Items Tagged ‘Ambient Clinical Analytics’

February 17th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Twin Cities Public Television (Almanac)
Head of Mayo Clinic: John Noseworthy

Interview with Dr. John Noseworthy begins at 12:14. Almanac is hosted by Cathy Wurzer and Eric Eskola. Mary Lahammer contributes political reporting on a weekly basis.

Reach:  Twin Cities Public Television's "Almanac" program is a Minnesota institution. It has occupied the 7 o'clock time slot on Friday nights for more than a quarter of a century. It is the longest-running prime time TV program ever in the region. "Almanac" is a time capsule, a program of TPTrecord that details our region's history and culture during the past twenty five years. The hour-long mix of news, politics and culture is seen live statewide on the six stations of the Minnesota Public Television Association. Almanac was the first Minnesota TV show that virtually everyone in the state could watch together. The program's unusual format has been copied by numerous PBS stations around the country and it has led to Almanac being honored with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting's award for Best Public Affairs Program.

Related coverage:
Post-Bulletin, Political Notebook: Noseworthy talked to White House officials about travel ban

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. 

Contacts:  Kelley Luckstein, Karl Oestreich

 

KSTP
Mayo Clinic Doctors Demonstrate Dangers of Ice Fishing

Ice fishing may be a favorite pastime of many Minnesotans, but doctors say it can also be more dangerous than some realize. Mayo Clinic doctors aimed to demonstrate those dangers with the help of a mannequin they call Gus. Gus has been dinged, dented and generally doomed in a series of Mayo Clinic public education videos. Previous installments include Gus being hit by a driver who's texting, suffering a fireworks injury and receiving the Heimlich.

Reach: KSTP-TV is the ABC affiliate in Minneapolis that broadcasts on channel 5. KSTP-TV Online has more than 503,000 unique visitors each month. It is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., and is the only locally-owned and operated broadcasting company in the Twin Cities. KSTP-TV first broadcast in April 1948, and was the first television station to serve the upper Midwest.

Additional coverage: 
La Crosse TribuneAnglers beware: Ice fishing more perilous than traditional methods
KAAL, Mayo Clinic Doctors Demonstrate Dangers of Ice Fishing
Star Tribune, Mayo study finds hazards of ice fishing are many and varied

Context: Ice fishing might seem like a benign sport – for everyone except the fish. Sitting in a cozy shanty waiting for a bite, what could go wrong? A lot, Mayo Clinic surgeons have found. The ice fishing injuries they have chronicled seem more like a casualty list from an extreme sport: burns, broken bones, concussions and more. The findings are published in the American Journal of Emergency Medicine. The study team analyzed data on emergency department visits between 2009 and 2014 obtained from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System ─ All Injury Program and found 85 patients hurt while ice fishing. There may be more cases than they could find; the database collects data on emergency room visits from a nationally representative sample of roughly 100 hospitals with six or more beds, and the researchers had to search case narratives to identify ice fishing injuries. More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Sharon Theimer,  Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

News4Jax
Thousands run marathon to support breast cancer research
by Ashley Mitchem

After a decade that included nearly 100,000 runners, the Donna 26.2 marathon has become more than just a run -- it's the only marathon in the United States dedicated to breast cancer research. Donations support breast cancer research at Mayo Clinic and provide financial assistance to
those living with breast cancer.

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville. This Week in Jacksonville is a weekly public affairs program on WJXT.

Additional coverage: Florida Times-Union, First Coast News

Context: The DONNA Foundation is a non-profit organization in Northeast Florida producing the only marathon in the U.S. dedicated to breast cancer research, awareness and care.  The DONNA Foundation has helped to develop and maintain the Mayo Clinic Breast Cancer Translational Genomics Program.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

Marketplace
Mayo Clinic's hometown looks to become the 'Silicon Valley of medicine'
by Catharine Richert

If you head directly south from St. Paul, Minnesota, you'll eventually find yourself in Rochester, home of the world-renowned Mayo Clinic. For NPR Marketplace Logomore than 100 years, the city and the hospital have been synonymous. And now, a massive economic development project backed by Mayo, the city and the state aims to transform the city of more than 100,000 into a magnet for startups and entrepreneurs in medicine and other fields. Mayo BioBusiness Center Chair Jim Rogers said Rochester’s transformation is already apparent. "I can count — just about every building has a new business in the last four of five years, it seems,” he said. "It's incredible what's occurring here."

Reach: Marketplace is produced and distributed by American Public Media (APM), in association with the University of Southern California. The Marketplace portfolio of programs includes Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal, Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio, Marketplace Weekend with Lizzie O'Leary, and Marketplace Tech with Ben Johnson. Marketplace programs are currently broadcast by nearly 800 public radio stations nationwide across the United States and are heard by more than 13 million weekly listeners.

Previous coverage in the January 13, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: With Mayo Clinic at its heart, the Destination Medical Center (DMC) initiative is the catalyst to position Rochester, Minnesota as the world’s premier destination for health and wellness; attracting people, investment opportunities, and jobs to America’s City for Health and supporting the economic growth of Minnesota, its bioscience sector, and beyond.

Contacts: Duska Anastasijevic, Bob Nellis

 

CNN
For decades, women had heart attacks in silence
by Michael Nedelamn

Sharonne Hayes, a cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic and founder of its Women's Heart Clinic, originally thought it was near-impossible to do research on SCAD. She expected to see no more than one or two cases in her career. "Most of the cases were in the pathology literature, so it wasCNN Logo (thought to be) almost universally fatal," said Hayes, who has educated patients through the advocacy organization WomenHeart for over 15 years. In 2009, a woman approached her at a WomenHeart conference and asked, "What is Mayo doing about research on SCAD?" "It's probably so rare," Hayes replied. "We could never research it."

Reach: Cable News Network (CNN) is a worldwide news and information network providing live, continuous coverage of news from around the globe, 24 hours a day. CNN online received more than 55 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Context:  Sharonne Hayes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Hayes studies cardiovascular disease and prevention, with a focus on sex and gender differences and conditions that uniquely or predominantly affect women. With a clinical base in the Women's Heart Clinic, Dr. Hayes and her research team utilize novel recruitment methods, social media and online communities, DNA profiling, and sex-specific evaluations to better understand several cardiovascular conditions. A major area of focus is spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD), an uncommon and under-recognized cause of acute coronary syndrome (heart attack) that occurs predominantly in young women.

Contacts: Traci Klein, Kelley Luckstein

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Tags: 26.2 with Donna Marathon, A Tu Salud, ACA, AccuWeather, Almanac, alzheimers, AMA, Ambient Clinical Analytics, antibacterial soap, arrhythmia, Associated Press, Barron News-Shield


March 11th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

International Business Times
Betting On Cancer: Phoenix Aims To Become Oncology Destination As More Cities Look To Biotech For Growth
by Elizabeth Whitman

A transformation has taken place in the Phoenix area over the past decade as oncology centers and research institutions have merged, expanded and reconfigured their operations….“We’ve said, ‘Hey, we’re good at cancer. We’re going to do more,’” saidInternational Business Times Logo Dr. Wyatt Decker, the CEO of the Mayo Clinic in Arizona as well as an emergency room physician. More than 20 percent of the clinic’s patients come from out of state, drawn by the Mayo brand's reputation and the perks of the temperate, picturesque desertscape of the Valley of the Sun. In 2010, the clinic generated a positive annual economic impact of more than $1.5 billion, the Mayo Clinic has calculated, and Decker estimated that amount has grown by 30 to 50 percent since then.

Reach:  The International Business Times has more than 1.6 million unique visitors to its website each month. International Business Times is a digital global news publication that provides comprehensive coverage and analysis of business, economic, political and technological issues around the world. It reaches over 55 million people every month in seven global editions and four different languages.

Context:  Mayo Clinic introduced its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota in 2015 and in Arizona in mid March 2016. Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients — especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures — proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

International Business Times
Obesity In America: As Healthcare Costs Rise, Hospitals Weigh New Ways Of Caring For Larger Patients
by Elizabeth Whitman

“It’s those little things that add up,” said Robert Cima, a colorectal surgeon at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Many International Business Times Logohospitals have neither the equipment nor the resources to move their patients efficiently, he said, even though they long ago began buying parallel sets of surgical equipment for operating on larger patients. Now, “the real issue is caring for them on the floor. That cost is huge, relative to the operating room,” Cima said.

Reach:  The International Business Times has more than 1.6 million unique visitors to its website each month. International Business Times is a digital global news publication that provides comprehensive coverage and analysis of business, economic, political and technological issues around the world. It reaches over 55 million people every month in seven global editions and four different languages.

Context: Robert Cima, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic colorectal surgeon. Mayo Clinic surgeons helped develop minimally invasive (laparoscopic) colon and rectal surgery and use these techniques on almost all surgeries. Laparoscopic procedures use smaller incisions than conventional surgery, which decreases bleeding, lessens pain and shortens both expected hospital stays and overall recovery times. They are also skilled in robotic surgery, a specialized form of laparoscopic surgery, and ileoanal anastomosis surgery that avoids the need for a permanent colostomy.

Contact:  Sharon Theimer

 

Los Angeles Times
As measures of health, fitness and fatness matter more than weight
by Melissa Healy

The new studies suggest that these caveats about BMI are especially true for people as they age beyond their 50s and enter seniority, said Mayo Clinic cardiologist Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, who researches obesity's health effects. In the CanadianLos Angeles Times Logo study and others that have raised what's called "the obesity paradox," Lopez-Jimenez said it's possible that older people who carry a few extra pounds are protected by having a reserve of excess weight they can afford to lose during an illness.

Reach:  The Los Angeles Times has a daily readership of 1.9 million and 2.9 million on Sunday, more than 8 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.5 million. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 128 years.

Context: Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Lopez-Jimenez studies obesity and cardiovascular disease from different angles, from physiologic studies assessing changes in myocardial mechanics and structural and hemodynamic changes following weight loss, to studies addressing the effect of physicians' diagnosis of obesity on willingness to lose weight and successful weight loss at follow-up.

Contacts: Joe Dangor, Traci Klein

 

Huffington Post
Why The Fat You Can See Isn’t The Fat You Should Worry About
by Erin Schumaker

In reality, the area of your body where you store your fat may be a better predictor of health -- regardless of your body mass index. "All fat is not the same," said Dr. Virend Somers, a cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Fat directly under the skin -- the stuff we can see -- isn't necessarily harmfuHuffPost Healthy Livingl.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique visitors.

Context: Virend Somers, M.D., Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic physician with joint appointments in cardivascular diseases and nephrology and hypertension. Dr. Somers directs the Cardiovascular Facility and the Sleep Facility within Mayo Clinic's Center for Clinical and Translational Science.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

CBS News
Can drinking lots of coffee lower risk for MS?
by Mary Brophy Marcus

In this case, a new study in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry suggests being a java drinker may lower the risk for multiple sclerosis (MS). Dr. Mark Keegan, professor of neurology and chair of the division of multiple sclerosis at theCBS News Logo Mayo Clinic, said, "They show some observational evidence that in two separate populations high amounts of coffee intake was associated with a reduction in the risk of MS," but he also cautioned that observational studies don't equal medical advice.

Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

Context: B. Mark Keegan, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist. Dr. Keegan is involved in clinical and translational research in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and other related inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Post-Bulletin
Mayo sees big potential for small MRI machine
by Brett Boese

After nearly nine years of planning, Mayo Clinic researchers are just weeks away from collecting data on a $5.7 million Logo for Post-Bulletin newspapercompact 3T MRI scanner on its Rochester campus. Lead researchers John Huston III, a neuroradiologist, and Matt Bernstein, a medical physicist, are optimistic that their targeted work on the brain will improve patient diagnoses and outcomes, particularly involving strokes, Alzheimer's, tumors and high-impact injuries such as concussions.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context: The reality of magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, machines is one of great size — both in price and physical space. This, then, restricts access to needed medical screenings. But what if you could shrink both and still produce high-quality MR images? Mayo Clinic researchers, in a partnership with GE and funding through a National Institutes of Health grant, are hoping to answer that question, and many others, now that a new, one-of-a-kind compact 3-Tesla MRI scanner is in place at the Department of Radiology research labs. More information about the new MRI scanner can be found on Discovery's Edge, Mayo Clinic's research magazine.

Contact: Ethan Grove

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Tags: 24news.ca, AARP, alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer’s Research Center at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Amazon.com, Ambient Clinical Analytics, APoE4 gene, Associated Press, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Atypical Afib, AWARE, bariatric patients


April 9th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

 

Washington Post

Alzheimer’s warning signs
by Fredrick Kunkle
For people of a certain age, it’s not uncommon to seize on any forgetfulness as a symptom of Alzheimer’s disease. Lose the car keys, forget a name, read a Top 10 list of dementia’s warning signs and the worry begins…So in an attempt to offer some perspective,

Washington Post newspaper logo here’s another list. We interviewed three experts: Lipton, who also heads the division of cognitive aging and dementia at Montefiore Medical Center; Ronald C. Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center; and Heather M. Snyder, director of medical and scientific operations at the nonprofit Alzheimer’s Association… Sometimes it’s not even a retrieval problem. In today’s frenzied, multitasking world, people don’t always form memories in the first place. Petersen says focusing more attention on tasks at hand might be more helpful than obsessing over what you can’t remember.

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post averages 518,700, and Sunday circulation averages 736,800.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Duska Anastasijevic

 

Star Tribune
Head strong: 5 ways to boost your brain, from 'neurobics' to walnuts
by Allie Shah

…Advances in technology have enabled scientists to explore the brain as never before — and they’re making bold discoveries. The Star Tribune Health newspaper logonew thinking is that our brains are malleable and capable of building new connections between nerve cells, even as we grow older. “We had these assumptions for a long time that your brain was fully formed and shaped in late adolescence,” said Glenn Smith, a neuropsychologist at the Mayo Clinic who specializes in Alzheimer’s. “Then … it was all downhill from there.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Glenn Smith, Ph.D., L.P., is a Mayo Clinic neuropsychologist. Dr. Smith is a principal investigator for the Education Core, Mayo Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, and associate director for Education Resources, Mayo Clinic Center for Translational Science Activities. The research conducted by Dr. Smith and his colleagues has led to the development of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Action to Benefit Thinking and Independence (HABIT) program, a 10-day, 50-hour, intensive intervention program for people with mild cognitive impairment.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

 

KSTP
Mayo Medical School to Establish Branch Campuses in Arizona, Florida

Mayo Medical School announced Tuesday that it has received the endorsement of the national accrediting body for medical education to establish branch campuses in Scottsdale, Arizona, and Jacksonville, Florida…"This signifies an important step in ourKSTP-5 Twin Cities
transformation to a national medical school and our ability to deliver extraordinary medical education and highly diverse clinical experiences to our students across all campuses," said Sherine Gabriel, the dean of Mayo Medical School and professor of Epidemiology and Medicine.

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Context: Mayo Medical School announced that its expansion plan to establish branch campuses in Scottsdale, Arizona, and Jacksonville, Florida, has received the endorsement of the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME), the national accrediting body for medical education. “We are thrilled with the positive response from LCME,” says Sherine Gabriel, M.D., M.Sc.,(retiring) dean of Mayo Medical School and William J. and Charles H. Mayo Professor of Epidemiology and Medicine, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. “This signifies an important step in our transformation to a national medical school and our ability to deliver extraordinary medical education and highly diverse clinical experiences to our students across all campuses.” More information on the announcement can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Deborah Anderson

 

Women’s Health magazine
Are Tampons the New Pap Smear?

... So how soon will your tampon be able to diagnose cancer? Not so fast. First, researchers need to do more studies; a clinical trial is Womens Healthunderway right now, says lead study author Jamie Bakkum-Gamez, M.D., a gynecological oncologist at the Mayo Clinic. Currently, there’s no routine way to screen for endometrial cancer (aside from reporting vague symptoms to your doctor, such as irregular bleeding), which strikes more than 50,000 women each year, most of them post-menopausal, and is the most common gynecological cancer in the U.S., according to the study.

Reach: Women's Health magazine has a monthly circulation of 1.5 million readers and covers health and beauty, fitness and weight loss, career and stress, sex and relationships, nutrition and diet and technology. Women's Health - Online has more than 5.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic have shown that it is possible to detect endometrial cancer using tumor DNA picked up by ordinary tampons. The new approach specifically examines DNA samples from vaginal secretions for the presence of chemical “off” switches — known as methylation — that can disable genes that normally keep cancer in check. The finding is a critical step toward a convenient and effective screening test for endometrial cancer, which is the most common gynecologic malignancy in the United States. The results are published in the journal Gynecologic Oncology. More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Reuters
Midlife arts, crafts and socializing tied to better late-life cognition
by Kathryn Doyle

In a new study of people over age 85, those who said they engaged in things like painting, quilting or book clubs during middle age were less likely to develop memory impairments that may precede dementia. Based on these results, using your brain for cognitiveReuters Logo and social activities seems to preserve cognitive function or keep the neurons stimulated, said lead author Rosebud O. Roberts of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world newsbusiness newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile and interactive television platforms.

Additional coverage:
Pioneer Press, Yahoo! Canada, Daily Mail, WebMD, Express UK, Yahoo! UK & Ireland, Prevention magazine, CBS News, HealthDay, LA Times, KDKA CBS Pittsburgh, Science 2.0, Telegraph UK, KMBZ New York, US News & World Report, Pacific Standard, CNN

Context: People who participate in arts and craft activities and who socialize in middle and old age may delay the development in very old age of the thinking and memory problems that often lead to dementia, according to a new study published in the April 8, 2015, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.  “As millions of older US adults are reaching the age where they may experience these memory and thinking problem called Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), it is important we look to find lifestyle changes that may stave off the condition,” said study author Rosebud Roberts, MB, ChB, MS, of Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. and a member of the American Academy of Neurology. “Our study supports the idea that engaging the mind may protect neurons, or the building blocks of the brain, from dying, stimulate growth of new neurons, or may help recruit new neurons to maintain cognitive activities in old age.” More information about the study can be found here.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

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Tags: 'techno yoga' movement, 3D Carotid Ultrasound, ABC News, acetaminophen is not effective for pain, alzheimer's disease, Ambient Clinical Analytics, American Birkenbeiner or "Birkie, Arab News, Arizona Republic, Art heals, artificial intelligence technology, atherosclerosis


March 21st, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

WCCO
Health Watch: A Promising At-Home Colon Cancer Test

A new at-home test to check for colon cancer is showing promising results. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic say the results are impressive. Colon cancer is preventable and curable ifCBS Minnesota caught early, yet millions of Americans don’t get screened. Now, the test, called the Cologuard, detects blood in a patient’s stool sample as well as DNA changes that can be a sign of cancer or precancerous polyps.

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

Additional coverage:
CBS News Morning RoundsNew DNA test may provide non-invasive alternative for colon cancer screening

Star TribuneAlternative to colonoscopy detects cancers – though it has its own 'ick' factor

Huffington Post
New Noninvasive Colorectal Cancer Screening Test Is Effective In Large Trial

HealthDayNew Stool Test Shows Promise as Colon Cancer Screen

BloombergExact Sciences’ Colon Cancer Test Detects More Tumors

Post-Bulletin, Heard on the Street: Exact Sciences treatment shows promise

BusinessweekExact Sciences’ Colon Cancer Test at Home Finds More Tumors

Washington Post, Markets EmergingThe Street

Context: A clinical trial of Cologuard shows unprecedented results for finding colorectal cancer with a noninvasive test. “Cologuard detection rates of early stage cancer and high-risk precancerous polyps validated in this large study were outstanding and have not been achieved by other noninvasive approaches,” says the study’s author David Ahlquist M.D., a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist and co-inventor of the Cologuard test. Colorectal cancer has become the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States, but it is highly treatable if found early. Cologuard uses a self-contained collection kit that allows patients to send stool samples to a high-tech lab for screening. More information, including an interview with Dr. Ahlquist, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Brian Kilen

Florida Times-Union
Lung transplant patients picking up harmonicas to improve breathing
by Meredith Rutland

It didn’t seem like the best instrument for a just-off-the-operating-table lung transplant patient like Larry Rawdon. He saw it as a challenge and, later, as way to help him breathe Florida Times-Union newspaper logoeasier. Rawdon, now 65 and living in Southside, had lost two sets of lungs — one given by birth and one by transplant — and was on his third when he picked up the harmonica.… Most days are tough when recovering from a transplant. Making silly sounds on the harmonica and laughing about it with other patients is a much-needed reprieve, said Dr. Cesar Keller, a Mayo Clinic pulmonary transplant doctor. “Sometimes, it’s nice to have something that’s fun to do and easy to do, and useful,” he said.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: After surviving two separate lung transplant procedures in 2005 and 2008, musician Larry Rawdon is sharing new ways of healing through music with other patients at Mayo Clinic in Florida. It was, after all, music that led him to Mayo Clinic and aided in his recovery after he was diagnosed in 2002 with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.  Read more in Sharing Mayo Clinic.

Public Affairs Contact: Paul Scotti

KAAL
Proton Beam Offers State-of-the-Art Cancer Treatment at Mayo
by Steph Crock

We've been following it since the groundbreaking, now the first ever look inside Mayo's nearly $200 million proton beam therapy building. It's the recipient of one of largest donations Mayo Clinic has ever received, the Richard O. Jacobson Building, home to the Mayo Clinic proton beam therapy program, is now complete… "This is a dream come true. Its' likeKAAL-TV 6 Christmas day for us," said Robert Foote, M.D. Mayo Clinic. Mayo doctors will now be able to treat cancer patients more effectively with fewer side effects. "Conventional radiation has an entrance dose and an exit does that causes side effects and complications," said Dr. Foote.

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Additional coverage:

Post-Bulletin, Our View: Critics of proton beam facility miss the point

Post-BulletinProton center begins process of "commissioning

Finance & CommerceStatus Report: Mayo proton therapy facility

Star Tribune, Mayo's proton beam therapy adds to debate over high-tech costs 

How it works: Star Tribune.

KTTCKIMTFOX47Twin Cities Business Magazine

Context: Construction on the Richard O. Jacobson Building, home to the Mayo Clinic proton beam therapy program, is now complete. Over the next 15 months, physicians, scientists and technicians will calibrate and test equipment in advance of the facility’s scheduled opening in the summer of 2015. More information on proton beam therapy can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Joe Dangor

USA TODAY
Lynx sign marquee jersey sponsorship w/Mayo Clinic

The Minnesota Lynx are cashing in on their recent run of success. The Lynx announced an expanded partnership with the Mayo Clinic on Monday that includes a new jersey that USA Today NEWfeatures the Mayo Clinic name across the front rather than the team's name. The Lynx and NBA's Timberwolves are also partnering with the health care provider on a new practice facility just across the street from their arena.

Reach: USA TODAY  has the highest daily circulation of any U.S. newspaper with a daily average circulation of 2.9 million, which includes print and various digital editions.

Additional coverage:
Post-BulletinOur View: Lynx jerseys shocking, but the right fit

MPR, Lynx out, Mayo in on team jerseys

Post-Bulletin, Answer Man: No Mayo-Cleveland tilts scheduled so far

KARE11KTTCStar TribunePioneer PressKSTPKSFY SDKDLH DuluthWDIO DuluthKMSPPost-BulletinESPNDarren Rovell TweetMinneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal , KTTCPost-BulletinStar Tribune

Context: This week, the 2013 Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA) Champion Minnesota Lynx announced a multi-year partnership with Mayo Clinic that includes marquee placement on the team’s home and away jerseys. The new agreement also designates Mayo Clinic as the exclusive presenting sponsor for the 2014 Lynx season, which kicks off on May 16. This agreement between the Lynx and Mayo Clinic is part of a previously announced strategic collaboration that includes the development of a new state-of-the-art training facility and sports medicine center in Mayo Clinic Square, formerly known as Block E in downtown Minneapolis. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

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Tags: 12NewsArizona, 13ABC.com, 13ABC.com (Toledo), 2013 Mayo Clinic Distinguished Alumni Award and Dr. Richard DeRemee, 5 key questions to ask before surgery, ABC News, ABC15 in Arizona, ABC6, ABC6 (Knoxville), ACA, acid reflux, Affordable care act


February 21st, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations


Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic updates its model for the modern age
by Lori Sturdevant

Milestone anniversaries can be useful things. Take this season’s 150th anniversary of the cold January 1864 day when Dr. W.W. Mayo placed an ad in area newspapers announcing that his medical Star Tribune commentaries logopractice was open for business in downtown Rochester and the Mayo Clinic was born. A burst of high-risk, high-opportunity change is hard upon the health care industry in general and Mayo Clinic in particular. That makes this a fine time for Mayo folk to reflect on how their mammoth enterprise became famous for the best in medical care, and how that story might guide what comes next.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation. Lori Sturdevant writes editorials and a weekly column about topics she has covered for more than 30 years, state government and politics.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

On Jan. 27, 1864, English-born Dr. William Worrall Mayo first notified the public about his medical practice in Rochester, Minn., planting the seeds of what would eventually become an international medical organization with more than 59,000 expert physicians, scientists and health care professionals, attracting millions of patients from across the globe. This year marks 150 years of continuous service to patients, and Mayo Clinic is launching a yearlong recognition that will honor a legacy of medical accomplishments and a model for the future of health care. Dr. Mayo’s sons, Drs. William and Charles Mayo, joined the practice in the late 1880’s and, with their father, created Mayo Clinic’s medical hallmark: The integrated care model that focuses a team of experts on one patient at a time and puts patients’ needs first.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic Commemorates 150th Anniversary in 2014

Public Affairs Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Karl Oestreich

KAAL
ABC 6 Exclusive Interview with Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. Noseworthy

KAAL-TV 6In an exclusive interview ABC 6 News Anchor Ellery McCardle sits down with Mayo Clinic President & CEO Dr. John Noseworthy. In a three part conversation, they talked about the changes Mayo will experience, including the possibility of layoffs, the organizations future expansion in new cities and countries, and concerns of people who may be worried about such a large expansion. Part 1, Part 2Part 3

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bryan Anderson, Karl Oestreich

Yahoo! Homepage Centerpiece
Why a cat bite could land you in the hospital: Surprising results from new study
by Eric Pfeiffer

Cat lovers might want to take extra caution the next time they tempt the wrath of their favorite pet feline. A new study produced by the Mayo Clinic has found that cat bites are potentially more seriousLogo of Yahoo News than most individuals, and medical experts, previously thought.

Reach: Yahoo! reaches more than a half a billion across devices and around the globe. According to news sources, roughly 700 million people visit Yahoo websites every month.

Additional coverage:
Wall Street Journal (Video), Cat Bites Pose Little-Known Dangers, Cats can reduce stress and lift spirits, but there can be serious risks involved with keeping felines in the house. A new study from the Mayo Clinic reveals cat bites can be very difficult to treat. Anna Mathews reports on Lunch Break.

Wall Street Journal, Cat Bites Pose Little-Known Dangers by Anna Mathews, A new study by researchers at the Mayo Clinic has found that of 193 patients who came in for cat bites on their hands over a three-year period, 30% had to be hospitalized for an average stay of 3.2 days…"Cat bites can be very serious, and when you do get an infection, it can be very difficult to treat," said Brian T. Carlsen, a Mayo surgeon who was an author of the study. That's particularly true with a hand injury because of the structure of the tendons and joints, he said.

MPR Blog, Roses are red, violets are blue, it’s Valentine’s Day, the rest’s up to you… 3) LOVE AND MARRIAGE GO TOGETHER LIKE … CATS AND THE WEB (OF YOUR HAND)?... An elusive regional angle for a cat story on the Internet — it’s a writer’s dream. Don’t put your hand near that cat’s mouth; you don’t know where it’s been! In a three-year retrospective study published in the February issue of The Journal of Hand Surgery, researchers reviewed records of 193 people who came to Mayo Clinic Hospital with cat bites to the hand. Additional coverage: CBS DenverWebProNews 

Context: Dogs aren’t the only pets who sometimes bite the hands that feed them. Cats do too, and when they strike a hand, can inject bacteria deep into joints and tissue, perfect breeding grounds for infection. Cat bites to the hand are so dangerous, 1 in 3 patients with such wounds had to be hospitalized, a Mayo Clinic study covering three years showed. Two-third of those hospitalized needed surgery. Middle-aged women were the most common bite victims, according to the research, published in the Journal of Hand Surgery.

Mayo Clinic News Network: When Cats Bite: 1 in 3 Patients Bitten in Hand Hospitalized, Infections Common

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