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January 27th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik


CBS News
Healthcare providers on how healthcare may change under Trump

The CEOs of the Mayo Clinic, Cleveland Clinic and New York-Presbyterian Hospital sat down with CBS News at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. They offered their thoughts on how healthcare may change in the incoming Trump administration.CBS News Logo

Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

Related coverage in the January 20, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Star Tribune
Aging boomers, lack of funding for Alzheimer's may lead to 'major social and economic crisis'
by Allie Shah

Do we cure cancer, heart disease or diabetes? No, but we can make significant progress," said Dr. Ron Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Star Tribune newspaper logoAlzheimer's disease Research Center. "So if I'm destined to develop Alzheimer's disease-related changes in the brain at age 75, and I can push that to age 78 or 80, that's a big deal. That's why I say delaying onset and slowing progression is a more realistic goal than a cure." Petersen will participate in a panel discussion, hosted by TPT Tuesday, on the state of Alzheimer's disease in Minnesota. The event is sold out.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

NPR
Athlete-Turned-Trucker Works To Improve Truckers' Health
by Alex Smith

On a chilly winter morning, dozens of truck driver trainees file into a classroom at the headquarters of Prime Inc., a trucking company based in Springfield, Mo. At the front is Siphiwe Baleka, an energetic former swimming champion in his mid-40s. He delivers grim news about trucker
health to the new recruits. "If you haven't started to think about this, you need to start right now," Baleka says. ..The relatively small lifestyle changes that Baleka promotes could be enough to make a life-changing difference in the health of many truck drivers, says Dr. Clayton Cowl, chief of preventive, occupational and aerospace medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. "The drivers themselves — they don't need to be running marathons, necessarily," Cowl says.

Reach: Shots is the online channel for health stories from the NPR Science Desk.

Context:  Clayton Cowl, M.D. heads Mayo Clinic's preventive, occupational and aerospace medicine. The division consists of 22 physicians who have specialty training in internal medicine or family practice and a team of trained occupational health nurses. Several of our physicians are board-certified in preventive, occupational and/or aerospace medicine. Mayo Clinic's integrated group practice model makes consultation with any other medical specialists readily available.

Contact:  Kelly Reller

 

Star Tribune
Filmmaker Ken Burns on Mayo Clinic: 'One of the most amazing medical places on Earth'
by Neal Justin

Ever since a Mayo Clinic newsletter mentioned this past October that Ken Burns' production company was spending time on the Rochester Star Tribune newspaper logocampus for an upcoming documentary, details have been sketchy…On a website for the Better Angels Society, the foundation that supports Burns' work and raises funds for them, it categorizes "The Mayo Clinic" under "Ken Burns Presents: The Next Generation," a division dedicated to a new generation of filmmakers with their boss lending his reputation and guidance as an executive producer.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: City Pages

Context:  To learn more about the Ken Burns' film, check out this story in Mayo Clinic in the Loop.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

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Tags: ABC News, Affordable care act, ALN magazine, alzheimers, Apple, apps, Associated Press, Becker’s Hospital Review, blisters, Boston Scientific, Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer News


October 24th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

NY Times
Is It Really Dementia?
By Paula Span

…Perhaps another 25 percent of patients actually have other types of dementia, like Lewy body or frontotemporal — scarcely happy news, but because these diseases have different trajectories The New York Times newspaper logoand can be exacerbated by the wrong drugs, the distinction matters…In trying to tell the difference — not a job for amateurs — one key consideration is age, said Dr. Ronald C. Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic’s Alzheimer’s center. Dementia is highly age-related, he pointed out.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field and chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Duska Anastasijevic

 

HealthDay
Two-Pronged Program Looks Best for Helping Smokers Quit

…Taking a prescription medication with brief advice was also more effective than unaided attempts to quit. However, smokers who used over-the-counter nicotine replacement therapy with no counseling had a reduced Health Day Logosuccess rate, according to the study in the October issue of the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings…Smoking cessation is one of the most important health behavior changes that physicians can encourage in their patients, Dr. J. Taylor Hays, director of the Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center in Rochester, Minn., said in the news release.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center (NDC) was one of the first centers in the country to focus exclusively on treatments for tobacco dependence. The NDC's model of care has now become the standard in many medical centers around the United States. The treatment team at the center offers you support and works with you to help develop the motivation and skills needed to stop using tobacco.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein


Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic extends telemedicine tests to Austin kiosks

by Matt McKinney

If an employee at the Mayo Clinic Health System’s Austin campus feels ill, help is just a few steps away, thanks to an experiment underway this month. A kiosk outfitted with basic medical instruments and a high-definition video link has started taking patients for a new telemedicine project known as “Mayo Connected Care.” The kiosks, manufactured by HealthSpot of Dublin, Ohio, have been undergoing tests at Mayo since February, said Star Tribune newspaper logoMark Ciota, the CEO for Mayo Clinic Health System sites in Austin and Albert Lea.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Mayo Clinic is committed to reducing health care expenses and improving access to medical services through a new telemedicine pilot project called Mayo Clinic Health Connection, now available at Mayo Clinic Health System in Austin. The Mayo Clinic Health Connection trials a telehealth delivery system to meet patient’s needs through the HealthSpot® platform, which combines robust cloud-based software and a private walk-in kiosk that offer solutions to care for patients in their place of work. The system will be piloted with Mayo Clinic Health System employees in Albert Lea and Austin before potentially being deployed to other local employers. More information can be found  in the news release: Mayo Clinic Health Connection News Release FINAL 10 2 14.

Public Affairs Contact: Tami Yokiel


Star Tribune
Health care providers readying for a wave of nurse retirees

by Lee Schafer

Star Tribune Business section logoThese days, even the renowned Mayo Clinic in Rochester is scrambling to fill holes in its nursing staff as baby boomers continue to retire. Not that the folks at Mayo are particularly worried. “We’ve seen this before,” said Pam Johnson, Mayo Clinic’s chief nursing officer. “It ebbs and flows. Some years we’ve hired 40 or 50 and some we’ve had up to 500. This year ago it will probably be somewhere in between.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Every year, more than 1 million patients from all 50 states and nearly 150 countries choose Mayo Clinic for their medical care. Mayo Clinic has a legacy of inspiring hope and contributing to health and well-being by providing the best care to every patient through integrated clinical practice, education and research. Mayo Clinic nurses practice in 60 specialties across a variety of locations, including Phoenix/Scottsdale, Ariz.; Jacksonville, Fla.; Rochester, Minn.; and Mayo Clinic Health System in Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin and Georgia. Career opportunities include positions in perioperative (surgical) nursing, hospital (inpatient) nursing and ambulatory (outpatient) nursing. Join a team where the potential for personal growth is unlimited and colleagues inspire you to stretch and grow beyond your boundaries. More information on Mayo Clinic nursing careers can be found here.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bryan Anderson, Alyson Gonzalez

 

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Tags: ABC News, ACOs, aging, American News Report, Apple, Arab News, Argentina Star, Arizona Republic, Austin Daily Herald, Austin Herald, Beloit Daily News, Benzinga


October 9th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Reuters TV
Scrambling away pain for cancer patients

Researchers are testing a device called the Scrambler which ''re-trains'' the brain to alleviate chronic pain caused by chemotherapy Reuters VIdeo logotreatment… Dr. Charles Loprinzi of the Mayo Clinic says peripheral neuropathy occurs when the brain sends pain signals to damaged nerves in a constant cycle.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world news, business newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile, and interactive television platforms.

Context: Charles Loprinzi, M.D., is the Regis Professor of Breast Cancer Research and a Mayo Clinic medical oncologist.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Huffington Post
Your Perpetually Stuffed Nose Is Just Your Body Fighting The Good Fight
by Sarah Klein

…When we're sick, our bodies get busy fighting off the infection -- and some of that fighting manifests as the very symptoms we associate witHuff Post Health and Fitness Logoh our maladies. "Some part of why we feel sick when we have an infection is actually the body's immune response," says Mayo Clinic infectious diseases physician and researcher Pritish Tosh, M.D.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique viewers.

Context: Pritish Tosh, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases expert.

Public Affairs Contact: Alyson Gonzalez

 

Star Tribune
Medica makes MNsure play in Rochester
by Christopher Snowbeck

Medica is launching a new health insurance plan in the Rochester area that offers lower premiums if people primarily get their health care from the Mayo Clinic. For years, insurers have blamed high costs at Mayo for above-average insurance premiums across southeastern Minnesota, but Medica says good care Star Tribune Business section logocoordination by Mayo doctors will let the insurer charge less for the new product, called “Medica With Mayo Clinic.” “Premiums long have been higher in the Rochester area, and that’s really been driven by the providers in that area,” said Dannette Coleman, a senior vice president with Medica.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

Modern Healthcare, Narrow network plan with Mayo to debut on Minnesota exchange by Bob Herman, Health insurer Medica is rolling out a new narrow-network plan in Minnesota, an increasingly common option, and Mayo Clinic will be the enticement to draw in potential enrollees. The plan, which will be offered both off and on Minnesota's exchange established by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, will include only specific providers in southern Minnesota. But the insurer said monthly premiums and copayments will be affordable for those who choose the plan.

MinnPost, Northfield News, Post-Bulletin, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal, Republican EagleCNBC, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal, KTTC, MPR 

Context: Medica and Mayo Clinic today announced a new health plan for individuals and families in southern Minnesota that comes at a lower cost than other available options. The plan, Medica with Mayo Clinic, is available for a January 1, 2015, effective date and can be purchased both on and off MNSure, Minnesota’s public health insurance exchange.  This health plan expands options for consumers seeking Mayo Clinic care in Rochester and throughout southern Minnesota at a lower cost than other available options and at the lowest price in southeast Minnesota on the MNsure exchange. More information can be found in the news release.

Public Affairs Contact: Adam Brase

 

KSTP
INTERVIEW: Making Strides Against Breast Cancer
by Cassie Hart

… Just two months ago a new law went into effect in Minnesota to bring those numbers down. Doctors are KSTP-TV Eyewitness News Lognow required to notify women if they have dense breast tissue. Mayo Clinic Dr. Sandhya Pruthi, a lead breast cancer researcher, stopped by KSTP to talk more about it. Meanwhile, this weekend more than 1,000 people will join together to walk in the fight against breast cancer.

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Context: October is Breast Cancer Awareness MonthSandhya Pruthi, M.D. is the principal investigator at Mayo Clinic for several nationwide multicenter breast cancer chemoprevention trials; these are interdisciplinary efforts with the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. She is also actively involved in cancer education for both patients and health care providers.

Public Affairs Contact: Joe Dangor

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Tags: ABC30 Calif., ActionNewsJax, acute myeloid leukemia, Adiv Johnson, advisory board, Alto Nivel Mexico, Apple, Arizona Business Magazine, Arizona Daily Star, Arizona Republic, Ask the Expert, ASU News


September 25th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

FOX Business
Opening Bell: Mayo Clinic CEO: Possible Ebola could come to the U.S.

Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy breaks down what we need to know about Ebola in wake of the CDC forecasting as many as 1.4M cases of the deadly virusOpening Bell Fox Business
by January if efforts to contain it aren’t ramped up.

Reach: FoxNews.com has more than 13 million unique visitors each month. Fox Business Network is headquartered in News Corporation's studios in midtown Manhattan with bureaus in Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco (Silicon Valley), Washington, D.C. and London.

Context: John NosewortFox Businesshy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Dr. Noseworthy recently joined Fox Business’s “Opening Bell” to discuss a variety of health care-related topics.

Additional mentions:
FOX Business, Cut in: I’m Maria Bartiromo…then the Mayo Clinic’s, Dr. John Noseworthy on the Ebola crisis. All coming up tomorrow opening bell 9:00 am eastern.
FOX Business The Willis Report and FOX Business After the Bell

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Bryan Anderson

 

Reuters TV
New test to 'eradicate' colon cancer

A new diagnostic tool that targets genetic markers in human stools could significantly reduce deaths due to Reuters VIdeo logocolon cancer. Ben Gruber reports…But Dr. David Alquist of the Mayo Clinic says there's now a new option for colon cancer screening - it's called Cologuard - and it identifies genetic markers for cancer in stool samples with 94 percent accuracy.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world news, business newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile, and interactive television platforms.

Previous Coverage of Colon Cancer Screening Test in August 29, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Exact Sciences Corp. (NASDAQ: EXAS) today announced that Mayo Clinic will be the first health system to offer Cologuard®, the first and only Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved, noninvasive stool DNA screening test for colorectal cancer. Cologuard will be available to patients through their primary care physicians at Mayo Clinic.

cologuardAvailable by prescription only, Cologuard offers people 50 years and older, who are at average risk for colorectal cancer, an easy to use screening test which they can do in the privacy of their own home. It is the first noninvasive screening test for colorectal cancer that analyzes both stool-based DNA and blood biomarkers to detect cancer and precancer. The Cologuard technology platform was co-developed by Exact Sciences Corp. and Mayo Clinic as part of a broad, exclusive collaboration. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Brian Kilen

 

Additional Reuters TV Coverage of Mayo Clinic

Reuters TV
Inside-out stomach shrinkage a new option for the obese

Researchers in the United States have developed a new procedure that shrinks the stomach by as much as 80 percent without major surgery. Using a specialized endoscope, doctors re-shape the stomach byReuters VIdeo logo stitching it smaller from the inside out…Dr. Christopher Gostout, Gastroenterologist, Mayo Clinic, saying: "If you look at the mass of people in the United States and outside the United States who are obese now, we can't operate on everybody. But maybe if we can catch them before they get too bad with a pretty safe reliable technique, this would be a good fit."

Reuters TV
Round 2: Measles vs. Cancer

Scientists at the Mayo Clinic are starting a second round of human clinical trials to test if an engineered Reuters VIdeo logostrain of measles virus is an effective cancer treatment. The trial follows a successful first round of tests where a woman went into complete remission after a massive dose of the virus eradicated cancer in her body. Ben Gruber reports.

 

Eau Claire Leader-Telegram
MedEx program provides medical experience
by Christena O’Brien

Katie Benson stood behind Dr. Karen Myhre in an exam room last month and watched as the Mayo Clinic Health System pediatrician examined 15-month-oldLeader Telegram logo Celeste Raa…The experience was part of the MedEx program at Mayo Clinic Health System, which provides high school juniors considering a career in medicine to spend one-on-one time job shadowing physicians who practice in a variety of specialties.

Circulation: The Leader-Telegram is the largest daily newspaper in west-central Wisconsin. It covers 12 counties with circulations of 23,500 weekdays and 29,800 Sundays.

Context: The MedEx program at Mayo Clinic Health System provides high school juniors the opportunity to spend one-on-one time job shadowing doctors who practice in a variety of specialties. To be considered for the program, students must be entering their junior year of high school, at least 16 years old and seriously considering a career as a physician. Before applying for the program, students must first become volunteers at Mayo Clinic Health System and complete 30 required volunteer hours. Once they have completed 20 of the 30 hours, they can apply to the program. This involves completing an application form, writing an essay and submitting letters of reference. Students who are accepted into the program will spend eight, four-hour shifts job shadowing a physician during a normal work day the summer after completing their junior year of high school. For more information about the MedEx program, contact becky.bieno@mayo.edu.

Public Affairs Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist 

 

Florida Times-Union
Health Notes: Mayo Clinic researchers believe many liver transplant patients can be 'fast-tracked' and avoid ICU
by Charlie Patton

The liver transplant team at Mayo Clinic in Florida has found, based on 12 years of experience, that more than half of patients receiving a new liver can be “fast-Florida Times-Union newspaper logotracked” to return to a surgical ward following their transplant, bypassing a one- or two-day stay in the Intensive Care Unit…Amanda Chaney, a nurse practitioner with the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, has been selected to participate in the Future Leaders Program by The American Association of Nurse Practitioners, the largest professional membership organization for nurse practitioners.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: The liver transplant team at Mayo Clinic in Florida has found, based on 12 years of experience, that more than half of patients receiving a new liver can be “fast-tracked” to return to a surgical ward room following their transplant, bypassing a one- or two-day stay in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). “To the best of my knowledge, our program has been the only liver transplant program in the United States, and perhaps in the world, with this unique fast-track patient care model consistently practiced,” says the study’s senior investigator, C. Burçin Taner, M.D., chair of Transplant Surgery at Mayo Clinic, Florida. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Paul Scotti

 

Wall Street Journal
A Less-Invasive Procedure to Treat Fibroids
by Laura Johannes

Many women with fibroids have a hysterectomy, a complete removal of the uterus, or a myomectomy, a removal of just the fibroids. Laparoscopic power The Wall Street Journal newspaper logomorcellation is a common technique to break up tissue so those surgeries can be performed through tiny incisions but it has come under intense scrutiny… Long-term data published in recent years "shows that women have good relief of their symptoms," adds Mayo Clinic researcher Elizabeth A. Stewart. Dr. Stewart is co-author of a 2008 guideline by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, which called the procedure "safe and effective."

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Related Coverage:

Wall Street Journal, DEADLY MEDICINE by Jennifer Levitz and Jon Kamp…After Dr. Amy Reed had surgery to remove uterine fibroids, involving a procedure known as power morcellation, she learned that it had worsened her prognosis by spreading a cancer she and her doctors didn't know she had..."I don’t think there is an acceptable safe morcellator out there,” Bobbie Gostout, the Mayo Clinic’s chairwoman of obstetrics and gynecology, said at the Florida conference, responding to the Korean study. “I think it is time to go back to our industry partners and say we need a new alternative. We need a contained system.” Dr. Gostout now says her practice has almost eliminated power morcellators since at least 2011 and would use them only for the rare patient, such as one more prone to bleeding or infection, in dire need of a quicker recovery time, or with limited pain-relief options. 

Context:  Elizabeth A. Stewart, M.D. is a  gynecologic surgeon at Mayo ClinicUterine fibroids cause significant fear and morbidity and can compromise workplace performance, according to a published survey of nearly 1,000 women in the U.S. The results were published this month in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Journal of Women's Health. The findings shed new light on the impact, prevalence and treatment concerns related to uterine leiomyomas (fibroids), which affect up to 80 percent of women by age 50. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Dana Sparks

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Tags: ABC News, ABC12 Mich., Advocate Health Care, Albert Lea Tribune, Amanda Chaney, Apple, Area Development, Arizona Republic, Arizona State University, ASU News, Austin Daily Herald, AZO Sensors


September 11th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich


Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Featured

KARE11
KARE 11 Investigates: High school football helmet safety

How the football helmets your school uses measure up…A recent study from a neurology professor at Florida State University found Virginia Tech's 'not recommended' helmet was actually the best atKARE-11 TV, Minneapolis-St. Paul preventing concussions and a University of Wisconsin study found no difference among helmets. So is the helmet enough? "When I think about concussion, it's not just about the equipment although that's very important," says Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Michael Stuart who is leading new football research at Mayo Clinic.

Reach: KARE is a an NBC affiliate in the Minneapolis-St.Paul market.

Additional helmet/safety coverage: MPR

Context:  Michael Stuart, M.D. is co-director, Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

Dallas Morning News
Methodist becomes the first Texas member of Mayo’s Care Network
By Gary Jacobson

Operating for a century and a half, the Mayo Clinic is probably the strongest health care provider brand in the country. Last year, about 4,500 Texans, including 1,000 patients from the Dallas area, went to Dallas Morning News logoMayo for treatment, said Stephen Mansfield, CEO of Dallas-based Methodist Health System…“This is not an acquisition or a merger,” Mansfield said at a news conference formally announcing the alliance. “It’s a clinical collaboration.” Mansfield and David Hayes, medical director of Mayo’s Care Network, said the alliance allows Methodist physicians to consult with Mayo specialists and share treatment protocols and other best practices as they collaborate on patient care.

Reach: Dallas Morning News has a daily circulation of more than 257,000 and more than 1.4 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional Coverage: Dallas Regional Chamber blog, Becker’s Hospital Review, Dallas Business Journal, News Medical, D Healthcare Magazine, Biz Beat Blog, KDFW Dallas, KTVT Dallas

Related Coverage:

Dallas Morning News, Big-name hospitals, retailers, clinics collaborate for cost control by Gary Jacobson, Never has more change come more rapidly to the health care industry. In North Texas, not-for-profit providers are collaborating with retailers on walk-in clinics at neighborhood drugstores and aligning with elite national providers. This week, Dallas-based Methodist Health System said it was becoming part of the Mayo Clinic’s nationwide Care Network. Similarly, Baylor Scott & White Health is working on an agreement to become part of the Cleveland Clinic’s national cardiology network.  Additional coverage: Post-Bulletin

Context: Mayo Clinic and Methodist Health System (Methodist) officials announced Sept. 9 that Methodist has joined the Mayo Clinic Care Network. Methodist, one of North Texas’ oldest nonprofit health systems, was selected following a comprehensive evaluation that ranged from its clinical and business practices to quality, safety and service efforts and patient satisfaction. More information about the announcement can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

Star Tribune
At Apple's product unveiling, Mayo takes a big role
By Evan Ramstad

When Apple Inc. unveils new products Tuesday, one of the tech industry’s most anticipated events of the year, it will have Mayo Clinic at its side to encourage people to use smartphones, and possibly aStar Tribune Business section logo smartwatch, to monitor health. The combination of Rochester-based Mayo, one of the best-known names in health care, and Apple could be a major boost to the practice of routinely tracking health conditions and fitness performance.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional Coverage:

KARE11, Apple's big reveal has Minnesota connection, The Mayo Clinic has found a new high-tech partner in Apple. On Tuesday, the tech giant introduced the new iPhone 6, which will come in two sizes that are both bigger than the current iPhone 5. The much anticipated Apple Watch was also introduced with a starting price of $349. With the announcement, we learned the Mayo Clinic has been working for two years to help develop software called HealthKit for the new devices…"By interacting with patients and their data at an earlier stage in their state of wellness or their state of illness, you can effect change so those patients potentially wouldn't have to present to the emergency department," said Mayo Clinic Dr. John Wald.

Modern Healthcare, Mayo eyes Apple collaboration to expand consumer outreach by Darius Tahir, The Mayo Clinic has decided to be involved with Apple as it rolls out its new iWatch Tuesday because it hopes the iWatch, along with Apple's HealthKit app, will allow it to better reach patients remotely.  Another major provider, Memorial Sloan-Kettering in New York, also reportedly an Apple partner, did not respond to requests for comment on its plans.

More coverage on Apple/Mayo:  NY Times, Star Tribune, ABC News, Forbes, AppAdvice, Geeky Gadgets, Good Morning America!, Tech 2, 9to5Mac, iDownloadBlog.com, Gadgest.esKAAL, Modern Healthcare, BringMeTheNews, Houston Chronicle, KTTC, WCCO, Apple Insider,The Advisory, RushLimbaugh.com, Post-Bulletin, Hospitals & Health Networks, iPhoneHacks.com, Bloomberg

Context: During the keynote address at the Worldwide Developers Conference 2014Apple, Inc., unveiled HealthKit, a digital repository for various types of health-fitness related data. Apple highlighted HealthKit through a new Mayo Clinic app under development that would offer users a more personalized experience and make their health data more actionable in supporting healthier lifestyles. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

KAAL
Mayo Clinic Partners With IBM's Watson
By Brianna Long

…For someone who has been a winner on Jeopardy and is featured at conferences nationwide, their resume must be pretty impressive. But in this case, it's not a someone at all, but rather a something. KAAL TV logoWatson is IBM's super-computer, and now, it got a new job at Mayo Clinic…"The clinical trials matching solution, that we're working with IBM on, based on the Watson technology, does would be to accelerate and streamline that, so that it will automatically show up on my computer, when I see a patient, which trials this patient might be eligible for," said Dr. Nick LaRusso, the Mayo physician who is the lead on the Watson collaboration.

Reach:  KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Additional Coverage:

Star Tribune, Mayo Clinic partners with IBM's Watson computer for matching patients, clinical trials by AP, The Mayo Clinic is partnering with IBM and its Watson supercomputer to pair cancer patients with the right clinical trials. The Rochester clinic announced Monday it's working with the Armonk, N.Y.-based computing company on trial matching starting in 2015. The Watson cognitive computing system will sort through 8,000 Mayo studies and approximately 170,000 ongoing studies worldwide to match patients. Watson rose to fame by defeating a pair of "Jeopardy!" champions in 2011. Dr. Nicholas LaRusso of Mayo is leading the collaboration and says Watson could "transform" how health care is delivered. He says the program could significantly increase the number of patients who enroll in trials, as well as the accuracy of the matching.

KTTC, Washington Post, Modern Healthcare, Post-Bulletin, HealthcareDIVE, WCCO, News Observer, CNN MoneyPolitico, MobiHealthNews, A Smarter Planet Blog, The Scientist, Vida en el Valle, KTTC

Context: Mayo Clinic and IBM announced plans this week to pilot Watson, the IBM cognitive computer, to match patients more quickly with appropriate clinical trials, beginning with research studies in cancer. A proof-of-concept phase is currently underway. “In an area like cancer —where time is of the essence — the speed and accuracy that Watson offers will allow us to develop an individualized treatment plan more efficiently so we can deliver exactly the care that the patient needs,” says Steven Alberts, M.D., chair of medical oncology at Mayo Clinic. More information about the announcement can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

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Tags: 9to5Mac, A Smarter Planet Blog, ABC News, Active Times, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Albert Lea Tribune, American News Report, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, AppAdvice, Apple, Apple Insider, ASU


August 7th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Spokesman-Review
Kootenai Health Joins Mayo Network

Kootenai Health and Mayo Clinic leaders today announced Kootenai Health as a Spokesman-Review newspaper bannermember of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a national network of like-minded organizations that share a commitment to better serving patients and their families.

Reach: The Spokesman-Review is a daily newspaper in Spokane, Washington. The Coeur D'Alene Bureau of the Spokesman-Review is located in Coeur D'Alene, Idaho, and covers the news from the western part of the state. The daily circulation of the Spokesman Review is more than 100,000 and the weekend circulation is more than 131,000.

Additional coverage:

Coeur d' Alene Press, What Kootenai Health-Mayo partnership means to you, patients
Post-Bulletin, Spokesman-Review Wash., Boise Weekly, Coeur d’Alene Press, KROC AM Radio, WorldNews.com, KREM Wash. KREM-CBS Wash., News Medical, CDA Press

Context: Kootenai Health and Mayo Clinic leaders announced this week Kootenai Health as a member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a national network of like-minded organizations that share a commitment to better serving patients and their families. The network, which began in 2011, now includes 30 member organizations that are interested in working with Mayo Clinic to improve health care delivery by sharing knowledge and promoting collaboration between physicians. As part of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, Kootenai Health physicians now have access to Mayo Clinic’s knowledge and expertise when these additional resources will be helpful, allowing many patients to avoid unnecessary travel for answers to complex medical questions. “We are working with Mayo Clinic so our patients can benefit from leading medical expertise and physician collaboration without having to leave home,” says Jon Ness, Kootenai Health CEO. “Our two organizations share the same commitment that health care should be provided close to home whenever possible.” More information about the announcement can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

AARP
8 Ways to Shape Up for Your Surgery
by Elizabeth Agnvall

Jean Hanson needed a new hip. After years of teaching P.E. and tearing up ski slopes all over the world, AARP The Magazine Logothe Sedona, Arizona, resident was in so much pain that she relied on a walker. She finally decided to have surgery at the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix, but there was just one problem: Doctors there wouldn't do the operation unless she quit smoking.

Reach:  AARP, The Magazine, has a circulation of more than 22.2 million and is published every other month.

Context: The news that you will need surgery can prompt many questions and a lot of anxiety. Beyond details about your medical condition and treatment options, what should you ask your surgeon before the operation? Whatever you need to ask to be comfortable with the decisions you make about your care, says Robert Cima, M.D., a colon and rectal surgeon and chair of Mayo’s surgical quality subcommittee. To learn more about the five questions to ask your surgeon before an operation, please go to Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Entertainment Tonight
Country Legend Glen Campbell Refuses to be Silenced by Alzheimer's

Alzheimer's has made it difficult for Glen Campbell to remember names and people, but he has no problem performing on stage. We have a look at the new documentary about his diagnosis. TheEntertainment Tonight Logo Rhinestone Cowboy, who has inspired stars like Taylor Swift to Keith Urban, refused to let his debilitating disease slow him down, and went on a final tour of 151 shows. As an extra treat, Campbell invited award-winning filmmaker James Keach along to capture every moment for the documentary Glen Campbell: I'll Be Me. The segment includes video of Glen at Mayo Clinic and of his appointment with Dr. Ronald Peterson.

Reach: Entertainment Tonight reaches more than 12 million viewers in the US and 70 other countries.

Context: Glen Campbell: I'll Be Me opens October 24. Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Prevention
9 New Discoveries About Fat That Will Clarify A Lot

…9. The circumference of your waist can tell you your heart disease risk. Women with waists over 37 inches have an 80% higher risk of conditions like heart disease, lung problems or cancer compared toPrevention logo women whose waist span was under 27 inches, according to a Mayo Clinic review published…

Reach: Prevention is published monthly with a circulation of 2.8 million.  Prevention - Online has more than 1.1 million unique visitors each month and has 9.3 million average page views each month.

Context: Having a big belly has consequences beyond trouble squeezing into your pants. It’s detrimental to your health, even if you have a healthy body mass index (BMI), a new international collaborative study led by a Mayo Clinic researcher found. Men and women with large waist circumferences were more likely to die younger, and were more likely to die from illnesses such as heart diseaserespiratory problems, and cancer after accounting for body mass index, smokingalcohol use andphysical activity. The study is published in the March edition of Mayo Clinic Proceedings. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Alyson Gonzalez

 

MPR
Are doctors misdiagnosing children with ADHD?

MPR Daily Circuit Dr. Jyoti Bhagia, Assistant Professor of psychiatry at Mayo Clinic.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context:  Jyoti Bhagia, M.D., is a psychiatrist with Mayo Clinic Children's Center. Her interests include mood disorder, ADHD and obesity.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Post-Bulletin
Pulse On Health: Become one of thousands aiding research
by Jeff Hansel

Mayo Clinic Biobank leaders say they have surpassed 40,000 participants and are "moving quickly Logo for Post-Bulletin newspapertoward our goal of 50,000." I submitted blood samples many months ago and, by my own choice, essentially gave permission for use in perpetuity for anything from disease research to drug development.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context:  Mayo Clinic and the Center for Individualized Medicine have made a significant commitment to building a scalable biorepository infrastructure, which includes two specimen processing core laboratories and several large centralized biospecimen collections. One of these biospecimen collections is the Mayo Clinic Biobank, a collection of samples, including blood and blood derivatives, and health information donated by Mayo Clinic patients. Unlike many biobanks in existence at Mayo Clinic and elsewhere, the Mayo Clinic Biobank is not focused on any particular disease. Rather, the Biobank collects samples and health information from patients and other volunteers regardless of health history. Once a participant becomes a part of the Biobank, he or she becomes a part of ongoing health research. More information on Mayo Clinic Biobank can be found here

Public Affairs Contacts: Sam SmithBob Nellis

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Tags: ABC15 in Arizona, ACA, ADHD, Ahwatukee Foothills News, alzheimer's disease, AP, Apple, Arizona Po Warner Football and Cheer, Associated Press, Baltimore Sun, bariatric surgery, Be the Match


July 31st, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich


Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Wall Street Journal
What Makes a Superfood?
By Heidi Mitchell

Salmon has at times been touted as a cancer preventive. Many nutritionists praise the health benefits of blueberries, kale and cinnamon bark. How does a food get elevated from the grocery aisle to superfoodThe Wall Street Journal Logo status? One expert, Phil Hagen, a preventive-medicine specialist at the Mayo Clinic's Healthy Living Program in Rochester, Minn., explains why there is more to food than a name.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Phillip Hagen, M.D. is a physician in Mayo Clinic's Preventive, Occupational and Aerospace Medicine department.

Public Affairs Contacts: Ginger Plumbo, Traci Klein

 

Florida Times-Union
Gift from Bacardi family will help Mayo Clinic researchers in Jacksonville close in on 'the future of medicine'
by Charlie Patton

The future of medicine is regenerative medicine. That’s a view shared by Thomas Gonwa, associate Florida Times-Union newspaper logodirector of the Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine in Jacksonville, and by Jorge and Leslie Bacardi. “Regenerative medicine will be the cutting-edge medicine of the 21st century,” Gonwa says. “We think it is the most important thing happening in medicine,” Leslie Bacardi said. Now the Bacardis, who live in Nassau in the Bahamas, have given what Mayo Clinic officials call “a substantial gift” to fund ongoing research and clinical trials in regenerative medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional Coverage:

Phys.org, Bacardis make gift to significantly advance Mayo Clinic's regenerative medicine research

Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic Florida gets regenerative medicine boost

WEJZ Fla., Bio-Medicine, Mayport Mirror Fla.

Context: Imagine a future in which a new lung is grown for a patient in need, using the patient’s own cellular material, or a day when an injection of replacement cells will enable a patient to self-heal damage in the brain, nerves or other tissues. Regenerative medicine is no longer science fiction, and a substantial gift from Jorge and Leslie Bacardi of the Bahamas will significantly accelerate the research of Mayo Clinic’s Center for Regenerative Medicine on the Florida campus. More information, including a video interview with Jorge Bacardi can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affair Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

AP
Injuries come frequently despite advances in safety, sports medicine and training

…August inevitably will be filled with more cringes and crutches, even though the NFL has tried to make the game safer in recent years. The league has placed limits on padded practices and implemented moreAssociated Press Wire Service Logo rules changes to protect players on both sides of the ball. "Despite all the advances in sports medicine, nutrition and training, we just can't prevent all injuries," said Dr. Ed Laskowski, co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center in Rochester, Minnesota. "What we can do is protect them as much as possible through training and technique."

Reach: The Associated Press is a not-for-profit news cooperative, owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members. News collected by the AP is published and republished by newspaper and broadcast outlets worldwide.

Additional Coverage:

New York Times (AP), N.F.L. Teams Chase the Dream of an Injury-Free Camp

ABC News, Star Tribune, USA Today, Fox News, Yahoo! Sports, CTV News

Context: Ed Laskowski, M.D., is co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center. The Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center is a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

Arizona Republic
Coaches, Mayo team up on head injuries
by Nathan Brown

The 2014 Arizona Pop Warner Football Clinic, headlined by Dr. David Dodick, brought coaches from all Arizona Republic newspaper logolevels of Arizona Pop Warner together to discuss protocols being put in place with a partnership between the Mayo Clinic and Arizona Pop Warner for the upcoming season. Dodick, along with fellow Mayo Clinic doctors Amaal Starling and Bert Vargas, education coaches on the impact of concussions along with the new testing.

Reach: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday. The newspaper’s website Arizona Central, averages 83 million pages views each month.

Additional Coverage: ABC 15

Context: In response to growing concerns about concussions and head injuries in youth sports,Arizona Pop Warner Football and Cheer and Mayo Clinic have announced a groundbreaking collaboration that will provide intensive medical research about the effects of sports-related injuries. As part of the program, all participants ages 10 years and older in Arizona Pop Warner’s flag and tackle football programs, as well as all participants in the organization’s cheerleading programs, will be required to complete a comprehensive evaluation prior to play that will provide a baseline for future testing in the event of an injury. This baseline evaluation will provide immediate data when testing young athletes after an injury, helping physicians determine the nature and extent of the injury and helping to assess a timeline for return to competition. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

FOX 9
Minn. musician bikes from Seattle to Boston to honor friend

He's collaborated with everyone from Eric Clapton the world-renowned Minnesota Orchestra, but a local musician is putting his career on hold to remember a lifelong friend who died of cancer.…Maurer said heMy Fox KMSP TC hopes to inspire people to see life at 10 mph instead of 60, like Held inspired him. He also hopes that those who are inspired will donate to the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, which is where Held went for treatment.

Reach: Minneapolis-St.Paul is the 16th largest television market in the United States with 1.7 million TV homes.  FOX 9 News (WFTC) is the Twin Cities Fox affiliate.

Context: George Maurer is an accomplished musician and composer (recently won a McKnight Composer Fellowship) who is on day a 48-day bike ride from Seattle to Boston (covering 48 states) in memory of his friend Carolyn Held, who passed away in 2012 from cancer. The bike ride is a fundraiser for Mayo Clinic Cancer Center where Carolyn was a patient. Carolyn made the same bike rip in 1988 to raise funds for the Boys and Girls Club of Little Falls, Minnesota. More information cane be found on George's Blog, his Facebook page and by watching a video explaining the trip.

Public Affairs Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Cannon Falls Beacon
Facility design a team effort

From check-in to departure, patients at Mayo Clinic Health System will notice process improvements in Cannon Falls Beacon Newspaper logothe new medical center that incorporate functional design which will better provide seamless care. Clinic exam and hospital suites were designed with the help of staff.

Reach: The Cannon Falls Beacon is a weekly newspaper published in Cannon Falls, Minnesota.

Additional Coverage:

KTTC
Mayo Clinic Health System opens new location in Cannon Falls

KROC
Ribbon Cutting for Mayo’s New Cannon Falls Facility

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic plans ribbon cutting for new Cannon Falls clinic

Context: I’m in awe,” says Jerry Williams of Mayo Clinic Health System’s new clinic and hospital. Williams was one of approximately 2,000 who toured the new medical center during a public grand opening event on Friday, July 25. Located at 32021 County 24 Boulevard, the new clinic opens on Aug. 4 and the hospital and emergency department open on Aug. 7. More information on the new clinic and hospital can be found here.

Public Affairs Contact: Asia Christensen

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Tags: "sitting disease", Alan Greenway, Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology’s Statistics and Data Center, AP, Apple, Arizona Pop Warner Football, Arizona Republic, Associated Press, Association of Medical Illustrators annual meeting, ASU News, BC News, Becker’s Hospital Review


July 24th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich


Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Advisory Board

Why Mayo Clinic's CEO wants to serve 200 million patients—and how he plans to do it

Question: I've read that before you joined the Mayo Clinic—and this was decades ago—one of your first encounters with the organization was when a physician was supposed to visit your hospital for a commemorative dinner…and he missed it. Can you talk Advisory Boarda little bit about that? John Noseworthy: It was one of the two or three most pivotal moments in my life. You're right, he missed his flight—and it was because he was with a patient. I was very young and I remember thinking, "who is this man who is so humble that he would put the needs of the patient ahead of his receiving  a distinguished recognition." And then I wondered what organization could retain and keep a person like that. It was Mayo Clinic.

Reach: The Advisory Board Company is a global research, technology, and consulting firm partnering with more than 165,000 leaders in more than 4,100 organizations across health care and higher education.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

 

Wall Street Journal
Why Seven Hours of Sleep Might Be Better Than Eight
by Sumathi Reddy

…Other experts caution against studies showing ill effects from too much sleep. Illness may cause someone to sleep or spend more The Wall Street Journal newspaper logotime in bed, these experts say. And studies based on people reporting their own sleep patterns may be inaccurate. "The problem with these studies is that they give you good information about association but not causation," said Timothy Morgenthaler, president of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, which represents sleep doctors and researchers, and a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic Center for Sleep Medicine.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context:  Timothy Morgenthaler, M.D., Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, is also affiliated with the Mayo Clinic Center for Sleep Medicine. Mayo Clinic doctors trained in sleep disorders evaluate and treat adults and children. The Center for Sleep Medicine is one of the largest sleep medicine facilities in the United States. Staff in the center treats about 6,500 new people who have sleep disorders each year. The Center for Sleep Medicine is accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Public Affairs Contacts: Alyson Gonzalez, Traci Klein

 

Star Tribune
Mayo links abnormal protein in brain to Alzheimer's
by Mary Lynn Smith

…“Alzheimer’s disease symptoms have been typically thought to be produced by plaques and tangles,” said Dr. Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s disease Research Center. “Now these folks have documented that there’s a third elementStar Tribune newspaper logo that contributes to Alzheimer’s symptoms.” The protein, known as TDP-43, is normally found in the brain. But what Mayo researchers found is that when it becomes abnormal — chemically different and bunched up — a patient is more likely to show symptoms of Alzheimer’s, explained Dr. Keith Josephs, who headed the research team’s four-year study.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Related Coverage:
Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic-led study on Alzheimer's grabs worldwide attention
MPR, Alzheimer's research at Mayo may open new possibilities to investigate
KTTC, Protein discovery may be key to Alzheimer's cure
WCCO, Albuquerque Journal, MinnPost

Previous Coverage in July 17, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Highlights

Context:  Since the time of Dr. Alois Alzheimer himself, two proteins (beta-amyloid (Aβ) and tau) have become tantamount to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). But a Mayo Clinic study challenges the perception that these are the only important proteins accounting for the clinical features of the devastating disease. In a large clinico-imaging pathological study, Mayo Clinic researchers demonstrated that a third protein (TDP-43) plays a major role in AD pathology. In fact, people whose brain was TDP positive were 10 times more likely to be cognitively impaired at death compared to those who didn’t have the protein, showing that TDP-43 has the potential to overpower what has been termed resilient brain aging. The study was published in the journal Acta Neuropathologica. “We wanted to determine whether the TDP-43 protein has any independent effect on the clinical and neuroimaging features typically ascribed to AD and we found that TDP-43 had a strong effect on cognition, memory loss and medial temporal atrophy in AD,” says Mayo Clinic neurologist Keith Josephs, M.D., the study’s lead investigator and author. “In the early stages of the disease when AD pathology was less severe, the presence of TDP-43 was strongly associated with cognitive impairment. Consequently, TDP-43 appears to play an important role in the cognitive and neuroimaging characteristics that have been linked to AD.” More information on the study, including a video interview with Dr. Josephs, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Star Tribune
Mayo sees big future for personalized medicine
by Jim Spencer

Medical treatment will become more genetically specific to individuals as the 21st century progresses, the Mayo Clinic’s director of Star Tribune Business section logolaboratory medicine told a congressional subcommittee Wednesday. Dr. Frank Cockerill said that Mayo, one of the world’s leaders in specialized diagnostics, develops 150 tests per year in an attempt to become more precise in treating patients.  The Rochester-based clinic is moving toward tests that will let doctors tailor treatments that are unique to individuals, Cockerill told participants at a 21st Century Cures roundtable sponsored by the House Energy and Commerce Committee’s subcommittee on health. For instance, instead of using standard dosages, Cockerill said Mayo’s labs try to tranform scientific discoveries into “valid tests” that allow doctors to apply “specific genetic findings in a patient.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Frank Cockerill, M.D. is chair of the Mayo Clinic Department of Laboratory Medicine and PathologyMayo Clinic's Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology (DLMP) in Rochester is one of the largest clinical laboratories in the world. It is composed of more than 3,200 people working in numerous specialty laboratories performing more than 20 million tests a year. Mayo Medical Laboratories (MML) is a reference laboratory specializing in esoteric laboratory testing for health care organizations throughout the United States and around the world. MML's mission is to support the local delivery of laboratory services through the provision of exceptional reference laboratory services and by providing support services that facilitate and augment community integration efforts.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Post-Bulletin

Our view: Community can help keep Mayo Clinic at top of rankings

Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperWhat's most impressive about Mayo Clinic's No. 1 ranking as the best hospital in the country by U.S. News & World Report magazine were the consistent high marks in several categories of evaluation. The report gave Mayo No. 1 or No. 2 rankings in 11 of the 12 specialties based on reputation, services and volumes, safety and clinical outcomes.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Related Coverage:
Post-Bulletin, Pulse on Health: It's the personal care behind being No. 1 that counts
MedPage Today, Top-Ranked Hospitals Sing Own Praises
CSPAN, General Speeches: Rep. Erik Paulsen, R-Minnesota, 3rd District

Previous Coverage in July 17, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Highlights

Context: Mayo Clinic has achieved the highest honor in U.S. News and World Report’s ranking of top hospitalsMayo Clinic earned more number one rankings than any other provider, ranking number one or number two in 11 of the 12 specialties based on reputation, services and volumes, safety and clinical outcomes. “We have a deep commitment to delivering high-value health care that best meets patients' needs. We owe our success to truly dedicated staff that provide a seamless patient experience and the care that each individual needs,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Noseworthy, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Rebecca Eisenman

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Tags: "sitting disease", A.L.S., ABC News, ABC15, advisory board, Ahwatukee Foothills News, Aitkin Age, Albuquerque Journal, alzheimer's disease, Am.com, AP, Apple


July 3rd, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

New York Times

Medical Boards Draft Plan to Ease Path to Out-of-State and Online Treatment
by Robert Pear

Officials representing state medical boards across the country have drafted a model law that would make it much easier for doctors licensed in one state to treat patients in other states, whether in person, by videoconference or online…The Mayo Clinic, in Minnesota, for example, has established links with more than two dozen hospitals The New York Times newspaper logoand health systems…“Cross-border licensure is a strategic imperative as we move forward in this brave new world,” said Kathleen M. Harrington, who is in charge of government relations at Mayo.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Context: In stroke telemedicine, also called telestroke, doctors who have advanced training in the nervous system (neurologists) remotely evaluate people who've had acute strokes and make diagnoses and treatment recommendations to emergency medicine doctors at other sites. Doctors communicate using digital video cameras, Internet telecommunications, robotic telepresence, smartphones and other technology.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Fortune
Test-driving the Mayo Clinic's new plan for healthy living
by Larry Armour

The famed clinic has a fresh approach to helping patients stick with a fitness program. I went to check it out. I’m sharing a gym in Rochester, Minn., with 16 men and women. We are part of a pilot program for a new venture called the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Plan. We were told to wear comfortable clothes and athletic shoes, butFortune magazine logo the hardcore workout we all expected never shows up. Instead, we are introduced to a concept called NEAT, which stands for Non-Exercise Activity Thermogenesis.

Reach: FORTUNE has a circulation of more than 845,000 readers.  It's website receives more than 4.5 million unique visitors each month.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is designed to help people break down barriers, dispel myths and give participants a comprehensive wellness experience tailored to their individual goals. What makes this program unique is that it doesn’t end once the person leaves the campus; it offers ongoing support long after the person returns home. “Mayo has been dedicated to the health and wellness of individuals for 150 years, and this program continues that tradition by offering life-changing experiences to people seeking whole-person wellness who want to maximize their health,” says Donald Hensrud, M.D., medical director, Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. “We’re committed to partnering with each participant to design an individualized wellness plan to help them reach their wellness goals so that their success continues once they return home and are immersed back into the reality of their busy lives.” More information on Mayo's Healthy Living Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

MPR
Researchers, advocates see better ALS therapies on the horizon

This weekend marks the anniversary of one of pro sports' most poignant moments: Baseball great Lou Gehrig, standing before microphones near home plate at Yankee Stadium on July 4, 1939 as a standing-room only crowd honored him as one of the most famous players of his time...There are two stem cell therapy trials going on atMPR-News-300x45 Mayo Clinic. Both involve using stem cells grown from a participant's stomach fat. One is looking at the safety of injecting ALS patients with varying doses of their stem cells. The other trial uses a patient's stem cells, modified with growth factors, and reintroduced into the patient's spinal fluid. Researchers hope those tweaked stem cells will protect cells that control movement from further damage and death from ALS. Dr. Anthony Windebank, with the Center for Regenerative Medicine at Mayo, calls the fledgling therapy a "radically new kind of treatment." 

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Additional Coverage:

Men’s HealthGehrig's Final, Finest At-Bat

Post-Bulletin, Gehrig honored, 75 years after speech 


Context:
 Seventy-five years ago, on July 4th 1939, baseball legend Lou Gehrig delivered the famous speech bidding farewell to the ballpark and his fans. Two weeks before Gehrig had been diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Accompanied by his wife, Eleanor, Lou left Mayo Clinic with the devastating diagnosis on June 20th 1939, a day after his 36th birthday. He died in June two years later, not quite 38 years old, of the rare neurological disease that would come to bear his name.

ALS is a type of progressive motor neuron disease that typically strikes at middle to later life and causes nerve cells in spinal cord, brain stem and brain to gradually break down and die. These nerve cells are responsible for muscle function so eventually, ALS can affect the ability to control the muscles needed to move, speak, eat and breathe.

While ALS still evades cure and effective treatment, researchers at Mayo Clinic are conducting a Phase I clinical trial in the hope that they can guide newly grown stem cells to become protective of neuromuscular function.

“We use fat-derived mesenchymal stem cells from the patient's own body. These cells are modified in the laboratory and delivered through a spinal tap into the fluid around the patient's nervous system to promote neuron survival,” explains neurologist Anthony Windebank, M.D, deputy director for discovery in the Center for Regenerative Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Rochester. “We hope that the growth factors that they are producing will help protect and promote the survival of nerve cells and therefore slow down or arrest the progression of ALS. If we can halt an ALS patient's loss of cells at 20 to 30 percent, that person’s function would be well-preserved," says Dr. Windebank. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Post Bulletin
Hockey players get cognitive training from Mayo Clinic staff
by Jeff Hansel

Mayo Clinic's new Rochester training center for elite athletes has taken a cue from the Israeli military. The facility, in the Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center, this year Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperbegan cognitive training designed to increase hockey players' "hockey sense" — their awareness of where the puck and other players are on the ice. It uses "applied cognitive engineering" developed with USA Hockey…Dr. Michael Stuart, co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center, said athletes can actually improve their ability to anticipate what's going to happen on the ice based on the location of the puck or other players, including "both teammates and opponents."

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center is a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, sports performance optimization, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

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Tags: 3D mammography, A.L.S., AftenPosten, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimer's disease, Apple, Arthritis Today, Augie Nieto, autism spectrum disorder, birth control, Bloomberg Businessweek, BMI


June 26th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Wall Street Journal
Obesity Is Undercounted in Children, Study Finds
by Sumathi Reddy

…A new study finds that the commonly used body-mass-index measure may fail to identify as many as 25% of children, age 4 to 18 years, who have excess body fat. The meta-analysis, scheduled for publication online in the journal Pediatric Obesity on Tuesday, reviewed 37 separate studies involving a combined The Wall Street Journal newspaper logo53,521 participants. "BMI is not capturing everybody who needs to be labeled as obese," said Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, director of preventive cardiology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who headed the study with Asma Javed, a pediatric endocrinology fellow.

Additional coverage:

KAAL, Mayo Study Finds Fault with Youth BMI Measurements
WJXT Fla., KTVZ Oreg., ANSA Italy


Wall Street Journal Lunch Break
Video: Obesity Undercounted in Children, Study Finds

A new study finds that the commonly used body mass index measure A new study finds that the Wall Street Journal Live Logocommonly used body mass index measure may leave out as many as 25% of children with excess body fat. Dr. Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, co-author of the study and director of preventive cardiology at the Mayo Clinic, joins Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero.

Context: Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Lopez-Jimenez's research program has studied obesity and cardiovascular disease from different angles, from physiologic studies assessing changes in myocardial mechanics and structural and hemodynamic changes following weight loss, to studies addressing the effect of physicians' diagnosis of obesity on willingness to lose weight and successful weight loss at follow-up.


Wall Street Journal
How to Keep Your Muscles Strong as You Age
by Laura Landrow

...For now, however, the best medicine available to maintain muscle mass and strength is less complicated and costly—namely, exercise and a healthy diet. Yet about 60% of people over 65 are insufficiently active or overtly inactive, and many have poor nutrition, says Nathan LeBrasseur, a researcher who directs the Muscle Performance and Physical Function Laboratory and the Healthy Aging and The Wall Street Journal newspaper logoIndependent Living Initiative at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Dr. LeBrasseur estimates that most people will lose approximately 30% of muscle mass over their lifetime, and as much as 50% by the time they reach their 80s or 90s.

Context: Nathan LeBrasseur, Ph.D. is a Mayo Clinic researcher and is affiliated with Mayo Clinic's Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging and Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. More information about his work can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

 

Wall Street Journal
How Bad Sitting Posture at Work Leads to Bad Standing Posture All the Time
by Jeanne Whalen

Good posture means aligning ears over the shoulders, shoulders over hips, and Wall Street Journal Life and Culture logohips over the knees and ankles…Many deskbound office workers have started standing and walking in this position, too, says Andrea Cheville, a rehabilitation physician at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. To counteract kyphosis, it is important to stretch the pectoral muscles and strengthen the trapezius muscles in the upper back, which hold the shoulder blades back, Dr. Cheville said. Remembering to keep the ears and head over the shoulders, and not jutting forward, is also important.

Context: Andrea Cheville, M.D., Mayo Clinic Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, is an expert on exercise in the elderly and also focuses on the delivery of supportive care services to optimize the functionality and quality-of-life for patients with cancer in all disease stages.

Wall Street Journal
Can Data From Your Fitbit Transform Medicine?
By Elizabeth Dwoskin

Many runners and fitness fanatics have been quick to embrace wearable wireless tracking devices for Wall Street Journal Tech Logomeasuring physical activity and calories burned. Now, a growing number of physicians are formally studying whether such "wearables" can improve patients' health by spurring people to get moving…David Cook, an anesthesiologist at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, who, along with colleagues, used Fitbit Inc.'s namesake gadget to track activity levels of cardiac-surgery patients. The researchers found that patients who moved more the day after surgery were more likely to be discharged sooner. The findings prompted the hospital to dispatch physical therapists to study patients who weren't moving as much, said Dr. Cook.

Context: David J. Cook, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

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Tags: 3D mammograms, ABC News Australia, ABC30, aging, Agnes Rapacz, Allevant Solutions, alzheimer's disease, American News Report, angina, ANSA, anti-obesity devic, AP


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