Items Tagged ‘antibiotics’

December 23rd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. This will be our last edition of 2016.  Look for us again on January 6, 2017. Thank you and happy holidays.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Los Angeles Times
A senior-friendly workout to improve movement and prevent injury

Jogging outdoors, running on a treadmill or lifting weights at the gym aren’t always practical — or enjoyable — activities for everyone. However, one type of exercise works for everyone, no matter your age or ability, because it relies on improving practical movements often involved inLogo for Los Angeles Times newspaper everyday activities. “Natural movement is universal, and it’s about bringing movement back to the basics,” says Bradly Prigge, wellness exercise specialist with the Mayo Clinic’s Healthy Living Program. “It’s not about following the latest fitness craze or learning the newest secret to weight loss. Natural movement is about connecting with your body and cultivating an awareness of your full abilities.”

Reach:  The Los Angeles Times has a daily readership of 1.9 million and 2.9 million on Sunday, more than 8 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.5 million. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 128 years.

Additional coverage: Mountain Grove News-Journal

Other recent coverage in the Los Angeles Times related to Mayo Clinic's Healthy Living Program

Cosmopolitan, Do You Really Need to Take Vitamins?
WTOP Washington, Mayo Clinic expert: 4 actions for a healthy holiday season
Yahoo! News, 9 Ways to Boost Your Immune System by Michael O Schroeder
WEAU Eau ClaireTODAY INTERVIEW: Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Recipes

Previous coverage related to Mayo Clinic's Healthy Living program in the December 2, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life.

Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Joe Dangor

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic in Rochester adds customized plane to air fleet

The Mayo Clinic in Rochester has unveiled a customized $8.5 million airplane to transport high-risk patients to its facilities. The fixed-wing aircraft adds to the Mayo One fleet that was created in 1984. The program began with a single helicopter based in Rochester and now boasts four — two in Rochester, one in Mankato and one in Eau Claire, Wisconsin.Star Tribune newspaper logo

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: KSTP, Becker’s Hospital Review, KIMT

Context: While a certain red sled usually owns the flight-related headlines this month, Santa's sleigh isn't the only one getting press this December. Several news outlets, it seems, are reporting on another vehicle taking flight. But instead of delivering toys to good girls and boys, the new Mayo One airplane delivers patients in need of immediate, advanced care to Mayo Clinic. And like Santa's ride, this one also has some pretty unique features, and the equipment, medication and staff to make it function as a sky-high Emergency Department. You can read more about the new Mayo one airplane in Mayo Clinic in the Loop.

Contact:  Glenn Lyden

 

KIMT
St. Mary’s nurse returns to work after hiking accident
by DeeDee Stiepan

It’s an incredible story of survival that we first brought you in May when a St. Mary’s nurse fell 100ft while hiking in Arizona. Amber Kohnhorst spent 24 hours in extreme pain, without food or water until she was KIMT LOGOrescued by helicopter. Now, the 25-year old is back in Rochester, and it’s been quite some time since she was working as a Registered Nurse on the 5th floor at St. Mary’s Hospital. “My last shift was Friday May 13th, she tells us. “I’ve never really believed in Friday the 13th but now it kind of freaks me out.”

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Previous coverage in December 2, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Amber Kohnhorst loves animals and adventure. The trip she'd planned to Best Friends Animal Sanctuary in Utah promised both. She'd spend time volunteering at the shelter and do some hiking in nearby Cane Beds, Arizona. But what sounded like a perfect vacation quickly became a nightmare when the 25-year-old Mayo Clinic nurse fell 100 feet down a cliff during what was supposed to be a short hike. You can read more about Amber's story on Mayo Clinic In the Loop.

Contacts:  Ginger Plumbo, Kelly Reller

 

NBC News
Why Heart Attacks Are Striking Healthy Young Women
by Lauren Dunn and Parminder Deo

Researchers are discovering that SCAD heart attacks occur more frequently than once thought..."SCAD is a type of heart attack, but completely NBC News Logodifferent than the one we normally think of," says cardiologist Dr. Sharonne Hayes of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. "It's caused by a split or tear in an otherwise healthy artery that leads to a drop in blood flow to the heart leading to a heart attack."

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Context:  Sharonne Hayes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Hayes studies cardiovascular disease and prevention, with a focus on sex and gender differences and conditions that uniquely or predominantly affect women. With a clinical base in the Women's Heart Clinic, Dr. Hayes and her research team utilize novel recruitment methods, social media and online communities, DNA profiling, and sex-specific evaluations to better understand several cardiovascular conditions. A major area of focus is spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD), an uncommon and under-recognized cause of acute coronary syndrome (heart attack) that occurs predominantly in young women.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic sees innovation as key to the future

Mayo Clinic recognizes the historic changes taking place in the health care landscape. The health care provider has become famous for treating the whole patient by integrating various specialties of care. Now Mayo is going to be using its of health care innovation system as a model for generating revenue. Mayo-Jacksonville is setting aside spaces for innovators and is taking part in more collaborations.Florida Times-Union newspaper logo

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Charles Bruce, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist and serves as medical director of Mayo Clinic Ventures at Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville, Florida. James (Jim) Rogers is chair of Mayo's newly formed Business Development Department, which combines the functions of Mayo Clinic Ventures and the Office of Business Development. The new department will oversee Mayo's partnerships with external organizations, spearhead new business opportunities and support the advancement of medical technology in conjunction with Mayo Clinic leaders, entrepreneurs and inventors.

Contacts: Kevin Punsky, Duska Anastasijevic

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Tags: ABC15 Arizona, AccuWeather.com, advisory board, Affordable care act, Alatus, alcohol, Amber Kohnhorst, American Medical Association, anesthesia, Angie Murad, antibiotics, antidepressants


December 12th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Wall Street Journal
Mayo CEO: Focus on Health Care, Not Health Insurance
Wall Street Journal Video logoAt WSJ’s CEO Council, Mayo Clinic CEO John Noseworthy, M.D., talks with the WSJ’s Sara Murray about the Affordable Care Act and ways to provide better health care.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Dr. Noseworthy participated in the Wall Street Journal CEO Council. In early December, top global CEOs gathered once again in Washington, D.C., for the annual meeting of The Wall Street Journal CEO Council.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

 

Star Tribune
Part 1: The Next Mayo / Remaking a Medical Giant, Mayo Faces New Price of Success
by Jeremy Olson

(The Next Mayo is a Star Tribune series examining Minnesota’s legendary clinic in a competitive new era for health care.) Mayo has been lauded by President Obama and influential health economists as an example of superb care and medical efficiency. Yet Mayo also has a reputation in Star Tribune logoMinnesota — confirmed by publicly available health data — for high prices. How Mayo resolves that paradox will determine the future of a clinic that has become a signature Minnesota brand. Additional stories: A conversation with Dr. John Noseworthy, Q&A: Mayo Clinic Care Network director Dr. David Hayes, Q&A: Mayo Clinic gastroenterology dept. chair Dr. Vijay Shah

 

Star Tribune
Part 2: Mayo Cautiously Builds An Empire
by Dan Browning and Jackie Crosby

Jordan Hatfield’s case puzzled the doctors. A champion javelin thrower and top student at Northern Kentucky University, Hatfield developed stomach pains and insomnia during his sophomore year. Then came headaches, vision problems and nerve pain...Hatfield is among dozens of patients in Star Tribune Health newspaper logoKentucky to benefit from the Mayo Clinic Care Network, an ambitious effort by the Rochester-based health system to expand its reach and secure its place in an era of rapid changes in health care. In just four years, Mayo has signed up 31 affiliates in 18 states, Mexico and Puerto Rico.

 

Star Tribune
Part 3: Mayo Seeks to Dominate with Data
by Jackie Crosby

The patients arrive at the Mayo Clinic from all over the world, thousands a day, each presenting a different medical challenge. Some have illnesses so rare that even medical journals don’t offer a time-tested treatment plan. Others bring a complicated combination of ailmStar Tribune Business section logoents — diabetes with heart failure and kidney disease — that offer conflicting treatment options… “What we’re trying to find out, if we can, is what does health care cost, and what of that spend really adds value to a patient’s outcome over time, especially with these high-impact diseases,” said Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy. Additional stories: ‘Big data’ is changing American medical care, Timeline: A look back at key events in the history of the Mayo Clinic

 

Star Tribune
For Mayo Patient, helping medicine even in death
by Jackie Crosby

Tony Luebbers was one of the first patients in which his hometown doctors at St. Elizabeth Healthcare could work hand-in-hand with the Mayo Clinic Star Tribune local logoin Rochester. It turned out to be one for the medical books. Luebbers, a retired accountant, had gone to see his family doctor in this northern Kentucky city complaining of stomach pains. Multiple screenings and biopsies left doctors baffled. Through St. Elizabeth’s affiliation with the Mayo Clinic Care Network, Luebbers’ Kentucky doctors were able to share lab results and medical records, and consult directly with Mayo’s deep bench of experts.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: The Next Mayo is a Star Tribune series examining Minnesota's legendary clinic in a competitive era for health care.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

 

Post-Bulletin
Cannon Falls grad survived 20 hours of surgery, accepted paraplegia
by Brett Boese

The phone rang, and all Tess Pfohl could do was pray. It was the day before Thanksgiving, about three months since the 25-year-old Cannon Falls native had undergone 20 hours of surgery to remove a potentially fatal cancer that had wrapped itself around her spine. Pfohl had voluntarily chosen to become paraplegic in hopes of extending her life, but Mayo Clinic doctors were unwilling to discuss her chances of survival. Mayo Clinic surgeon Dr. Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperMichael Yaszemski said the world-class facility has performed just 160 such surgeries in the past 18 years…Pfohl, who normally is an avid social media user, went silent during the wait. She returned only after breathing a sigh of relief when the Mayo Clinic called to report the spot wasn't cancerous.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn. and southeast Minnesota.

Context: Michael Yaszemski, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon. Dr. Yaszemski investigates bone, cartilage and spinal cord regeneration using synthetic polymeric scaffolds, cells and controlled delivery of bioactive molecules. Dr. Yaszemski's Tissue Engineering and Biomaterials Laboratory is equipped to perform polymer synthesis and characterization and scaffold fabrication utilizing injectable techniques and solid freeform fabrication techniques. His research team cultures cell-polymer constructs, studies delivery kinetics of bioactive molecules from microparticles and microparticle-scaffold combinations, and studies these scaffold-cell-biomolecule combinations in vivo. The team investigates musculoskeletal sarcoma biology and works on the controlled local delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to osteosarcoma, chordoma and chrondrosarcoma.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

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Tags: animal therapy, antibiotics, Arizona Research Consortium and Mayo Clinic, Austin Business Journal, AZO Nano, Baby Boomers and health care, Barron News-Shield, Becker’s Hospital Review, BetaBoston (Boston Globe), big data and health care, Bill Marriott, BioWorld


May 22nd, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

 

 
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

TIME
Measles Vaccine Cures Woman Of Cancer
by Markham Heid

Mayo Clinic researchers have wiped out a 49-year-old Minnesota woman’s blood cTime magazine logoancer with a radical new virus-based treatment that involved injecting her with “the highest possible dose” of a measles vaccine, suggesting virotherapy could treat some cancers.

Reach: Time magazine has a weekly circulation of 3.3 million. Time Online receives mores than 4.6 million unique visitors to its website each month and its monthy page views are more than 32.8 million.

Additional coverage:  USA TODAY, Imperial Valley News, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Chicago Tribune, SELF, LA Times, Boston Globe, Reuters, Telegraph UK, Hawaii Reporter, Design & Trend, Post-Bulletin, KSDK, Forbes, Leadership Newspapers, Le Figaro Sante, EveryJoeStar Tribune 

Previous coverage

Context: In a proof of principle clinical trial, Mayo Clinic researchers have demonstrated that virotherapy — destroying cancer with a virus that infects and kills cancer cells but spares normal tissues — can be effective against the deadly cancer multiple myeloma. The findings appear in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Two patients in the study received a single intravenous dose of an engineered measles virus (MV-NIS) that is selectively toxic to myeloma plasma cells. Both patients responded, showing reduction of both bone marrow cancer and myeloma protein. One patient, a 49-year-old woman, experienced complete remission of myeloma and has been clear of the disease for over six months. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis


KARE11
Fort Hood shooting survivor faces challenges in MN
by Boyd Huppert

Patrick Zeigler sits quietly in a traveling museum celebrating 150 years of the Mayo Clinic. KARE-11 TV, Minneapolis-St. PaulPatrick is volunteering his time at the wounded warrior display. Visitors stop to read the text and view the pictures around him. Some notice Patrick's army cap and his service dog Ranger, then extend a hand to thank Patrick for his service.

Reach: KARE is a an NBC affiliate in the Minneapolis-St.Paul market.

Context: Army Staff Sgt. Patrick Zeigler was critically injured in the shooting at Fort Hood in November 2009 -- Zeigler was shot four times, including once in the head, during the attack. His first trip to Rochester came at a critical point in his recovery, and the soldier credits his Mayo Clinic team with saving his life.

Public Affairs Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Rebecca Eisenman

 

KSTPKAAL
Mayo Clinic Develops New, Less Invasive Weight Loss Procedure
by Naomi Pescovitz

A new study was underway for a weight loss procedure not meant for the morbidly obese. "This is radically different from the surgery because the surgery is radical," said Dr. KSTP-TV Eyewitness News LogChristopher Gostout, Consultant at Mayo Clinic and Director of the Developmental Endoscopy Unit. Gostout and Dr. Barham Abu Dayyeh, Assistant Professor of Medicine at Mayo, had developed a way to shrink a person's stomach, without the scarring or slicing through the skin.

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.  KAAL, like KAAL TV logoKSTP,  is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Additional coverage: KTTC, WXOW La Crosse

Context: Christopher Gostout, M.D., and Barham Abu Dayyeh, M.D., are Mayo Clinic physicians in Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Public Affairs Contacts: Brian KilenRebecca Eisenman

 

Arizona Republic
Kidney donation leads to friendship between women
by Wendy Neri

At first glance, Nancy Shaver and Kati Walker could hardly be more different. Two decades apart in age, one is a longtime elementary-school principal with closely cropped Arizona Republic newspaper logowhite hair and an exuberant laugh; the other, a vibrant young mother, artist and fitness enthusiast with ombre hair and tattoos.…Soon after, Shaver, Walker, and both the transplant and donor teams at Mayo Clinic scheduled the transplant surgery for the following January. At that point, Shaver and Walker began meeting for coffee to get to know each other better.

ReachThe Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday. The newspaper’s website Arizona Central, averages 83 million pages views each month.

Context: Mayo Clinic doctors actively perform research in kidney transplantation, presenting their work at national and international meetings. The Mayo Clinic Transplant Center supports many studies for kidney transplant research.

Public Affairs Contact: Lynn Closway

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Tags: 12 Habits of Highly Healthy People, 2014 Recognition of Outstanding Contribution Award, 2018 Super Bowl, Advance for Occupational Therapy Practitioners, Advance Healthcare Network for Nurses, Alaska, All About Jazz, alzheimer's disease, Amy Purdy, antibiotics, antiviral medications, Arizona Republic


July 12th, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

July 12 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Philadelphia Enquirer
Study seeks ways to treat Alzheimer's before symptoms start
By Stacey Burling

The day is coming when doctors will be able to diagnose and treat Alzheimer's disease before people have symptoms, and Ronald Petersen is among the doctors laying the groundwork for that future. Petersen is director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, which is using detailed tests to monitor cognitive changes in older adults from Olmsted County, Minn., as they age.

Circulation: The Philadelphia Inquirer has a daily circulation of more than 350,000 readers. Philadelphia Inquirer - Online has more than 1.7 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

NY Times (Blog)
Skin Cancer on the Rise in Young Women
by Emma Fitzsimmons

…But as I learned more about skin cancer, I discovered that it is becoming increasingly common, especially among young women. A recent study by the Mayo Clinic found that melanoma, the most serious type, had increased eightfold for women under 40 since 1970.  “There is this thought that, ‘It won’t happen to me because I’m young,’ but that’s not true anymore,” said Dr. Jerry Brewer, a dermatologist at the Mayo Clinic and an author of the study.

Circulation: The New York Times has the third highest circulation nationally, behind USA Today (2nd) and The Wall Street Journal (1st) with 1,150,589 weekday copies circulated and 1,645,152 circulated on Sundays.

Related Coverage:
WZVN Fort Myers
Mayo Clinic: Monthly skin exam could save lives

NBC2 (FL)
Mayo Clinic: Monthly skin exam could save lives

Sarasota Tribune News (NY Times)
Skin cancer and young women

Previous Coverage:
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights, June 21, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights, May 31, 2013

Context: Jerry D. Brewer, M.D. is a dermatological surgeon and Svetomir Markovic, M.D. is a hematologist and oncologist at at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Alyson Gonzalez

ABC News Nightline (Online text with video)
REPORTER'S NOTEBOOK By ELY BROWN and

It was just more than a year ago when we touched down in Rochester, Minn. to do a story on the organ transplant unit at Mayo Clinic. Before we could even check our camera mics, we got word that another plane had just landed carrying a red cooler containing a liver for 60-year-old Gordon Karels.

ABC News (Colter Meinert's story with video)
Inside Mayo Clinic Organ Transplant Unit: Gift of Life

Colter Meinert, 9, was born with half a heart, but a donor heart may transform his life.

ABC News (Jessica Danielson's story with video)
Inside Mayo Clinic Organ Transplant Unit: Living for 2

Part 2: For Jessica Danielson, 30, not a day goes by without thinking of her "angel" organ donor.

Reach: “Nightline” ranks No. 1 in late night among Total Viewers, Adults 25-54 and Adults 18-49, ahead of both NBC’s “The Tonight Show” and CBS’ “The Late Show.” Total Viewers (3.899 million), Adults 25-54 (1.504 million) and Adults 18-49 (1.197 million), for the week of April 23, 2012, according to Nielsen Media Research. ABCNews.com is the official website for ABC News.

Additional Coverage:
KSTP
'Nightline' Features Duluth Woman for 2nd Time

WDIO Duluth, KSTP, Fiji News, Australian News

Previous Coverage of Jessica Danielson's Transplant:
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly News Highlights, June 21, 2012

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights, May 4, 2012

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Arizona Republic
Mayo Clinic takes us closer to the cutting edge
Our View: Biomedical campus a win from the recession
By Editorial Board

Years ago, when the Mayo Clinic built a hospital in north Phoenix, it had no neighbors. It still sits mostly by itself, surrounded by acres upon acres of empty land. That may be one of the few positives to come from the real-estate bust. When the market imploded, no developer wanted to buy the trust land along Loop 101 near the hospital.

Circulation: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday. The newspaper’s website Arizona Central, averages 83 million pages views each month.

Context: Mayo Clinic in Arizona celebrated 25 years in the southwest in 2012. Mayo Clinic in Arizona now spans two campuses, comprising more than 400 acres of land, and has added two research buildings on the Scottsdale campus, while the Phoenix campus includes a 244-bed hospital, specialty clinic, housing for transplant and cancer patients and leased space for a child care center as well as hospice and a hotel. Offsite family medicine practices were also added in Scottsdale and Glendale, Ariz.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Celebrates 25 Years in Arizona

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic researchers study how body can repair itself
by Dan Browning

At Mayo Clinic’s Center for Regenerative Medicine, physicians and researchers have a dazzling array of tools at their fingertips: transplants, genomics, computerized data analysis and biomedical engineering. But the core idea is simple: stimulating or restoring the human body’s innate ability to heal itself. Recent discoveries in cellular biology and genomics have led scientists to the threshold of what transplant cardiologist Dr. Brooks Edwards called the “single most-exciting advance” in his 35 years at Mayo.

Circulation: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: In the Center for Regenerative Medicine at Mayo Clinic, interdisciplinary teams of physicians and scientists are carrying out innovative basic, translational and clinical research to develop definitive regenerative treatments aimed at fully healing damaged tissues and organs, offering solutions and hope for people who have conditions that today are beyond repair.

Public Affairs Contacts: Nick Hanson, Jennifer Schutz, Kelley Luckstein

MyFOX9
CLIFF DIVING: The dangers of taking the plunge

For many thrill seekers, cliff-diving is a popular past-time during the hot Minnesota summers, but medical professionals who spoke with FOX 9 News say it's an adrenalin rush with serious risks. Dr. Donald Jenkins, trauma expert, Mayo Clinic, is interviewed.

Reach: FOX 9 News (WFTC) serves the Minneapolis-St. Paul market.  

Related Coverage on Summer Safety:
CBS News
Treat Fireworks With Caution On The Fourth of July 

Eau Claire Leader-Telegram, WIBW Kansas

Context:  In Cannon Falls, Minn. cliff diving at Lake Byllesby has led to several injuries seen in the emergency department at Mayo Clinic Health System, Cannon Falls. Besides facing the legal consequences, cliff divers put themselves in serious danger.

Related News Release: Mayo Clinic: Five Tips to Keep Your Summer Safe and Injury Free

Public Affairs Contacts: Nick Hanson, Kristy Jacobson

KSTP
Mayo Clinic Opens Center to Reduce C. diff Exposure
by Cassie Hart

The Mayo Clinic is opening a new treatment center aimed at reducing the cases of something called Clostridium difficile (C.diff), which is the most common infectious cause of diarrhea in hospitals

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Previous C. diff Coverage
Mayo Clinic in the News Weeklyy Highlights, Dec. 21, 2012

Context: Fecal transplants are quick, inexpensive and offer a 90 percent cure rate for patients. About one-fourth of people with C. difficile get sick again, either because the initial infection never went away or because they’re reinfected with a different strain of the bacteria. Treatment for recurrent disease may include antibiotics, which may involve one or more courses of a medication, a longer course of treatment or an antibiotic given once every two days; probiotics, such as S. boulardii, given along with the antibiotic medication or a “stool transplant” to restore healthy intestinal bacteria by placing donor stool in your colon, using a colonoscope or nasogastric tube. Although this is rarely done in practice, research has shown stool transplant to be helpful.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Opens C. difficile Clinic

Treatments and drugs

Public Affairs Contact: Brian Kilen

News4Jax
Study: Bracelet-like device controls acid reflux

A bracelet-like device with magnetic beads can control the chronic digestive disorder gastroesophageal reflux disease, according to a study published online Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine…The advance is significant, says study co-author C. Daniel Smith, M.D., chair of the surgery department at Mayo Clinic in Florida and a specialist in treating reflux disease. Mayo Clinic is the only medical center in Florida and one of two in the Southeast to help study the device.

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville.

Context: Mayo Clinic in Florida will be one of the first health care institutions in the United States to offer a newly approved device to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The condition, also known as acid reflux disease, can lead to serious health problems. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the device and treatment procedure in March 2012 for patients with GERD who continue to have chronic reflux symptoms despite taking medication. C. Daniel Smith, M.D. is chair of the General Surgery Department and is also affiliated with the Bariatric Center at at Mayo Clinic in Florida, and an internationally recognized expert on the treatment of GERD.

News Release: Bracelet-Like Device Controls Chronic Acid Reflux, Study Finds

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

Arizona Republic
New cancer center at Mayo Clinic may mean 1,000 new jobs
by Rachael Levy

When Mayo Clinic opens its cancer center in 2015, health-care leaders say, people will come from all over the world to receive treatment at the northeast Phoenix facility. The center will offer innovative treatment that’s not available in the Southwest. But beyond the care, officials say, the center also signals progress for economic development in the area. Officials expect the center, an expansion of Mayo’s Phoenix campus, to provide more than 1,000 medical-related jobs, including more than 100 physician positions. And developers envision the 380,000-square-foot cancer center as one piece of a vast biomedical corridor surrounding the facility.

Circulation: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday. The newspaper’s website Arizona Central, averages 83 million pages views each month.

Previous Coverage:
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights, July 3, 2012

Context: On June 27, the last piece of steel went into place onto the newest building on Mayo Clinic’s Phoenix campus — a building that will be the future Arizona home to Mayo Clinic’s Cancer Center and the first proton beam therapy facility of its kind in the Southwest. The new Cancer Center will begin to be occupied in early 2015, with proton beam therapy expected to begin by 2016. Mayo Clinic’s proton beam therapy program will be the first of its kind in the Southwest.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Cancer Center Topping off Ceremony

Public Affairs Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

Star Tribune
Rochester, Minn.: Big city, small-town charm
by Christine Bernier Lienke

It’s true that Rochester has become synonymous with the Mayo Clinic. But the city has much more to offer beyond world-renowned health care. The rapidly growing city exudes small-town charm with architectural history and lively arts, dining and shopping scenes…Rochester, Minnesota’s third-largest city, spans nearly 55 square miles and is home to nearly 108,000 residents.

Circulation: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Destination Medical Center (DMC), an economic development initiative designed to secure Mayo Clinic and Minnesota’s future as a global medical destination, passed on May 20 as part of the Minnesota Legislature’s tax bill. It will help fund the public infrastructure required to keep pace with an estimated $5 billion private investment by Mayo Clinic and other private entities over the next 20 years.

Destination Medical Center Website

Public Affairs Contacts: Bryan Anderson, Karl Oestreich

The Onion
70% Of Americans Take Prescription Drugs

A report from the Mayo Clinic found that nearly 7 in 10 Americans take at least one prescription medication, and noted that antibiotics, antidepressants, and painkillers were the most frequently prescribed drugs in the U.S. What do you think?

Circulation: The Onion is widely considered to be the top humor periodical in the United States and is published weekly. The Onion contains scathingly funny commentary on world events, human behavior, and journalistic convention. The Onion is distributed to readerships in New York City, Chicago, Milwaukee, Madison, the Twin Cities, Denver/Boulder, Austin, Toronto and to thousands of subscribers. The Onion's online version receives nearly 750,000 unique visitors each month.

Previous Coverage:
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights, July 3, 2012

Context: Nearly 70 percent of Americans are on at least one prescription drug, and more than half take two, Mayo Clinic and Olmsted Medical Center researchers say. Antibiotics, antidepressants and painkilling opioids are most commonly prescribed, their study found. Twenty percent of patients are on five or more prescription medications, according to the findings published online in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

News Release: Nearly 7 in 10 Americans Take Prescription Drugs, Mayo Clinic, Olmsted Medical Center Find

Public Affairs Contacts: Nick Hanson, Sharon Theimer

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

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Tags: ABC News, ABC News Nightline, ABCnews.com, acid reflux, alzheimer's disease, and Blood Institute, antibiotics, antidepressants, Arizona Republic, Australian News, bio-plotter, biomedical corridor


July 3rd, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

 

 

July 3, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

We are publishing early this week since we will be away celebrating America's Independence Day. Please stay safe and sound during your celebrations. Mayo Clinic doctors offer Five Tips to Keep Your Summer Safe and Injury Free. And take some time to watch a new "Saving Lives with Gus" video that shows what can happen if we aren't careful when using fireworks. The brainchild behind Gus is Raaj Ruparel, M.D., a Mayo resident.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

National Review
How to Save $213 billion — and Your Own Life
by Grace-Marie Turner

Are we taking too many drugs? The Twitterverse is abuzz over a new study released by the Mayo Clinic which found that 70 percent of Americans are taking at least one prescription drug. A second independent study, conducted by the IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics, provides relevant insights. IMS found that if we used prescription drugs more wisely, the U.S. could save at least $213 billion a year in health-care expenses. The key is reducing medication overuse, underuse, and improper use.

Reach: National Review and National Review Online provide news, commentary and opinion targeted toward a Republican audience. The magazine has a circulation of 130,000 readers and its website has 2.5 million unique visitors each month.

Additional Coverage:

NY Daily News
Prescription drugs: Study says 7 out of 10 Americans are taking at least one

FOX6 Milwaukee
Mayo Clinic study: 70% of Americans on prescription medication
 

Post-Bulletin
Our View: Study of prescription drug use is tip of the iceberg

UPI
7-in-10 U.S. adults take at least one prescription

Star Tribune Blog
7 in 10 Americans takes at least one prescription drug,
Nearly 7 in 10 Americans are on at least one prescription drug, and more than half take two, according to a new study by the Mayo Clinic. Antibiotics are the most common medication, with antidepressants and painkillers close behind.The statistics came from the Rochester Epidemiology Project in Olmsted County, Minn., and were published in the online journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

MPR, Huffington Post, WCCO, KSTC45, FOX9, Drug Store News, KSTP, KAAL; WTOP Radio; abclocal.go.com; HealthFinder.gov;  Medical News Today, Big News Network, KSHB Kansas City, Medscape, MinnPost, Houston Business Journal, BET, RTT News, CBS News, Headline & Global News, KTAR, Pharmaceutical International, The Guardian UK, Opposing Views, Drudge Report, TIME; msnbc.com, onAOL.com; Yahoo! Lifestyle India, Phillyburbs.com, Health Day;  Louisville Courier-Journal, Medical News Today, Big News Network, KSHB Kansas City, Medscape, MinnPost, Houston Business Journal, USAToday.com, CSN, MN Daily, KTVK, esciencenews.com, KXLF, Breitbart, Silicon Investor, Black Christian News, Blogs.MarketWatch.com, KFIAM640;   Newstalk1160, Ron Paul Forums, US News & World Report, Examiner.com, New York Daily News, WTSP, Right Side News, Amarillo.com, Catholic Online, Science 2.0, Science Codex, American News Report, WKRG-TV, Newser, Yeshiva World News, News-Medical.net, PharmaLive,  Headlines & Global News, Newsroom America, Psych Central, Infection Control Today, Federal Nutrition, BringMetheNews.com, KLFD1410, ThirdAge.com, Drugs.com; CityPages, Consumer Affairs, Before It’s News, Investment Watch Blog,  Claims Journal, Yeshiva World, New Kerala, Courier-Journal

Context: Nearly 70 percent of Americans are on at least one prescription drug, and more than half take two, Mayo Clinic and Olmsted Medical Center researchers say. Antibiotics, antidepressants and painkilling opioids are most commonly prescribed, their study found. Twenty percent of patients are on five or more prescription medications, according to the findings, published online in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

News Release: Nearly 7 in 10 Americans Take Prescription Drugs, Mayo Clinic, Olmsted Medical Center Find

Public Affairs Contacts: Nick Hanson, Sharon Theimer

Rheumatology Practice News
The Mayo Brothers’ Clinic: A History of Excellence
by James Prudden

Through extensive on-site interviews with several members of Mayo Clinic’s Rheumatology Division, an impression of this celebrated hospital was formed, but the overall nuanced picture did not come without the addition of 3 unlikely, diverse factors: the parking lot, the piano, and the necktie. Each one shined a surprising light on the impressive care to be found at Mayo that gives the patient experience there such depth. There is clinical expertise aplenty, surely, but there is more to it than that. It might come as a surprise to some that a nonclinical item like the placement of a new parking lot would demand the attention of an esteemed member of the Mayo rheumatology staff, but there she was, Sherine E. Gabriel, MD, former president of the American College of Rheumatology, engaged in a long conversation about the wisdom of placing a parking lot in a particular area of the Mayo campus.

Reach: This edition of the Rheumatology News was distributed to more than 10,000 rheumatologists and general practice physicians as well as the European League Agaainst Rheumatism annual meeting in Madrid in June. The issue will also be broadly distributed at the American College of Rheumatology fall conference.

Context: Rheumatologists at Mayo Clinic provide state-of-the-art diagnosis and treatment for diseases that affect the body's connective tissue. Physicians in the specialty see nearly 20,000 patients each year.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

TODAY Show
Difference Between Headaches and Migraines

Cindy McCain, who has suffered from migraines for more than 20 years, launched the 36 Million Migraine Campaign on TODAY Thursday, an effort by the American Migraine Foundation to raise $1 for each of the 36 million American migraine sufferers. Dr. David Dodick, Mayo Clinic Arizona appears on the show.

Reach: The TODAY Show reaches an average daily audience of 5.5 million viewers.

Context: Cindy McCain has teamed up with the American Migraine Foundation (AMF) to launch a major national program to help millions of Americans who suffer with this disorder. McCain, who went public with her own struggle with migraines four years ago, is seeking to mobilize public attention to increase our nation’s research investment in migraine and raise public visibility for the condition.  David Dodick, M.D. is a neurologist and director of Mayo Clinic in Arizona’s Comprehensive Concussion Program. Dr. Dodick's research focuses on prevention and treatment for migraine and cluster headaches.

News Release: Cindy McCain and American Migraine Foundation

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

San Francisco Chronicle
Sleep may be impaired by devices' bright screens
by Kathryn Roethel

It may seem like the screens on your electronic devices consume your every waking hour. Now, new research indicates that, if you use smartphones and tablets before bed, they may be cutting into your sleep hours, too - or at least delaying them. New research from the Mayo Clinic shows that smartphones and tablets set at their brightest settings and held very close to the face emit enough light to suppress the body's production of melatonin, a hormone the brain releases when lighting is dark or dim.

Reach: The San Francisco Chronicle is the largest newspaper in Northern California with a daily circulation of more than 212,000 and is the second largest on the West Coast. Its website has more than 3.1 million unique visitors each month. The San Francisco Chronicle is owned by Heart Corporation which owns 15 daily newspapers.

Previous Coverage in June 7, 2013 Weekly News Highlights

Context: Smartphones and tablets can make for sleep-disrupting bedfellows. One cause is believed to be the bright light-emitting diodes that allow the use of mobile devices in dimly lit rooms; the light exposure can interfere with melatonin, a hormone that helps control the natural sleep-wake cycle. But there may be a way to check your mobile device in bed and still get a good night’s sleep. A Mayo Clinic study suggests that dimming the smartphone or tablet brightness settings and holding the device at least 14 inches from your face while using it will reduce its potential to interfere with melatonin and impede sleep. “In the old days people would go to bed and read a book. Well, much more commonly people go to bed and they have their tablet on which they read a book or they read a newspaper or they’re looking at material. The problem is it’s a lit device, and how problematic is the light source from the mobile device?” says co-author Lois Krahn, M.D., a psychiatrist and sleep expert at Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz.

News Release: Are Smartphones Disrupting Your Sleep? Mayo Clinic Study Examines the Question

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

KTAR
Phoenix's Mayo Clinic reaches construction milestone
by Aaron Granillo

One of the country's top cancer research centers is one step closer to opening a cutting-edge treatment facility in Phoenix. On Thursday construction crews put the final steel beam into place, where the Mayo Clinic will operate with proton- beam therapy. "It's a $182 million investment in a laserlike beam of matter," said Dr. Wyatt Decker, CEO of Mayo Clinic Arizona. "Protons go deep into the human body, release very little energy until they hit their target, then they release a burst of energy that kills tumor cells."

Reach: KTAR-FM 92.3 is a commercial News/Sports/Talk station in the Phoenix, Ariz. area. Its signal reaches parts of California and Nevada.

Additional Coverage: ABC15

Context: On June 27, the last piece of steel went into place onto the newest building on Mayo Clinic's Phoenix campus — a building that will be the future Arizona home to Mayo Clinic's Cancer Center and the first proton beam therapy facility of its kind in the Southwest. The new Cancer Center will begin to be occupied in early 2015, with proton beam therapy expected to begin by 2016. Mayo Clinic's proton beam therapy program will be the first of its kind in the Southwest.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Cancer Center Topping off Ceremony

Public Affairs Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

To unsubscribe: To remove your name from the global distribution list, send an email to Emily Blahnik with the subject: UNSUBSCRIBE from Mayo Clinic in the News.

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Tags: ABC15, Amarillo.com, American College of Rheumatology, American Migraine Foundattion, American News Report, antibiotics, antidepressants, Before It’s News, BET, Big News Network, Black Christian News, Blogs.MarketWatch.com


April 1st, 2013

What do you know about ear infections? Take a quiz and find out

By Logan Lafferty loganlafferty

There is nothing worse than hearing your child cry in pain with an ear infection and wanting to do everything to help them. Oftentimes that means demanding antibiotics from your nurse practitioner, physician assistant or pediatrician. At the same time, the CDC, American Academy of Pediatrics, the World Health Organization and major news organizations have given considerable attention to concern about antibiotic-resistant bugs, otherwise known as superbugs.

 

NBC Latino by Dr. Joseph Sirven

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Tags: American Academy of Pediatrics, antibiotic-resistant bugs, antibiotics, CDC, ear infection, NBC Latino, superbugs, World Health Organization


June 12th, 2012

Most Don’t Need Antibiotics Before Dental Work

By

Recommendations restricting the use of antibiotic prophylaxis before invasive dental procedures to only a handful of patient groups did not appear to increase rates of infective endocarditis caused by viridans group streptococci, researchers found. Among 22 patients diagnosed with the infection over a 12-year period in Olmsted County, Minn., only three received the diagnosis after the restrictions were issued, according to Daniel DeSimone, MD, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and colleagues.

 

MedPage Today by Todd Neale

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Tags: antibiotics, Dr. Daniel DeSimone, infective endocarditis, invasive dental procedures, MedPage Today


June 12th, 2012

Most Don’t Need Antibiotics Before Dental Work

By

Recommendations restricting the use of antibiotic prophylaxis before invasive dental procedures to only a handful of patient groups did not appear to increase rates of infective endocarditis caused by viridans group streptococci, researchers found. Among 22 patients diagnosed with the infection over a 12-year period in Olmsted County, Minn., only three received the diagnosis after the restrictions were issued, according to Daniel DeSimone, MD, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and colleagues.

 

MedPage Today by Todd Neale

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Tags: antibiotics, Dr. Daniel DeSimone, endocarditis, invasive dental procedures, MedPage Today


May 10th, 2012

Probiotics May Prevent Diarrhea in Antibiotic-Takers, Study Suggests

By

It's no secret to people who take antibiotics that the drugs can wreak havoc on a person's stomach. A new study says taking probiotics, which can be found in supplements or in certain brands of yogurt, may provide an effective way to prevent diarrhea during an antibiotic regimen… According to the Mayo Clinic, probiotics have also been tied to treatment benefits for yeast infections, irritable bowel syndrome, eczema in children, and reduces the severity of colds and flu.

 

CBS News by Ryan Jaslow

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Tags: antibiotics, CBS News, probiotics


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