually a constellation of different conditions that occur when the body doesn't have enough time to adapt to the lower air pressure and lower oxygen level at high altitudes, explains Dr. Clayton Cowl, chair of the division of preventive, occupational and aerospaceCBS News Logo medicine at the Mayo Clinic. "The body doesn't like things to be out of kilter," Cowl, who's also a pulmonologist, told CBS News.

Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

Context:  Clayton Cowl, M.D. heads Mayo Clinic's preventive, occupational and aerospace medicine. The division consists of 22 physicians who have specialty training in internal medicine or family practice and a team of trained occupational health nurses. Several of our physicians are board-certified in preventive, occupational and/or aerospace medicine. Mayo Clinic's integrated group practice model makes consultation with any other medical specialists readily available.

Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

News4Jax
This Week In Jacksonville: Mayo Clinic

Interview with Dr. Gianrico Farrugia.

News Jax 4 LogoReach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville. This Week in Jacksonville is a weekly public affairs program on WJXT.

Context: Gianrico Farrugia, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vice president and CEO of Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
The big problems with obesity
by Jill Daly

There’s been a steep increase in the prevalence of obesity in the United States since 2011, according to Ursula Bauer, director of the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, speaking before journalists in a National Press Foundation program earlier thisPittsburgh Post-Gazette Logo year. Treating people who are obese for pneumonia and the flu has been challenging, according to vaccine researcher Gregory Poland of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who also spoke at the journalists program this year. He said people who are obese often develop low-grade chronic inflammation, so their immune system cannot respond well to antibiotics and vaccines. Normal immune responses are interfered with, on a cellular level.

Reach: The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette has a daily circulation of more than 140,00 readers. It's website has more than 1 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Gregory Poland, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious disease expert. Dr. Poland and his team within the Vaccine Research Group aim to improve the health of individuals across the world by pursuing challenges posed by infectious diseases and bioterrorism through clinical, laboratory and epidemiologic vaccine research.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

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Tags: AccuWeather, advisory board, aging, AJMC.com, altitude sickness, Amber Kohnhorst, Angie Puffer, Baxalta, Beacon Health System, Becker's Hospital News, Becker’s Hospital Review, Biostage Inc.


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