Items Tagged ‘allergies’

March 3rd, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

USA Today
Having a baby past 35: What women should know
by Ashley May

Have a plan, and the money to execute it, before 35. Fertility doctors say women approaching 35 who want children but aren’t yet ready should look into egg or embryo freezing. Charles Coddington, professor and OB/GYN for Mayo Medical School, also advises getting a full checkup for reproductive health. After age 35, pregnancy is more difficult because of less frequent ovulation. Also, women 35-45 have aUSA Today newspaper logo 20-35% chance of miscarriage, compared with women under 35 that average a 15-20% chance of miscarriage, according to the American Pregnancy Association. … Frozen eggs of a woman younger than 35 have a greater than 50% chance of producing a live birth. Past age 40, freezing eggs or embryos will not have a great success – less than 9 percent result in live birth, Coddington said.

Reach: USA TODAY  has an average daily circulation of 4.1 million which includes print, various digital editions and other papers that use their branded content.

Context: Charles Coddington, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic ObGyn. The Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota supports women throughout their lifelong journey from childbearing age to menopause and beyond. You can learn more about Dr. Coddington's research interests here.

Contact:  Kelley Luckstein

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic investing $70 million in Mankato hospital
by Christopher Snowbeck

Mayo Clinic’s regional network of medical centers is investing $70 million to expand and renovate the surgery suite and orthopedic clinic at its hospital in Mankato. The project includes a $65 million upgrade to the Star Tribune newspaper logohospital’s surgery facilities that is part of a broader plan to better link the Mankato campus with Mayo Clinic’s headquarters in Rochester, according to details released Friday. “Mayo Clinic is committed to the needs of patients in Mankato and the surrounding communities we serve,” said Dr. James Hebl, vice president of Mayo Clinic Health System in southwest Minnesota, in a statement.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: KROC AM, KEYC Mankato, Minneapolis/St. Paul Business, Journal, Post-Bulletin, Healthcare Dive, Germany Sun, Becker’s ASC ReviewMankato Free Press

Context:  Mayo Clinic Health System today announced plans for a $65 million hospital surgical suite expansion in Mankato. Construction is expected to begin later this year. “Mayo Clinic is committed to the needs of patients in Mankato and the surrounding communities we serve,” says James Hebl, M.D., vice president of Mayo Clinic Health System in Southwest Minnesota. “The projects are an investment in our patients, our staff and the needs of our communities. Providing access to outstanding care in state-of-the-art facilities closer to where patients live is of paramount importance, and is the driving force behind the decision to dedicate substantial resources to these initiatives.” More information about the expansion can be found here.

Contact:  Micah Dorfner

 

Star Tribune
Mayo earnings hit by Medicaid, labor costs
by Christopher Snowbeck

Mayo Clinic's net income slipped last year as the Rochester-based health care giant spent more on staffing for growth initiatives, and saw more losses on patients with Medicaid coverage. Even so, the overall results being released Monday show "it was a strong year," said Kedrick Adkins Jr., the clinic's chief financial officer. Mayo posted $475 million in net income on $11 billion in revenue, down about 10 percent from 2015Star Tribune newspaper logo net income of $526.4 million, according to the clinic's latest financial report.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: KTTC, Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal, Dotmed.comBecker’s Hospital Review, Healthcare Dive

Context: With more than 1.3 million patients seeking Mayo Clinic’s expertise yearly, the institution continues its work to provide the best care to every patient through integrated clinical practice, education and research. Mayo Clinic reported a strong financial position in 2016, with contributions of $466 million to its pension plan for staff and more than $600 million in capital projects. “The outstanding work of Mayo Clinic employees is the engine that drives our mission to our patients, advances important research and educational initiatives, and positions our institution as a key voice for the future of health care,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic. “Our strong financial performance enables Mayo to hire and retain the best talent, and invest in technology, facilities and our staff as we strive to deliver the best outcomes and service to our patients.”

Contact:  Susan Barber Lindquist

 

 

KAAL
Mayo Clinic Performs Rare In-Womb Surgery to Give Baby New Chance at Life
by Marissa Collins

An Austin mom and her baby are doing well after her pregnancy took an unexpected turn. Nineteen weeks in, doctors told her something was wrong with her unborn baby … Her baby was diagnosed with a severe KAAL 6 News Rochester Logoform of Spina Bifida halfway through her pregnancy. “Once the baby is being formed the babies back does not close. The spine does not close, so the nerves can be open," says Dr. Rodrigo Ruano, Director at Mayo Clinic Fetal Diagnostic and Intervention Center.

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Context: The Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota supports women throughout their lifelong journey from childbearing age to menopause and beyond. The Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine staff care for women experiencing high-risk pregnancies related to obstetric, medical, surgical or genetic complications.

Contact:  Kelley Luckstein

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Tags: AccuWeather, Action News Jax, acupuncture, Albert Lea Tribune, allergies, alzheimers, Andy Sandness, Anya Guy, ASH Clinical News, Associated Press, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Austin Daily Herald


March 25th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Forbes
What Science Tells Us Can Affect Our Risk Of Alzheimer's Disease
by Alice G. Walton

…But it’s not clear whether single components of the diet are enough to affect Alzheimer’s risk. I think the diet fads of blueberries, broccoli, coffee are all nonsense,” says David S. Knopman, researchForbes Pharma and Healthcare logoer at the Mayo Clinic. “No one eats food in isolation, and trying to disentangle associations between foods, especially when all the data is observational, is a hopeless and useless task.”

Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 million unique visitors each month.

Context:  David Knopman, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist. Dr. Knopman is involved in research in late-life cognitive disorders, such as mild cognitive impairment and dementia. Dr. Knopman's specific interests are in the very early stages of Alzheimer's disease, in cognitive impairment due to stroke (cerebrovascular disease) and in cognitive impairment due to frontotemporal degeneration.

Contacts: Traci Klein, Susan Barber Lindquist

 

US News & World Report
10 Most Competitive Medical Schools
by Delece Smith-Barrow

There's a strong demand for doctors in the workforce, but most people who apply to medical school don't get in…. But at some US News Education Logoinstitutions, hardly anyone gets an acceptance letter. The Mayo Medical School in Minnesota accepted only 1.8 percent of applicants – 81 out of the 4,616 who applied – for fall 2015. It had the lowest acceptance rate among all ranked medical schools.  Mayo accepted an even smaller percentage of applicants than it did in fall 2014​, when it admitted just 2 percent.

Reach: U.S. News & World Report is a multi-platform publisher of news and information, which includes http://www.usnews.comand http://www.rankingsandreviews.com.

Additional coverage:

Post Bulletin — Heard on the Street: Mayo health schools get good grades

Related coverage:

KTTC — Mayo Medical School's biggest graduating class matched into residency programs; Post Bulletin

Context: U.S. News & World Report recently released its 2017 rankings for Best Graduate Schools across the nation. Mayo Medical School and Mayo School of Health Sciences, two schools within Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, advanced significantly in the findings. “We are competing with some of the largest, well-known universities in the nation,” says Mark Warner, M.D., Juanita Waugh Executive Dean for Education, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. “These high ratings reflect the commitment of our faculty to deliver the highest quality education to the extraordinary students who come to our schools.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Deb Anderson

 

Wall Street Journal
The Healing Power of Forgiveness
by Diane Cole

A wealth of research has linked the isolation and loneliness that can result to increased health problems and higher mortality. It is tantamount to “suffocating” yourself emotionally, says Amit Sood, a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester,WSJ Banner Minn. The effects on one’s health from bottled-up anger and resentment can range from anxiety and depression to higher blood pressure and increased risk of heart attacks, he says.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Related coverage:

Business Insider — A doctor shares his No. 1 tip for tricking your mind into feeling happier

Cosmopolitan magazine — ​20 Ways to Reduce Work Stress in 1 Minute or Less

Context: Amit Sood, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in General Internal Medicine and the Cancer Center. The Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness combines wisdom from neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, and spirituality to help people choose contentment.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

NBC News
OpEd: Are You Getting Enough Vitamin D?
by Andrea King Collier

Donald Hensrud, MD, medical director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program says, at least 20-50 percent of adults have NBCNewsComsome form of low vitamin D values. "Low vitamin D is more common in winter months, because of less sunlight, but it is more common in African-Americans because they convert less vitamin D from one form to another in the skin," Dr. Hensrud says. According to Dr. Hensrud, vitamin D deficiencies are also more common in obese individuals and for people with kidney or liver disease.

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life. Donald Hensrud, M.D. is the program’s medical director.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Los Angeles Times
Intensive exercise may keep the aging mind sharp
by Melissa Healy

Mayo Clinic cardiologist Virend Somers said the new research may not illuminate direct relationships between exercise and cognitive aging, however. It may show, as many observational studies do, that cognitively healthier people are more likely toLos Angeles Times Science Now Logo engage in healthy behaviors, such as exercise, that in turn maintain their brain health… "Given its cost-free nature and the myriad other benefits of exercise, I think we should assume it helps until definitively shown otherwise," said Somers.

Reach:  The Los Angeles Times has a daily readership of 1.9 million and 2.9 million on Sunday, more than 8 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.5 million. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 128 years.

Context: Virend Somers, M.D., Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic physician with joint appointments in cardivascular diseases and nephrology and hypertension. Dr. Somers directs the Cardiovascular Facility and the Sleep Facility within Mayo Clinic's Center for Clinical and Translational Science.

Contacts: Traci Klein, Joe Dangor

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo opening lab for nanotech research

With support from the state of Florida, Mayo Clinic’s Jacksonville campus has opened a state-of-the-art laboratory for Florida Times-Union newspaper logonanotechnology research, an emerging field of science that studies and applies materials that are the size of an atom. The lab will be directed by Debabrata “Dev” Mukhopadhyay, a scientist in cancer and nanotechnology who was recruited by Mayo to open the lab with a $2 million grant from the state.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Previous coverage in March 19, 2016 Mayo Clinic in News Weekly Highlights

Context: With support from the state of Florida, Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus has opened a state-of-the-art laboratory for nanotechnology research, an emerging field of science that studies and applies materials that are the size of an atom. The laboratory is a key part of Mayo Clinic’s new Translational Nanomedicine Program. The goal is to develop, test and apply tiny materials in diagnosing and treating patients, particularly those with cancer. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Twin Cities Business
Mayo-Boston Scientific R&D Partnership Bridges Venture Capital Gap
by Don Jacobson

During the recent political debate over whether to repeal the federal excise tax on medical devices, manufacturers claimed part of the reason it was a bad policy is that it stifled research and development innovation. Now that the tax has been suspendedTwin Cities Business Magazine Logo for two years, Boston Scientific and Mayo Clinic say they’ve been freed to greatly expand a unique R&D collaboration. In December, device makers celebrated when the tax was suspended for two years, and last week Boston Scientific -- which employs about 5,000 people in Minnesota – announced it was using some of savings to ramp up a previously unrevealed scientific research collaboration with the Mayo Clinic.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Additional coverage:

Worcester Business Journal — Mayo Clinic helps Boston Scientific speed development; Cardiovascular Business, Qmed,DOTmed.com

Previous coverage in March 19, 2016 Mayo Clinic in News Weekly Highlights

Context: Boston Scientific Corporation (NYSE: BSX) and Mayo Clinic announced this week a continuing collaboration where the two organizations share intellectual property and stimulate the rapid development of medical devices to address unmet clinical needs. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

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Tags: “assisted suicide, , ActionNewsJax, Alcohol abuse among med students, allergies, Allevant Solutions, alzheimer's disease, amygdala, Angela Murad, AOL.com, Arab News, Atlanta Black Star


April 24th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

USA Today
Best memory advice? Exercise, stimulating hobbies

…A study by researchers at the Mayo Clinic published this month in Neurology found that adults who engaged in activities such as arts and crafts, book clubs and travel were half as likely to develop mild cognitive impairment in their 80s as those who did not pursue brain-stimulatingUSA Today Newspaper Logo hobbies.

Reach: USA TODAY  has the highest daily circulation of any U.S. newspaper with a daily average circulation of 4.1 million, which includes print, various digital editions and other  papers that use their branded content.

Additional coverage: Boston Globe

Previous Coverage in April 9, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: People who participate in arts and craft activities and who socialize in middle and old age may delay the development in very old age of the thinking and memory problems that often lead to dementia, according to a new study published in the April 8, 2015, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.  “As millions of older US adults are reaching the age where they may experience these memory and thinking problem called Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), it is important we look to find lifestyle changes that may stave off the condition,” said study author Rosebud Roberts, MB, ChB, MS, of Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. and a member of the American Academy of Neurology. “Our study supports the idea that engaging the mind may protect neurons, or the building blocks of the brain, from dying, stimulate growth of new neurons, or may help recruit new neurons to maintain cognitive activities in old age.” More information about the study can be found here.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

TPT
Almanac

Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy talks about Medicare payment reform with Almanac hosts Cathy Wurzer and Eric Eskola.

Reach:  Twin Cities Public Television's "Almanac" program is a Minnesota institution. It has occupied the 7 o'clock time slot on Friday nights for more than a quarter of a century. It is the longest-running prime time TV program ever in the region. "Almanac" is a time capsule, a program of TPTrecord that details our region's history and culture during the past twenty five years. The hour-long mix of news, politics and culture is seen live statewide on the six stations of the Minnesota Public Television Association. Almanac was the first Minnesota TV show that virtually everyone in the state could watch together. The program's unusual format has been copied by numerous PBS stations around the country and it has led to Almanac being honored with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting's award for Best Public Affairs Program. Almanac has also earned six regional Emmy awards.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Mayo Clinic has been a strong advocate of modernizing Medicare and repealing the Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) and replacing it with a reimbursement system that truly rewards quality and efficiency not simply volume. The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act strengthens Medicare, extends the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and makes numerous other improvements to the health care system.

Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Karl Oestreich

 

News4Jax
Dangers of e-cigarette use

Dr. Vandana Bhide, an internal medicine doctor with the Mayo Clinic, discusses the dangers of e-cigarette use and rising News Jax 4 Logonumber of teen users.

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville.

Context: Vanda Bhide, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in Hospital Internal Medicine in Florida.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

HealthDay
Migraines Often Undiagnosed, Doctor Says

If you don't know whether or not your headache is just a headache, or if it's actually a migraine, you may be missing out on effective treatments, Health Day Logosuggests an expert at the American Migraine Foundation. "Migraine is not just a headache, but a neurological disorder that has a wide variety of symptoms and specific treatments," foundation chair Dr. David Dodick, who's also a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Scottsdale, Ariz., said in a foundation news release.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: FOX10Phoenix, ABC FOX Montana

Context: David Dodick, M.D. is a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona and an expert in concussion care and director of the Mayo Clinic Concussion Program.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

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Tags: 1to1 Media, 3-T MRI advancing on ultrasound for fetal abnormalities, a rare side-effect of certain chemotherapy, ABC FOX Montana, ABC News, AFRO, allergies, Almanac, Ames Tribune, Argus Leader, Ariz., Arizona Daily Star


April 11th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Star Tribune
Novel Mayo technique improves outlook for breast cancer surgeries
by Dan Browning

Mayo Clinic likes to say that its team-based, patient-centric approach to medical care increases value. On Tuesday it released the latest evidence — research showing that a novel technique improves outcomes for women with breast cancer, the nation’s No. 2 cause of death for women, after lung cancer…“In breast cancer,Star-Tribune-Logo-300x45 what I think is critical is that multidisciplinary team,” said Dr. Judy Boughey, a professor of surgery at Mayo who was the article’s lead author. “The pathologists here are making me look good … because I’m doing the same [excision] procedure I would do anywhere else.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

KAAL, Mayo Breast Cancer Treatment Sees Success A unique process that doctors at Mayo Clinic Hospital use when removing tumors in breast cancer patients is showing results…"Obviously opening the incision delays the wound healing, increases risk for infection, and takes the patient away from work and away from their family and is associated with more stress and anxiety," Dr. Judy Boughey said.

MedicalResearch.com
Breast Cancer: Frozen Section Analysis During Lumpectomy Decreases Need For Reoperation, MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Boughey: This study showed that the rate of reoperation after lumpectomy for breast cancer was significantly lower at Mayo Clinic in Rochester compared to national data. Mayo Clinic in Rochester uses frozen section analysis of margins at time of lumpectomy to direct any margin re-excisions during the surgery and therefore has a significantly lower rate of need for a second operation to ensure clean margins. The rate of reoperation was four times higher in the national data set than in the Mayo Clinic data set.

Context: Unique laboratory testing during breast cancer lumpectomies to make sure surgeons remove all cancerous tissue spares patients the need for a repeat lumpectomy in roughly 96 percent of cases at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, a success rate much higher than the rate nationally, a Mayo study shows. During the years reviewed, 13.2 percent of breast cancer lumpectomy patients nationally had to return to the operating room within a month of their initial surgery, compared to 3.6 percent at Mayo in Rochester, which uses a technique called frozen section analysis to test excised tissue for cancer while  patient are still on the operating table. The findings are published in the journal Surgery. More information on this study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Channel12 Ariz.
First piece of Mayo Clinic proton beam installed

Channel 12 Arizona NBCCrews installed the first pieces of the new proton beam therapy center at the Mayo Clinic on Monday. The beam will work by isolating and treating cancer cells.

Reach: Channel 12 is an NBC affiliate in Phoenix, AZ.

Additional coverage: KPNX Ariz.KTVK Ariz.

Context: Mayo Clinic in Arizona broke ground in December 2011 for a $182 million facility to house Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy program — marking the beginning of a new era in cancer treatment. Steven Schild, M.D., is chair of radiation oncology at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Public Affairs Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

Becker’s Hospital Review
12 Things to Know About Mayo Clinic
by Helen Adamopoulos

Here are 12 key things to know about Rochester, Minn.-based Mayo Clinic, which was recently named one of 100 Great Hospitals in America in 2014 by Becker's Hospital Review. 1. Mayo Clinic — a nonprofit worldwide leader in medical care and research — got its start in 1864, when William Worrall Mayo, MD, opened aBeckers Hospital Review private medical practice in Rochester. The organization officially took on the Mayo Clinic name in March 1914. 2. Mayo Clinic's operating income rose 55 percent from $395.4 million in fiscal year 2012 to $612.1 million in 2013. It saw total revenue of $9.42 billion last year.

Reach: Becker's Hospital Review features up-to-date business and legal news and analysis relating to hospitals and health systems. Content is geared toward high-level hospital leaders (CEOs, CFOs, COOs, CMOs, CIOs, etc.), and we work to provide valuable content, including hospital and health system news, best practices and legal guidance specifically for these decision-makers. Each of the 12 annual issues of Becker's Hospital Review reaches a qualified audience of approximately 18,500 healthcare leaders. 

Context: On Jan. 27, 1864, English-born Dr. William Worrall Mayo first notified the public about his medical practice in Rochester, Minn., planting the seeds of what would eventually become an international medical organization with more than 59,000 expert physicians, scientists and health care professionals, attracting millions of patients from across the globe. This year marks 150 years of continuous service to patients, and Mayo Clinic is launching a yearlong recognition that will honor a legacy of medical accomplishments and a model for the future of health care.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Florida Times-Union
Editorial: A major battle to combat child obesity

Nearly four of every 10 children in our community are either overweight or flat-out obese, say area health experts…“We’re seeing so many children in our community Florida Times-Union newspaper logostruggle to be at healthy weights,” said Dr. Alva Roche Green during a recent session with the Times-Union editorial board. A pediatrician at the Mayo Clinic, Roche-Green added that it’s “not an exaggeration to say childhood obesity is at a crisis level” across Jacksonville and Florida in general.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Alva Roche Green, M.D., is a Family Medicine physician at Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Red Wing Republican-Eagle
MCHS report highlights growing improvements
by Anne Jacobson

Mayo Clinic Health System made substantial changes in 2013 toward better care and lower costs. These included more emphasis on primary care teams and launching Patient Online Services, according to MCHS officials.

Red Wing Republication Eagle logo

Reach: The Red Wing Republican Eagle has served residents of Red Wing, Minn., since 1857, The Red Wing Republican Eagle is owned by RiverTown Multimedia, a subsidiary of
Forum Communications and has a daily circulation of  more than 5,400.

Context: Mayo Clinic Health System held a public discussion on its 2013 annual report April 7 in Red Wing, Minn. Thomas Witt, M.D., president and CEO of the MCHS Cannon Falls, Lake City and Red Wing said now the three medical centers and their affiliated clinics work more seamlessly together and with the Mayo Clinic “hub” in Rochester.

Public Affairs Contact: Kristy Jacobson

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Tags: 100Reporters, 13 ABC, 8 News Now Las Vegas, ABC 7, Advance Healthcare Network, AIB Corporate Banking, allergies, Alzheimer's Disease Research Center at Mayo Clinic, Am.com, American College of Cardiology, American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Amethyst “Amy” Hiestand


March 28th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

TPT Almanac
Mayo CEO Dr. John Noseworthy, capitol reporters, Rochester mayor, Syrian crisis, political scientist panel

TPT's public affairs program, Almanac, broadcast its first remote program on March 21 from Phillips Hall at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. More than 400 people were inTPT attendance for the live broadcast.

Context: Twin Cities Public Television's "Almanac" program is a Minnesota institution. It has occupied the 7 o'clock timeslot on Friday nights for more than a quarter of a century. It is the longest-running primetime TV program ever in the region. "Almanac" is a time capsule, a program of record that details our region's history and culture during the past twenty five years. The hour-long mix of news, politics and culture is seen live statewide on the six stations of the Minnesota Public Television Association. Almanac was the first Minnesota TV show that virtually everyone in the state could watch together. The program's unusual format has been copied by numerous PBS stations around the country and it has led to Almanac being honored with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting's award for Best Public Affairs Program. Almanac has also earned six regional Emmys awards.

Related coverage: 
Post-BulletinPublic TV's 'Almanac' broadcasts live from Mayo Clinic

InsuranceNewsNet
Public TV's 'Almanac' broadcasts live from Mayo Clinic

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic aims for more Pentagon funding
by Corey Mitchell

The Mayo Clinic, with military ties that stretch back to the Civil War, is making a push to more aggressively pursue a larger share of the $900 million-plus spent annually by the Star-Tribune-Logo-300x45Pentagon on medical research. The medical giant has opened a Department of Defense Medical Research Office in Rochester and hired McAllister & Quinn, a Washington, D.C.-based lobbying firm, to help procure more federal funding. Dr. Peter Amadio, medical director of Mayo’s DOD Medical Research Office, said that while Mayo has some defense contracts, there’s “an opportunity for us to do better.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:
Minneapolis /St. Paul Business Journal, Mayo goes to battle for military funds 

BringMeTheNews, Mayo Clinic angling for more Pentagon funds

Context: Mayo Clinic has opened the Mayo Clinic Department of Defense (DOD) Medical Research Office. The office, in Rochester, MN., is designed to be an easy to use single point of contact, linking the research needs of the DOD with Mayo Clinic investigators capable of addressing those needs, and to improve access to funding to serve DOD research and development priorities. The office oversees Mayo Clinic's portfolio of DOD-funded research, which has evolved over Mayo’s long and successful partnership with the U.S. government. Today, dozens of Mayo Clinic researchers receive funding for special projects that use new technologies and innovative solutions to support military readiness, functional restoration and rehabilitation after complex injuries, restore health and improve wellness of military populations.

“This is a continuation of Mayo Clinic’s 150-year legacy with the DOD,” says Peter Amadio, M.D., director of the office, and an orthopedic surgeon at Mayo Clinic. “The office and website are designed to strengthen this long-standing relationship and to not only match DOD research needs with the expertise of Mayo Clinic, but also accelerate the entire process from proposal development to funding to delivery of a completed project. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Brian Kilen

WCCO
Boy With Melanoma Raises Thousands Making Bracelets To Battle Cancer
by Susan-Elizabeth Littlefield

There are certain statistics you want your kids to be a part of. This is not one of them. Less than 10 children in this country have a form of childhood melanoma, and one of them lives in the Twin Cities metro. Graham Fowler, of Fridley, Minn., is a 10-year-old with Spitzoid Melanoma. He’s being treated at the Mayo Clinic and has had eight surgeries.CBS Minnesota

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

Context: Melanoma, the most serious type of skin cancer, develops in the cells (melanocytes) that produce melanin — the pigment that gives your skin its color. Melanoma can also form in your eyes and, rarely, in internal organs, such as your intestines. Specialists at Mayo Clinic work as a team to make a prompt melanoma diagnosis so you can begin treatment as soon as possible. Mayo Clinic's surgical pathologists and dermatopathologists are respected for their expertise in identifying melanoma stage, depth and severity, which is critical for selecting the most appropriate treatment combination.

Public Affairs Contact: Joe Dangor

Florida Times-Union (Subscription required)
Medical tourism provides big economic boost to Jacksonville economy
by Charlie Patton

In the two weeks they’ve been here, they’ve done quite a bit of sightseeing, going to the St. Augustine Alligator Farm and making a day trip to Disney World….But the purpose of their Florida Times-Union newspaper logovisit isn’t fun. They came to Jacksonville because they were seeking cancer treatment for James at the University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute…William C. Rupp, the chief executive officer of the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, which has an economic impact in the Jacksonville area of about $1.6 billion, said that about 43,000 of the approximately 1000,000 patients treated at the clinic each year qualify as medical tourists.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:
St. Augustine Record; Travel Weekly, Can medical tourism provide a shot in the arm for Fla.? 

Context: William Rupp, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vice president and CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

Phoenix Business Journal
Inside the Reporter’s Notebook
By Angela Gonzales

Phoenix Business JournalPhoenix Business Journal senior healthcare reporter Angela Gonzales interviews Dr. Wyatt Decker.

Reach: The Phoenix Business Journal is published by American City Business Journals which owns more than 40 other local business newspapers.

Context: Wyatt Decker, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic Vice President and CEO at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh
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Tags: A.L.S., ABC News, Aby Bedtka, Aetna InteliHealth, Afghanistan, African-American men and cancer survival rates, allergies, Almanac, alzheimer's disease, american heart association, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Aerospace Medicine


May 15th, 2012

Feeling Blown Away By Pollen? You’re Not the Only One

By

People with allergies can grow out of them — or into them — at any stage of life, doctors say. “As a general trend, over the decades of life, allergies can get better,” said James Li, an allergy specialist with the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. People with allergies that were developed in childhood, even food allergies, can outgrow them.

 

Grand Forks Herald by Pamela Knudson

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Tags: allergies, Dr. James Li, Grand Forks Herald


January 30th, 2012

Allergic to the Cold

By

Dr. Martha Hartz talks about allergies to the cold.

Weather Channel, 01/27/2012

Additional coverage: KTTC

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Tags: allergic to the cold, allergies, Dr. Martha Hartz


January 27th, 2012

Minnesota child allergic to the cold

By

Schools deal with all kinds of children's allergies these days but none quite like the one that has been diagnosed in Jackson, Minnesota. In Mrs. Bosma's 5th grade class at Riverside Elementary nearly every child has one sort of allergy or another.  "So how many of you have allergies," asked Mrs. Bosma.
"During harvest there is dust and all that," said one child.  "I'm allergic to cigarette smoke," said another. And then there's Grant Schlager's response. "I have an allergy to cold," said Grant…"In particular if he gets a large cold exposure, he breaks out in a lot of hives," said Mayo Clinic's Dr. Martha Hartz who diagnosed Grant's allergy.

KARE 11, by Jeffrey DeMars, 01/26/2012

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Tags: allergic to cold, allergies, Dr. Martha Hartz, Jackson, Minnesota, Riverside Elementary


October 14th, 2009

Allergy Cures: The Truth Behind 10 Myths

By Kelley Luckstein KelleyLuckstein

Sniffling, sneezing – and perplexed? Allergies are frequently misunderstood. Get a better grip on thisallergysneezing condition, so you can avoid triggers and manage symptoms.

 

One in five Americans has allergies — and the numbers are growing. So are misconceptions and myths about the condition.

 

If allergies are making you miserable, don’t add to your suffering. Learn what’s fact and fiction and clear your head…

 

Myth #6: You’ll outgrow childhood allergies.


True and false…If you had mild allergies as a child, “the better your chances are for outgrowing” them, says Chad Masters, M.D., a family physician at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla.

 

Lifescript by Leah Greenbaum 10/13/09

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Tags: allergies


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