Items Tagged ‘apps’

March 31st, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

NY Times
How to Follow the News in a Political Age of Anxiety
by Lesley Alderman

Another day and, for many, another worrisome news alert out of Washington — or two, or three. Travel bans. Policy reversals. Wire taps. In October, during the buildup to Election Day, we heard from therapists about how their patients were feeling fearful, angry and distrustful in reaction to the contentious presidential race. Now, these same therapists report that many of their patients are even more upset as they struggleThe New York Times newspaper logo to make sense of the direction in which the country is heading. And many can’t tear themselves away from the news. … “Many of my patients are frightened and on edge. They wonder, Could the next news alert report that missiles are flying through the air?” said Dr. Robert Bright, a psychiatrist at the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix. “Almost all my patients report having insomnia.” He tells clients who are feeling overwhelmed to turn off news alerts on their phones and instead tune into the news just once a day. If social media feels as if it’s making your blood pressure rise, limit the number of times per week you log on.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: Robert Bright, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic psychiatrist.

Contacts: Jim McVeigh, Traci Klein

 

Today.com
'Black Insomnia' may be the strongest coffee in the world
by Emi Boscamp

A couple years ago, scientists unveiled the world's blackest black, called Vantablack, which absorbs 99.965% of visible light. Well, now there may be a coffee equivalent to Vantablack, called Black Insomnia. It debuted in South Africa last year and just arrived in the United States. No word yet on how much light it absorbs. … But what would happen if you drank more than that? We're jittery just thinking about it. "It depends how sensitive you are to caffeine, Dr. Sharonne N. Hayes, M.D., cardiologist at Mayo Clinic and professor of cardiovascular diseases, explained to TODAY Food over the phone. "It may not cause a serious medical issue, but it may be uncomfortable. For example, people with arrhythmias are triggered by caffeine and may experience palpitations."

Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show.

Context:  Sharonne Hayes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Hayes studies cardiovascular disease and prevention, with a focus on sex and gender differences and conditions that uniquely or predominantly affect women. With a clinical base in the Women's Heart Clinic, Dr. Hayes and her research team utilize novel recruitment methods, social media and online communities, DNA profiling, and sex-specific evaluations to better understand several cardiovascular conditions. A major area of focus is spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD), an uncommon and under-recognized cause of acute coronary syndrome (heart attack) that occurs predominantly in young women.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Star Tribune
With almost $300 million in private funds, Mayo's Rochester project set to get $585M in public money
by Matt McKinney

Millions of dollars in state aid for expansion of the Mayo Clinic should start to arrive in Rochester this fall, it was announced Thursday. The public dollars were pledged for the Destination Medical Center (DMC) project in 2013, but the Legislature said they wouldn’t come until the Star Tribune newspaper logoclinic and private investors first put up their own money. Now that has happened, with almost $300 million in private investment. The figures released Thursday by the DMC board put private investment totals so far at $297.7 million, a figure that covers everything from a new sign at a private business to a $68 million Mayo project at its Saint Marys Campus.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: KTTCBecker’s Hospital Review, U.S. News & World Report, KDLT News, Kansas City Star, Post-Bulletin, Santa Cruz Sentinel, LMT Online, Post-Bulletin, ABC News, Wichita Eagle, Las Vegas Sun

Related coverage:

Star Tribune, Destination Medical Center by Lisa Clarke

Post-Bulletin (special report table of contents)

Post-Bulletin, Special Report- DMC: Transforming Rochester

Post-Bulletin, The hustle is over; the show’s about to begin

Post-Bulletin, Where in Discovery Square will Mortenson build first? 

Post-Bulletin, Saint Marys area prepares for dramatic change

Post-Bulletin, Developers discover Discovery Square 

Post-Bulletin, Hammes doubles down on Rochester investment

Post-Bulletin, Where health care meets hospitality 

Post-Bulletin, Staver: As DMC unfolds, we must protect city’s values

Post-Bulletin, DMC will be a draw for millennials 

Post-Bulletin, Powers: History should repeat itself, with DMC

Post-Bulletin, Will DMC create 'Silicon Valley of Medicine'? 

Context: The Destination Medical Center Corporation (DMCC) Executive Committee announced today that the DMC economic development initiative exceeded the $200 million private development investment threshold –needed to trigger the release of state DMC dollars to be used for public infrastructure improvements – by $97.7 million, totaling $297.7 million in private investment. “Reaching this important milestone reaffirms that we are on the right track, and Rochester is already experiencing growth and new opportunities,” said Lt. Gov. Tina Smith, DMCC Board Chair. “With the $200 million threshold met, I look forward to working with the State of Minnesota, Rochester community and Mayo Clinic to invest in transportation, world-class amenities, and other public infrastructure that supports opportunity for everyone.” More information can be found on the Destination Medical Center website.

Contacts:  Kelley Luckstein, Bob Nellis

 

ActionNewsJax
Mayo Clinic study: High-intensity interval training can reverse aging process
by Danielle Avitable

A new study by the Mayo Clinic found that certain workouts can reverse the aging process. The study found that a high-intensity interval training workout, combined with resistance training, can turn back time. "You're essentially slowing down that aging process, what I think is amazing, because we didn't have those things before," Dr. Vandana Bhide, of the Mayo Clinic, said.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Additional coverage: Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Previous coverage in March 24, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in March 17, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in March 1o, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Everyone knows that exercise is good for you, but what type of training helps most, especially when you’re older - say over 65? A Mayo Clinic study says it’s high-intensity aerobic exercise, which can reverse some cellular aspects of aging. The findings appear in Cell MetabolismMayo researchers compared high-intensity interval training, resistance training and combined training. All training types improved lean body mass and insulin sensitivity, but only high-intensity and combined training improved aerobic capacity and mitochondrial function for skeletal muscle. Decline in mitochondrial content and function are common in older adults. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Kevin Punsky, Bob Nellis

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Tags: ABC News, ABC2 Baltimore, AccuWeather, ActionNewsJax, aging, Aiden Remme, Albert Lea Tribune, allergies, alzheimer's disease, anger rooms, anxiety, apps


January 27th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik


CBS News
Healthcare providers on how healthcare may change under Trump

The CEOs of the Mayo Clinic, Cleveland Clinic and New York-Presbyterian Hospital sat down with CBS News at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. They offered their thoughts on how healthcare may change in the incoming Trump administration.CBS News Logo

Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

Related coverage in the January 20, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Star Tribune
Aging boomers, lack of funding for Alzheimer's may lead to 'major social and economic crisis'
by Allie Shah

Do we cure cancer, heart disease or diabetes? No, but we can make significant progress," said Dr. Ron Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Star Tribune newspaper logoAlzheimer's disease Research Center. "So if I'm destined to develop Alzheimer's disease-related changes in the brain at age 75, and I can push that to age 78 or 80, that's a big deal. That's why I say delaying onset and slowing progression is a more realistic goal than a cure." Petersen will participate in a panel discussion, hosted by TPT Tuesday, on the state of Alzheimer's disease in Minnesota. The event is sold out.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

NPR
Athlete-Turned-Trucker Works To Improve Truckers' Health
by Alex Smith

On a chilly winter morning, dozens of truck driver trainees file into a classroom at the headquarters of Prime Inc., a trucking company based in Springfield, Mo. At the front is Siphiwe Baleka, an energetic former swimming champion in his mid-40s. He delivers grim news about trucker
health to the new recruits. "If you haven't started to think about this, you need to start right now," Baleka says. ..The relatively small lifestyle changes that Baleka promotes could be enough to make a life-changing difference in the health of many truck drivers, says Dr. Clayton Cowl, chief of preventive, occupational and aerospace medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. "The drivers themselves — they don't need to be running marathons, necessarily," Cowl says.

Reach: Shots is the online channel for health stories from the NPR Science Desk.

Context:  Clayton Cowl, M.D. heads Mayo Clinic's preventive, occupational and aerospace medicine. The division consists of 22 physicians who have specialty training in internal medicine or family practice and a team of trained occupational health nurses. Several of our physicians are board-certified in preventive, occupational and/or aerospace medicine. Mayo Clinic's integrated group practice model makes consultation with any other medical specialists readily available.

Contact:  Kelly Reller

 

Star Tribune
Filmmaker Ken Burns on Mayo Clinic: 'One of the most amazing medical places on Earth'
by Neal Justin

Ever since a Mayo Clinic newsletter mentioned this past October that Ken Burns' production company was spending time on the Rochester Star Tribune newspaper logocampus for an upcoming documentary, details have been sketchy…On a website for the Better Angels Society, the foundation that supports Burns' work and raises funds for them, it categorizes "The Mayo Clinic" under "Ken Burns Presents: The Next Generation," a division dedicated to a new generation of filmmakers with their boss lending his reputation and guidance as an executive producer.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: City Pages

Context:  To learn more about the Ken Burns' film, check out this story in Mayo Clinic in the Loop.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

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Tags: ABC News, Affordable care act, ALN magazine, alzheimers, Apple, apps, Associated Press, Becker’s Hospital Review, blisters, Boston Scientific, Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer News


January 13th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

First Coast News
The Chat Wednesday January 11: Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa Part 1

First Coast News
The Chat Wednesday January 11: Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa Part 2

Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, Mayo Clinic neurosurgeon, joined “The Chat,” a live afternoon show on Jacksonville’s First Coast News. TheFirst Coast News Logo show’s web site breaks up the segments in two parts (see links below). The first segment focuses on his early life/career with images of his time at Johns Hopkins, and the second segment focuses on his role and work at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville.

Reach: First Coast News refers to two television stations in Jacksonville, Florida. WJXX, the ABC affiliate and WTLV, the NBC affiliate.

Previous coverage in September 23, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
Previous coverage in April 22, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, M.D., prominent neurosurgeon, researcher and educator, joined Mayo Clinic in 2016 as chair of the Department of Neurosurgery on the Florida campus, along with several members of his research team from Johns Hopkins Medicine. Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa is renown nationally and internationally as a surgeon, researcher, humanitarian and author. His laboratory has published many manuscripts and articles, submitted a number of patents and obtained three NIH grants. Students and fellows who worked with Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa have gone on to join leading neuroscience programs throughout the world. Mayo Clinic's world-renowned neurosurgeons perform more than 7,000 complex surgical procedures every year at campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota.

Contact: Kevin Punsky


Yahoo! News
Robert M. Jacobson stresses importance of flu vaccine

The Minnesota Department of Health released a report on Thursday on the increase of flu activity throughout the state. Friday afternoon, we Logo of Yahoo Newsspoke with a health professional at Mayo Clinic about the importance of getting the flu vaccine. According to the Minnesota Department of Health's report released on Thursday flu season is in full swing, and can indeed continue to increase in activity. In fact, Dr. Jacobson, a primary care physician and professor of pediatrics at Mayo Clinic, said in the last two weeks alone, there were 50 hospitalized patients in Minnesota from the flu.

Reach: Yahoo News receives more than 8.4 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: KTTC

Context:  Robert Jacobson, M.D. is a pediatrician with the Mayo Clinic Children's Center. Dr. Jacobson also serves as the medical director for the Population Health Science Program at Mayo Clinic's Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery. He also leads Mayo's Employee and Community Health (ECH) Research Initiative. You can read about his medical research here.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Wisconsin Public Radio
The Mayo Clinic Diet: Second Edition

It's the beginning of a new year, a time when many people resolve to make healthier choices--like eating a healthier diet. We learn how to improve health while losing weight with the medical editor of "The Mayo Clinic Diet." He says this plan is a lifestyle and not a diet in the traditional sense. We learn how it works.

Reach: Wisconsin Public Radio consists of 34 radio stations programmed by seven regional studios and carrying programming on three content networks: the Ideas Network, the NPR News and Classical Network and the All Classical Network.

Additional coverage: 

Post-Bulletin, The Mayo Clinic Diet earns top honor
KTTC, Mayo Clinic Diet is #1, according to U.S. News & World Report
KWLM Willmar Radio, KFGO Fargo-Moorhead, 104.7 DukeFM, WXOW La Crosse

Previous coverage in the January 6, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context:  As the second edition of The Mayo Clinic Diet hits store shelves, the diet plan has been named Best Commercial Diet by U.S. News & World Report.  “We are honored to be recognized for a weight-loss method that offers lasting results,” says Donald Hensrud, M.D., medical editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet and director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. Learn more about the Mayo Clinic by watching this Mayo Clinic Minute or read more about it on Mayo Clinic Network. “The Mayo Clinic Diet is much more than a diet,” Dr. Hensrud says. “It’s a lifestyle program in which people can eat great-tasting food and feel better right away ─ even while they lose weight. More importantly, these lifestyle changes are sustainable and can improve long-term health as people reach and maintain a healthy weight.”

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

MPR
For Rochester, becoming the 'Silicon Valley of Medicine' won't be easy
by Catharine Richert

The Destination Medical Center project wants to give Rochester a reputation for something it's never been: a magnet for tech start-ups and MPR News logoentrepreneurs. But turning the city into what the DMC calls the "Silicon Valley of Medicine" won't be easy. The DMC is a multibillion, 20-year economic development effort to remake Rochester so Mayo can better compete for both patients and top talent. It's also meant to help diversify the region's economy by attracting new businesses. But Rochester's risk-averse culture has held it back, said Jamie Sundsbak, an entrepreneur and former Mayo Clinic researcher. "When you have a large medical institution like the Mayo Clinic — a world renowned, top medical institution in the world — you get that way by eliminating risk," he said. "If you look at some of the entrepreneurial communities, risk is what they are excited about."

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: With Mayo Clinic at its heart, the Destination Medical Center (DMC) initiative is the catalyst to position Rochester, Minnesota as the world’s premier destination for health and wellness; attracting people, investment opportunities, and jobs to America’s City for Health and supporting the economic growth of Minnesota, its bioscience sector, and beyond.

Contacts: Duska AnastasijevicSusan Barber Lindquist

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Tags: 104.7 DukeFM, AccuWeather, advisory board, Albert Lea Tribune, Alzforum, apps, asthma, Austin Herald, Becker’s Hospital Review, Breast Cancer, breastfeeding, Brooke Werneburg


February 9th, 2010

Land of 10,000+ apps

By Kelley Luckstein KelleyLuckstein

Minnesota has a thriving tech community producing popular applications for the iTunes Store, even if there's no easy way to count them…

 

Tracking Minnesota-connected apps isn't easy. The iTunes Store doesn't break them down by region. And even if it did, not all apps are independently developed. Look up the Public Radio app, for example, and it's credited to the Public Radio Exchange, the Boston-based entity that hired CodeMorphic to do the actual development. CodeMorphic also has done work for clients as diverse as NBC Universal and the Mayo Clinic, all of which distributed the resulting apps under their brands and names.

 

Star Tribune, by Randy Salas, 2/8/2010

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Tags: apps, iTunes


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