Items Tagged ‘anxiety’

February 24th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Associated Press
AP Exclusive: Twin tragedies give survivor a new face
by Sharon Cohen

He'd been waiting for this day, and when his doctor handed him the mirror, Andy Sandness stared at his image and absorbed the enormity of the moment: He had a new face, one that had belonged to another man. His father and his brother, joined by several doctors and nurses at MayoAssociated Press Wire Service Logo Clinic, watched as he studied his swollen features. He was just starting to heal from one of the rarest surgeries in the world — a face transplant, the first at the medical center. He had the nose, cheeks, mouth, lips, jaw, chin, even the teeth of his donor. Resting in his hospital bed, he still couldn't speak clearly, but he had something to say. He scrawled four words in a spiral notebook: "Far exceeded my expectations," he wrote, handing it to Dr. Samir Mardini, who read the message to the group.

Reach: The Associated Press is a not-for-profit news cooperative, owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members. News collected by the AP is published and republished by newspaper and broadcast outlets worldwide.

Additional coverage: New York Times, STAT, Washington Post, USA TODAY, CBS Minnesota, KSTP, Louis Post-Dispatch, ABC News, MSN, NWF Daily News, AP Big Story, Stamford Advocate, Medical Xpress, CTV News, WTOP, Evening Standard, DailyMail.com, Olean Times Herald, Evening Standard, TribLivePeople, News-medical.net, Morning Ticker, KARE 11, WCCO, The West Australian, KAAL, Star Tribune, Mirror UK, BBC,CBC, US Magazine, GoMN, Chicago Tribune, KGWN, FOX News, Arizona Republic, Pioneer Press, Latinos Health, Science Alert, iTech Post, The Columbian, Eau Claire Leader-Telegram, Knoxville News Sentinel, BABW News, Canada Journal, Jackson Hole News & Guide, Counsel & HealBecker’s Hospital Review, New York Post, Herald-Whig, Sky News, Business Insider, com.au, Metro UK, UPI.com, Yahoo! Australia, The Inquisitr, WDEF, Deccan Herald, Aurora Sentinel, KRNV, Rapid City Journal, WNYT, Cortez Journal, Daily Star, Metro UK, Tri-City Herald, Tech Times, India.com, WQOW, Gephardt Daily, Hindustan Times, Pulse Headlines, KBMT, Sumter Item, ABC13 Houston, FuturismStar TribuneNew York Times, RedOrbit, Catholic Online, NBC 6 South Florida, The HitavadaBecker’s Hospital Review, NBC ChicagoTCT magazine

Context:  A multidisciplinary team of surgeons, physicians and other health professionals recently completed a near-total face transplant on a Wyoming man on Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus. The extensive, life-changing surgery will improve the patient’s ability to chew, swallow, speak, breathe and smell. The recipient, Andrew Sandness, is a 32-year-old man from eastern Wyoming whose face was devastated by a gunshot wound at the age of 21. He is doing well. “I am absolutely amazed at the outcome so far,” says Sandness. “I am now able to chew and eat normal food, and the nerve sensation is slowly improving, too. My confidence has improved, and I’m feeling great ― and grateful. I am so thankful to my donor and the donor’s family, and to all of the people who have supported me throughout this process.” For more information on the face transplant, the following segments are available on Mayo Clinic News Network:

Mayo Clinic announces successful face transplant on Wyoming man

Mayo Clinic Radio: Face transplant — how the surgical team prepared

Transforming a life: Mayo Clinic announces its first face transplant

Contact:  Ginger Plumbo

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo researcher Abba Zubai is sending stem cells for study on the International Space Station
by Charlie Patton

As a boy growing up in Nigeria, Abba Zubair dreamed of becoming an astronaut. But as he prepared to apply to college, an advisor told him to Florida Times-Union newspaper logofind a different path. “He said it may be a long time before Nigeria sends rockets and astronauts into space, so I should consider something more practical,” Zubair saud. He decided to become a physician, and is currently the medical and scientific director of the Cell Therapy Laboratory at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. And while he’ll almost certainly never get to make a journey outside the Earth’s atmosphere himself, if the weather stays good Saturday he’ll be sending a payload into space.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage: Action News Jax, Augustine Record, KTIV, Spaceflight Now, KTTCTechnology Networks

Context: Consider it one physician’s giant leap for mankind. Today, the latest rocket launch from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, included a payload of several samples of donated adult stem cells from a research laboratory at Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus. The launch by SpaceX, an American aerospace manufacturer and space transport services company, is part of NASA’s commercial resupply missions to the International Space Station. The biological cells come from the laboratory of Abba Zubair, M.D., Ph.D., who says he has eagerly awaited the launch following several delays over the past couple of years. Dr. Zubair, who specializes in cellular treatments for disease and regenerative medicine, hopes to find out how the stem cells hold up in space. He says he’s eager to know whether these special cells, which are derived from the body’s bone marrow, can be more quickly mass-produced in microgravity and used to treat strokes. Microgravity is the condition in which people or objects appear to be weightless. The effects of microgravity can be seen when astronauts and objects float in space. Microgravity refers to the condition where gravity seems to be very small. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Kevin Punsky

 

USA Today
Can't sleep? When is it time to seek professional help
by Mary Bowerman

It’s no secret that Americans aren’t getting enough sleep. For those who are self-medicating or tossing and turning, it may be time to look at your sleeping habits once and for all, according to Timothy Morgenthaler, co-director of Mayo’s Center for Sleep Medicine in Rochester. "I think it'sUSA Today newspaper logo becoming increasingly clear that sleep is a vital component of health; for many years we've been aware of nutrition and exercise, and I think we now realize that sleep is very closely entwined with overall health," Morgenthaler said.

Reach: USA TODAY  has an average daily circulation of 4.1 million which includes print, various digital editions and other papers that use their branded content.

Context: Timothy Morgenthaler, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine physician who also practices in Mayo Clinic's Center for Sleep Medicine.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

KARE 11
Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup
by Pat Evans

New findings about America’s heart health awareness, opinions, and behaviors have been uncovered as part of the Mayo Clinic National Health KARE-11 LogoCheckup, which first launched in January 2016 and provides a quick pulse on consumer health opinions and behaviors at multiple times throughout the year. “The Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup helps us to better understand the health knowledge and practices of all Americans, beyond the patients that walk through our doors,” says John Wald, M.D., Medical Director for Public Affairs at Mayo Clinic.

Reach: KARE-TV is the NBC affiliate serving the Minneapolis-Saint Paul market.

Additional coverage: KGUN TucsonCNBCKAALKXLY Spokane

Context: A new survey by Mayo Clinic revealed that more than two-thirds of African-Americans are concerned about their heart health (71 percent), which is significantly more than Caucasian (41 percent) or Hispanic (37 percent) respondents. Respondents from the South (51 percent) were also significantly more likely to express concern than those in the Northeast (39 percent) or West (35 percent). These findings were uncovered as part of the Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup, which first launched in January 2016 and provides a quick pulse on consumer health opinions and behaviors at multiple times throughout the year. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

FOX 13 Tampa Bay
Vaccine could prevent breast, ovarian, lung cancer
by Dr. Joette Giovinco

It's a dream many parents would welcome for their children: a vaccine that could prevent breast, ovarian and some lung cancers. It'Fox 13 Tampa Bay Logos also the dream of immunology professor Dr. Keith Knutson. "The hope is we can develop vaccines before the development of cancer much in the way that we use a polio vaccine or a flu vaccine," Dr. Knutson tells us in in his Mayo Clinic Jacksonville laboratory.

Reach:  Fox 13 is the Fox affiliate in Tampa Bay, Florida.

Context: Researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have been awarded a $13.3 million, five-year federal grant to test a vaccine designed to prevent the recurrence of triple-negative breast cancer, a subset of breast cancer for which there are no targeted therapies. The grant, the Breakthrough Award from the U.S. Department of Defense’s Breast Cancer Research Program, will fund a national, phase II clinical trial testing the ability of a folate receptor alpha vaccine to prevent recurrence of this aggressive cancer following initial treatment. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Knutson, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

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Tags: AAN, ABC News, ABC13 Houston, acupuncture, Alain Elkann, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimers, Ambient Clinical, Andy Sandness, anxiety, AP Big Story, Arizona Republic


January 6th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik


Reuters

‘Hidden’ celiac disease less common now in U.S.
by Shereen Lehman

Fewer people in the U.S. have celiac disease without realizing it, a new study finds. The actual proportion of people with celiac disease in the United States has not changed since 2009, researchers say. “The total prevalence is stable,” Dr. Joseph Murray told Reuters Health in a phone interview. But there are fewer people walking around with “hidden” celiac disease. “When you look at the proportion that are diagnosedReuters Logo versus undiagnosed, that's gone up dramatically. Go back six years and most patients were undiagnosed, with only about one in five getting diagnosed,” said Murray, a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota who was part of the study team.

Reach: Reuters has 196 editorial bureaus in 130 countries and 2,400 editorial staff members and covers international news, regional news, politics, social issues, health, business, sports and media.

Context: Joseph Murray, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist. Dr. Murray's research interests focus in two distinct areas: celiac disease and esophageal disorders. To learn more about celiac disease, check out this Mayo Clinic radio interview with Dr. Murray.

Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Joe Dangor

 

Today.com
The real brain food could be fresh veggies and olive oil, study finds
by Maggie Fox

People got points for light to moderate drinking — in this case about a third of drink a day to no more than three drinks a day on average for men and two for women. Dr. David Knopman, a professor of neurology TODAY Showat the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota who was not involved in the study, said this could translate to real-life benefits. “Loss of brain volume is an inevitable part of the aging process,” Knopman told NBC News. “A bigger brain is in general better for you because at least in late life, it makes a person more resistant to the effects of brain diseases,” he added.

Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show.

Context: David Knopman, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist.  Dr. Knopman is involved in research in late-life cognitive disorders, such as mild cognitive impairment and dementia. Dr. Knopman's specific interests are in the very early stages of Alzheimer's disease, in cognitive impairment due to stroke (cerebrovascular disease) and in cognitive impairment due to frontotemporal degeneration.

Contacts: Susan Barber Lindquist, Traci Klein

 

Post-Bulletin
Brewer has FAITH in Rochester
by Brett Boese

When Mayo Clinic Dr. LaPrincess Brewer took the stage last month in Charlotte, N.C., Jackie Johnson couldn't help beaming with pride. Johnson, a vocal advocate within Rochester's Black community, hasn't stopped singing Brewer's praises as the Brewer's success has resonated across the country, even as it flies under the radar locally. Brewer's FAITH program, an acronym for Fostering African-AmericanLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaper Improvement in Total Health, was among the featured attractions at the 28th annual Healthy Churches 2020 National Conference that was held in her hometown. Its initial success in Baltimore and the ensuing impact in Minnesota since Brewer arrived at Mayo in 2013 has prompted significant accolades for the charismatic 35-year-old cardiologist.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context: LaPrincess Brewer, M.D., M.P.H., has a primary research focus in developing strategies to reduce and ultimately eliminate cardiovascular disease health disparities in racial and ethnic minority populations and in underserved communities through health promotion and community-based participatory research. Dr. Brewer also has special interest in increasing minority and women's participation in cardiovascular clinical trials through mobile health (mHealth) interventions. Additionally, she has published work on faith-based interventions for cardiovascular disease prevention, racial differences in weight maintenance and psychosocial factors influencing cardiac risk factors.

Contact: Ethan Grove

 

ABC News
US News and World Report Releases List of Best Diets
by Gillian Mohney

Every year many Americans make a New Year's resolution to lose weight, but finding ways to drop pounds and keep them off is difficult. Today, U.S. News and World Report released its annual list of the best diets, ABC News logoaccording to nutrition and medical experts. The diets were chosen by a panel of nutritionists, dietary consultants, physicians and other experts convened by U.S News and World Report. Mayo Clinic Diet: This diet is broken into two parts. The first part requires no calorie counting, but dieters are stuck with meals made up of healthy foods including whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and healthy fats, as well as at least 30 minutes of physical activity a day.

Reach: ABC News Online has more than 28.8 million unique visitors to its site each month. ABC’s World News Tonight with David Muir averages about 9.2 million viewers each night.

Additional coverage:
HealthDay, Plant-Based Diets Score Big for Healthy Weight Loss
WATE6 Knoxville, U.S. News and World Report ranks top diets
FOX News, US News ranks best diet plans for 2017
Atlanta Journal-ConstitutionWant to lose weight? Experts say these are the best diets of 2017
FOX4 Dallas, Lose weight faster by tracking habits

Context:  As the second edition of The Mayo Clinic Diet hits store shelves, the diet plan has been named Best Commercial Diet by U.S. News & World Report.  “We are honored to be recognized for a weight-loss method that offers lasting results,” says Donald Hensrud, M.D., medical editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet and director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. Learn more about the Mayo Clinic by watching this Mayo Clinic Minute or read more about it on Mayo Clinic Network. “The Mayo Clinic Diet is much more than a diet,” Dr. Hensrud says. “It’s a lifestyle program in which people can eat great-tasting food and feel better right away ─ even while they lose weight. More importantly, these lifestyle changes are sustainable and can improve long-term health as people reach and maintain a healthy weight.”

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

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Tags: ABC News, Affordable care act, Albert Lea Tribune, alternative medicine, anxiety, arthritis, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Attn:, Baltimore Sun, Becker’s Hospital Review, Beloit Daily News, Billings Gazette


March 7th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80 Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Steamboat Today
Yampa Valley Medical Center announces new partnership with the Mayo Clinic

...Yampa Valley Medical Center has announced a new partnership with the Mayo Clinic that will give physicians here the ability to consult with thousands of the clinic's specialists across the country. "We couldn't be more proud to have this relationship with this organization," hospital CEOSteamboat Today newspaper logo Frank May said Wednesday morning in a packed conference room as he was flanked by the Mayo Clinic's vice president and medical director. "This elevates our game."

Reach: Steamboat Today is a daily newspaper serving Steamboat Springs and the surrounding areas in Routt County, Colo. with a circulation of 7,000. Its website receive more than 30,500 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Post BulletinHeard on the Street: Mayo Clinic adds Colorado health-care provider as new member

Context: Mayo Clinic and Yampa Valley Medical Center officials announced this week that the Steamboat Springs hospital is the newest member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. The network connects Mayo Clinic and health care providers who are interested in working together to enhance the delivery of locally provided high quality health care. Yampa Valley Medical Center is the second hospital in Colorado to be invited to join the network. More information about the announcement can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

Wall Street Journal
The Debate Over Juice Cleanses and Toxin Removal
by Melinda Beck

…Consuming more vegetables is great, mainstream doctors and nutritionists agree. But they dismiss the detox claims as a confusing jumble of The Wall Street Journal newspaper logoscience, pseudoscience and hype. They argue that humans already have a highly efficient system for filtering out most harmful substances—the liver, kidneys and colon..."Nobody has ever been able to tell me what these toxins are," says Donald Hensrud, an internist and nutrition specialist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Donald Hensrud, M.D., is Chair, Mayo Clinic Preventive, Occupational and Aerospace Medicine in Minnesota. Dr. Hensrud's research focuses on obesity, nutrition and disease prevention, physical activity and health promotion, and clinical preventive medicine.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob Nellis, Traci Klein

 

Philadelphia Inquirer
Getting Teeth Pulled Before Heart Surgery May Pose Serious Risks

If you're a heart patient, you might be wise to wait to have any infected teeth pulled if you're about to have cardiac surgery, a new study suggests. Philadelphia InquirerIn a small, retrospective study, Mayo Clinic researchers found that 8 percent of heart patients who did not wait to have teeth pulled suffered major adverse health outcomes, such as a heart attack, stroke, kidney failure or death.

Circulation: The Philadelphia Inquirer has a daily circulation of more than 350,000 readers. Philadelphia Inquirer - Online has more than 1.7 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional coverage: Winnipeg Free PressNewsMedical.NetNew Jersey HeraldMyFoxTampaBayHealthYahoo!.netUPI.comKEYC (Mankato)Tech Times, State ColumnMedical ResearchYahoo! Health, NIH Medline Plus, MSN.com, ScienceDaily, CBSAtlanta.com, WDAM.com (Mississippi), KNOE.com (Louisiana), MyFoxDFW (Dallas based in Las Vegas), MyFoxNewYork, HawaiiNewsNow 

Previous Coverage in Feb. 28, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: To pull or not to pull? That is a common question when patients have the potentially dangerous combination of abscessed or infected teeth and the need for heart surgery.  In such cases, problem teeth often are removed before surgery, to reduce the risk of infections including endocarditis, an infection of the inner lining of the heart that can prove deadly.  But Mayo Clinic research suggests it may not be as simple as pulling teeth: The study found that roughly 1 in 10 heart surgery patients who had troublesome teeth extracted before surgery died or had adverse outcomes such as a stroke or kidney failure. The findings are published in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Pulling Problem Teeth Before Heart Surgery to Prevent Infection May Be Catch-22

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

FOX9
INVESTIGATORS: Radiation and records

…Former Airman Nathan Edward Morris must run a medical drill once every four months. Blood is drawn, an MRI is taken and the oncologist My Fox KMSP TCwill read the results Morris believes can be linked back to what might be called friendly fire from 11 years ago…Morris's tumor is so invasive that only a surgeon at the Mayo Clinic was willing to operate on it last July…Doctors believe they were able to cut most of the cancer out…Morris finds himself back at Mayo Clinic so often. The system of sashaying patients from appointment to appointment is incredibly slick and is specifically designed so the sick don't have to wait for days to get results -- but every minute spent waiting is one that makes Morris "nervous."

Reach: Minneapolis-St.Paul is the 16th largest television market in the United States with 1.7 million TV homes. FOX 9 News (WFTC) typically has good viewership for its 9 p.m., newscast, but lags behind its competitors at 5, 6 and 10 p.m.

Follow-up story: FOX9, Airman gets brain tumor resolution

Context: Nathan Morris is a patient of Mayo Clinic oncologist and neurologist Derek Johnson, M.D.  Dr. Johnson's research is part of Mayo's Neuro-Oncology Program. The goal of the Neuro-Oncology Program of the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center is to identify prevention and treatment strategies that improve the survival and quality of life for patients with primary brain tumors.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

 

KTTC
Small business start-ups finding success in Rochester
by Devin Bartolotta

The Rochester Area Economic Development, Inc. (RAEDI) held its annual meeting Thursday. It was all about the future of Rochester. "Growing the companies that are from here and want to stay here, you have the opportunity to create a new legacy," said Peter Barth, keynote speaker atKTTC today's meeting…"I think it's going to be a really positive change. Rochester, until now, has been dominated by a single industry or maybe two. And I think having these small satellite industries build up around Mayo Clinic will be really healthy," said Dr. Russell.

Reach: KTTC is an NBC affiliate that serves the Rochester, Minn. area including the towns of Austin, Mason City, Albert Lea and Winona. Its website receives more than 73,300 unique visitors each month.

Context: RAEDI's primary goal is to attract, retain and assist the growth/expansion of base business within the Rochester Area. Mayo Clinic Business Accelerator provides infrastructure that enables entrepreneurism for the Rochester community.   Founded by RAEDI, City of Rochester, Mayo Clinic Treasury Services and Mayo Clinic Ventures, the Mayo Clinic Business Accelerator provides collaborative space for new companies, venture capital firms and entrepreneurs.

Public Affairs Contact: Brian Kilen

 

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Tags: : KING 5 Wash., ABC News, acne, advisory board, Aftonbladet, Alice Echo News Journal, All Access, allParenting, Altoona Herald, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, anxiety


February 28th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

LA Times
Bit by bit, a more fit workplace
by Rene Lynch

Nearly all of us need to make more time for fitness. Finding that time, though, can seem impossible. But what if you could wedge that workout in at work? If it sounds far-fetched (or a great way to get yourself fired), listen up. Dr. James Levine, an obesity expert at theLogo for Los Angeles Times newspaper Mayo Clinic, says Americans don't need to log more time at a gym. Instead, they need to banish their sedentary ways by incorporating easy bursts of activity from dawn to dusk.

Reach: The Los Angeles Times has a daily readership of 1.9 million and 2.9 million on Sunday, more than 8 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.5 million. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 128 years.

Related coverage:

ABC NewsABC NewsFitness Trackers Get Stylish, But Accuracy May Need Work, Experts Say by Liz Neporent…To think it all started with a pair of "magic underwear." Dr. James Levine, a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona, studies the relationship between movement performed outside the gym and obesity. About a decade ago, he rigged up an undergarment with sensors designed to catch the body's every little shift in movement.

ABC NewsABC News Radio, Fitness Trackers Get Stylish, but Accuracy May Need Work, Activity trackers -- wearable devices that count steps and measure calorie burn -- are going through a boom. Sales of the devices last year topped $330 million, according the market research group NPD, and consumers have more than two dozen brands and styles to choose from, including shoe chips, bracelets, anklets, pendants and clip-ons…Dr. James Levine, a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona, studies the relationship between movement performed outside the gym and obesity. Additional coverage: Good Morning America

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob Nellis, Jim McVeigh

HealthDay
Getting Teeth Pulled Before Heart Surgery May Pose Serious Risks
by Randy Dotinga

…In a small, retrospective study, Mayo Clinic researchers found that 8 percent of heart patients who did not wait to have teeth pulled suffered major adverse health outcomes, such as a heart attack, stroke, kidney failure or death. "Guidelines from the American College of Health DayCardiology and American Heart Association label dental extraction as a minor procedure, with the risk of death or non-fatal heart attack estimated to be less than 1 percent," study co-author Dr. Mark Smith said in a statement. Additional coverage:  KSAZ Ariz.US News & World ReportFOX NewsMedicineNet.comForbes.comWMCTV.comFox5Vegas.com19ActionNews.comWDAM.comHHS HealthFinder.gov

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: To pull or not to pull? That is a common question when patients have the potentially dangerous combination of abscessed or infected teeth and the need for heart surgery.  In such cases, problem teeth often are removed before surgery, to reduce the risk of infections including endocarditis, an infection of the inner lining of the heart that can prove deadly.  But Mayo Clinic research suggests it may not be as simple as pulling teeth: The study found that roughly 1 in 10 heart surgery patients who had troublesome teeth extracted before surgery died or had adverse outcomes such as a stroke or kidney failure. The findings are published in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Pulling Problem Teeth Before Heart Surgery to Prevent Infection May Be Catch-22

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic had strong 2013 despite challenges
by Jeff Kiger
Despite the uncertainty of the health-care market, Mayo Clinic revenues grew by 6 percent to $9.4 billion in 2013. CEO and President John Noseworthy and Chief Administration OfficerLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaper Jeff Bolton discussed highlights of Mayo Clinic's 2013 financial results Wednesday during a brief telephone press conference.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Additional coverage: Star Tribune, Net income up 55 percent at Mayo Clinic for 2013; KTTC, Star Tribune (PDF), FOX47, Post-Bulletin, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal

Context: As Mayo Clinic recognizes its Sesquicentennial year, the not-for-profit organization reached a record 63 million people in 2013. The strong performance was bolstered by successful implementation of new care delivery models — such as the Mayo Clinic Care Network — that provide knowledge to patients, physicians and consumers in traditional and new ways. “Expanding our reach is not a new goal for us,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. “In fact, as we consider our history, growth has been a constant for 150 years.”

Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic Reports Strong Performance in 2013, Reaching More Than 63 Million People

Public Affairs Contacts: Karl Oestreich, Bryan Anderson

Harvard Business Review
How Mayo Clinic Is Using iPads to Empower Patients
by David Cook, Joseph Dearani

Throughout the world, companies are embracing mobile devices to set customer expectations, enlist them in satisfying their own needs, Harvard Business Review Logoand get workers to adhere to best practices. An effort under way at the Mayo Clinic shows how such technology can be used to improve outcomes and lower costs in health care.

Reach: Harvard Business Review – Online provides editorial content designed to complement the coverage found in its parent print publication, which focuses on business management. The site receives more than 232,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: David Cook, M.D., Mayo Clinic General Internal Medicine, conducts research in medical education. Joseph Dearani, M.D. is chair of Cardiovascular Surgery, Minnesota.

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Tags: : ABC News Radio, 19ActionNews.com, 2013 Mayo Clinic Performance Report, 26.2 with Donna, AAN, ABC News, AD and aging, Advance for Nurses, African-American, African-American pioneers, African-Americans, alcohol


May 31st, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

 

 

May 31, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

US News & World Report
What to Know Before You Glow
by Rachel Pomerance

It's officially summer. You want to get your glow on, but you know better than to do it the old-fashioned way. In case you missed the memo, tanning is bad for you. Sure, the rays get you vitamin D. But so does milk. Even a so-called "baseline tan" is not OK, says Jerry Brewer, chair of dermatologic surgery at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Plain and simple: Tanned skin equals DNA damage, he says. "Asking what's a safe amount of tan is kind of like asking how much cyanide do you want in your breakfast."

Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional Coverage:
KMSP FOX9
Sun Smart Campaign
KAAL
National Don’t Fry Day - Sun Safety Awareness

Previous Coverage

Context: Have fun in the sun, but be sun smart. That’s the message two cartoon-style moles deliver to kids of all ages in new public service announcements released by Mayo Clinic as part of Skin Cancer Awareness Month in May. Melanoma is on the rise, particularly among teens and young adults. It can be deadly. In the public service messages, available for use on television, radio, online and other platforms, two moles — animal moles, that is — illustrate the importance of four, key skin cancer prevention and early detection tips…

YouTube: Mayo Clinic: Have Fun in the Sun, But Be Sun Smart – Skin Cancer Prevention PSA

News Release: Have Fun in the Sun, But Be Sun Smart

News Release: Mayo Clinic: Melanoma Up to 2.5 Times Likelier to Strike Transplant, Lymphoma Patients

News Release: Mayo Clinic Study Finds Dramatic Rise in Skin Cancer in Young Adults

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Nick Hanson

KSTP
Mayo Clinic Experts Work with Schools to Fight Obesity
by Scott Theisen

The state health department says obesity is one of its most serious concerns in Minnesota. Twenty-five percent of adults are obese, and for kids 2 to 5 years old, 13 percent are obese; more are overweight… Mayo Clinic Dr. Esther Krych and colleagues developed the BMI screening material. They want to identify kids whose BMI is too high and educate parents. "Our goal is to try to stop the problem before it starts, and that's really prevention," Krych said.  

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Context: There's a serious obesity epidemic in the United States and it's a growing concern when it comes to children. Being overweight or obese as a child puts you at greater risk of being overweight as an adult and increases the risk of heart disease and diabetes. So, experts at Mayo Clinic are exploring ways to help prevent childhood obesity. One project has Mayo teaming up with school districts to add body mass index (BMI) screening to the standard kindergarten screening.  Esther Krych, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic pediatrician.

Public Affairs Contact: Dana Sparks

Star Tribune
As May fades to gray, we’re kind of blue
By Bill McAuliffe

It might be the end of May, but at one St. Paul tanning parlor, wintry blues are knocking on the door. “The ones that tan normally in the winter, they’re coming back,” said Chris Frank, owner of Perfect Tan in the Merriam Park neighborhood, where the gray May has helped boost business by 20 percent over last year. “They want that vitamin D. They’re saying they thought the longer days would help, but they’re really dragging.’’…The conditions aren’t quite enough to trigger seasonal affective disorder, a chronic condition tied to the short days and long nights of winter, said Dr. Katherine M. Moore, a psychiatrist in the Mayo Clinic’s Department of Psychiatry and Psychology. But the disappointments and the altered routines that have come with the cool and wet May have certainly been enough to make people feel, well, gloomy.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277.

Context: Katherine Moore, M.D., is a psychiatrist in the Mayo Clinic’s Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, which is one of the largest psychiatric treatment groups in the United States. Highly skilled specialists provide expert care to adults, teenagers and children who have mental, addictive and emotional disorders.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Chicago Health
Growing Up with Tragedies

Terribly violent storms, like the one witnessed in Oklahoma this week, can leave lasting damages much more permanent than a shredded earth. This is especially so for children. Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health problem in kids and adults. Mayo Clinic Children’s Center anxiety prevention expert and psychologist Stephen Whiteside, Ph.D., offers tips to help conquer weather-related fears.

Reach: Chicago Health: Top Doctors & Hospitals offers expert insight into modern healthcare and lifestyle, the best practices and treatments, and more through engaging editorial and professional profiles. It is a resource for Chicagoans to advocate for their own care and an opportunity for medical institutions and practitioners at the apex of their field to educate the public. Chicago Health: Top Doctors & Hospitals is published by Northwest Publishing, LLC, a Chicago based media company.

Previous Coverage

Context: Violent storms — often accompanied by lightning, thunder, heavy rain, powerful winds and even tornado warnings — can be stressful for anyone, but severe weather can trigger much more severe anxiety, especially among children. Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health problem in kids and adults. Mayo Clinic Children’s Center anxiety prevention expert and psychologist Stephen Whiteside, Ph.D., offers tips to help conquer weather-related fears.

News Release: Thunderphobia: Mayo Experts Offer Tips to Help Children Conquer Severe Weather Fears

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Twin Cities Business Magazine
Mayo Clinic to Build Sports Medicine Center
by Rebecca Omastiak

Mayo Clinic announced Tuesday that it plans to build a 22,000-square-foot sports medicine center to meet the demands for its growing sports medicine and rehabilitation practice. The Sports Medicine Center aims to provide both sports rehabilitation and training equipment and facilities and is part of the 100,000-square-foot, four-floor, Mayo Clinic Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center building project… “Mayo Clinic is able to serve athletes of all levels in a multidisciplinary environment that can manage the entirety of our patients’ needs,” Edward Laskowski, Mayo’s Sports Medicine Center co-director, said in a statement.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Additional Coverage:
Pioneer Press
Rochester: Mayo to double up on sports medicine

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic hopes to triple Sports Medicine Center numbers

MPR, KELOland S.D., Argus Leader S.D., KSTP, KARE 11, KTTC, BringMeTheNews, News Medical, FOX47, KAAL, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal, News Medical , Post-Bulletin

Context:
Mayo Clinic announced this week an expansion to its sports medicine practice to meet the growing regional, national and international demand for its expertise. The expansion is part of the 100,000-square-foot Mayo Clinic Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center building project, and is scheduled to open in spring of 2014. The Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center is a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Planning Major Sports Medicine Center Expansion

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

Green Bay Press-Gazette
Unusual medical condition gives Abe, his parents tough start to new
life by Peter Srubas

Baby Abe’s sucking and breathing skills still aren’t what they should be, but the little guy once known as “the big boy of the NIC unit” at Mayo Clinic is giving every indication he’s eventually going to have a normal life, his doctor says. Abe, son of Emma and Mike Slowinski of De Pere, was born Feb. 11 and already has been through three major surgeries, thanks to an uncommon ailment called a congenital diaphragmatic hernia — that is, due to a flaw in his diaphragm, his stomach and intestines were up in his chest, shoving his heart to the wrong side and interfering with his lung development…“It happens in about one in every 3,000 births,” said Dr. Chris Colby, a neonatologist at Mayo Clinic’s Children’s Center in Rochester, Minn.

Reach: The Green Bay Press-Gazette is one of 10 daily newspapers within Gannett Wisconsin Media and has a daily circulation of more than 40,000 subscribers. Its web site attracts more than 337,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: Abraham Slowinski was born in Rochester after the family had received the diagnosis of him having an uncommon ailment called a congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Chris Colby, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neonatologist at Mayo Clinic’s Children’s Center.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

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Tags: Abe Slowinski, anxiety, Argus Leader S.D., baseline tan, BMI, body mass index, BringMeTheNews, Cancer, childhood obesity, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, DNA damage, Dr. Chris Colby


May 24th, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

 

 

May 24, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Star Tribune
Rochester, Mayo Clinic celebrate $585 million windfall from the state
By Jennifer Brooks

Minnesota came up with the money — more than half a billion dollars — and now Mayo Clinic is keeping its part of the bargain. It won’t be going anywhere anytime soon. “It’s a great day to be a Minnesotan, a great day to call Rochester our home,” Mayo CEO John Noseworthy told a cheering crowd Wednesday in Rochester. He was flanked by Gov. Mark Dayton and legislative leaders, all celebrating the herculean effort that went into ramming the $585 million Mayo legislation through the Legislature in a matter of months.

MPR
Mayo Clinic celebrates state funding approval, but questions remain on expansion details
by Elizabeth Baier

Mayo Clinic's proposed 20-year, $5 billion investment plan to make its flagship campus a "destination medical center" is closer to becoming reality.  The tax bill awaits Gov. Mark Dayton's signature to become law, but Mayo Clinic, local and state officials are celebrating the legislative victory, which commits $327 million in state aid for Rochester, Minn.  Amid the celebration, questions remain about how exactly the clinic plans to expand and how local taxpayers will contribute to the growth in Rochester.  Hundreds of Mayo employees, local and state officials, even former Vice President Walter Mondale filled the lobby of the Mayo Clinic building in Rochester Wednesday, to celebrate what Mayo and government officials say is the largest economic development initiative in Minnesota's history.

Additional DMC Celebration Coverage:
Star Tribune, KIMT, KAAL, KTTC, KARE 11, Post-Bulletin, MinnPost, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal,

Other Prominent DMC Coverage This Past Week:
Post-Bulletin
Our View: Norton defied odds, Senjem defied party for DMC

MPR
Dayton hails results of session

Pioneer Press
Lawmakers sign off on Mayo vision

Pioneer Press
Mayo Clinic expansion plan calls for $400 million in state infrastructure support

Additional DMC Coverage:
Sioux Falls Argus Leader, Post-Bulletin, The Republic Ind., Post-Bulletin, Pioneer Press, MPR, KAAL, Star Tribune, Finance & Commerce, Post-Bulletin, Star Tribune

Destination Medical Center Website

Public Affairs Contacts: Bryan Anderson, Karl Oestreich

WYMT
Pikeville Medical Center joins Mayo Clinic Care Network

A major announcement for healthcare in the mountains on Thursday. Pikeville Medical Center and Mayo Clinic officials announced a collaboration to connect doctors with Mayo Clinic specialists. The announcement made at a news conference is one that hospital President/CEO Walter E. May calls the most important announcement in the hospital's history… Dr. Stephen Lange with the Mayo Clinic Care Network explains, "Breakthrough research will be available right here in this community and less people will have to travel to get answers to their complex questions."

Reach: WYMT is a CBS affiliate in Lexington, KY. The station serves the east-central part of Kentucky. WKYT leads in total-day and late-night news ratings.

Additional Coverage: Kingsport Times News, Huntington Herald-Dispatch, Lexington Herald Leader, Lane Report, WSAZ, Kentucky.com, Appalachian News-Express

Post-Bulletin
'Humble anchorman' speaks at Mayo Clinic commencement
by Brett Boese

In some ways, Tom Brokaw's life came full circle Saturday morning in Rochester. In 1957, the self-described "whiz kid" visited the Med City to purchase the first suit of his life at Hanny's. He then left for New York to participate on a game show opposite South Dakota Gov. Joe Foss, a renowned fighter pilot during World War II. Brokaw returned to Rochester on Saturday, nattily dressed, as one of the most recognized figures across the globe. During a commencement ceremony at Mayo Civic Center, he became the first recipient of an honorary degree from the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine.

Circulation: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Additional Coverage on Tom Brokaw's Commencement Speech: NBC Nightly News (fast forward about 1.5 minutes), KARE 11, Post-Bulletin, KAAL, KTTC, San Francisco Chronicle, WCCO, Yankton Daily Press S.D., WXOW Eau Claire, The Republic Ind., Tampa Bay Tribune, Duluth News Tribune, FOX 47

Context: Tom Brokaw, internationally known special correspondent for NBC News, received the first-ever Mayo Clinic honorary degree — the Doctor of Letters (Hon.D.Litt.) — in recognition of his career as a distinguished journalist and best-selling author, his significant contributions to the preservation of history through the arts, and his dedication to public service and exemplary service to Mayo Clinic. The first conferment of an honorary degree (honoris causa) by Mayo Clinic and the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine occured during a joint commencement ceremony for the graduating classes of Mayo Graduate School and Mayo Medical School on Saturday, May 18. During the commencement ceremony, 67 physicians and scientists will receive degrees from Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. (In all, 84 physicians and scientists will receive degrees, including those who are not attending the ceremony.)

Mayo Clinic's College of Medicine educates medical and science professionals through five schools: Mayo Medical School, Mayo Graduate School, Mayo School of Health Sciences, Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education and Mayo School of Continuous Professional Development.

Mayo Medical School was established in 1972 and has more than 190 students currently enrolled in its four-year M.D. program. Mayo Graduate School was established in 1989 and grants Ph.D., M.D.-Ph.D., and master's degrees in 11 focus areas of biomedical research. The school has over 270 students.

News Release: Tom Brokaw to Receive Mayo Clinic's First-Ever Honorary Degree, Address Commencement

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic researchers seek tiny option against cancer
by Jeff Hansel

…But Mayo researchers say if they cut calcium uptake by the mitochondria, "sufficient cellular stress builds up, making the gold nanoparticles more effective in destroying cancer cells." "Everybody's dancing about with happiness about nanoparticles. But every nanoparticle isn't the same," said Dr. Y.S. Prakash, an anesthesiologist and physiologist at Mayo in Rochester. "Every kind of nanoparticle, whether it's made from gold, silver, titanium, carbon, each one behaves differently. Not only does each one behave differently, it behaves differently in different cell types."

Circulation: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Additional Coverage Relating to Gold Nanoparticles: BreakThrough Digest, HealthCanal, Science Daily, Medical Daily, Science Newsline, Physorg Nanowerk

Context: Positively charged gold nanoparticles are usually toxic to cells, but cancer cells somehow manage to avoid nanoparticle toxicity. Mayo Clinic researchers found out why and determined how to make the nanoparticles effective against ovarian cancer cells. The discovery is detailed in the current online issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

News Release: Mayo Clinic: How Gold Nanoparticles Can Help Fight Ovarian Cancer

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

WCCO
Good Question: How Do You Keep Fear Of Storms From Becoming A Phobia?
By Jason DeRusha

The skies turn gray. The lightning cracks. Thunder booms. For most of us, a fleeting moment of fear is as bad as it gets. “I was petrified of tornadoes. Would almost pass out when the sirens went off,” said Kathy Lauer on my Facebook page. “Even when there’s not a storm, [kids are] checking the weather, they’re feeling nervous if it gets overcast. That’s different,” said Dr. Steven Whiteside, a Mayo Clinic child psychologist who specializes in anxiety.

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

KMSP FOX Twin Cities
Tips for tackling 'thunderphobia' in children
by Lindsey LaBelle

Severe weather can trigger severe anxiety, especially in children, and the Mayo Clinic Children's Center is offering ways for parents to confront the subject for a stress-free storm season. Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health problem in kids, and they often take their weather-related fears with them to school, hindering their concentration, Children's Center anxiety prevention expert and psychologist Dr. Stephen Whiteside says.

Reach: FOX 9 News (WFTC) typically has good viewership for its 9 p.m., newscast, but lags behind its competitors at 5, 6 and 10 p.m. Minneapolis-St.Paul is the 16th largest television market in the United States with 1.7 million TV homes.  

Additional Coverage Relating to Storm Anxiety:
Health24, NBC News Pa., Hawaii News Now,  Doctors Lounge, News Medical, Newsday, HealthDay, KEYC Mankato, HealthNewsDigest

Context: Violent storms — often accompanied by lightning, thunder, heavy rain, powerful winds and even tornado warnings — can be stressful for anyone, but severe weather can trigger much more severe anxiety, especially among children. Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health problem in kids and adults. Mayo Clinic Children's Center anxiety prevention expert and psychologist Stephen Whiteside, Ph.D., offers tips to help conquer weather-related fears.

News Release: Thunderphobia: Mayo Experts Offer Tips to Help Children Conquer Severe Weather Fears

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

HealthDay
Study Links Coffee to Lower Risk for Rare Liver Disease
by Mary Dallas

Just a few extra cups of coffee each month might help prevent the development of an autoimmune liver disease known as primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), a new study suggests. Investigators from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., found that drinking coffee was associated with a reduced risk of developing the disease, which can lead to cirrhosis of the liver, liver failure and biliary cancer. This association, however, does not prove a cause-and-effect relationship. "While rare, PSC has extremely detrimental effects," Dr. Craig Lammert, an instructor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic, said in a news release from the Digestive Disease Week annual meeting in Orlando.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day.

Additional coverage: MedPage Today, Mirror UK, Business Standard, Philly.com, Big News Network, Science World Report, French Tribune, News-Medical, redOrbit, Healio, Health.com, Newsday, Winnipeg Free Press, Medical DailyRTT News, Voice of America, Wall Street Journal, CBS Atlanta, Utah Peoples Post, Pentagon Post, Science Recorder, Highlight Press, Headline and Global News, Barchester Health, UPI, KMSP FOX9, Health24

Context: Regular consumption of coffee is associated with a reduced risk of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), an autoimmune liver disease, Mayo Clinic research shows. The findings were being presented at the Digestive Disease Week 2013 conference in Orlando, Fla.

News Release: Consuming Coffee Linked to Lower Risk of Detrimental Liver Disease, Mayo Clinic Finds

Public Affairs Contact: Brian Kilen

WEAU Eau Claire
Camp Wabi

The Mayo Clinic Health System and YMCA are once again sponsoring Camp Wabi for kids struggling with weight issues. Dr. John Plewa, Mayo Clinic Health System pediatrician, and fifth-grader Lucas Winkler of Durand, talk about Camp Wabi.

Reach: WEAU-TV is the NBC affiliate for much of western Wisconsin, including Eau Claire and La Crosse. WEAU is licensed to Eau Claire and its transmitter is located in Fairchild, Wisc.

Context: Summer camp means fun and friends. One camp sponsored by Mayo Clinic Health System and the YMCA helps kids who struggle with their weight make better health choices. John Plewa, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic Health System pediatrician.

Public Affairs Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

To unsubscribe: To remove your name from the global distribution list, send an email to Emily Blahnik with the subject: UNSUBSCRIBE from Mayo Clinic in the News.

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Tags: American Liver Foundation, anxiety, Appalachian News-Express, Barchester Health, Big News Network, biliary cancer, BreakThrough Digest, Business Standard, Camp Wabi, cancer cells, CBS Atlanta, child psyschology


May 3rd, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

 

 

May 3, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

US News & World Report
Have Anxiety? There's an App for That
by Rachel Pomerance

Exposing new populations to mental health treatment provided the rationale for an app called Anxiety Coach, released last fall by the Mayo Clinic. Using the principles of cognitive behavioral therapy, the app guides users to face their fears and eventually become free of them. Select, for example, "talking in public," and the app provides a to-do list of activities to tackle, such as purposefully mispronouncing a word in conversation or complimenting a stranger. "You gradually face your fears and learn through your own experience it's unlikely to happen, and when things don't go well, you can handle it," says Stephen Whiteside, director of the Pediatric Anxiety Disorders Program at the Mayo Clinic and co-creator of Anxiety Coach.

Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional Coverage: Detroit Free Press

Previous Coverage from April 12 Weekly News Highlights

Context: Children who avoid situations they find scary are likely to have anxiety a Mayo Clinic study of more than 800 children ages 7 to 18 found. The study published this month in Behavior Therapy presents a new method of measuring avoidance behavior in young children. “This new approach may enable us to identify kids who are at risk for an anxiety disorder,” says lead author Stephen Whiteside, Ph.D., a pediatric psychologist with the Mayo Clinic Children’s Center. “And further, because cognitive behavior therapy focuses on decreasing avoidance behaviors, our approach may also provide a means to evaluate whether current treatment strategies work the way we think they do.”

News Release: Children Who Avoid Scary Situations Likelier to Have Anxiety, Mayo Clinic Research Finds

News Release: Mayo Clinic Debuts Anxiety Coach App for iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic study finds explanation for postmenopausal belly fat
by Allie Shah

Scientists have long known that lower estrogen levels after menopause can cause fat storage to shift from the hips and thighs to the abdomen. Now, a groundbreaking study, co-authored by the Mayo Clinic, has determined why: Proteins, revved up by the estrogen drop, cause fat cells to store more fat…Even though the research doesn’t provide weight-loss solutions, it may bring a sense of relief to millions of middle-aged women who have been fighting an often losing battle against the dreaded “post-meno belly.” “It doesn’t mean you’re absolutely doomed,” said Dr. Michael Jensen, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic and one of the study’s authors, “but it does mean it’s going to be harder, probably” to lose weight.

Circulation: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 514,457 copies and weekday circulation is 300,330. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional Coverage:  MedCity News (Star Tribune)

Context: People who are of normal weight but have fat concentrated in their bellies have a higher death risk than those who are obese, according to Mayo Clinic research presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress in Munich. Those studied who had a normal body mass index but central obesity — a high waist-to-hip ratio — had the highest cardiovascular death risk and the highest death risk from all causes, the analysis found. A news release highlighting the study is here. Michael Jensen, M.D., a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist, is one of the authors on the study.

Previous Coverage: CBS This Morning

Public Affairs Contacts: Nick Hanson, Traci Klein

HealthDay
General Anesthesia Not Linked to Raised Risk for Dementia

Despite previous concerns, older people who receive general anesthesia are not at greater risk of developing long-term dementia or Alzheimer's disease, a new study says.  The study, by researchers from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., involved 900 patients over the age of 45 who had dementia, a disease that affects brain functions such as memory, language, problem-solving and attention. All of the participants were residents of Olmsted County, Minn., from 1985 to 1994…"It's reassuring we're adding to the body of knowledge that there is not an association of anesthesia and surgery with Alzheimer's," study senior author Dr. David Warner, a pediatric anesthesiologist at the Mayo Clinic, said in a Mayo news release.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day.

Additional Coverage:
WCCO Radio
Mayo Study: No Link Between Anesthesia And Dementia

Philadelphia Inquirer, US News, Medical Daily, HealthCanal, Medical Xpress

Context: Elderly patients who receive anesthesia are no more likely to develop long-term dementia or Alzheimer's disease than other seniors, according to new Mayo Clinic research. The study analyzed thousands of patients using the Rochester Epidemiology Project — which allows researchers access to medical records of nearly all residents of Olmsted County, Minn. — and found that receiving general anesthesia for procedures after age 45 is not a risk factor for developing dementia. The findings were published Wednesday, May 1, online in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Researchers know that some elderly patients have problems with cognitive function for weeks, sometimes months, following surgical procedures, says senior author David Warner, M.D., a pediatric anesthesiologist at the Mayo Clinic Children's Center.

News Release: No Link Between Anesthesia, Dementia in Elderly, Mayo Clinic Study Finds

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson 

WEAU Eau Claire
New PSA stresses how to stay safe in the sun

After our long winter, we all deserve to get out and soak up the sun! But doctors say there is such a thing as too much sun. According the Centers for Disease Control, one person dies of Melanoma every hour in the U.S and a growing number of those people are under 30. That's why Mayo Clinic Health System started a new campaign today to warn people about the dangers of too much sun. “Have fun in the sun but be smart anyone can get skin cancer, even young people," were the words used in the Mayo Clinic Health System PSA.

Additional Coverage: KEYC Mankato, HealthCanal

Context: Have fun in the sun, but be sun smart. That's the message two cartoon-style moles deliver to kids of all ages in new public service announcements released by Mayo Clinic as part of Skin Cancer Awareness Month in May. Melanoma is on the rise, particularly among teens and young adults. It can be deadly. In the public service messages, available for use on television, radio, online and other platforms, two moles — animal moles, that is — illustrate the importance of four, key skin cancer prevention and early detection tips...

YouTube: Mayo Clinic: Have Fun in the Sun, But Be Sun Smart - Skin Cancer Prevention PSA

News Release: Have Fun in the Sun, But Be Sun Smart

News Release: Mayo Clinic: Melanoma Up to 2.5 Times Likelier to Strike Transplant, Lymphoma Patients

News Release: Mayo Clinic Study Finds Dramatic Rise in Skin Cancer in Young Adults

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Susan Barber Lindquist, Micah Dorfner

KAET Arizona
Breast Cancer Collaboration
Host: Ted Simons

Arizona State University and Mayo Clinic and T-Gen have joined forces to fight breast cancer. The three have formed the Breast Cancer Interest Group or Big Group to help research some of the toughest breast cancers to treat. Joining us now is Dr. Karen Anderson, a member of the Big Group. She has a joint appointment at ASU and Mayo Clinic.

Reach: Eight, Arizona PBS is a PBS station that has focused on educating children, reporting in-depth on public affairs, fostering lifelong learning and celebrating arts and culture. Its signal reaches 86 percent of the homes in Arizona. With more than 1 million viewers weekly, Eight consistently ranks among the most-viewed public television stations per capita in the country. Eight is a member-supported service of Arizona State University.

Context: The Breast Cancer Interest Group (BIG), a collaboration between researchers at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) and Arizona State University (ASU). The collaboration focuses on using the state-of-the-art genomics infrastructure and a high-quality breast cancer tumor biorepository. The focus of the group is to investigate molecular pathways to identify treatment targets for patients with triple negative breast cancer and endocrine-resistant breast cancer.  Mayo Clinic researchers are involved in many studies related to breast cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment. Mayo physicians often inform eligible patients about opportunities to participate in research studies and clinical trials related to advancements in the treatment of breast cancer.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

Arizona Republic
Cancer patients have more options, more decisions to make
By Ken Alltucker

When he was diagnosed with bladder cancer nearly five years ago, Louis Amaniera did exactly what the doctor ordered. He followed instructions, kept appointments, took prescribed drugs and readied his body for surgery. He had questions, but those questions never reached his lips...“In the past, (care) was based on what type of disease you had,” said Dr. Ruben Mesa, director of Mayo Clinic Cancer Center in Arizona. “Now it has moved much more to what we know about you and what we know about your cancer.”

Circulation: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday. The newspaper’s website Arizona Central, averages 83 million pages views each month.

Context: Ruben Mesa, M.D., is a chair of Hematology/Oncology at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center is a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center with a multisite presence. Its three campuses — in Scottsdale, Ariz., Jacksonville, Fla., and Rochester, Minn. — give the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center a broad geographic reach, enabling it to serve diverse patient populations around the world. The campuses are also home to outstanding, internationally recognized physicians and scientists who collaborate across the full spectrum of cancer research, from basic biology to treatment, as they seek ways to reduce the burden of cancer.

Public Affairs Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

Star Tribune
Minnesota Legislature makes welcome progress on Mayo

 …The Legislature seems to have found a way to say yes to Mayo Clinic’s call for help in building what it calls a Destination Medical Center in Rochester. Similarly structured provisions to help Rochester pay for the public infrastructure demands of a major Mayo expansion have landed in the House and Senate tax bills. The House bill won floor approval last week; the Senate bill is expected on the floor today. Barring an unforeseen hiccup, Gov. Mark Dayton and a tax conference committee should be able to reach an accord with Mayo and its local government partners before the Legislature adjourns on or before May 20.

Circulation: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 514,457 copies and weekday circulation is 300,330. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: On Jan. 30, Mayo Clinic announced Destination Medical Center (DMC), a $5 billion economic development initiative to secure Minnesota’s status as a global medical destination center now and in the future. The goal of DMC is to ensure that Minnesota and Mayo Clinic are destinations for medical care in the coming decades. This initiative is the culmination of a three-year study by Mayo Clinic to chart its future business strategy in an increasingly complex, competitive and global business environment.

Additional Destination Medical Coverage: Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal,  The Bond Buyer, Businessweek, Toronto Telegraph, Austin Daily Herald, Star Tribune, KAAL, Post-Bulletin, Post-Bulletin (Poll), Post-Bulletin, Post-Bulletin, Post-Bulletin, Post-Bulletin (Opinion), Post-Bulletin, Post-Bulletin, MPR

Previous Destination Medical Coverage 

Public Affairs Contacts: Bryan AndersonKarl Oestreich

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

To unsubscribe: To remove your name from the global distribution list, send an email to Emily Blahnik with the subject: UNSUBSCRIBE from Mayo Clinic in the News.

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Tags: alzheimer's disease, Anesthesiology, anxiety, Arizona, Arizona Horizon, Arizona Republic, Arizona State University, ASU, Austin Daily Herald, Big Group, Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer Interest Group


April 9th, 2013

Anxiety? There’s an app for that

By Logan Lafferty loganlafferty

The Mayo Clinic is reporting around 2,000 downloads of its Anxiety Coach App, which for $4.99 gives people instructions for managing their fears and a log for recording their anxiety levels when they confront their fears. A Star Tribune story examined the strong relationship in children between the avoidance of fears and the development of severe anxiety. For some people, exposure therapy is necessary to help people gradually confront their fears and reduce their anxiety in the process, said Dr. Stephen Whiteside, director of Mayo's pediatric anxiety disorders clinic in Rochester, Minn.

 

Star Tribune by Jeremy Olson

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Tags: anxiety, Anxiety Coach app, Dr. Stephen Whiteside, pediatric anxiety, Star Tribune


March 13th, 2013

Mayo: Children who avoid risk tend to develop anxiety later

By Logan Lafferty loganlafferty

Children who avoid or flee from worrisome situations are more likely to develop anxiety, according to an analysis of parent and child surveys conducted by Mayo Clinic researchers. The underlying theory isn't that new, that an absence of risk and challenge in childhood leads to nervousness and anxiety later on. But researchers were nonetheless surprised at the ability of their surveys on "avoidance" to predict which children would develop more anxiety a year later.

Additional Coverage: KMSP

 

Star Tribune by Jeremy Olson

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Tags: anxiety, avoidance, childhood, risk, Star Tribune


October 18th, 2012

Cancer-Specific Anxiety Likely Increases Depressive Symptoms

By Kelley Luckstein KelleyLuckstein

Higher levels of cancer-specific anxiety were associated with poor sexual function and indicators of depression among men who underwent surgery to treat prostate cancer. The researchers hypothesized that cancer-specific anxiety would affect quality of life in men who had prostatectomy. “The 10-year survival for a man undergoing surgery to remove localized prostate cancer is greater than 95%,” Alexander Parker, PhD, an associate professor of epidemiology and urology at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., said in a press release. “Given that the majority of men who undergo prostatectomy for prostate cancer will not die from their disease, we are concerned about what life will be like for these patients decades after diagnosis and treatment.”

 

Helio

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Tags: anxiety, cancer-specific anxiety, Dr. Alexander Parker, Helio, prostate cancer, prostatectomy


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