Items Tagged ‘alcohol’

December 23rd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. This will be our last edition of 2016.  Look for us again on January 6, 2017. Thank you and happy holidays.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Los Angeles Times
A senior-friendly workout to improve movement and prevent injury

Jogging outdoors, running on a treadmill or lifting weights at the gym aren’t always practical — or enjoyable — activities for everyone. However, one type of exercise works for everyone, no matter your age or ability, because it relies on improving practical movements often involved inLogo for Los Angeles Times newspaper everyday activities. “Natural movement is universal, and it’s about bringing movement back to the basics,” says Bradly Prigge, wellness exercise specialist with the Mayo Clinic’s Healthy Living Program. “It’s not about following the latest fitness craze or learning the newest secret to weight loss. Natural movement is about connecting with your body and cultivating an awareness of your full abilities.”

Reach:  The Los Angeles Times has a daily readership of 1.9 million and 2.9 million on Sunday, more than 8 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.5 million. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 128 years.

Additional coverage: Mountain Grove News-Journal

Other recent coverage in the Los Angeles Times related to Mayo Clinic's Healthy Living Program

Cosmopolitan, Do You Really Need to Take Vitamins?
WTOP Washington, Mayo Clinic expert: 4 actions for a healthy holiday season
Yahoo! News, 9 Ways to Boost Your Immune System by Michael O Schroeder
WEAU Eau ClaireTODAY INTERVIEW: Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Recipes

Previous coverage related to Mayo Clinic's Healthy Living program in the December 2, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life.

Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Joe Dangor

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic in Rochester adds customized plane to air fleet

The Mayo Clinic in Rochester has unveiled a customized $8.5 million airplane to transport high-risk patients to its facilities. The fixed-wing aircraft adds to the Mayo One fleet that was created in 1984. The program began with a single helicopter based in Rochester and now boasts four — two in Rochester, one in Mankato and one in Eau Claire, Wisconsin.Star Tribune newspaper logo

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: KSTP, Becker’s Hospital Review, KIMT

Context: While a certain red sled usually owns the flight-related headlines this month, Santa's sleigh isn't the only one getting press this December. Several news outlets, it seems, are reporting on another vehicle taking flight. But instead of delivering toys to good girls and boys, the new Mayo One airplane delivers patients in need of immediate, advanced care to Mayo Clinic. And like Santa's ride, this one also has some pretty unique features, and the equipment, medication and staff to make it function as a sky-high Emergency Department. You can read more about the new Mayo one airplane in Mayo Clinic in the Loop.

Contact:  Glenn Lyden

 

KIMT
St. Mary’s nurse returns to work after hiking accident
by DeeDee Stiepan

It’s an incredible story of survival that we first brought you in May when a St. Mary’s nurse fell 100ft while hiking in Arizona. Amber Kohnhorst spent 24 hours in extreme pain, without food or water until she was KIMT LOGOrescued by helicopter. Now, the 25-year old is back in Rochester, and it’s been quite some time since she was working as a Registered Nurse on the 5th floor at St. Mary’s Hospital. “My last shift was Friday May 13th, she tells us. “I’ve never really believed in Friday the 13th but now it kind of freaks me out.”

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Previous coverage in December 2, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Amber Kohnhorst loves animals and adventure. The trip she'd planned to Best Friends Animal Sanctuary in Utah promised both. She'd spend time volunteering at the shelter and do some hiking in nearby Cane Beds, Arizona. But what sounded like a perfect vacation quickly became a nightmare when the 25-year-old Mayo Clinic nurse fell 100 feet down a cliff during what was supposed to be a short hike. You can read more about Amber's story on Mayo Clinic In the Loop.

Contacts:  Ginger Plumbo, Kelly Reller

 

NBC News
Why Heart Attacks Are Striking Healthy Young Women
by Lauren Dunn and Parminder Deo

Researchers are discovering that SCAD heart attacks occur more frequently than once thought..."SCAD is a type of heart attack, but completely NBC News Logodifferent than the one we normally think of," says cardiologist Dr. Sharonne Hayes of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. "It's caused by a split or tear in an otherwise healthy artery that leads to a drop in blood flow to the heart leading to a heart attack."

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Context:  Sharonne Hayes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Hayes studies cardiovascular disease and prevention, with a focus on sex and gender differences and conditions that uniquely or predominantly affect women. With a clinical base in the Women's Heart Clinic, Dr. Hayes and her research team utilize novel recruitment methods, social media and online communities, DNA profiling, and sex-specific evaluations to better understand several cardiovascular conditions. A major area of focus is spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD), an uncommon and under-recognized cause of acute coronary syndrome (heart attack) that occurs predominantly in young women.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic sees innovation as key to the future

Mayo Clinic recognizes the historic changes taking place in the health care landscape. The health care provider has become famous for treating the whole patient by integrating various specialties of care. Now Mayo is going to be using its of health care innovation system as a model for generating revenue. Mayo-Jacksonville is setting aside spaces for innovators and is taking part in more collaborations.Florida Times-Union newspaper logo

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Charles Bruce, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist and serves as medical director of Mayo Clinic Ventures at Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville, Florida. James (Jim) Rogers is chair of Mayo's newly formed Business Development Department, which combines the functions of Mayo Clinic Ventures and the Office of Business Development. The new department will oversee Mayo's partnerships with external organizations, spearhead new business opportunities and support the advancement of medical technology in conjunction with Mayo Clinic leaders, entrepreneurs and inventors.

Contacts: Kevin Punsky, Duska Anastasijevic

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Tags: ABC15 Arizona, AccuWeather.com, advisory board, Affordable care act, Alatus, alcohol, Amber Kohnhorst, American Medical Association, anesthesia, Angie Murad, antibiotics, antidepressants


November 23rd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

STAT
Mayo leaders: A nine-fold path to preventing burnout

We’ve talked about burnout before, and it seems like lots of hospitals have ideas to combat it. Well, Mayo Clinic has some more ideas – nine of them, to be precise. In the issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings released today, Dr. Tait Shanafelt, director of Mayo’s Program on Physician Well-STAT Logo of Boston Globebeing, and Dr. John Noseworthy, Mayo’s CEO, say administrators can’t force doctors to fight this battle on their own. “Burnout is a system issue, and addressing it is the shared responsibility of both the individuals and health care organizations,” Shanafelt writes.

Reach: STAT covers the frontiers of health and medicine including science labs, hospitals, biotechnology board rooms, and political back rooms. Hosted by The Boston Globe, STAT launched on November 5, 2015. The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Additional coverage: News-Medical.net, Cardiovascular Business, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, FierceHealthcare

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic have been documenting the rise and costs of physician burnout for more than a decade. Now, they are proposing nine strategies that health care organizations can use to reverse the trend and limit the risk to patients and their medical staff. Tait Shanafelt, M.D., director of Mayo Clinic’s Program on Physician Well-being, and John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic, offer the nine-point plan in the current issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings“Research has shown that more than half of U.S. physicians are experiencing symptoms of burnout, and the rate is increasing,” says Dr. Shanafelt, first author of the article. “Unfortunately, many organizations see burnout as a personal problem to be addressed by the individual physician. It is clear, however, that burnout is a system issue, and addressing it is the shared responsibility of both the individuals and health care organizations.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Washington Post
A non-pill treatment for many chronic illnesses: Exercise

Exercise isn’t good only for building muscle and losing weight. “If a pill could give you all benefits of exercise, it would be the best pill around,” Washington Post newspaper logosays Edward Laskowski, co-director of Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine and a specialist in physical medicine and rehabilitation. Yet doctors underprescribe exercise, even though research shows that it can deliver comparable benefits to drugs and surgery with fewer side effects, according to a recent review in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. Here’s how to safely get the disease-fighting benefits of exercise…

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Edward Laskowski, M.D., co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center, a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, sports performance optimization, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Huffington Post
Why You Might Be Losing Your Sense of Taste As You Age
by Bill Ward

Our mouths perceive just five elements — sweet, sour, bitter, salt and umami (glutamate). They also can tell if there’s fat in food, said Dr. Erin O’Brien, a rhinologist in the Mayo Clinic’s Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Rochester, Minn. “As you chew food, the flavor is released andHuffington Post Logo you smell it through the back of the nose,” O’Brien said. “If you’re eating strawberry ice cream, your tongue will tell you it’s sweet, but it won’t know the flavor. The nose tells you it’s strawberry. That’s the difference between taste and flavor.”

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique viewers.

Context: Erin O'Brien, M.D, is a Mayo Clinic otorhinolaryngology (ENT). The Department of Otorhinolaryngology (ear, nose and throat or ENT) at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota provides a full range of medical and surgical services for pediatric and adult patients with head and neck disorders and diseases.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

FirstCoastNews
A day in the life of a cancer survivor; Judi Zitiello
by Keitha Nelson-Williams

Eighty-five percent of people diagnosed with pancreatic cancer will die with-in six months. Judi Zitiello was diagnosed in 2014, and she's still First Coast News Logoliving to this day. But every three months, as she goes to the Mayo Clinic for a CT scan, life stands still for the mother of four and grandmother of seven with one on the way…FCN sat down with Dr. Pashtoon Kasi, M.D. Assistant Professor, GI Oncology at the Mayo Clinic to discuss the lethal cancer and why there are so few survivors. "The tumor itself it's a pretty unforgiving disease," said Kasi. "Unlike some of the other tumors this causes a lot of dense fibrous tissue around it. So a lot of the drugs are not able to get to it."

Reach: First Coast News refers to two television stations in Jacksonville, Florida. WJXX, the ABC affiliate and WTLV, the NBC affiliate.

Context: Pashtoon Kasi, M.B.B.S. is a Mayo Clinic oncologist and hematologist. An avid runner, Judi Zitiello, 66, was forced into a six-week hiatus when she developed a meniscus tear in early 2014. The retired financial executive was always active – exercising, hosting dinner parties, and volunteering to run the JT Townsend Foundation, a Jacksonville, Florida, philanthropic organization. Judi wasn’t too concerned about the downtime at first. She knew her body would take time to heal. But the pain lingered. Then Judi began losing weight and her energy waned. "I didn't have the energy to get off the couch. I didn’t feel well. I was just not myself," Judi recalls. Still, she thought it must be related to her knee injury. But when she began experiencing severe itching on her arms and torso, and her stool turned a clay color, Judi knew it was time to see someone other than the physical therapist. Little did she realize she would be starting a fight against pancreatic cancer. You can read more about Judi's story on Sharing Mayo Clinic and Mayo Clinic in the Loop.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

Arizona Republic
Ask a Doc: Making surgery safer for high-risk bleeders

Question: What research is underway to help those at high risk for bleeding during medical procedures? Answer: As Arizona Republic newspaper logoa vascular interventional radiologist at Mayo Clinic, I treat patients with a wide range of vascular diseases and disorders. When I’m not performing procedures, I’m in the lab researching ways to improve current therapies, making the experience even safer and more effective for our patients, especially those who are at high risk for bleeding… — Dr. Rahmi Oklu

Reach: The Arizona Republic has daily circulation of more than 180,000 and its website azcentral.com has more than 2.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic, Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are developing a biomaterial that has potential to protect patients at high risk for bleeding in surgery. The Nov. 16 cover article, “An Injectable Shear-Thinning Biomaterial for Endovascular Embolization,” in the journal Science Translational Medicine reports on a universal shear-thinning biomaterial that may provide an alternative for treating vascular bleeding. The study’s lead co-author Rahmi Oklu, M.D., Ph.D., a vascular interventional radiologist at Mayo Clinic’s Arizona campus, explains shear-thinning biomaterial offers many advantages over metallic coils, the current gold standard. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

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Tags: ABC15 Arizona, acupuncture, Affordable care act, aging, alcohol, Alzforum, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers, Aneurysm, Arizona Republic, Becker’s Hospital Review, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine


September 9th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

 

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Star Tribune
Mortenson picked for Destination Medical Center's Discovery Square
By Nicole Norfleet

M.A. Mortenson Co. has been chosen as the developer for the research campus of Mayo Clinic’s Destination Medical Center (DMC) in downtown Rochester. The six-block subdistrict which will be called Discovery Square is supposed to “serve as a point where physicians and scientists willStar Tribune newspaper logo come together with businesses and entrepreneurs to accelerate advancements in medical research and technology for critical advances in patient care,” according to an announcement.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: Twin Cities Business, Post-Bulletin, KAAL-TV, Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal, KIMTConstruction DiveHealthcare DesignFinance & CommerceTwin Cities Business, Post-Bulletin, KAAL-TV, Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal, KIMT

Context: Mayo Clinic announced recently that it will collaborate with M.A. Mortenson Company, a real estate development firm for Destination Medical Center’s (DMC) Discovery Square. Discovery Square will serve as a point where physicians and scientists will come together with businesses and entrepreneurs to accelerate advancements in medical research and technology for critical advances in patient care. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

US News & World Report
At Mayo Clinic, Researchers Burrow Into Burnout
by Steve Sternberg

If the Mayo Clinic – widely regarded as one of the most enlightened health systems in the world – struggles with high rates of physician burnout, US News Logono health system is immune of its physicians suffer from burnout because they have created a team, led by Dr. Tait Shanafelt, that studies professional satisfaction among physicians and other health workers…Shanafelt's residency included a month devoted to a research topic of his choice. He described his observations to his research adviser, who theorized that the residents were suffering from burnout and said, "Let's put together a team and explore it." Their resulting study of residents at University of Washington-affiliated hospitals appeared in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine in 2002.

Reach: U.S. News & World Report is a multi-platform publisher of news and information, which includes http://www.usnews.com and http://www.rankingsandreviews.com.

Context: Tait Shanaflet, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic hematologist. He is the director of the Mayo Clinic Department of Medicine Program on Physician Well-being, a clinical laboratory evaluating personal and organizational factors that contribute to physician satisfaction. His research in this area has involved physicians at all stages of their career from medical school to practice had has include several multi-center and national studies. This research is intended to identify personal and organizational factors that can be modified in order to promote physician well-being and enhance the quality of care physicians deliver. More information on his physician burnout research can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Current
MPR and Mayo Clinic team up to offer classical soundtrack
by April Simpson

Minnesota Public Radio and the Mayo Clinic are promoting health and healing through a unique partnership that launched Thursday. Research has shown that the benefits of listening to music include improved pain control and lowered anxiety and blood pressure. So MPR will curate aCurrent news logo playlist of classical compositions for the listening pleasure of patients at Mayo Clinic hospitals in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota.

Reach: Current is the nonprofit news service for and about public media in the U.S. Current publishes online daily and in print - 16 issues in 2016.

Additional coverage: Malaysia SunTwin Cities Business

Context: Patients at Mayo Clinic hospitals in Rochester; Jacksonville, Florida; and Phoenix will be able to relax to a custom blend of classical music provided by Minnesota Public Radio (MPR), beginning Sept. 1. A new agreement calls for MPR’s national programming division, American Public Media (APM) — the largest provider of classical music programming in North America — to supply up to 17 hours of streaming classical music that Mayo Clinic can distribute at no charge to patients and visitors in patient rooms. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Deb Anderson

 

WJXT Jacksonville
Pediatricians say ‘no’ to FluMist
by Ashley Harding

Since it became available several years ago, the FluMist nasal spray was a big relief. But parents, be prepared for that dreaded trip to the doctor now because it's not an option this season. "It's believed that the shot News Jax 4 Logois actually more effective," said Dr. Vandana Bhide with Mayo Clinic. She says the reason why the FluMist isn't working as well is hard to explain. "I don't think we know exactly why. I think because the injectable one is seen by the entire body in the bloodstream, perhaps the immune system responds better," said Dr. Bhide.

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville. This Week in Jacksonville is a weekly public affairs program on WJXT.

Context: Vandana Bhide, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic internist and pediatrician.

Contact: Kevin Punksy

 

STAT
Raising an alarm, doctors fight to yank hospital ICUs into the modern era
by Usha Lee McFarling

In a modern ICU, a single patient can generate 2,000 data points per day, said Dr. Brian Pickering, an anesthesiologist and critical care physician at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. In a 24-bed ICU like his, that’s 50,000 data points a day. Important information is easily lost, or forgotten. Pickering joined the Mayo Clinic nine years ago from Ireland, where patient data was still logged on a paper chart at the end of theSTAT Logo of Boston Globe bed. He was overwhelmed, he said, by electronic records in the United States that had too many tabs and screens and were difficult to navigate. “Point. Click. Point. Click. Point. Click. Back and forth,” he said. “That may work if you’ve only got one patient. But I’ve got 24 in the ICU, and any one of them could be in crisis at any minute.” With colleagues, Pickering created an “electronic intern,” called AWARE, that identifies the most important information a physician needs and highlights it, organizing it around organ systems.

Reach: STAT covers the frontiers of health and medicine including science labs, hospitals, biotechnology board rooms, and political back rooms. Hosted by The Boston Globe, STAT launched on November 5, 2015. The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Context:  Brian Pickering, M.B., B.Ch., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist. Dr. Pickering has been involved in the development of novel electronic interfaces for use in the intensive care unit (ICU) that facilitate reduced cognitive load, medical errors and resource utilization. He has extensive experience in evaluating systems of health care delivery and in the delivery of quality improvements to those systems.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

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Tags: ABC News, alcohol, alzheimers, Arcadia, Becker’s Hospital Review, blood pressure, Bloomberg, Camp Oz, Constructive Dive, Consumer Reports, Current, destination medical center


February 28th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

LA Times
Bit by bit, a more fit workplace
by Rene Lynch

Nearly all of us need to make more time for fitness. Finding that time, though, can seem impossible. But what if you could wedge that workout in at work? If it sounds far-fetched (or a great way to get yourself fired), listen up. Dr. James Levine, an obesity expert at theLogo for Los Angeles Times newspaper Mayo Clinic, says Americans don't need to log more time at a gym. Instead, they need to banish their sedentary ways by incorporating easy bursts of activity from dawn to dusk.

Reach: The Los Angeles Times has a daily readership of 1.9 million and 2.9 million on Sunday, more than 8 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.5 million. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 128 years.

Related coverage:

ABC NewsABC NewsFitness Trackers Get Stylish, But Accuracy May Need Work, Experts Say by Liz Neporent…To think it all started with a pair of "magic underwear." Dr. James Levine, a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona, studies the relationship between movement performed outside the gym and obesity. About a decade ago, he rigged up an undergarment with sensors designed to catch the body's every little shift in movement.

ABC NewsABC News Radio, Fitness Trackers Get Stylish, but Accuracy May Need Work, Activity trackers -- wearable devices that count steps and measure calorie burn -- are going through a boom. Sales of the devices last year topped $330 million, according the market research group NPD, and consumers have more than two dozen brands and styles to choose from, including shoe chips, bracelets, anklets, pendants and clip-ons…Dr. James Levine, a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona, studies the relationship between movement performed outside the gym and obesity. Additional coverage: Good Morning America

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob Nellis, Jim McVeigh

HealthDay
Getting Teeth Pulled Before Heart Surgery May Pose Serious Risks
by Randy Dotinga

…In a small, retrospective study, Mayo Clinic researchers found that 8 percent of heart patients who did not wait to have teeth pulled suffered major adverse health outcomes, such as a heart attack, stroke, kidney failure or death. "Guidelines from the American College of Health DayCardiology and American Heart Association label dental extraction as a minor procedure, with the risk of death or non-fatal heart attack estimated to be less than 1 percent," study co-author Dr. Mark Smith said in a statement. Additional coverage:  KSAZ Ariz.US News & World ReportFOX NewsMedicineNet.comForbes.comWMCTV.comFox5Vegas.com19ActionNews.comWDAM.comHHS HealthFinder.gov

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: To pull or not to pull? That is a common question when patients have the potentially dangerous combination of abscessed or infected teeth and the need for heart surgery.  In such cases, problem teeth often are removed before surgery, to reduce the risk of infections including endocarditis, an infection of the inner lining of the heart that can prove deadly.  But Mayo Clinic research suggests it may not be as simple as pulling teeth: The study found that roughly 1 in 10 heart surgery patients who had troublesome teeth extracted before surgery died or had adverse outcomes such as a stroke or kidney failure. The findings are published in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Pulling Problem Teeth Before Heart Surgery to Prevent Infection May Be Catch-22

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic had strong 2013 despite challenges
by Jeff Kiger
Despite the uncertainty of the health-care market, Mayo Clinic revenues grew by 6 percent to $9.4 billion in 2013. CEO and President John Noseworthy and Chief Administration OfficerLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaper Jeff Bolton discussed highlights of Mayo Clinic's 2013 financial results Wednesday during a brief telephone press conference.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Additional coverage: Star Tribune, Net income up 55 percent at Mayo Clinic for 2013; KTTC, Star Tribune (PDF), FOX47, Post-Bulletin, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal

Context: As Mayo Clinic recognizes its Sesquicentennial year, the not-for-profit organization reached a record 63 million people in 2013. The strong performance was bolstered by successful implementation of new care delivery models — such as the Mayo Clinic Care Network — that provide knowledge to patients, physicians and consumers in traditional and new ways. “Expanding our reach is not a new goal for us,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. “In fact, as we consider our history, growth has been a constant for 150 years.”

Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic Reports Strong Performance in 2013, Reaching More Than 63 Million People

Public Affairs Contacts: Karl Oestreich, Bryan Anderson

Harvard Business Review
How Mayo Clinic Is Using iPads to Empower Patients
by David Cook, Joseph Dearani

Throughout the world, companies are embracing mobile devices to set customer expectations, enlist them in satisfying their own needs, Harvard Business Review Logoand get workers to adhere to best practices. An effort under way at the Mayo Clinic shows how such technology can be used to improve outcomes and lower costs in health care.

Reach: Harvard Business Review – Online provides editorial content designed to complement the coverage found in its parent print publication, which focuses on business management. The site receives more than 232,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: David Cook, M.D., Mayo Clinic General Internal Medicine, conducts research in medical education. Joseph Dearani, M.D. is chair of Cardiovascular Surgery, Minnesota.

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Tags: : ABC News Radio, 19ActionNews.com, 2013 Mayo Clinic Performance Report, 26.2 with Donna, AAN, ABC News, AD and aging, Advance for Nurses, African-American, African-American pioneers, African-Americans, alcohol


January 31st, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Modern Healthcare
Symptoms, diagnosis and a prescription: How we can modernize healthcare in America
by Dr. John Noseworthy

Modern Healthcare

It is a tough time in many ways for our country—and for patients. The slow economy, the rapid growth in our aging population, the rising cost of healthcare and the new healthcare law have come together to make this a time of great change in how healthcare is delivered and paid for in the U.S.

Reach: Modern Healthcare, published by Crain Communications, is a healthcare news weekly that provides hospital executives with healthcare business news. The magazine specifically covers healthcare policy, Medicare/Medicaid, and healthcare from a business perspective. It also publishes a daily e-newsletter titled Modern Healthcare’s Daily Dose. The weekly publication has a circulation of more than 70,000 and its online site receives more than 29,700 unique visitors each month.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer,  Karl Oestreich

Reuters
U.S. says results encouraging for healthcare delivery reforms
By David Morgan

The Obama administration on Thursday reported what it called encouraging results from efforts to reduce healthcare costs and improve the quality of care for more than 5 million Medicare beneficiaries under Obamacare. As part of President Barack Obama's healthcare reform law, the Reutersefforts center around more than 360 accountable care organizations (ACOs), which are networks of doctors, hospitals and other providers specially organized to help move Medicare away from traditional fee-for-service medicine..."Today's report reflects important steps. More work is needed to modernize our antiquated Medicare payment system and base payment on evidence-based quality measures and proven patient outcomes," said Dr. John Noseworthy, chief executive of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, which is not part of the government's program.

Reach: Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing newsworld newsbusiness newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal financestock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, videomobile, and interactive television platforms.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

MPR
Mayo Clinic CEO John Noseworthy on the State of the Union

By Tom Crann

Minnesota got a brief shout-out in the State of the Union speech last night when President Obama pointed to the founder of Punch Pizza for the company's minimum wage practices. But Dr. John Noseworthy, President and CEO of the Mayo Clinic, was also at theMPR-News-300x45 address. Noseworthy spoke with MPR News' Tom Crann the State of the Union, the Affordable Care Act and the Mayo Clinic's 150th anniversary.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Additional coverage: KAALPost-Bulletin, KTTCKIMT, C-SPAN

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

KSTP
Mayo Clinic Celebrates 150th Year Anniversary
by Ellen Galles

The Mayo Clinic is celebrating 150 years. In that time, the clinic has brought the world dozens of medical breakthroughs like cortisone and the heart-lung machine. But some of the most KSTP-TV Eyewitness News Logimportant medical breakthroughs could be yet to come…Doctors like Anthony Windebank are researching to see if stem cells can be used to regenerate vital organs in patients who have heart disease, kidney disease and Lou Gehrig's Disease.

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Additional Sesquicentennial coverage: Post-BulletinKSTP morning show, Politico

Context: On Jan. 27, 1864, English-born Dr. William Worrall Mayo first notified the public about his medical practice in Rochester, Minn., planting the seeds of what would eventually become an international medical organization with more than 59,000 expert physicians, scientists and health care professionals, attracting millions of patients from across the globe.

This year marks 150 years of continuous service to patients, and Mayo Clinic is launching a yearlong recognition that will honor a legacy of medical accomplishments and a model for the future of health care.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic Commemorates 150th Anniversary in 2014

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

Florida Times-Union
Progress for Jacksonville, but big hurdles ahead, quality-of-life report says
by Steve Patterson

…“We see Jacksonville’s potential and have raised our expectations. This community demands to reach a higher standard,” said William Rupp, CEO of Mayo Clinic, who chaired the committeeFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo behind JCCI’s 29th annual progress report.

Circulation: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: William Rupp, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vice president and CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

Additional Mayo Clinic News Highlights This Week:  Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: Aguas Digital.com, Albert Lea Tribune, alcohol, Amber Sherman, Ana Gregg, Anti-VEGF drugs, AP, Assisi Heights, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Atlanta storm, Austin Daily Herald, Bemidji Pioneer


December 6th, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

 

 

December 6, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Bloomberg
Personalized Flu Shots Offer Best Chance to Beat Season
by Michelle Fay Cortez

A wave of new flu vaccines designed for the first time to focus on individual groups, including children, the elderly and people with allergies, may help boost U.S. vaccination rates as the new season develops this year…Personalized Medicine “For the first time in human history, we can actually target an influenza vaccine to an individual patient,” said Gregory Poland, head of the Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group in Rochester, Minnesota. “That’s a great advance.”

Reach:  Bloomberg has 2,300 media professionals in 146 bureaus across 72 countries. Bloomberg delivers its content across more than 400 publications, over 310 million households worldwide through Bloomberg Television and 500,000 in the New York metro area and 18.5 million subscribers through satellite radio.

Additional Coverage: Chicago Tribune

Context: The  flu shot season includes several new vaccine options for consumers, Mayo Clinic vaccine expert Gregory Poland, M.D., says. Fearful of needles? There’s now an influenza vaccination just for you. Allergic to eggs? It won’t stop you from getting a flu shot. The new choices move influenza vaccinations closer to the personalized approach long sought by immunologists including Dr. Poland, but they may also prove bewildering to patients, he says.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Flu Vaccines – Changes & Choices for 2013

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob Nellis, Sharon Theimer

MinnPost
Google Executive Chairman Schmidt joins Mayo Clinic board of directors
By Joe Kimball

Eric Schmidt, Google's executive chairman, is now on Mayo Clinic's 31-member board of directors. Schmidt joined the Mayo board last month, the clinic said. Mayo is in the midst of a $5 billion expansion over the next 20 years; included is more than $500 million in state and local tax money to pay for parking, transit, utilities and other public amenities. 

Circulation: MinnPost is a nonprofit, nonpartisan enterprise which provides news and analysis based on reporting by professional journalists, most of whom have decades of experience in the Twin Cities media. MinnPost averages more than 78,000 unique visitors to its site each month.. In Dec. 2013, MinnPost also had 27,300 followers on Twitter and its main Facebook page was liked by 9,500-plus readers.

Additional Coverage: Post-Bulletin, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal, BringMeTheNews

News Release: Mayo Clinic Trustees Welcome New Member, Elect Emeritus Member

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

Star Tribune
Mayo plans $72 million expansion of St. Marys Hospital in Rochester
By Janet Moore

The Mayo Clinic said Monday that it will add five floors to Saint Marys Hospital and reno­vate other parts of the campus in Rochester, part of a $72 million project. The floors will be added to the Mary Brigh East Building, and the third floor of the Domitilla Building will be renovated. Both projects will begin in the second quarter of 2014 and are expected to be completed by early 2016.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional Coverage: Twin Cities Business Magazine, KARE11, KMSP, KARE11 online, Prairie Business, Sioux Falls Argus Leader, FOX 47, KEYC, Austin Daily Herald, WWTC The Patriot, KSTP, KAAL, Pioneer Press, Finance & Commerce, La Crosse Tribune, KSFY S.D., MPR, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal, BringMeTheNews, Pioneer Press, Post-Bulletin, KTTC, HealthDayMedPage Today

News Release: Mayo Clinic Planning Expansion and Renovation Projects at Saint Marys Hospital

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

Post-Bulletin
Track medical substance-use data, association board member says
by Jeff Hansel

A study by Mayo Clinic researchers shows nearly 1 in every 100 of anesthesiology specialists-in-training developed substance-use disorder during their residency programs. In addition "at least 11 percent" of those with confirmed substance use disorders eventually die "of a cause directly related to the disorder," says an announcement of a study appearing in the Dec. 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. "That's a pretty high mortality rate for a disease," said Dr. David Warner of the Mayo Clinic, a member of the American Board of Anesthesiology's Board of Directors and co-author of the study.

Circulation: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: According to a study conducted by Mayo Clinic and the American Board of Anesthesiology (ABA), nearly 1 in every 100 anesthesiology residents entering primary training from 1975 to 2009 developed substance use disorder (SUD) during training. The incidence of this disorder is continuing to increase and the risk of relapse or death is high. The study appears in the Dec. 4 issue of JAMA, a medical education theme issue.

Substance use disorder is a serious public health problem, and physicians are not immune. Anesthesiologists have ready access to potent drugs such as intravenous opioids, although only indirect evidence exists that SUD is more common in anesthesiologists than in other physicians, according to background information in the article. "Although relatively few anesthesiology residents develop SUD, the incidence is continuing to increase," says David Warner, M.D., of Mayo Clinic's Department of Anesthesiology, and the ABA Board of Directors and chair of the Research and Credentials committees.

News Release: Mayo Clinic, American Board of Anesthesiology Study Finds Substance Use Disorder Among Medical Residents And High Risk of Relapse

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

Additional Mayo Clinic News Highlights This Week:
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Tags: #GlutenChat, 10 News, ABA, ABC News, Affordable care act, AIDS, Al Jazeera America, Al Jazeera magazine, alcohol, American Board of Anesthesiology, Andy Thieman, anesthesiology residents


June 7th, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

 

 

June 7, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

CNBC
Mayo Clinic's CEO on $5 Billion Expansion

John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO, discusses what his company is doing to create more jobs, the best opportunities internationally for growth and Obamacare.

Reach: CNBC provides real-time financial market coverage and business information to more than 340 million homes worldwide, including more than 95 million households in the United States and Canada.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic President and CEO, was interviewed by Maria Bartiromo on CNBC’s Closing Bell.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

Florida Times-Union
What Northeast Florida hospitals charge for procedures can vary by thousands
by Kate Perry

To treat a Medicare patient with chest pain, Orange Park Medical Center charges almost $36,000 — more than three times the cost at the Mayo Clinic. But when the federal government sends payment, the Hospital Corporation of America-owned hospital gets paid $3,300. It’s a far cry from their listed charge and $1,000 less than the Mayo Clinic will receive for the same procedure, according to data released this month by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services showing the hospital charge and the rate Medicare paid for the 100 most popular procedures in 2011.

Circulation: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Bob Brigham is chair, administration at Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punksy

MPR – The Daily Circuit
Is your iPad an anti-sleeping tablet?

Many people spend their last moments before sleep reading on a tablet computer or checking messages on a smart phone. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic wondered whether the light emitted by such devices might be disrupting users' sleep patterns. The initial findings of a sleep study suggest that dimming a smartphone and holding it at least 14 inches from your face might help you sleep better. Dr. Lois Krahn, a psychiatrist at Mayo's Scottsdale, Ariz., clinic, conducted the study to determine if smartphones and tablets were interfering with melatonin, a hormone that helps control the body's sleep cycle.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Additional coverage:

KARE11 , Using your smartphone and not disrupting your sleep 
ABC News Radio, Innovations Report, Deccan Chronicle, Yahoo! Noticias, Yucatan Hoy, starMedia, El Imparcial, Headlines and Global News, Daily Mail UK, Biomedicine, Yahoo! Noticias, RxPG NEWS, Medical News Today, Times of India, Headlines & Global NewsHealth News Digest, Health Canal, Times of India, NDTV Gadgets, Indian Express, , Medical Daily, Science Codex, Sisat Daily, Cyber India Online, Innovations Report

Context: Smartphones and tablets can make for sleep-disrupting bedfellows. One cause is believed to be the bright light-emitting diodes that allow the use of mobile devices in dimly lit rooms; the light exposure can interfere with melatonin, a hormone that helps control the natural sleep-wake cycle. But there may be a way to check your mobile device in bed and still get a good night's sleep. A Mayo Clinic study suggests that dimming the smartphone or tablet brightness settings and holding the device at least 14 inches from your face while using it will reduce its potential to interfere with melatonin and impede sleep. "In the old days people would go to bed and read a book. Well, much more commonly people go to bed and they have their tablet on which they read a book or they read a newspaper or they're looking at material. The problem is it's a lit device, and how problematic is the light source from the mobile device?" says co-author Lois Krahn, M.D., a psychiatrist and sleep expert at Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz.

News Release: Are Smartphones Disrupting Your Sleep? Mayo Clinic Study Examines the Question

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

MPR
Making the most out of doctor-patient conversations

As doctors engage patients in conversations about their health, they need skills they didn't necessarily learn in medical school…Less medicine for overwhelmed patients "It's hard enough to live with a chronic condition like diabetes, says Dr. Victor Montori of the Mayo Clinic. But sometimes doctors make it harder, by piling on more tests and treatments than the patient can bear.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: The research of Victor Montori, M.D., takes place in the Knowledge and Evaluation Research Unit at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Montori is interested in how knowledge is produced, disseminated and taken up in practice — and how this leads to optimal health care delivery and patient outcomes. Dr. Montori also serves as director of the Health Care Delivery Research Program in the Mayo Clinic Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

Post-Bulletin
Officials, residents pack Rochester City Council meeting about Mayo Clinic's DMC
by Edie Grosfield

City and Mayo Clinic officials and citizens packed a Rochester City Council committee-of-the-whole meeting Monday afternoon to hear an overview of the Destination Medical Center legislation that was passed recently as part of the state's tax bill.

Post-Bulletin
DMC has big plans
by Mike Klein

The words "infrastructure plan" conjure images of utilitarian streets and sewers, but Mayo Clinic'sDestination Medical Center calls for far more than that. The $500-million-plus plan envisions creating a pleasing urban environment in downtown Rochester where pedestrians could walk on leafy plazas with shopping and restaurants, and be trundled to their appointments by streetcars, based on documents created by DMC and the city of Rochester.

Related Coverage:
Post-Bulletin
Fran Bradley: DFL took some of the shine off of DMC

MPR
Mayo Clinic expansion boosts talk of high-speed rail

MPR
Mayo Clinic win could help attract high-speed rail

Post-Bulletin
Destination Twin Cities? Rochester high-speed rail plan studied

Additional Coverage: Star Tribune, Post-Bulletin, KAAL, Post-Bulletin, MPR, KAAL, MPR

Context: Destination Medical Center (DMC), an economic development initiative designed to secure Mayo Clinic and Minnesota’s future as a global medical destination, passed on May 20 as part of the Minnesota Legislature’s tax bill. It will help fund the public infrastructure required to keep pace with an estimated $5 billion private investment by Mayo Clinic and other private entities over the next 20 years.

Destination Medical Center Website

Public Affairs Contacts: Bryan Anderson, Karl Oestreich, Nora O'Sullivan (Zip Rail)

MinnPost
Mayo doctors propose higher — and new — 'sin taxes'
by Susan Perry

Two Mayo Clinic physicians have joined the growing ranks of health professionals who believe we should be using our tax codes to help change behavior and improve health. In a provocative commentary published in the June issue of the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, anesthesiologists Dr. Michael Joyner and Dr. David Warner propose increasing current taxes on alcohol and tobacco and implementing new taxes on fatty foods and sugary beverages.

Circulation: MinnPost is a nonprofit, nonpartisan enterprise which provides news and analysis based on reporting by professional journalists, most of whom have decades of experience in the Twin Cities media. According to MinnPost, the site averages more than 450,000 visits and more than 850,000 page views a month. At the end of 2010, MinnPost also had 8,800 followers on Twitter and its main Facebook page was liked by 3,500-plus readers.

Additional Coverage: BringMeTheNewsNewsTrackIndia, Business Standard, FOX9 News, Medical Xpress, Feed My Science, Science Newsline, Science Codex, Toronto Telegraph, Post-Bulletin, ThirdAge, KAAL

Context: Go ye and sin no more — or pay for it, when it comes to junk food, smoking and consuming alcohol. That's the message from two Mayo Clinic physicians who say raising "sin" taxes on tobacco and alcoholic beverages and imposing them on sugary drinks and fatty foods would lead many people to cut back, improving public health. The article by Michael Joyner, M.D., and David Warner, M.D., appears in the June issue of the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

News Release: Smoking, Sugar, Spirits and 'Sin' Taxes: Higher Price Would Help Health, Mayo Clinic Doctors Say

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

MinnPost
The telemedicine tourniquet
by Denise Logeland

Inside the Mayo Clinic’s Center for Innovation in Rochester, a new initiative is taking shape: the development of Mayo’s Center for Connected Care. “This is a major initiative of the Mayo Clinic across all of its campuses,” says Dr. Bart Demaerschalk, director of the Mayo Clinic’s telestroke and teleneurology program and a vascular neurologist with the Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix. The vision is to “provide virtual care to patients regionally, within states that are historically Mayo Clinic territories, but also nationally and globally.” And not just in Demaerschalk’s specialty of stroke diagnosis and treatment.

Circulation: MinnPost is a nonprofit, nonpartisan enterprise which provides news and analysis based on reporting by professional journalists, most of whom have decades of experience in the Twin Cities media. According to MinnPost, the site averages more than 450,000 visits and more than 850,000 page views a month. At the end of 2010, MinnPost also had 8,800 followers on Twitter and its main Facebook page was liked by 3,500-plus readers.

Context: Bart Demaerschalk, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona and also director of the Mayo Clinic Telestroke and Teleneurology program. In stroke telemedicine, also called telestroke, doctors who have advanced training in the nervous system (neurologists) remotely evaluate people who've had acute strokes and make diagnoses and treatment recommendations to emergency medicine doctors at other sites. Doctors communicate using digital video cameras, Internet telecommunications, robotic telepresence, smartphones and other technology.

Public Affairs Contact: Shelly Plutowski

Star Tribune
Mayo swings for fences in sports medicine
by Jackie Crosby

The Mayo Clinic is making a big play to attract ailing athletes and weekend warriors with aching knees to its campus. The hospital system plans to open a 22,000-square-foot sports medicine facility in Rochester next spring that will double its existing practice. The center aims to be a sort of high-tech medical playground that will help the injured get back in the game and the healthy hone their skills. “A lot of people think of Mayo as the last resort,” said Dr. Edward Laskowski, co-director of Mayo’s Sports Medicine Center. “We want to change that.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional Coverage:
MinnPost
Mayo Clinic to build sports medicine center

Post-Bulletin
Our View: Sports Medicine Center is part of paradigm shift 

Additional Coverage: Sioux City Journal

Previous Coverage

Context: Mayo Clinic announced this week an expansion to its sports medicine practice to meet the growing regional, national and international demand for its expertise. The expansion is part of the 100,000-square-foot Mayo Clinic Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center building project, and is scheduled to open in spring of 2014. The Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Centeris a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Planning Major Sports Medicine Center Expansion

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic starts individualized medicine consulting clinic

Mayo Clinic has announced a new individualized medicine consulting clinic for patients with serious medical conditions who have not found answers through conventional testing. The IM Clinic does not focus on research. Rather, Mayo reports, whole-genome sequencing will be used as a standard part of care by a team of 20 genomics-trained physicians. Genetic counselors will guide patients through the process. The IM Clinic startup period began about six months ago.

Circulation: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: You have a serious medical condition, but the conventional tests fail to find an answer. You still have no diagnosis and no effective treatment. What do you do? Mayo Clinic has always been a destination for patients seeking answers. Now, Mayo is taking that concept to the next level with the public launch of its Individualized Medicine Clinic — at all three of its campuses, in Minnesota, Florida and Arizona.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Launches Individualized Medicine Consulting Clinic

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

WEAU Eau Claire
Mayo to make change to help avoid infections

There will be a change at a local hospital starting next week to try to avoid infections. Mayo Clinic Health System Eau Claire says it will start washing all critical care patients with a powerful germ-killing soap to prevent MRSA infections. It says currently it only uses the soap on select critical care patients, like people who have had heart surgery.  Registered Nurse and Critical Care Director Marguerite Paradris with the hospital says the germs they’re most worried about, are not actually that uncommon outside the hospital.

Reach: WEAU-TV is the NBC affiliate for much of western Wisconsin, including Eau Claire and La Crosse. WEAU is licensed to Eau Claire and its transmitter is located in Fairchild, Wisc.

Context: Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire says it will start washing all critical care patients with a powerful germ-killing soap to prevent MRSA infections. It says currently it only uses the soap on select critical care patients, like people who have had heart surgery. Registered Nurse and Critical Care Director Marguerite Paradis with the hospital says the germs they’re most worried about are not actually that uncommon outside the hospital.

“Those resistant organisms exist probably everywhere in our environment, and many of us probably have touched them or been around them. What happens is when you come to the hospital it's when you're the most vulnerable and those organisms can then cause infections in people who are in the hospital," Paradis said.

A recently released study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found washing all ICU patients with the soap daily can help prevent MRSA infections, but the hospital says their change was already in the works before the study was released.

Public Affairs Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

WQOW Eau Claire
Eau Claire man bikes, swims, and runs road to recovery after heart attack

Within the first five minutes of meeting 53-year-old Tom Draz, you'd probably discover he's a seasoned athlete… But a year ago, his fast pace was faced with a shock. Tom says, "Last year, before the Eau Claire Half Marathon I was scheduled to run, I was swimming in the pool at the YMCA and started feeling really weak and tired." After some persuasion from his wife, Geralyn, Tom went to the hospital where he learned he was having a heart attack…Amy Olson, a Registered Nurse, at Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire, says, "Being a runner myself, runners tend to connect on a different level. So my heart went out to him knowing he had spent so much time training for such an event and not being able to do it."

Reach: WQOW-TV is an ABC-affiliated television station in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. The station broadcasts its channel 18 DTV signal on UHF RF channel 15. The station is owned and operated by Quincy Newspapers Inc., which also owns WXOW-TV in La Crosse.

Context: Our friends at Mayo Clinic Health System report on the Hometown Health blog, the lifelong runner and Eau Claire, Wis., resident was at the local YMCA getting in some last-minute training for a half marathon when he began to feel "unusually tired and had chest pain." The pain and fatigue was such that it kept him from finishing his workout and forced him to make a trip to the Emergency Department at Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire, where doctors told him he was having a heart attack. They stabilized him, but while recovering in the hospital the next day, Draz went into cardiac arrest. "One minute I was alive, and the next minute I was dead," he told Hometown Health. Quick action by his nurses, who used a defibrillator to restore his heart rhythm, "got my heart beating again and saved my life," Draz says.

Public Affairs Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

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Tags: : ABC News Radio, alcohol, Amy Olson, Biomedicine, BringMeTheNews, Business Standard, Cancer, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, chronic disease, Closing Bell, CMS, CNBC


April 16th, 2013

House Dems eye alcohol tax bump

By Logan Lafferty loganlafferty

A tax increase on alcohol has been added to the list of ways Minnesota House Democrats are proposing to help balance the state's budget and spend more money for schools…The plan also provides property tax relief for 520,000 homeowners, increases the tax break for renters and gives manufacturers a sales tax break for capital equipment purchases. It also helps pay for improvements in Rochester to handle a proposed Mayo Clinic expansion, for a Mall of America expansion and a tax break for 3M.

Additional Coverage: KMSP, KARE 11, Pioneer Press, Star Tribune, MinnPost, Grand Forks Herald

 

MPR by Tom Scheck

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Tags: alcohol, Minnesota Legislature, MPR, proposal, state budget, tax increase


April 18th, 2012

Drinking On The Job: Is 2012 The New 1966?

By

The TV show Mad Men has won fans for breathing life — and a heavy whiff of bourbon — into the fictional advertising world of 1960s New York. But surely no American company has such a liver-pickling culture in this day and age, right?... An article at the Mayo Clinic site gives a brief overview of alcohol's possible benefits when consumed strictly in moderation — along with listing the possible (very) negative consequences of overindulging, which range from high blood pressure to certain types of cancer.

 

 

NPR by Bill Chappell   4/18/12

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Tags: alcohol, Mad Men


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