Items Tagged ‘Anesthesiology News’

March 17th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

KTTC
Mayo Clinic researchers pinpoint experimental drug that may shrink tumors in multiple myeloma patients
by Jason Pope

The Mayo Clinic says this experimental drug is leading to tumor shrinkage in patients affected by multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma is a cancer that affects the blood cells that fight infection. Rather than fighting infection, the cancer causes kidney problems and infections. AccordingKTTC TV logo to Dr. Marta Chesi, the drug was developed to support tumor death but instead of killing the tumor cells, it made them more visible. This visibility helps the immune system spot the tumor cells and eliminate them.

Reach: KTTC is an NBC affiliate that serves the Rochester, Minn. area including the towns of Austin, Mason City, Albert Lea and Winona. Its website receives more than 73,300 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Life Science Daily

Context: Mayo Clinic researchers have found that an experimental drug, LCL161, stimulates the immune system, leading to tumor shrinkage in patients affected by multiple myeloma. The findings are published in Nature Medicine. Multiple myeloma is a blood cancer that affects plasma cells – white blood cells that normally produce antibodies to fight infection. Rather than produce helpful antibodies, the cancer cells, as they grow, secrete large amounts of a single antibody that accumulate in the body, causing kidney problems and infections. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

Huffington Post
Finding treatments to fight fibroids

Fibroid embolization and focused ultrasound are minimally invasive options that reproductive endocrinologist Dr. Ebbie Stewart says warrant Huffington Post Logomore research to help guide women and health care providers on a treatment plan. She co-authored a recent study that looked at the two treatments, compared recovery time, and noted adverse events in the first six weeks after treatment, Dr. Stewart says.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique viewers.

Context:  Elizabeth "Ebbie Stewart, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic ObGyn. Dr. Stewart studies uterine fibroids, also called uterine leiomyomas or myomas. Fibroids are noncancerous tumors of the uterus that commonly cause heavy menstrual bleeding, pelvic pain and pressure, bowel and bladder problems, and sometimes infertility and miscarriage. Fibroids are also the leading cause of hysterectomy.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Men’s Health
This Exact Workout Routine May Actually Reverse Aging
by Elizabeth Millard

Research has shown physical activity can reduce inflammation in your body and improve heart health—both important for staying young beyond your years. But not all exercise is the same in keeping age-related decline at bay, researchers from the Mayo Clinic say…“Decline is mitochondria isMens Health Logo the key factor responsible for age-related physical declines,” says the study’s senior author, Sreekumaran Nair, M.D., Ph.D. That includes osteoporosis, arthritis, gastrointestinal issues, decreased flexibility, hypertension, and cardiovascular issues. “Higher intensity of exercise seems to elicit a rejuvenation of mitochondrial [processes] in everybody, including older people.”

Reach: Men's Health has an audience of more than 13.5 million readers.

Additional coverage: Healthline, The Hans India, Canindia.com, AARP

Context: Everyone knows that exercise is good for you, but what type of training helps most, especially when you’re older - say over 65? A Mayo Clinic study says it’s high-intensity aerobic exercise, which can reverse some cellular aspects of aging. The findings appear in Cell MetabolismMayo researchers compared high-intensity interval training, resistance training and combined training. All training types improved lean body mass and insulin sensitivity, but only high-intensity and combined training improved aerobic capacity and mitochondrial function for skeletal muscle. Decline in mitochondrial content and function are common in older adults. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Bob Nellis

 

Washington Post
It’s not just being stuck inside; cold weather sets us up for getting sick
by Emily Sohn

It's not clear why winter brings so many health woes, says Pritish Tosh, an infectious-disease physician and researcher at the Mayo Clinic in Washington Post newspaper logoRochester, Minnesota. "The reason one virus is a wintertime virus may not be the same reason another virus is a wintertime virus," Tosh says. "We're finding more and more that it's not one size fits all."

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:
Chicago TribuneWhy do we get sick in winter?
Health, How to Get Rid of the Flu Faster

Context: Pritish Tosh, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist. Dr. Tosh is interested in emerging infections and preparedness activities related to them, ranging from collaborating with the Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group in basic science vaccine development to hospital systems research related to pandemic preparedness. Influenza is a viral infection that attacks your respiratory system — your nose, throat and lungs. Influenza, commonly called the flu, is not the same as stomach "flu" viruses that cause diarrhea and vomiting.

Contact: Bob Nellis

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Tags: AARP, ABC News, Analitica, Anesthesiology News, Associated Press, Becker’s Hospital Review, bone health, Brandix, bullying, BuzzFeed, Canindia.com, Cardiovascular Business


October 28th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Modern Healthcare
Commentary: Why Mayo Clinic wants to rethink how hospital quality is graded
by Dr. John Noseworthy

You may have seen the news: Mayo Clinic was one of a small number of hospitals in the country awarded a five-star rating by the CMS on its Hospital Compare website when the ratings were released in July. Mayo was also named the top hospital in the country by U.S. News and World Report in its annual Best Hospitals Honor Roll. What may be surprising, in light of these accolades, is our concern about the wayModern Healthcare value is being measured.

Reach: Modern Healthcare is the industry's leading source of healthcare business and policy news, research and information. The magazine covers health care policy, Medicare/Medicaid, and health care from a business perspective. Modern Healthcare magazine is ranked No. 1 in readership among healthcare executives and deemed a "must-read" by the who's who in healthcare. Modern Healthcare has more than 72,0000 paid magazine subscribers and its website receives more than 568,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

KSTP
Targeted Therapy Means Lung Cancer Doesn’t Have to be a Death Sentence
by Kevin Doran

…Katherine Bensen has a charmed life. A wonderful marriage and four beautiful kids. But it all changed December 31, 2014. "And I was diagnosed with Adenocarcinoma of the lungs, which is stage 4, and a KSTP-5 Twin Citiesnonsmoking lung cancer."…Initially, Katherine was told her only option was chemo, and she had 6 to 12 months to live. But, then she discovered she was a candidate for targeted therapy, which she received at Mayo Clinic.

Reach: KSTP-TV is the ABC affiliate in Minneapolis that broadcasts on channel 5. KSTP-TV Online has more than 503,000 unique visitors each month. It is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., and is the only locally-owned and operated broadcasting company in the Twin Cities. KSTP-TV first broadcast in April 1948, and was the first television station to serve the upper Midwest.

Context: Julian Molina,M.D., Ph.D, is an oncologist with the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. Dr. Molina's research focuses on drug development/phase I clinical trials, lung cancer, and head and neck malignancies including thyroid cancer.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

MPR
Photos: A walk through Mayo Clinic's healing art
by Catharine Richert

Auguste Rodin, Andy Warhol and Alexander Calder never trained a doctor, performed surgery or cured a disease. But their timeless art, on display around Mayo Clinic, still offers a kind of medicine. "The arts do have a healing aspect. They improve the quality of experience for patients," Dr. Paul Scanlon, a specialist in pulmonary and critical care medicine, said as he walked a reporter and photographer recently aroundMPR News logo some of Mayo's most notable pieces.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Art is an important part of the Mayo Clinic healing environment. Mayo's history is also vital to the foundation of the clinic and an integral part of the patient-focused care model. Tour guides and greeters in these areas serve by sharing their love of history and art to enhance patients' care experience at Mayo Clinic. Mayo Clinic Center for Humanities in Medicine supports the primary value of Mayo Clinic, the needs of the patient come first, by integrating the arts and expressions of human culture into the healing environment. Paul Scanlon, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic specialist in pulmonary and critical care medicine. Dr. Scanlon also chairs Mayo's Humanities in Medicine Committee, which provides leadership for integrating the arts, history and ethics in the medical environment to support the Mayo Clinic ideal that the needs of the patient come first. The Center`s programs and research in the humanities serve patients, families, caregivers and the larger community, promoting the compassionate delivery of healthcare.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Arizona Republic
Our View: Mayo Clinic and ASU are rethinking the best doctor you've ever had

"Innovative" is one of those words that gets overused. But it fits when Arizona State University and the Mayo Clinic describe their new team effort. This partnership not only offers Arizona an innovative way to run Arizona Republic newspaper logoa medical school, it brings prestige to the Valley and the state. Most importantly, it focuses on preparing doctors for changes -- known and unknown -- that will affect their patients in the future.

Reach: The Arizona Republic has daily circulation of more than 180,000 and its website azcentral.com has more than 2.6 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:

Phoenix Business Journal, ASU, Mayo to build $200M innovation center in Phoenix

Arizona Republic, Mayo, ASU join forces on new medical school

Arizona Republic, Mayo, ASU team up on Scottsdale med school

Modern Healthcare, ASU, Mayo Clinic recruit students for new med school, training program

Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, 5 things to know about ASU, the Mayo Clinic partnership to transform healthcare education KJZZ

ABC15 Arizona, News-medical.net, KTAR-Radio, TriValley Central, Arizona Daily Star, FierceHealthcareKJZZ

Context:  Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University have announced the launch of a comprehensive new model for health care education and research: the Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University Alliance for Health Care. The goal of the alliance is to innovate health care delivery to improve patient care, accelerate cutting-edge research discoveries, and transform medical education. The alliance further links two of the Phoenix area’s most recognizable institutions. ASU recently was named the nation’s No. 1 “most innovative” university by U.S. News & World Report.Mayo Clinic earned the No. 1 top ranking nationally on 2016 U.S. News & World Report's Honor Roll of America's Best Hospitals, as well as the No. 1 spots for top hospitals in Arizona and Phoenix, Minnesota and Florida. The formalized alliance provides cohesion to a collection of joint projects, which have evolved over the past decade and sets the stage for many more. This expansion promises growing impact and scale. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic New Network and on Mayo Medical School's website.

Contact:  Jim McVeigh

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Tags: ABC15 Arizona, Albert Lea Tribune, alcohol consumption, AliveCor, AllAfrica.com, Alzforum, alzheimers, Anesthesiology News, Arizona Daily Star, Arizona Republic, Arizona State University, Artificial pancreas


October 21st, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Forbes
Mind Over Money: How To Balance Mental Well-being With Busy Careers From Mayo Clinic's Dr. Sood
by Jennifer Wang

… “The good people are very good at feeling bad about themselves,” Dr. Amit Sood advises on a panel at FORBES’ Under 30 Summit. “If you’re feeling bad, it means you’re a good person, it means that you’re sensitive and you care.” Sood, who founded the Mayo Clinic Resilience Program and chairs its Mind Body Initiative, says the keys to maintaining a positive state of mind are looking at things from a biggerForbes magazine logo perspective, finding meaning in what you’re doing, and focus on the journey instead of obsessing over outcomes.

Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Amit Sood, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in General Internal Medicine and the Cancer Center. Dr. Sood is editor of the  Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness and The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living. Dr. Sood was a panel member at the Forbes 30 Under 30 Summit recently in Boston where his panel addressed 6,000 participants on “How to win in the markets without losing their minds.”

Contact: Traci Klein

 

MPR
How significant is the latest Alzheimer's research
by Cathy Wurzer

A new insight into how a natural enzyme affects memory-loss in mice is getting a lot of attention for what it might mean for humans with Alzheimer's disease. World-renowned Alzheimer's researcher Karen Ashe at MPR News logothe University of Minnesota recently published her findings in the journal Nature Medicine. She found she was able to reverse memory loss in mice by lowering an enzyme called caspase-2. She'll be partnering with researchers at the Mayo Clinic to work on advancing this discovery. Morning Edition host Cathy Wurzer spoke with Ron Petersen, the director of the Mayo's Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, for more on the subject.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

KTTC
Mayo Clinic researchers develop way to detect prostate cancer recurrence sooner
by Chris Yu

For the first time, Mayo Clinic researchers mapped patterns of prostate cancer recurrence using the latest imaging technology, allowing doctors to detect recurrence sooner… According to urological surgeon Dr. Jeffrey Karnes, conventional bone and CT scans cannot identify sites of recurrence when the PSA level is lower than 10 … "Potentially find it sooner,  intervene sooner, and hopefully, that translates into betterKTTC TV logo outcomes for our patients," said Dr. Karnes.

Reach: KTTC is an NBC affiliate that serves the Rochester, Minn. area including the towns of Austin, Mason City, Albert Lea and Winona. Its website receives more than 73,300 unique visitors each month.

Context: R. Jeffrey Karnes, M.D. is a Mayo clinic urologist. Dr. Karnes research interests include: prostate cancer outcomes following radical prostatectomy, staging and surgery for advanced prostate cancer (special interest), prostate cancer biomarker discovery and implementation, bladder cancer urine markers, prostate and bladder cancer clinical trials and active surveillance in prostate cancer.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
Vincent's patients now have access to Mayo Clinic's cancer care
by Alexa Epitropoulos

The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center – a collaboration between St. Vincent's and Mayo – is now open to patients at St. Vincent's Riverside campus. The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, which is housed in a 11,500-square-Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logofoot medical suite on the same grounds as St. Vincent's, will offer cancer services to patients visiting the hospital starting on Oct. 17.

Reach:  The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals

Additional coverage: News4Jax broadcast, News4Jax, WJCT

Context: To deliver Mayo Clinic’s nationally ranked comprehensive cancer care to more people in Northeast Florida, the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center located at St. Vincent’s Riverside will open to patients on Oct. 17. The collaboration between Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus and St. Vincent’s HealthCare, a part ofAscension, the nation’s largest Catholic and non-profit health system, brings Mayo Clinic’s cancer services to patients in a newly built 11,500-square-foot medical suite on the campus of St. Vincent’s Riverside. “We are excited to launch this community collaboration and we look forward to further meeting the needs of cancer patients, right here in their own community,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., CEO, Mayo Clinic in Florida.  “This community collaboration will enable patients to receive cancer care at Mayo Clinic Cancer Center at St. Vincent’s and come to Mayo’s San Pablo Road campus when they need highly complex care, such as bone marrow transplants.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

KAAL
Remembering a Treasure: Rochester Honors the Life and Legacy of Sister Generose
by Ben Henry

Rochester spent Tuesday remembering and honoring one of Mayo Clinic’s strongest pillars of success, Sister Generose Gervais. Sister Generose died October 8 peacefully in the hospital she served for many years. She was 97-years-old. "It's been her life of service for me that has touched so many by the thousands day after day and night after night,” said former Mayo Clinic president and CEO Dr. Robert Waller. “She caredKAAL 6 News Rochester Logo
for patients and their families in ways beyond what medicine was able to provide.” … "Mayo Clinic has been richly blessed by this strong woman of faith. We are grateful for her selfless presence and her steady guidance. We know that her spirt lives on in the work that we do every day to serve patients," said current Mayo Clinic President and CEO Dr. John Noseworthy.

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Additional coverage:

KTTC, Plummer Building doors close for 10th time in 88 years to honor Sister Generose
KTTC, Community writes tributes to Sister Generose in memory books
Post-Bulletin, Mayo to close Plummer doors for Sister Generose
KTTC,  'Every day is a gift from God': Wisdom of Sister Generose shared during moving memorial
KTIV Sioux City'Every day is a gift from God': Wisdom of Sister Generose shared during moving memorial

Context: Sister Generose Gervais, long-time administrator of Saint Marys Hospital and president of the Poverello Foundation, passed away peacefully recently in the hospital she served for many years. She was 97. Sister Generose will be remembered for her tireless work on behalf of patients and the staff of Saint Marys Hospital. Her hospital ministry focused on perpetuating the Franciscan legacy, specifically nurturing the values of respect, integrity, compassion, healing, teamwork, innovation, excellence and stewardship among all Mayo Clinic staff. “Sister Generose was known for her faith, her quiet leadership, her wise counsel, her dedication to patients and staff, her sense of humor and the example of service that she lived every day,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic. “Mayo Clinic was blessed by her presence for more than 60 years.” More information about Sister Generose can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network and Mayo Clinic in the Loop.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

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Tags: ABC15 Ariz., alzheimer's disease, Anesthesiology News, Arizona Republic, Attn:, Austin Daily Herald, backpacks, Becker’s Hospital Review, Big News Network, Bloomberg, Boston Herald, Brian Bunkers


July 29th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Washington Post
Complex jobs and social ties appear to help ward off Alzheimer’s, new research shows
by Tara Bahrampour

The studies support previous findings that more stimulating lifestyles are associated with better cognitive outcomes later in life, and bolster the importance of intellectual engagement, said Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging and the Mayo Alzheimer’s Research Center. “Physical activity has been reasonably well-documented, but with intellectual activity the data get pretty soft…these two studies speakWashington Post newspaper logo to that,” he said. “What it may mean is the development of Alzheimer’s Disease or cognitive change with aging need not be a passive process; you can do something about it…staying intellectually active whether it be your job or other kinds of activities may actually be beneficial.”

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: NBC News

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

CBS News
Memory loss is not necessarily the first sign of dementia
by Ruslan Guzov

Memory loss may not always be the first warning sign that dementia is brewing -- changes in behavior or personality might be an early clue…"It's important for us to recognize that not everything's forgetfulness," CBS News Logosaid Dr. Ron Petersen, the Mayo Clinic's Alzheimer's research chief. He wasn't involved in developing the behavior checklist but said it could raise awareness of the neuropsychiatric link with dementia.

Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

Additional coverage: Associated Press

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

 

Washington Post
Men may get Alzheimer’s as much as women; we just haven’t known how to spot it
by Tara Bahrampour

Looking at the State of Florida’s brain bank, researchers at the Mayo Clinic found Alzheimer’s in 1,625 of 2,809 people who had donated their brains for autopsies. The donors were almost equally divided: 51 percent men and 49 percent women. But contrary to what has been seen in the general population, the Alzheimer’s cases in the brain bank were much more evenly divided: 54 percent of cases were women and 46Washington Post newspaper logo percent were men… It is hard to diagnose the disease in people under 70, according to Melissa Murray, an assistant professor at the Mayo Clinic’s department of neuroscience, who presented the study. “If you don’t know what the disease is then you can’t give even the modicum of treatment that we have available,” Murray said, noting that symptoms in men are often mistaken for cortico-basal syndrome, frontotemporal dementia, or other conditions.

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:

CBS News, 1 in 5 Alzheimer's cases may be misdiagnosed

Florida Times-Union, Mayo clinic study finds mens Alzheimer' misdiagnosed more often than women

ABC News, HealthDay, Neurology Today, Telegraph UK, Express UK, Daily MailActionNewsJax

Context: Mayo neuroscientist Melissa E. Murray, Ph.D., led the study, which suggests a high number of men are not accurately diagnosed during their lifetime. The Alzheimer’s Association issued a news release today about the research findings, which Dr. Murray is presenting at the 2016 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Toronto. “While it is well accepted that age is the strongest risk factor for Alzheimer’s, there is an enormous need to understand interacting factors that contribute to the development of the disease,” says Dr. Murray, assistant professor of Neuroscience on Mayo’s Jacksonville campus. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Star Tribune (Associated Press)
Behavior changes offer clues that dementia could be brewing
by Lauran Neergaard

If validated, the checklist could help doctors better identify people at risk of brewing Alzheimer's and study changes over time. "It's important for us to recognize that not everything's forgetfulness," said Dr. Ron Star Tribune LogoPetersen, the Mayo Clinic's Alzheimer's research chief. He wasn't involved in developing the behavior checklist but said it could raise awareness of the neuropsychiatric link with dementia.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: Chicago Daily Herald, Post-Bulletin, Kansas City Star

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber LindquistDuska Anastasijevic

 

STAT
Promising Alzheimer’s treatment flops in new trial, crushing hopes
by Damian Garde

A closely watched treatment for Alzheimer’s disease came up short in a late-stage trial, marking the latest setback in a field wracked by years of failure. The drug, from biotech company TauRx, did no better than a sugar pill at improving patients’ scores on tests of cognitive and physical function, according to data presented early Wednesday at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Toronto. The studySTAT Logo of Boston Globe looked at roughly 900 patients with mild to moderate forms of Alzheimer’s. “I must say I’m disappointed by the results,” said Dr. David Knopman, a Mayo Clinic neurologist not involved with the study.

Reach: STAT covers the frontiers of health and medicine including science labs, hospitals, biotechnology board rooms, and political back rooms. Hosted by The Boston Globe, STAT launched on November 5, 2015. The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Additional coverage:

CNN, Does it pass the 'smell test'? Seeking ways to diagnose Alzheimer's early

Reuters, TauRx Alzheimer's drug fails in large study; some benefit seen

New York Times, USA Today, MedPage TodayFOX News, Huffington Post, NBC News

Contacts: Susan Barber LindquistDuska Anastasijevic

 

 

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic researcher wins international award
by Brett Boese

A Mayo Clinic scientist received a prestigious international award Monday at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference that's being hosted in Canada. Dr. Guojun Bu, a neuroscientist at Mayo's Florida Logo for Post-Bulletin newspapercampus, received the 2016 MetLife Foundation Major Award for Medical Research in Alzheimer's Disease, which is given annually to the top scientist in this field of study. Bu and his research lab have produced more than 220 peer-reviewed articles on Alzheimer's over the past 20 years that have been cited more than 10,000 times. That work is widely recognized as being some of the most significant in the field.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context:  Guojun Bu, Ph.D., a neuroscientist onMayo Clinic’s Florida campus, will receive the 2016 MetLife Foundation Major Award for Medical Research in Alzheimer’s Disease ─ one of the most prestigious awards given annually to the top scientist in this field of study. The award was presented to Dr. Bu today at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Toronto. Over the past 20 years, Dr. Bu and his medical research lab have produced more than 220 peer-reviewed articles that have been cited more than 10,000 times. Colleagues and other Alzheimer’s researchers say his team’s contributions to Alzheimer’s research rank among the most significant in the field. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

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Tags: "liquid biopsies", 9&10 News (Michigan), Abby Bartz, ABC News, ActionNewsJax, Adult coloring, Allie Wergin, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers, Amber Kohnhorst, Andra Palmer, Anesthesiology News


April 1st, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Wall Street Journal
Cancer Treatment’s New Direction
by Ron Winslow

Evan Johnson had battled a cold for weeks, endured occasional nosebleeds and felt so fatigued he struggled to finish his workouts at the gym. But it was the unexplained bruises and chest pain that ultimately sent the then 23-year-old senior at theWSJ Banner University of North Dakota to the Mayo Clinic. There a genetic test revealed a particularly aggressive form of acute myeloid leukemia..…Dr. Kasi and his Mayo colleagues—Naseema Gangat, a hematologist, and Shahrukh Hashmi, a transplant specialist—are among the authors of an account of Mr. Johnson’s case published in January in the journal Leukemia Research Reports.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Naseema Gangat, M.B.B.S., is a Mayo Clinic hematologist, Shahrukh, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic hematologist and transplant specialist and Pashtoon Kasi is a Mayo oncology fellow. Evan Johnson’s case was published in the the journal Leukemia Research Reports and is an example of Mayo Clinic’s multidisciplinary-team based care approach. 

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

New York Times
On C.T.E. and Athletes, Science Remains in Its Infancy
by Benedict Carey

In the best study to determine risk so far, published in December, a research team at a Mayo Clinic bank in Jacksonville found The New York Times newspaper logoC.T.E. in 21 of 66 brains of people who had played contact sports. It found no evidence of the disorder in 198 people with no record of playing such sports. But the authors said they had no way to know whether those 21 former athletes had symptoms linked to C.T.E.; some had other neurological disorders as well when they died. “These are very early days, and we badly need larger studies, that include both athletes and nonathletes,” said Dr. Dennis Dickson, the study’s senior author.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Related coverage:

Washington Post — Dale Earnhardt Jr. plans to donate his brain for concussion research

Previous coverage in March 19, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in Dec. 4, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in Dec. 4, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Scientists have recently found evidence that professional football players are susceptible to a progressive degenerative disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which is caused by repetitive brain trauma. Now, researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have discovered a significant and surprising amount of CTE in males who had participated in amateur contact sports in their youth. About one-third of these men whose brains had been donated to the Mayo Clinic Brain Bank had evidence of CTE pathology. CTE only can be diagnosed posthumously.More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic will begin construction on two new buildings, costing $100 million, this year
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville announced Tuesday that it will begin $100 million in major construction projects this year. It will begin construction this summer on what Mayo officials are calling “a destination medical building” that will provideFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo integrated services for complex cancers, as well as neurologic and neurosurgical care. The 150,000-square-foot building will have four stories with the potential to add 11 more stories. More than 126,000 patients are expected to visit in the first year after the building opens.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:

WJXT-TV Jacksonville — Mayo Clinic announces $100M expansion;  WOKV-RadioJacksonville Daily Record, Jacksonville Business Journal, First Coast News, Twin Cities Business, WOKV-TV Florida

Context: Advancing its position as the premier medical destination center for health care in the Southeast, Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida will invest $100 million in major construction projects building on its 150-year history of transforming health care and the patient experience. This summer, Mayo Clinic will begin constructing an innovative destination medical building that will provide integrated services needed for complex cancer, as well as neurologic and neurosurgical care. Initially rising four stories, the 150,000-square-foot building has the potential for 11 more stories. More than 126,000 patients are expected to visit the first year the building opens. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Fast Company
Mayo Clinic Technology Said To Alleviate Nausea From VR
by Dahniel Terdiman

VR sickness could soon be a thing of the past, thanks to new technology developed at the famed Mayo Clinic. Today, the clinic Fast Companyannounced that it has licensed its patented galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) technology to the Los Angeles-based entertainment company vMocion. GVS is aimed at helping to alleviate the nausea problem many people have when using virtual reality systems. The idea is to incorporate GVS into a platform, known as 3v—which stands for virtual, vestibular, and visual—into VR and augmented reality systems, giving users what they call a three-dimensional movement experience.

Reach: Fast Company's editorial focus is on innovation in technology, ethonomics (ethical economics), leadership, and design. Written for, by, and about the most progressive business leaders, Fast Company and FastCompany.com inspire readers and users to think beyond traditional boundaries, lead conversations, and create the future of business.

Additional coverage: Forbes, Electronic Specifier, Engadget, (e) Science News, Digital Journal, Tech Crunch

Context:  Mayo Clinic and Mocion, LLC, an entertainment technology company, today announced it is making available Mayo Clinic’s patented Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation (GVS) technology specifically for use in virtual reality and augmented reality. vMocion’s 3v™ Platform (which stands for virtual, vestibular and visual) incorporates this patented GVS technology, which adds a complete sense of three-dimensional movement for the first time into a virtual reality or augmented reality environment. vMocion has been granted the exclusive, global, perpetual license for Mayo Clinic’s GVS patents and algorithms within all media and entertainment categories and will offer the 3v Platform to other media and entertainment companies through a licensing agreement. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

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June 26th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editors, Carmen Zwicker, Emily Blahnik

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic harnesses proton power
by Jeremy Olson

Until this week, Mayo Clinic had tested its $180 million proton beam accelerator only on water, a cadaver and cuts of meat donated by Ye Olde Butcher Shoppe in Rochester. But Monday, with a turn of a safety key and a press of a “beam on” button, radiation therapist Rebecca Keller sentStar Tribune newspaper logo positively charged protons through a series of powerful magnets, accelerating them to 60 percent of the speed of light, and focused them straight at the bottle cap-sized tumor in the brain of ­Ashley Sullivan. Physicists and cancer specialists crowded over Keller’s computer in the control room of Mayo’s new proton beam center to watch protons pepper the tumor.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Related Coverage:

KAAL, Mayo Treats First Patient Using Proton Therapy 

KSTP, Mayo Clinic Introduces Treatment to More Effectively Target Tumors 

Previous Coverage in June 12, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage in June 4, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context:  Mayo Clinic introduces its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota beginning this June and Arizona in spring 2016. Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients — especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures — proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Arizona Republic
Melanoma trial begins as new cancer drugs show promise
by Ken Alltucker

…While the number of melanoma cases has increased dramatically, doctors who treat the deadliest form of the disease say more treatment Arizona Republic newspaper logooptions have emerged in recent years. "The revolution in melanoma (treatment) over the past five years has been dramatic," said Dr. Alan Bryce, a Mayo Clinic oncologist who has treated Spatt. "There have been more advances in melanoma than any other cancer."

Reach: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday and has an average daily circulation of more than 261,000 readers. The newspaper’s website Arizona Republic - Online, averages more than 5.4 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: USA Today, Phoenix Business Journal

Context: Mayo Clinic and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) are helping launch a national clinical trial that will apply the latest in precision medicine to treat advanced melanoma skin cancer. The study leverages advances in genomics, informatics, and health information technology, yielding more precise medical treatments for patients with this devastating disease. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

Wall Street Journal
For CFOs, Signs of a Stronger Economy
by John Bussey

U.S. economic growth may be listless, but there are signs that could change in the coming months. That, at least, was the conclusion one could draw at this year’s gathering of global chief financial officers at The Wall Street Journal’s CFO Network conference. The CFOs clearly see aWSJ Banner tightening labor market—a sign of economic momentum. “We’re seeing increased competition for talented employees,” Kedrick Adkins Jr., CFO of the Mayo Clinic, said at the gathering in Washington, D.C., last week. “It’s across the organization.”

Additional coverage: Wall Street Journal

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has the largest print circulation in America with 1.4 million (60 percent) of a total of 2.3 million. Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Kedrick Adkins, Jr. is CFO of Mayo Clinic.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Wall Street Journal
Noseworthy, Tyson on Balancing Care and Cost

It’s a question at the heart of arguments about health care: How can the industry put a lid on soaring costs and still deliver quality, innovation WSJ Bannerand choice to patients? For insights, The Wall Street Journal’s Laura Landro spoke with two health-care executives whose organizations are renowned for innovative practices: John H. Noseworthy, president and chief executive of the Mayo Clinic, and Bernard J. Tyson, chairman and CEO of Kaiser Permanente. Here are edited excerpts of their conversation.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has the largest print circulation in America with 1.4 million (60 percent) of a total of 2.3 million. Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. 

Contact: Traci Klein

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Tags: ABC 15 Arizona, ABC News, Addie Sylvester, Albany Times-Union, Anesthesiology News, Arizona Family, Arizona Republic, Bismarck Tribune, breast density, CBS12 (Fla.), Child obesity, Chippewa Herald


January 24th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Bloomberg Radio

Mayo CEO Says Better Healthcare Strengthens Economies (Audio)

Dr. John Noseworthy, president and chief executive officer of Mayo Clinic, says investment in healthcare allows individuals benefit from the prosperity they deserve. The 2014 World Economic Forum is addressing how developing and emerging economies can learn from developed nations and leapfrog to a better future.Bloomberg Davos

Reach:  Kathleen Hays is the host of “The Hays Advantage” on Bloomberg Radio, a weekday program that brings in-depth insight and analysis to important economic, market and policy issues. Recognized as one of the top economic reporters and anchors in the country, Hays has covered the U.S. economy and the Federal Reserve for more than 20 years. She joined Bloomberg in 2006 after years as an on-air and online economics correspondent at CNN, CNNfn, and CNBC, where she served as a host, correspondent and commentator for numerous programs. The Hays Advantage appears on Bloomberg 1130-am in New York City, on 1200-am and 94.5-fm in Boston and on SiriusXm satellite radio on Channel 119.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

Fox Business

Can our health-care system sustain the expansion of Medicaid?

Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy on the future of health care.


Reach:
 FoxNews.com hFox Businessas more than 13 million unique visitors each month. Fox Business Network is headquartered in News Corporation's studios in midtown Manhattan with bureaus in Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco (Silicon Valley), Washington, D.C. and London.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

USA TODAY

Fish on the brain: Can eating it keep Alzheimer's at bay?
 By Nanci Hellmich

…Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, says there have been conflicting reports on this topic but this latest research "would suggest there iUSA Today NEWs a positive relationship between omega-3 fatty acid-rich diets and the preservation of brain volume in aging. The take-home message is to eat a heart-healthy diet that includes fish. I'd also recommend physicalexercise and engagement in intellectual activity."

Reach: USA TODAY  has the highest daily circulation of any U.S. newspaper with a daily average circulation of 2.9 million, which includes print and various digital editions.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

ABC News
Higher Risk of Death From Heart Attack Linked to Hospital Hours (Video)

When it comes to a heart attack, the difference between life and death may hinge on timing, according to the Mayo Clinic. Researchers found a 5 percent higher chance of death — almost 2,000 more ABC Newsdeaths a year — within 30 days of the heart attack if a person arrived at the hospital at night or on the weekend… “There are fewer staff and resources at night and on weekends — that’s true,” said Dr. Atsushi Sorita, the study’s lead author.

Reach:  ABCNews.com is the official website for ABC News. Its website receives more than 16.9 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: USA TODAYToronto StarHealthDayNBC NewsEast Idaho NewsTIMEWRCB Tenn.Health NewslineHealthCanalNews-MedicalThe Globe and MailCoshocton TribuneCincinnati.comAd Hoc News (Berlin)Aetna InteliHealth

Context: More people die and emergency hospital treatment takes longer for heart attack victims who arrive at the hospital during off-hours (nights and weekends), compared with patients who arrive during regular daily hours, according to a Mayo Clinic study published online in the British Medical Journal on Jan. 21. Read, view and listen to more about the study on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

Orlando Sentinel
As women seek preventive breast-cancer surgery, hospitals move to combine procedures
by David Breen

…Now surgeons at Florida Hospital Celebration Health have joined others throughout the country by offering what had been separate surgeries — mastectomy and breast reconstruction, and removal of the ovaries — in a single session…Dr. Sarah McLaughlin, a surgeon at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, sees a growing trend toward combining the procedures, estimating that she takes part inOrlando Sentinel six to 10 of them a year. It's a preferable option for many patients, she said, provided they are strong enough to deal with a surgery session that can last five to six hours.

Reach: The Orlando Sentinel has a daily circulation of more than 162,000. The newspaper serves central Florida. It's website has more than 1.1 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Sarah McLaughlin, M.D., is a surgeon with the Breast Clinic at Mayo Clinic in Florida. Whether you're facing noncancerous (benign) breast conditions, abnormal mammogram results, or newly diagnosed or recurrent breast cancer, the Breast Clinic at Mayo Clinic in Florida focuses on the needs of breast cancer patients. Mayo Clinic is one of the few places in the world where you can access all the specialists needed for comprehensive care "under one roof."

Public Affairs Contact: Paul Scotti

Star Tribune
Mayo wins FDA approval to test stem cell technique for heart patients
By Dan Browning

A decade-long Mayo Clinic research project on using stem cells to repair damaged heart tissue has won federal approval for human testing, a step that could have implications for millions of Americans Star Tribune Healthwith heart disease. 
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a multistate ­clinical trial of 240 patients with chronic advanced symptomatic heart failure to see if the new procedure produces a significant improvement in heart function, Mayo officials announced Friday.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: KTTC,  Imperial Valley NewsPost-BulletinKAALMedical Daily

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Bob Nellis, Jennifer Schutz

 

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Tags: 2014 World Economic Forum, ABC News, Ad Hoc News, adverse health events, Aetna InteliHealth, alzheimer's disease, Anesthesiology News, Argus Leader, Arizona Daily Star, Arizona Telemedicine Program, Ashville Citizen-Times, Atlanta Journal-Constitution


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