Items Tagged ‘Almanac’

February 17th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Twin Cities Public Television (Almanac)
Head of Mayo Clinic: John Noseworthy

Interview with Dr. John Noseworthy begins at 12:14. Almanac is hosted by Cathy Wurzer and Eric Eskola. Mary Lahammer contributes political reporting on a weekly basis.

Reach:  Twin Cities Public Television's "Almanac" program is a Minnesota institution. It has occupied the 7 o'clock time slot on Friday nights for more than a quarter of a century. It is the longest-running prime time TV program ever in the region. "Almanac" is a time capsule, a program of TPTrecord that details our region's history and culture during the past twenty five years. The hour-long mix of news, politics and culture is seen live statewide on the six stations of the Minnesota Public Television Association. Almanac was the first Minnesota TV show that virtually everyone in the state could watch together. The program's unusual format has been copied by numerous PBS stations around the country and it has led to Almanac being honored with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting's award for Best Public Affairs Program.

Related coverage:
Post-Bulletin, Political Notebook: Noseworthy talked to White House officials about travel ban

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. 

Contacts:  Kelley Luckstein, Karl Oestreich

 

KSTP
Mayo Clinic Doctors Demonstrate Dangers of Ice Fishing

Ice fishing may be a favorite pastime of many Minnesotans, but doctors say it can also be more dangerous than some realize. Mayo Clinic doctors aimed to demonstrate those dangers with the help of a mannequin they call Gus. Gus has been dinged, dented and generally doomed in a series of Mayo Clinic public education videos. Previous installments include Gus being hit by a driver who's texting, suffering a fireworks injury and receiving the Heimlich.

Reach: KSTP-TV is the ABC affiliate in Minneapolis that broadcasts on channel 5. KSTP-TV Online has more than 503,000 unique visitors each month. It is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., and is the only locally-owned and operated broadcasting company in the Twin Cities. KSTP-TV first broadcast in April 1948, and was the first television station to serve the upper Midwest.

Additional coverage: 
La Crosse TribuneAnglers beware: Ice fishing more perilous than traditional methods
KAAL, Mayo Clinic Doctors Demonstrate Dangers of Ice Fishing
Star Tribune, Mayo study finds hazards of ice fishing are many and varied

Context: Ice fishing might seem like a benign sport – for everyone except the fish. Sitting in a cozy shanty waiting for a bite, what could go wrong? A lot, Mayo Clinic surgeons have found. The ice fishing injuries they have chronicled seem more like a casualty list from an extreme sport: burns, broken bones, concussions and more. The findings are published in the American Journal of Emergency Medicine. The study team analyzed data on emergency department visits between 2009 and 2014 obtained from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System ─ All Injury Program and found 85 patients hurt while ice fishing. There may be more cases than they could find; the database collects data on emergency room visits from a nationally representative sample of roughly 100 hospitals with six or more beds, and the researchers had to search case narratives to identify ice fishing injuries. More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Sharon Theimer,  Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

News4Jax
Thousands run marathon to support breast cancer research
by Ashley Mitchem

After a decade that included nearly 100,000 runners, the Donna 26.2 marathon has become more than just a run -- it's the only marathon in the United States dedicated to breast cancer research. Donations support breast cancer research at Mayo Clinic and provide financial assistance to
those living with breast cancer.

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville. This Week in Jacksonville is a weekly public affairs program on WJXT.

Additional coverage: Florida Times-Union, First Coast News

Context: The DONNA Foundation is a non-profit organization in Northeast Florida producing the only marathon in the U.S. dedicated to breast cancer research, awareness and care.  The DONNA Foundation has helped to develop and maintain the Mayo Clinic Breast Cancer Translational Genomics Program.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

Marketplace
Mayo Clinic's hometown looks to become the 'Silicon Valley of medicine'
by Catharine Richert

If you head directly south from St. Paul, Minnesota, you'll eventually find yourself in Rochester, home of the world-renowned Mayo Clinic. For NPR Marketplace Logomore than 100 years, the city and the hospital have been synonymous. And now, a massive economic development project backed by Mayo, the city and the state aims to transform the city of more than 100,000 into a magnet for startups and entrepreneurs in medicine and other fields. Mayo BioBusiness Center Chair Jim Rogers said Rochester’s transformation is already apparent. "I can count — just about every building has a new business in the last four of five years, it seems,” he said. "It's incredible what's occurring here."

Reach: Marketplace is produced and distributed by American Public Media (APM), in association with the University of Southern California. The Marketplace portfolio of programs includes Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal, Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio, Marketplace Weekend with Lizzie O'Leary, and Marketplace Tech with Ben Johnson. Marketplace programs are currently broadcast by nearly 800 public radio stations nationwide across the United States and are heard by more than 13 million weekly listeners.

Previous coverage in the January 13, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: With Mayo Clinic at its heart, the Destination Medical Center (DMC) initiative is the catalyst to position Rochester, Minnesota as the world’s premier destination for health and wellness; attracting people, investment opportunities, and jobs to America’s City for Health and supporting the economic growth of Minnesota, its bioscience sector, and beyond.

Contacts: Duska Anastasijevic, Bob Nellis

 

CNN
For decades, women had heart attacks in silence
by Michael Nedelamn

Sharonne Hayes, a cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic and founder of its Women's Heart Clinic, originally thought it was near-impossible to do research on SCAD. She expected to see no more than one or two cases in her career. "Most of the cases were in the pathology literature, so it wasCNN Logo (thought to be) almost universally fatal," said Hayes, who has educated patients through the advocacy organization WomenHeart for over 15 years. In 2009, a woman approached her at a WomenHeart conference and asked, "What is Mayo doing about research on SCAD?" "It's probably so rare," Hayes replied. "We could never research it."

Reach: Cable News Network (CNN) is a worldwide news and information network providing live, continuous coverage of news from around the globe, 24 hours a day. CNN online received more than 55 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Context:  Sharonne Hayes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Hayes studies cardiovascular disease and prevention, with a focus on sex and gender differences and conditions that uniquely or predominantly affect women. With a clinical base in the Women's Heart Clinic, Dr. Hayes and her research team utilize novel recruitment methods, social media and online communities, DNA profiling, and sex-specific evaluations to better understand several cardiovascular conditions. A major area of focus is spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD), an uncommon and under-recognized cause of acute coronary syndrome (heart attack) that occurs predominantly in young women.

Contacts: Traci Klein, Kelley Luckstein

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Tags: 26.2 with Donna Marathon, A Tu Salud, ACA, AccuWeather, Almanac, alzheimers, AMA, Ambient Clinical Analytics, antibacterial soap, arrhythmia, Associated Press, Barron News-Shield


January 29th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Heather Privett  with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Post-Bulletin
Bug-zapping 'robots' help prevent infections
by Jeff Kiger

Mayo Clinic is rolling out a number of "bug zapper-like" devices to help battle bacteria and reduce potentially deadLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaperly patient infections. Unlike other U.S. hospitals, Mayo Clinic has seen the C-diff infections decline in recent years. However, they still have about 200 cases a year, said Dr. Priya Sampathkumar, chair of Mayo Clinic's infection control committee in Rochester. Mayo Clinic has not seen any C-diff-related deaths in at least two years, she added.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Additional coverage: Med City Beat, KTTCKIMT

Context: Mayo Clinic has added robots in its fight against Clostridium difficile (C-diff) bacteria. In the U.S., C-diff is one of the most common infections patients can get while receiving care at a health care facility. C-diff can cause a variety of symptoms, including potentially deadly diarrhea. A recent national report shows some progress in reducing C-diff infections; however, more work remains. “C-diff is extremely distressing for our patients,” says Priya Sampathkumar, M.D., chair of Mayo Clinic’s infection control committee on Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus. “It can be debilitating, decrease quality of life and can even result in death.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Twin Cities Public Television (Almanac)
Senator Franken, Mayo health survey, more capitol art

Dr. John Wald appeared to talk about Mayo Clinic National Health Check-Up. Dr. Wald's interview is the second one in the line up and appears at 13:15 of the program.

Reach:  Twin Cities Public Television's "Almanac" program is a Minnesota institution. It has occupied the 7 o'clock time slot on Friday nights for more than a quarter of a century. It is the longest-running prime time TV program ever in the region. "Almanac" is a time capsule, a program of TPTrecord that details our region's history and culture during the past twenty five years. The hour-long mix of news, politics and culture is seen live statewide on the six stations of the Minnesota Public Television Association. Almanac was the first Minnesota TV show that virtually everyone in the state could watch together. The program's unusual format has been copied by numerous PBS stations around the country and it has led to Almanac being honored with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting's award for Best Public Affairs Program. Almanac has also earned six regional Emmy awards.

Previous coverage in January 22, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context:  According to the first-ever Mayo Clinic National Health Check-Up, most Americans experience barriers to staying healthy, with their work schedule as the leading barrier (22 percent), particularly among men and residents of the Northeast. While work schedule is a top barrier for women, as well, they are significantly more likely than men to cite caring for a child, spouse or parent. “The Mayo Clinic National Health Check-Up takes a pulse on Americans’ health opinions and behaviors, from barriers to getting healthy to perceptions of aging, to help identify opportunities to educate and empower people to improve their health,” says John T. Wald, M.D., Medical Director for Public Affairs at Mayo Clinic. “In this first survey, we’re also looking at ‘health by the decades’ to uncover differences as we age.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

New York Times (Well blog)
The Health Benefits of Knitting
by Jane E. Brody

New York Times Well Blog…Perhaps most exciting is research that suggests that crafts like knitting and crocheting may help to stave off a decline in brain function with age. In a 2011 study, researchers led by Dr. Yonas E. Geda, a psychiatrist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., interviewed a random sample of 1,321 people ages 70 to 89, most of whom were cognitively normal, about the cognitive activities they engaged in late in life.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: Yonas Geda, M.D, is a Mayo Clinic psychiatrist. Dr. Geda's research interests can be found here and you can learn more about his study here.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Robb Report
Six Life-Changing Ways to Eat Healthier in the New Year
by Janice O’Leary

Earlier this month, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) released their first update in five years to the national dietary Robb Report Health & Wellness Logorecommendations. For many physicians and scientists who contributed to the report upon which these guidelines are based, the federally approved guidelines are a watered-down version of the original suggestions because they eliminated such advice as cutting back on red and processed meat, says Dr. Donald Hensrud, MD, medical director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program and editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet.

Reach:  The Robb Report is a monthly magazine with a circulation of more than 101,000. Its website has more than 632,000 unique visitors each month. Robb Report Health & Wellness covers methods for healthy and fulfilling lifestyles.

Context: Donald Hensrud, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist and editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet Book.

Contact:  Kelley Luckstein
Mpls. St. Paul Magazine
Mind + Body Revolution
by Dara Moskowitz Grumdahl

Peek into Minnesota’s leading hospitals, health care systems, doctor’s offices, and psychiatry practices today and you’ll see hundreds of examples Mpls-St. Paul Magazaine logoof integrative medicine. At the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program, throat cancer survivors learn new cooking methods and cardiac patients fill yoga classes led by yogis specializing in Reiki, an energy-based healing therapy. Dr. Deborah Rhodes, an internist at the Mayo Clinic, emphasizes that wellness goes beyond soothing white robes and pretty smells. “If you want to optimize cancer outcomes based on true data, we don’t see anywhere to go but with integrative medicine,” she says.

Reach:  Published for the residents of the Twin Cities, Minneapolis-St. Paul Magazine has a monthly circulation of more than 68,000.

Context: Deborah Rhodes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician with multiple departments.  Dr. Rhodes studies the application of a new breast imaging device, molecular breast imaging, to breast cancer screening. The long-term goal of Dr. Rhodes' research is to develop an individualized approach to breast cancer screening that incorporates breast density, age, and other factors that impact breast cancer risk and mammography sensitivity. The goal of an individualized approach to screening is to improve breast cancer detection while minimizing both the cost of screening and the harms associated with false-positive results and overdiagnosis.

Contact:  Kelley Luckstein

 

Star Tribune
Skipping lunch? Your doctor wants you to think again
by Allie Shah

Just one in five Americans steps away from his or her desk to eat lunch, studies show. Working straight through the day without a break can lead Star Tribune newspaper logoto higher levels of stress, mental fatigue, physical exhaustion and eventually burnout. “It’s really important that people keep in perspective the big picture — that they will really burn out,” said Dr. John Murphy, a family physician with Mayo Clinic Health System. “That lunch break is critically important.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: John Murphy, M.D. is a Family Medicine physician with Mayo Clinic Health System in Sparta, WI.

Contact: Rick Thiesse

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Tags: "bug zapper-like" devices battle bacteria, #FlexForAnn, $6 billion Destination Medical Center, a zoonotic disease, A.L.S., ABC News, Afilbercept costs $1800 per dose, Aflibercept given for macular degeneration, afternoon slump, Albert Lea Tribune, Albuequerque Journal, Almanac


April 24th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

USA Today
Best memory advice? Exercise, stimulating hobbies

…A study by researchers at the Mayo Clinic published this month in Neurology found that adults who engaged in activities such as arts and crafts, book clubs and travel were half as likely to develop mild cognitive impairment in their 80s as those who did not pursue brain-stimulatingUSA Today Newspaper Logo hobbies.

Reach: USA TODAY  has the highest daily circulation of any U.S. newspaper with a daily average circulation of 4.1 million, which includes print, various digital editions and other  papers that use their branded content.

Additional coverage: Boston Globe

Previous Coverage in April 9, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: People who participate in arts and craft activities and who socialize in middle and old age may delay the development in very old age of the thinking and memory problems that often lead to dementia, according to a new study published in the April 8, 2015, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.  “As millions of older US adults are reaching the age where they may experience these memory and thinking problem called Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), it is important we look to find lifestyle changes that may stave off the condition,” said study author Rosebud Roberts, MB, ChB, MS, of Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. and a member of the American Academy of Neurology. “Our study supports the idea that engaging the mind may protect neurons, or the building blocks of the brain, from dying, stimulate growth of new neurons, or may help recruit new neurons to maintain cognitive activities in old age.” More information about the study can be found here.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

TPT
Almanac

Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy talks about Medicare payment reform with Almanac hosts Cathy Wurzer and Eric Eskola.

Reach:  Twin Cities Public Television's "Almanac" program is a Minnesota institution. It has occupied the 7 o'clock time slot on Friday nights for more than a quarter of a century. It is the longest-running prime time TV program ever in the region. "Almanac" is a time capsule, a program of TPTrecord that details our region's history and culture during the past twenty five years. The hour-long mix of news, politics and culture is seen live statewide on the six stations of the Minnesota Public Television Association. Almanac was the first Minnesota TV show that virtually everyone in the state could watch together. The program's unusual format has been copied by numerous PBS stations around the country and it has led to Almanac being honored with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting's award for Best Public Affairs Program. Almanac has also earned six regional Emmy awards.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Mayo Clinic has been a strong advocate of modernizing Medicare and repealing the Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) and replacing it with a reimbursement system that truly rewards quality and efficiency not simply volume. The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act strengthens Medicare, extends the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and makes numerous other improvements to the health care system.

Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Karl Oestreich

 

News4Jax
Dangers of e-cigarette use

Dr. Vandana Bhide, an internal medicine doctor with the Mayo Clinic, discusses the dangers of e-cigarette use and rising News Jax 4 Logonumber of teen users.

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville.

Context: Vanda Bhide, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in Hospital Internal Medicine in Florida.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

HealthDay
Migraines Often Undiagnosed, Doctor Says

If you don't know whether or not your headache is just a headache, or if it's actually a migraine, you may be missing out on effective treatments, Health Day Logosuggests an expert at the American Migraine Foundation. "Migraine is not just a headache, but a neurological disorder that has a wide variety of symptoms and specific treatments," foundation chair Dr. David Dodick, who's also a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Scottsdale, Ariz., said in a foundation news release.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: FOX10Phoenix, ABC FOX Montana

Context: David Dodick, M.D. is a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona and an expert in concussion care and director of the Mayo Clinic Concussion Program.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

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Tags: 1to1 Media, 3-T MRI advancing on ultrasound for fetal abnormalities, a rare side-effect of certain chemotherapy, ABC FOX Montana, ABC News, AFRO, allergies, Almanac, Ames Tribune, Argus Leader, Ariz., Arizona Daily Star


April 18th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic builds 'Better' app to expand its name with consumers
By Dan Browning

The Mayo Clinic wants to help you feel “Better.” That’s the name of a new mobile app service launched by the Rochester-based health care provider, in partnershipStar Tribune Business section logo with a Silicon Valley venture capital firm and an accomplished tele-medicine entrepreneur. It’s part of Mayo’s overarching goal to put the clinic’s expertise into the hands of 200 million consumers.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

KAALMayo Launches New App to Reach Patients Worldwide

Bloomberg BusinessweekEngadgetMobi health newsPost-BulletinTech CrunchHIS Talk Mobile

Context: Better, a consumer health start-up, and Mayo Clinic have launched a new way for people to navigate the complexity of the healthcare system simply and quickly.  Through a mobile device, Better provides tailored Mayo Clinic health information, 24/7 access to the clinic's experienced and highly-skilled nurses, and a Better Personal Health Assistant who helps simplify and manage people's care so they can use their time to focus on being well. More information about Better can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

Florida Times Union
Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville receives $39.5 million grant for stroke study
by Charlie Patton

…the Mayo Clinic in Florida has received a $39.5 million grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke to conduct a seven-year clinical trial Florida Times-Union newspaper logoto look at the question of whether the use of medication is as effective in preventing stroke for someone with carotid stenosis, the narrowing of a carotid artery, as surgery and the placement of a stent, a small mesh tube that holds the artery open. Leading the study, which will be called the CREST-2, will be Thomas Brott, a neurologist who is director of research at Mayo’s Jacksonville campus, and his colleague, neurologist James Meschia.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:
Jacksonville Business JournalJacksonville's Mayo Clinic gets $39.5 million stroke study grant, The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke is funding a seven-year study at the Mayo Clinic in Florida examining whether medication is as effective in preventing stroke as is surgery or stents. Thomas Brott, a neurologist who is director of research at Mayo’s Jacksonville campus, and neurologist James Meschia will lead the study,  according to the Florida Times-Union.

Post-BulletinWTEV FlaHealth-News.wsDaily Star UKTelegraph UK
St. Augustine RecordWJXX Fla.WJCT Fla

Context: Is medicine as safe and effective as surgery or stenting in preventing a stroke caused by the buildup of plaque in the carotid artery? Thomas G. Brott, M.D., a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Florida, aims to find out. “It’s a critical question. The quality medicines we have today may mean that it is not necessary to perform invasive procedures on patients who do not have warning signs of stroke,” Dr. Brott says. “More than 100,000 carotid surgeries and carotid artery stentings are performed each year in the United States on such patients at risk — and that may not be necessary.” More information, including a video interview with Dr. Brott, about the international study to test best approach to stroke prevention can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

USA TODAY
Apathy could signal brain shrinkage in old age
by Mary Bowerman

A new study suggests that as people age, they should be aware of symptoms of apathy, which may indicate a decrease in brain volume and possible brain disease...Apathy, which has similar symptoms to depression, is hard to measureUSA Today newspaper logo because the symptoms are more subtle and complex, according to Ronald Petersen, the director of the Mayo Alzheimer's Disease Research Center at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who is not associated with the study.

Reach: USA TODAY  has the highest daily circulation of any U.S. newspaper with a daily average circulation of 2.9 million, which includes print and various digital editions.

Additional coverage: KARE11

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic


Post-Bulletin
Back and Forth: The early home of Dr. Henry Plummer
by Harley Flathers

Dr. Henry Stanley Plummer, the famed Mayo Clinic physician, was born March 3, 1874 to Dr. Albert and Isabelle Plummer in the little community of Hamilton. This Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperlittle village lies a mile and a half east and a mile south of Racine on the Mower-Fillmore County road. Sonja Hoag, a retired Mayo Clinic nurse, and her retired husband, many years a preacher, live in the home where Plummer was born.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Related coverage:
Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic mobile exhibit kicks off Monday

Mayo Clinic kicks off a free, mobile 150th-anniversary tour Monday in Kingman, Ariz., at Kingman Regional Medical Center, a member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. The exhibit is scheduled to visit more than 40 communities in Minnesota, Missouri, Colorado, California, North Dakota, Washington, Illinois, Nebraska, Maryland, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky and Michigan, along with Washington, D.C., Winnipeg and Toronto, Canada.

Context: On July 1, 1907, Dr. Henry Plummer and Mabel Root, Dr. Plummer's assistant, inaugurated Mayo's system of patient registration and medical record keeping. The single-unit record was central to the new system. It brought together all of a patient's records -- clinical visits, hospital stays, laboratory tests and notes -- in a single file that traveled with the patient and was stored in a central repository. This simple system quickly became the standard for medical record keeping around the world. This year marks 150 years of continuous service to patients, and Mayo Clinic is launching a yearlong recognition that will honor a legacy of medical accomplishments and a model for the future of health care. Dr. Mayo’s sons, Drs. William and Charles Mayo, joined the practice in the late 1880’s and, with their father, created Mayo Clinic’s medical hallmark: The integrated care model that focuses a team of experts on one patient at a time and puts patients’ needs first. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. 

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein


ABC15 Ariz.
Mayo Clinic's Simulation Center helps with team approach to medicine, reenacts real-life scenarios

ABC affiliate, channel 15 in Arizona

Mayo Clinic cardiologist, David Fortuin, M.D., joined the cast of Sonoran Living Live to talk about Mayo Clinic's Multidisciplinary Simulation Center and how it's used to perfect Mayo's team approach to patient care.

Reach:  KNXV-TV, ABC 15, is the ABC television station affiliate in Phoenix, Arizona.

Context: F. David Fortuin, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist.

Public Affairs Contact: Carol Benson

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Tags: ABC News, ABC15 in Arizona, About.com, acute pancreatitis, Alexa Ray Joel, allergy sufferers, Almanac, alzheimer's disease, APOE4, astigmatism, Austin Daily Herald, back pain


March 28th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

TPT Almanac
Mayo CEO Dr. John Noseworthy, capitol reporters, Rochester mayor, Syrian crisis, political scientist panel

TPT's public affairs program, Almanac, broadcast its first remote program on March 21 from Phillips Hall at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. More than 400 people were inTPT attendance for the live broadcast.

Context: Twin Cities Public Television's "Almanac" program is a Minnesota institution. It has occupied the 7 o'clock timeslot on Friday nights for more than a quarter of a century. It is the longest-running primetime TV program ever in the region. "Almanac" is a time capsule, a program of record that details our region's history and culture during the past twenty five years. The hour-long mix of news, politics and culture is seen live statewide on the six stations of the Minnesota Public Television Association. Almanac was the first Minnesota TV show that virtually everyone in the state could watch together. The program's unusual format has been copied by numerous PBS stations around the country and it has led to Almanac being honored with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting's award for Best Public Affairs Program. Almanac has also earned six regional Emmys awards.

Related coverage: 
Post-BulletinPublic TV's 'Almanac' broadcasts live from Mayo Clinic

InsuranceNewsNet
Public TV's 'Almanac' broadcasts live from Mayo Clinic

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic aims for more Pentagon funding
by Corey Mitchell

The Mayo Clinic, with military ties that stretch back to the Civil War, is making a push to more aggressively pursue a larger share of the $900 million-plus spent annually by the Star-Tribune-Logo-300x45Pentagon on medical research. The medical giant has opened a Department of Defense Medical Research Office in Rochester and hired McAllister & Quinn, a Washington, D.C.-based lobbying firm, to help procure more federal funding. Dr. Peter Amadio, medical director of Mayo’s DOD Medical Research Office, said that while Mayo has some defense contracts, there’s “an opportunity for us to do better.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:
Minneapolis /St. Paul Business Journal, Mayo goes to battle for military funds 

BringMeTheNews, Mayo Clinic angling for more Pentagon funds

Context: Mayo Clinic has opened the Mayo Clinic Department of Defense (DOD) Medical Research Office. The office, in Rochester, MN., is designed to be an easy to use single point of contact, linking the research needs of the DOD with Mayo Clinic investigators capable of addressing those needs, and to improve access to funding to serve DOD research and development priorities. The office oversees Mayo Clinic's portfolio of DOD-funded research, which has evolved over Mayo’s long and successful partnership with the U.S. government. Today, dozens of Mayo Clinic researchers receive funding for special projects that use new technologies and innovative solutions to support military readiness, functional restoration and rehabilitation after complex injuries, restore health and improve wellness of military populations.

“This is a continuation of Mayo Clinic’s 150-year legacy with the DOD,” says Peter Amadio, M.D., director of the office, and an orthopedic surgeon at Mayo Clinic. “The office and website are designed to strengthen this long-standing relationship and to not only match DOD research needs with the expertise of Mayo Clinic, but also accelerate the entire process from proposal development to funding to delivery of a completed project. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Brian Kilen

WCCO
Boy With Melanoma Raises Thousands Making Bracelets To Battle Cancer
by Susan-Elizabeth Littlefield

There are certain statistics you want your kids to be a part of. This is not one of them. Less than 10 children in this country have a form of childhood melanoma, and one of them lives in the Twin Cities metro. Graham Fowler, of Fridley, Minn., is a 10-year-old with Spitzoid Melanoma. He’s being treated at the Mayo Clinic and has had eight surgeries.CBS Minnesota

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

Context: Melanoma, the most serious type of skin cancer, develops in the cells (melanocytes) that produce melanin — the pigment that gives your skin its color. Melanoma can also form in your eyes and, rarely, in internal organs, such as your intestines. Specialists at Mayo Clinic work as a team to make a prompt melanoma diagnosis so you can begin treatment as soon as possible. Mayo Clinic's surgical pathologists and dermatopathologists are respected for their expertise in identifying melanoma stage, depth and severity, which is critical for selecting the most appropriate treatment combination.

Public Affairs Contact: Joe Dangor

Florida Times-Union (Subscription required)
Medical tourism provides big economic boost to Jacksonville economy
by Charlie Patton

In the two weeks they’ve been here, they’ve done quite a bit of sightseeing, going to the St. Augustine Alligator Farm and making a day trip to Disney World….But the purpose of their Florida Times-Union newspaper logovisit isn’t fun. They came to Jacksonville because they were seeking cancer treatment for James at the University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute…William C. Rupp, the chief executive officer of the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, which has an economic impact in the Jacksonville area of about $1.6 billion, said that about 43,000 of the approximately 1000,000 patients treated at the clinic each year qualify as medical tourists.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:
St. Augustine Record; Travel Weekly, Can medical tourism provide a shot in the arm for Fla.? 

Context: William Rupp, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vice president and CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

Phoenix Business Journal
Inside the Reporter’s Notebook
By Angela Gonzales

Phoenix Business JournalPhoenix Business Journal senior healthcare reporter Angela Gonzales interviews Dr. Wyatt Decker.

Reach: The Phoenix Business Journal is published by American City Business Journals which owns more than 40 other local business newspapers.

Context: Wyatt Decker, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic Vice President and CEO at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh
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Tags: A.L.S., ABC News, Aby Bedtka, Aetna InteliHealth, Afghanistan, African-American men and cancer survival rates, allergies, Almanac, alzheimer's disease, american heart association, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Aerospace Medicine


August 16th, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

 

 

August 16, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

ABC News
Grandma Gives Birth to Twin Granddaughters
by Liz Neporent

Talk about a labor of love. Susie Kozisek, an Iowa mother of four, ages 20 to 30, gave birth to her own twin granddaughters, Hallee and Hadlee.  Kozisek, 53, acted as a gestational carrier for her daughter, Ashley Larkin, because Larkin has pulmonary hypertension and cannot get pregnant. Before giving birth to the twins in July, she was also the gestational carrier for Larkin's older daughter, Harper, born in June 2011…Dr. Jani Jensen, the Mayo Clinic fertility doctor who performed the in vitro fertilizations for the family, said the circumstances surrounding the twins' birth were extremely uncommon. "It's usual for a mother to act as a gestational carrier for her own child and she was at the older end of the spectrum for pregnancy," Jensen said.

Reach: ABCNews.com is the official website for ABC News.

Context: Jani Jensen, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic reproductive endocrinologist.  Mayo Clinic's Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility manages complex problems related to infertility, fertility preservation, recurrent pregnancy loss, amenorrhea, endometriosis, polycystic ovarian disease, premature ovarian failure, congenital uterine anomalies and risk of genetic disorders in offspring. These specialists offer an integrated approach to diagnosis and treatment, which may include evaluation by doctors in other specialties and extensive diagnostic testing and counseling. A collaborative approach includes the woman and her partner as part of the health care team.

Additional Coverage: NY Daily News, Sioux City Journal, Guardian Express, Headlines & Global News, KGTV Calif., UPI, Good Morning America Yahoo!, Examiner, mom.me, BabyCenter, OneHallyu, Daily Mail UK, ABC News Radio, Globe Gazette, Post-Bulletin

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

Bloomberg
Heart Murmur Leading to Leaky Valves May Need Immediate Surgery
by Michelle Cortez

People with damaged mitral valves, which allow blood to flow backward in the heart, live longer and healthier lives if they get immediate surgery to repair a severe defect rather than wait for symptoms to appear…Getting the operation within three months boosts survival by 45 percent over a decade for those with valve regurgitation that hasn’t caused symptoms, the study found. The safety and success rates for surgical repair have risen dramatically in the past decade, said Rakesh Suri, a cardiovascular surgeon at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

Circulation: Bloomberg has 2,300 media professionals in 146 bureaus across 72 countries. Bloomberg delivers its content across more than 400 publications, over 310 million households worldwide through Bloomberg Television and 500,000 in the New York metro area and 18.5 million subscribers through satellite radio.

Additional Coverage: Chicago Tribune, HealthDay, WebMD, MedPage Today, theheart.org, News Medical, 2 Minute Medicine, US News & World Report

Context: New research findings appearing in  the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)ndicate that early mitral valve surgery appears to be associated with greater long-term survival and a lower risk of heart failure than watchful waiting for a distinct event such as symptoms or indications of heart dysfunction before doing such surgery. Rakesh Suri, MD, DPhil, Mayo Clinic, and colleagues found that treating mitral valve with degenerative regurgitation with surgery soon after diagnosis was associated with longer life and less risk of heart failure compared with watchful waiting.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Sharon Theimer

CNN
Study: Heavy coffee drinking in people under 55 linked to early death
by Elizabeth Landau

The latest study, published in Mayo Clinic's Proceedings, found an association between drinking more than 28 cups of coffee a week and an increased risk of death from all causes, in people 55 years old and younger. One cup of coffee is 8 ounces…"If you consume coffee, enjoy it," Dr. Donald Hensrud of the Mayo Clinic said. "But I wouldn't necessarily recommend taking it up if you don't like it." A lot of people already consider it a regular part of their lives. For nearly two-thirds of Americans, the daily coffee routine is just habit.

Reach: CNN.com has 74.2 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional Coverage: USA Today, Prevention, Huffington Post, HealthDay, CBSNews.com, SBS Australia, WSYR NY, Everyday Health, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Telegraph UK, TIME, ABC News, 9News Colo., Cleveland Plain Dealer, El Pais, Diario Panorama, ABC News Radio

Context: Nearly 400 million cups of coffee are consumed every day in America. Drinking large amounts of coffee may be bad for under-55s, according to a new study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. A study of more than 40,000 individuals found a statistically significant 21% increased mortality in those drinking more than 28 cups of coffee a week and death from all causes, with a greater than 50% increased mortality risk in both men and women younger than 55 years of age. Investigators warn that younger people in particular may need to avoid heavy coffee consumption. No adverse effects were found in heavy coffee drinkers aged over 55.

News Release: More Than 28 Cups of Coffee a Week May Endanger Health in Under-55s

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Outside Online
The Real Reason Why Athletes Dope
by Michael Joyner

What if we're blaming the wrong people for doping? A new look into why athletes choose to dope raises serious questions about the fight against drugs in sport. It’s been a tough month for dopers—in all sports. Last week, Alex Rodriguez was suspended for 200 games based on “non-analytic” evidence of doping, as part of the “Biogenesis” scandal in south Florida.  His suspension is the longest doping suspension in major league history.

Reach: Outside Magazine covers outdoor sports, activities and the environment. The magazine has a monthly circulation of more than 689,000 readers. Outside Online has more than 105,000 unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional Coverage in Outside Online:
Outside Online
Who’s faster: Usain Bolt or Mo Farah?
by Michael Joyner

The Olympic 10,000-meter champion Mo Farah has challenged Usain Bolt to a 600-meter race for charity. If this race actually goes off, who'll be the favorite and how fast might the winning time be?

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anthesiologist. Dr. Joyner and his lab team are interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Bob Nellis

NBC Latino
What you need to know about prescription drug abuse
by Dr. Joseph Sirven

Mayo Clinic Arizona Prescription drug abuse is the use of a medication that is prescribed by your doctor, but is used in a manner that is not intended by the prescribing doctor. Prescription drug abuse includes everything from taking a friend’s pain killer for your back ache to injecting medications to get high. Abuse of prescription drugs in the United States has been increasing.

Reach: NBC Latino is an English-language wesbite aimed at Hispanics featuring news and general interest information.

Context: Joseph Sirven, M.D., is chair of neurology at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Dr. Sirven's research pertains to all facets of the diagnosis and management of seizures and epilepsy.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

TIME
What’s the Best Motivator for Health? Cold, Hard Cash
by Alexandra Sifferlin

It’s no surprise that financial gain can be a powerful motivator, but a variety of groups are using that knowledge in innovative ways to help people get healthier. Mayo Clinic researchers recently reported that participants in a weight-loss study who had the opportunity to lose or gain $20 a month lost an average of 9 lb. in a year, which was four times greater than the amount lost by those who didn’t have the financial incentive.

Circulation: TIME magazine has a weekly circulation of 3.3 million. Time, Inc. engages more than 138 million U.S. consumers in print, online and via mobile devices each month.

Context: Weight loss study participants who received financial incentives were more likely to stick with a weight loss program and lost more weight than study participants who received no incentives, according to Mayo Clinic research that will be presented Saturday, March 9 at the American College of Cardiology’s 62nd Annual Scientific Session.

News Release: Money Talks When It Comes to Losing Weight, Mayo Clinic Study Finds

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

FOX 9
CHILDHOOD OBESITY: YMCA, Mayo Clinic team up, create camp
by Scott Wasserman

Childhood obesity is a growing problem, but the Mayo Clinic and YMCA are teaming up to help kids shed pounds and change lifestyles in a unique way in an effort to reverse the trend.  While Camp Wabi, located just north of Eau Claire, Wis., may look like a typical camp with the usual activities, it has a specific focus -- helping children who struggle with their weight learn a new way of living.

Reach: FOX 9 News (WFTC) serves the Minneapolis-St. Paul market.

Context: Zumba. Nutrition label reading. Swimming. All are part of creating healthy lifestyles for young people at Camp Wabi, a camp for kids who struggle with obesity. Teen campers and pediatrician John Plewa, M.D., talk about this special camp, a joint effort between Mayo Clinic Health System and the YMCA in Eau Claire.

Public Affairs Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

Jacksonville Business Journal
Mayo Clinic Florida moving forward to leverage biobank specimens
by Ashley Kritzer

The Florida Biobank opened in September 2012, collecting samples from volunteer Mayo patients who have granted access to their medical records, completed a 12-page lifestyle questionnaire and donated a blood sample, from which DNA is extracted and stored for future use. “We are not going to profit from it, but we are going to use it to drive research forward,” said said Alex Parker, a Florida-based associate director of the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine.

Circulation: The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Context: Participants who enroll in the Mayo Clinic Biobank are asked to grant access to their medical records, complete a 12-page lifestyle questionnaire and donate a blood sample, from which DNA is extracted and stored for future use. Participation in the Biobank is currently limited to people already receiving routine care at Mayo Clinic. It likely will eventually be opened to non-Mayo patients.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Opens Florida Biobank to Research Kidney Cancer, Other Diseases

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

Star Tribune
Dayton chief of staff named to chair $6B Mayo board
by Jennifer Brooks

Rochester and the Mayo Clinic are a step closer to a $6 billion makeover. Friday was the first meeting of the eight-member board that will oversee Mayo's massive Destination Medical Center project. The multi-decade, multi-billion dollar project is intended to double Mayo in size and transform its hometown into a hip, attractive destination in its own right. Twenty years from now, Rochester “is going to be better, it’s going to be newer, it’s going to be more attractive, it’s going to be more dynamic and it’s going to have more people with more jobs,” said Gov. Mark Dayton, who traveled to the Mayo Civic Center to kick off the first meeting of the Destination Medical Center board – and to see his chief of staff Tina Smith picked as head of that board.

Circulation: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional Coverage: MPR, KAAL, KIMT, KTTC, KDLT, KSTP, KAAL, Post-Bulletin, Duluth News Tribune, Prairie Business, WCCO, KARE11, Star Tribune Video

News Release: Destination Medical Center Corporation Board Will Hold First Meeting This Friday

News Release: Governor Dayton Makes Appointments to Destination Medical Center Board

News Release: Bill George Named Mayo Clinic Representative to Destination Medical Center Corporation Board

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

Star Tribune
A tireless search for a good night's sleep
by Allie Shah

With as many as 70 million Americans reporting trouble sleeping, health officials have redoubled efforts to unlock the mysteries of this essential bodily function. Still, they’re only beginning to learn how sleep works and why we need it. “We’re not even at the halfway point of our understanding of the complexities of sleep and health,” said Dr. Mark Hansen of the Mayo Clinic’s Center for Sleep Medicine in Rochester.

Circulation: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Mark Hansen, M.D.,  has appointments in Mayo Clinic's Center for Sleep Medicine and Psychiatry and Psychology. Mayo Clinic doctors trained in sleep disorders evaluate and treat adults and children in the Center for Sleep Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. The Center for Sleep Medicine is one of the largest sleep medicine facilities in the United States. Staff in the center treat about 6,500 new people who have sleep disorders each year. The Center for Sleep Medicine is accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Public Affairs Contacts: Alyson Gonzalez, Nick Hanson

MPR
The Daily Circuit, Beyond smoking bans, New Zealand envisions being cigarette-free

… So, how is Minnesota doing on anti-tobacco efforts? The American Lung Association gives it a mixed report card. The state received an A for smoke-free air, but F's for tobacco prevention and cessation. Dr. Richard Hurt, director of the Nicotine Dependence Center at the Mayo Clinic, and Erika Seward, a vice president at the American Lung Association, join The Daily Circuit to talk about what governments can and should be doing about smoking.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context:  Richard Hurt, M.D. is director of Mayo Clinic’s Nicotine Dependence Center and a leading expert on tobacco-related issues. As a former smoker, he once smoked three packs a day. Dr. Hurt had his last cigarette on Nov. 22, 1975.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

Pioneer Press
TPT's Mary Lahammer 'blown away' by response to MS reveal
by Amy Carlson Gustafson

On the Aug. 2 episode of "Almanac" on Twin Cities Public Television, political reporter Mary Lahammer revealed she has multiple sclerosis. She talked about living with MS with hosts Cathy Wurzer and Eric Eskola…Her doctor at the Mayo Clinic urged her to live with the disease for two years before going public, but she did confide in a small circle of folks, including state Rep. Rod Hamilton, who also has the disease.

Reach: The St. Paul Pioneer Press has a daily circulation of 208,280 and its Sunday newspaper circulation is 284,507. Its TwinCities.com website had approximately 20.4 million page views (March 2013). Mobile page views on smartphones and tablet computers totaled more than 11.4 million in March 2013.

Previous Coverage from August 9, 2013 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease in which the immune system, which normally protects your body, attacks the covering (myelin sheath) surrounding the nerves in your brain and spinal cord. These nerves send information from your brain and spinal cord to other nerves in your body, and myelin helps make this transmission efficient. MS can affect people of any age, although symptoms most commonly occur in people 20 to 40 years old. Women are twice as likely to develop MS as are men.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

To unsubscribe: To remove your name from the global distribution list, send an email to Emily Blahnik with the subject: UNSUBSCRIBE from Mayo Clinic in the News.

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Tags: : ABC News Radio, 2 Minute Medicine, 9News Colo., ABC News, Alex Rodriguez, Almanac, Alyson Gonzalez, amenorrhea, American Academy of Sleep Medicine, American College of Cardiology's 62nd Annual Scientific Session, Arnold School of Public Health, Ashley Larkin


August 9th, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

 

 

August 9, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

USA Today
Experts debate coverage of scans for Alzheimer's
by Karen Weintraub

The federal government will decide in early fall whether to pay for brain scans in people with suspected Alzheimer's disease…"As a neurologist who sees patients, I certainly would like to have the information provided by amyloid PET scans," said Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic's Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, in Rochester, Minn.

Circulation: USA TODAY has a circulation of 1.8 million and a readership of 3.1 million. USA TODAY websites have 26.3 million unique visitors a month.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Public Affairs Contacts: Nick Hanson, Traci Klein

Bloomberg
George Bush’s Stent Surgery Revives Debate on Heart Care
by Michelle Cortez

Former President George W. Bush’s decision to allow doctors to use a stent to clear a blocked heart artery, performed absent symptoms, is reviving a national debate on the best way to treat early cardiac concerns… Stents are lifesaving when patients are in the midst of a heart attack, said Chet Rihal, an interventional cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, who has studied use of the devices. They allow immediate and sustained blood flow that help a patient recover, he said.

Circulation: Bloomberg has 2,300 media professionals in 146 bureaus across 72 countries. Bloomberg delivers its content across more than 400 publications, over 310 million households worldwide through Bloomberg Television and 500,000 in the New York metro area and 18.5 million subscribers through satellite radio.

Additional Coverage: Seattle Times

Context: Charanjit, "Chet" Rihal, M.D., chair, Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, is the William S. and Ann Atherton Professor of Cardiology Honoring Robert L. Frye, M.D.  As a cardiologist, Dr. Rihal specializes in interventional cardiology with a focus on new device therapies, the treatment of acute myocardial infarction (heart attack), and structural heart disease. One area of expertise is replacing heart valves by catheterization through the arteries, avoiding chest surgery. Dr. Rihal applies clinical research techniques to answer questions about cardiovascular disease and improve patient safety. For example, each year, hundreds of thousands of X-rays are performed across the country to help detect and treat common cardiovascular conditions, but radiation can be harmful. In 2012, Dr. Rihal and his colleagues found a way to cut overall radiation exposure to these patients by nearly half using simple but effective methods.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein, Sharon Theimer

Jacksonville Business Journal,
Mayo Clinic researchers in Jacksonville find pancreatic cancer cause
by Michael Clinton

Researchers at Mayo Clinic in Florida have decoded the cause of inflammation-driven pancreatic cancer and potential solutions to reverse the process. The study was published in The Journal of Cell Biology Monday, and it shows how inflammation pushes acinar cells in the pancreas — those that produce digestive enzymes — to transform into duct-like cells. As these cells change, they can acquire mutations that can result in further progression to pancreatic cancer. Dr. Peter Storz, a biochemist and molecular biologist at Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus in Jacksonville, was a senior author on the study.

Circulation:  The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Additional Coverage:
MPR
Mayo researchers: Inflammation 'initial step' to pancreatic cancer
by Lorna Benson

Mayo Clinic researchers in Florida say they've identified how chronic inflammation of the pancreas reprograms some cells and makes them more susceptible to cancerous mutations.  Some white blood cells that respond to the inflammation drive the transformation of the damaged cells, rather than fix the problem, said Peter Storz, a Mayo biochemist and lead author of the study. "This process is believed to be an initial step leading to pancreatic cancer." 

Science Codex,  HealthCanal, Science Daily, KTTC, National Cancer Institute, Private MD Labs

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic in Florida have revealed the process by which chronic inflammation of the pancreas, pancreatitis, morphs into pancreatic cancer. They say their findings point to ways to identify pancreatitis patients at risk of pancreatic cancer and to potential drug therapies that might reverse the process.

The study, published online in The Journal of Cell Biology, maps how inflammation pushes acinar cells in the pancreas — those that produce digestive enzymes — to transform into duct-like cells. As these cells change, they can acquire mutations that can result in further progression to pancreatic cancer, says senior author Peter Storz, Ph.D., a biochemist and molecular biologist at Mayo Clinic.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Researchers Decode Origin of Inflammation-Driven Pancreatic Cancer

Public Affairs Contact: Kevn Punsky

Wall Street Journal
More Hospitals Offer Patients Rigorous Workouts After Heart Surgery by Laura Landro

Patients sometimes think that after heart surgery they are no longer at risk. "People are not cured after surgery, and there is still considerable prevention to do," says Randal Thomas, a preventive cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Dr. Thomas is co-author of a study that found rehabilitation attendance was associated with a 46% reduction in the 10-year risk of death from all causes, regardless of a patient's age. The study, of coronary bypass patients at Mayo, was published in the July issue of the journal Circulation.

Circulation: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is tops in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 2 million copies on weekdays.

Context: Randal Thomas, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. This study, "Participation in Cardiac Rehabilitation and Survival After Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery," appeared in the July issue of Circulation.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

PBS Almanac (TPT-Twin Cities)
Almanac: A Conversation About MS

Political reporter Mary Lahammer talked with Cathy and Eric about her personal struggle with a disease that disproportionately affects Minnesota woman. 

Reach: Based in St. Paul, Minnesota, tpt is one of the highest-rated PBS affiliates in the nation, reaching over 1.3 million people each month through multiple broadcast and online channels.

Additional Coverage:
Star Tribune
Mary Lahammer on living with multiple sclerosis

Keeping secrets isn’t easy for a born-and-bred journalist like TPT’s Mary Lahammer. That’s one reason she’s both relieved and eager to share news that she’s kept within a small circle for two years: She has multiple sclerosis, or MS.

Another reason has to do with the response she’s received from some of us in that circle who are old enough to remember when MS was a sure crippler and a death sentence.

It isn’t any longer, Lahammer says.

Don’t chalk up that assurance to an athlete’s determination or a young mother’s resolve, though at a vigorous age 39, she has both. Rather, I heard a journalist’s summation of two years of in-depth reporting among world-leading MS experts at Rochester’s Mayo Clinic, where she is a patient.

Circulation: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Orthun Kantarci, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist who is a nationally recognized multiple sclerosis (MS) expert.

MS is a disease in which the immune system, which normally protects your body, instead attacks the covering (myelin sheath) surrounding the nerves in your brain and spinal cord. These nerves send information from your brain and spinal cord to other nerves in your body, and myelin helps make this transmission efficient.

Attacks of multiple sclerosis lead to inflammation and injury to the myelin sheath, resulting in slowed or blocked nerve signals, which can lead to difficulty controlling vision, muscle coordination, strength, sensation and other bodily functions.

Multiple sclerosis can affect people of any age, although symptoms most commonly occur in people 20 to 40 years old. Women are twice as likely to develop MS as are men.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

To unsubscribe: To remove your name from the global distribution list, send an email to Emily Blahnik with the subject: UNSUBSCRIBE from Mayo Clinic in the News.

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Tags: Almanac, alzheimer's disease, amyloid PET scans, biochemist, blocked heart arteries, Bloomberg, Cancer, cardiac care, cardiac rehabilitation, circulation, coronary artery bypass grafting, coronary artery bypass surgery


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