Items Tagged ‘arthritis’

January 6th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik


Reuters

‘Hidden’ celiac disease less common now in U.S.
by Shereen Lehman

Fewer people in the U.S. have celiac disease without realizing it, a new study finds. The actual proportion of people with celiac disease in the United States has not changed since 2009, researchers say. “The total prevalence is stable,” Dr. Joseph Murray told Reuters Health in a phone interview. But there are fewer people walking around with “hidden” celiac disease. “When you look at the proportion that are diagnosedReuters Logo versus undiagnosed, that's gone up dramatically. Go back six years and most patients were undiagnosed, with only about one in five getting diagnosed,” said Murray, a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota who was part of the study team.

Reach: Reuters has 196 editorial bureaus in 130 countries and 2,400 editorial staff members and covers international news, regional news, politics, social issues, health, business, sports and media.

Context: Joseph Murray, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist. Dr. Murray's research interests focus in two distinct areas: celiac disease and esophageal disorders. To learn more about celiac disease, check out this Mayo Clinic radio interview with Dr. Murray.

Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Joe Dangor

 

Today.com
The real brain food could be fresh veggies and olive oil, study finds
by Maggie Fox

People got points for light to moderate drinking — in this case about a third of drink a day to no more than three drinks a day on average for men and two for women. Dr. David Knopman, a professor of neurology TODAY Showat the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota who was not involved in the study, said this could translate to real-life benefits. “Loss of brain volume is an inevitable part of the aging process,” Knopman told NBC News. “A bigger brain is in general better for you because at least in late life, it makes a person more resistant to the effects of brain diseases,” he added.

Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show.

Context: David Knopman, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist.  Dr. Knopman is involved in research in late-life cognitive disorders, such as mild cognitive impairment and dementia. Dr. Knopman's specific interests are in the very early stages of Alzheimer's disease, in cognitive impairment due to stroke (cerebrovascular disease) and in cognitive impairment due to frontotemporal degeneration.

Contacts: Susan Barber Lindquist, Traci Klein

 

Post-Bulletin
Brewer has FAITH in Rochester
by Brett Boese

When Mayo Clinic Dr. LaPrincess Brewer took the stage last month in Charlotte, N.C., Jackie Johnson couldn't help beaming with pride. Johnson, a vocal advocate within Rochester's Black community, hasn't stopped singing Brewer's praises as the Brewer's success has resonated across the country, even as it flies under the radar locally. Brewer's FAITH program, an acronym for Fostering African-AmericanLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaper Improvement in Total Health, was among the featured attractions at the 28th annual Healthy Churches 2020 National Conference that was held in her hometown. Its initial success in Baltimore and the ensuing impact in Minnesota since Brewer arrived at Mayo in 2013 has prompted significant accolades for the charismatic 35-year-old cardiologist.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context: LaPrincess Brewer, M.D., M.P.H., has a primary research focus in developing strategies to reduce and ultimately eliminate cardiovascular disease health disparities in racial and ethnic minority populations and in underserved communities through health promotion and community-based participatory research. Dr. Brewer also has special interest in increasing minority and women's participation in cardiovascular clinical trials through mobile health (mHealth) interventions. Additionally, she has published work on faith-based interventions for cardiovascular disease prevention, racial differences in weight maintenance and psychosocial factors influencing cardiac risk factors.

Contact: Ethan Grove

 

ABC News
US News and World Report Releases List of Best Diets
by Gillian Mohney

Every year many Americans make a New Year's resolution to lose weight, but finding ways to drop pounds and keep them off is difficult. Today, U.S. News and World Report released its annual list of the best diets, ABC News logoaccording to nutrition and medical experts. The diets were chosen by a panel of nutritionists, dietary consultants, physicians and other experts convened by U.S News and World Report. Mayo Clinic Diet: This diet is broken into two parts. The first part requires no calorie counting, but dieters are stuck with meals made up of healthy foods including whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and healthy fats, as well as at least 30 minutes of physical activity a day.

Reach: ABC News Online has more than 28.8 million unique visitors to its site each month. ABC’s World News Tonight with David Muir averages about 9.2 million viewers each night.

Additional coverage:
HealthDay, Plant-Based Diets Score Big for Healthy Weight Loss
WATE6 Knoxville, U.S. News and World Report ranks top diets
FOX News, US News ranks best diet plans for 2017
Atlanta Journal-ConstitutionWant to lose weight? Experts say these are the best diets of 2017
FOX4 Dallas, Lose weight faster by tracking habits

Context:  As the second edition of The Mayo Clinic Diet hits store shelves, the diet plan has been named Best Commercial Diet by U.S. News & World Report.  “We are honored to be recognized for a weight-loss method that offers lasting results,” says Donald Hensrud, M.D., medical editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet and director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. Learn more about the Mayo Clinic by watching this Mayo Clinic Minute or read more about it on Mayo Clinic Network. “The Mayo Clinic Diet is much more than a diet,” Dr. Hensrud says. “It’s a lifestyle program in which people can eat great-tasting food and feel better right away ─ even while they lose weight. More importantly, these lifestyle changes are sustainable and can improve long-term health as people reach and maintain a healthy weight.”

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

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Tags: ABC News, Affordable care act, Albert Lea Tribune, alternative medicine, anxiety, arthritis, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Attn:, Baltimore Sun, Becker’s Hospital Review, Beloit Daily News, Billings Gazette


December 16th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Chicago Tribune
Is bone broth the next hot health trend?
by Alison Bowen

Jason Ewoldt, a dietitian at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program in Rochester, Minn., said patients often ask him about something new they've read about. People often think, he said, "if a little bit's good, maybe a lot is better." But far from assuming what's best is tripling your boneChicago Tribune Logo broth intake after reading about its benefits, he said, "that's not necessarily the case." He said some people consider bone broth a magic elixir, crediting it with improving joint function and gut health.

Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 384,000 and a weekend circulation of more than 686,000.

Context: Jason Ewoldt is a dietitian at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program, which is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

HealthDay
Was football safer back in the day?

In a finding that suggests football used to be a less dangerous sport, a small study shows that men who played in high school in the 1950s and Health Day Logo1960s may not be at increased risk for dementia or memory problems…"What we can say is, for that era, football did not increase the risks of neurodegenerative disease compared with other sports," said senior researcher Dr. Rodolfo Savica, a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: NWI Times, Healthline, KTTC, WebMD, KIMT, CBS News, Medical News TodayWTAJ Pennsylvania, MSN

Context: A Mayo Clinic study published online recently in Mayo Clinic Proceedings found that varsity football players from 1956 to 1970 did not have an increased risk of degenerative brain diseases compared with athletes in other varsity sports. The researchers reviewed all the yearbooks and documented team rosters for Mayo High School and Rochester High School, now called John Marshall High School. The high school football players were compared with non-football playing athletes who were swimmers, basketball players and wrestlers. More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Reuters
Rural U.S. babies hardest hit by opiate addiction at birth
by Lisa Rapaport

These babies may have central nervous system issues like seizures and tremors, gastrointestinal problems and feeding difficulties, breathing challenges, as well as unstable body temperatures. “It is clear that neonatal abstinence syndrome is a growing problem across the country,” saidReuters Logo Dr. William Carey, a pediatric researcher at Mayo Clinic Children’s Center in Rochester, Minnesota. “While some state-level data has suggested that neonatal abstinence syndrome disproportionately affected rural counties, this is the first study to show that rural communities throughout America are particularly affected by this epidemic,” Carey, who wasn’t involved in the study, added by email.

Reach: Reuters has 196 editorial bureaus in 130 countries and 2,400 editorial staff members and covers international news, regional news, politics, social issues, health, business, sports and media.

Additional coverage: Yahoo! Sports

Context: William Carey, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic pediatrician with Mayo Clinic Children's Center. Mayo Clinic Children's Center pediatric and adolescent medicine specialists provide comprehensive care for the diagnosis and treatment of a wide range of diseases and conditions.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Tonic
The First Legit Study of Stem Cells and Arthritis Had Surprising Results
by Evy Pitt Stoller

According to a study led by the Mayo Clinic's Shane Shapiro, an orthopedic and sports medicine physician, the recent use of bone marrow stem Tonic cells in painful, arthritic joints has dramatically increased, while exactly how well the treatment works—or how safe it is—has yet to be made clear. "So many of these therapies are going on without the science to back it up," he says. "We weren't comfortable offering this treatment to patients until we or someone else had studied it in a rigorous fashion."

Reach: Tonic is a website hosted by Vice covering health and wellness, science, health issues, world health news and other topics.

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida have conducted the world’s first prospective, blinded and placebo-controlled clinical study to test the benefit of using bone marrow stem cells, a regenerative medicine therapy, to reduce arthritic pain and disability in knees. The researchers say such testing is needed because there are at least 600 stem cell clinics in the U.S. offering one form of stem cell therapy or another to an estimated 100,000-plus patients, who pay thousands of dollars, out of pocket, for the treatment, which has not undergone demanding clinical study.“Our findings can be interpreted in ways that we now need to test — one of which is that bone marrow stem cell injection in one ailing knee can relieve pain in both affected knees in a systemic or whole-body fashion,” says the study’s lead author, Shane Shapiro, M.D., a Mayo Clinic orthopedic physician. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Twin Cities Business
Mayo Researchers Land Patent For Non-Invasive Pancreatic Cancer Test
by Don Jacobson

The same Mayo Clinic research team that developed the Cologuard DNA-based stool test for colorectal cancer has also been working on similar technology for the early detection of pancreatic cancer. After encouraging early studies, they have now landed a patent for their methods. Dr.Twin Cities Business Magazine Logo David Ahlquist, a Mayo Clinic medical professor and consultant in its division of gastroenterology and hepatology, led the team that, late in the last decade, developed the genomic science behind the Cologuard test, which Mayo licensed in 2009 to Exact Sciences Corp. (NASDAQ: EXAS) of Madison, Wisconsin. Now, in a patent dated November 29, Ahlquist and Mayo colleagues Dr. John Kisiel, William R. Taylor, Tracy Yab and Douglas Mahoney were also granted rights to their method of “Detecting Neoplasm,” through which bio-samples, such as those collected from stool, can be analyzed for pancreatic cancer-related DNA biomarkers.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Context:  David Ahlquist M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist and co-inventor of the Cologuard test.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

ActionNewsJax
Air Force veteran hopes to meet donor's family after lung transplant in Jacksonville — A Georgia Air Force veteran ActionNewsJaxgot a double lung transplant at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville hours after his wife was told he was going to die… An hour after doctors said he wasn’t going to make it, two healthy lungs became available. The 21-year-old woman’s lungs were a match for Terry Junn. Doctors flew them into Mayo Clinic from Mississippi and Terry Junn went into surgery.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Related coverage: 
ActionNewsJax, Veteran gets double lung transplant in Jacksonville hours after doctors said he was going to die

Context: A lung transplant is a surgical procedure to replace a diseased or failing lung with a healthy lung, usually from a deceased donor. A lung transplant is reserved for people who have tried other medications or treatments, but their conditions haven't sufficiently improved. At Mayo Clinic, a team of doctors and staff work together to evaluate and treat people who may need lung transplants. Mayo Clinic's Transplant Center staff at Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota works together to evaluate and treat people who may need a lung transplant. Mayo Clinic offers common recommendations, evaluation processes, treatment, post-surgical care and follow-up care for lung transplant candidates at Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. Mayo Clinic uses technology to help make patient information available as needed at all three locations.

Contact: Paul Scotti

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Tags: 3D labs, ABC15 Arizona, ActionNewsJax, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimer's disease, arthritis, Becker's ASC Review, Becker’s Hospital Review, blood donation, bone broth, Boston Globe, breast cancer screening


October 14th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

MPR
Your genes can affect how medications work in your body

Doctors are learning about a new tool that can help them determine what the best treatment option is for each individual patient. It's called individualized medicine and it's the topic of a conference happening this week at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester. MPR's Phil Picardi spoke with Dr.MPR News logo Keith Stewart, who is the director of the Mayo Clinic's Center for Individualized Medicine.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Keith Stewart, M.B., Ch.B is a Mayo Clinic hematologist and director of Mayo's Center for Individualized Medicine.  Individualized medicine, also known as personalized medicine or precision medicine, means tailoring diagnosis and treatment to each patient to optimize care. Patients have experienced this kind of care for a century and a half at Mayo Clinic, where teams of specialists have always worked together to find answers.

Contact: Susan Buckles

 

TIME
The Case for Being Messy
by Tim Harford

Messy disruptions will be most powerful when combined with creative skill. The disruption puts an artist, scientist or engineer in unpromising Time magazine logoterritory—a deep valley rather than a familiar hilltop…We’re often told that good work comes from the ability to focus, to shut out distractions. To choose from a plethora of self-help tips along these lines, a Mayo Clinic psychologist, Dr Amit Sood, advises us to focus more effectively by turning off the TV, logging out of email and taking up “attention training” to “train your brain.”

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Amit Sood, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in General Internal Medicine and the Cancer Center. Dr. Sood is editor of the  Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness and The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Wall Street Journal
Can New Smartphone Apps Help Migraine Sufferers?
by Laura Johannes

David Dodick, a professor of neurology and director of headache medicine at Mayo Clinic, in Phoenix, says some migraine sufferers may not need the apps if they have obvious triggers, such as alcohol use or menstruation. More likely to benefit are people whose migraine attacks occur whenWSJ Banner several triggers “stack” on top of each other. “For example, you’re an accountant and it’s tax time, you’re stressed, sleep-deprived and you have a glass of wine to unwind. All those factors together have pushed you over the edge,” suggests Dr. Dodick, who is president of the International Headache Society.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: David Dodick, M.D. is a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Huffington Post
What Your Body Type Can Reveal About Your Health
by Deborah Long

It’s important to know which body type you are, because your health risks vary accordingly. A quick look in the mirror should tell you whether you’re an apple or a pear, but if you’re not sure, you can ask your doctor next time you have a physical. Michael Jensen, M.D., an endocrinologist Huffington Post Logowith the Mayo Clinic, is an expert on the health risks associated with excess weight. He has spent fully three decades studying the risks overweight patients face and is considered a pioneer of correlating how body type – or where excess weight is carried – relates to the likelihood of developing various diseases. His research has led him to conclude that there is no question that one body type is especially at risk for life-threatening conditions.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique visitors.

Context:  Michael Jensen, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Jensen and his lab study the effects of obesity and how body fat (adipose tissue) and body fat distribution influence health. The regulated uptake, storage and release of fatty acids from adipose tissue play a major role in determining its health effects.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic hits 30th year in Jacksonville by Mayo Clinic hits 30th year in Jacksonville
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville opened to patients 30 years ago, including 2,700 people from 30 states who already made appointments. By today’s standards, the facility was a small scale operation: One medical building, 37 physicians, 158 other employees. Contrast that to what MayoFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo is today — a medical center today that sprawls over 18 buildings and a parking garage on the campus located off San Pablo Road. Four-hundred-ninety-five physicians and scientists — many researchers with doctorates — and 4,664 other employees work there.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida is celebrating 30 years of providing high-quality medical care in Northeast Florida. Since the clinic opened in 1986, more than 600,000 unique patients from all 50 states and 143 countries have come to the Florida campus for Mayo’s unique, patient-centered approach to medical care. “Innovation is in our DNA at Mayo Clinic,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., CEO, Mayo Clinic in Florida. “Through three decades of growth, Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida has invested in people, space and technology to carry forward the vision of our founders and meet the needs of patients, today and into the future.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

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Tags: A.L.S., alzheimer's disease, arthritis, ATRI, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, birth control, body type, brain tumor, Business Insider, canker sores, CBS News, Cuddle Cot


August 12th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Buzzfeed
What You Should Know About Zika If You’re Going To The Olympics
by Anthony Rivas

So much so that athletes from around the world — mostly golfers, but also basketball players and cyclists — have given up their chance at winning gold over concerns that they might get infected. Meanwhile, lots of other spectators getting ready to fly down are probably wondering,BuzzFeed Logo “Is it really worth the risk?” …For men and women who don’t plan on having kids anytime soon, “the impact of the Zika virus on you is probably going to be very minimal,” Tosh said. In fact, about 80% of people who become infected “have absolutely no symptoms whatsoever.”

Reach: BuzzFeed receives more than 15.7 million unique visitors each month to its website and targets pop culture and social media enthusiasts.

Additional coverage:
HealthDay, Zika Won't Pose Risks at the Olympics: Health Experts
Hospitals & Health Networks, Clinical Vaccine Trials Underway; Rio Olympics See Few Mosquitoes by Matt O’Connor

Context: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued an emergency travel advisory after health officials in Florida identified local transmission of Zika virus in a Miami neighborhood. The CDC advisory recommends pregnant women and their partners avoid nonessential travel to Lynwood, a neighborhood in Miami, Florida where the Zika virus is active. Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist Dr. Pritish Tosh says, "It is somewhat unprecedented for a travel advisory to be issued to a very specific neighborhood. That's a testament to the strength of the epidemiology that has been going on, and how well the CDC and other health authorities have been working at this." More information, including a video interview with Dr. Tosh, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Bob Nellis, Deb Balzer

 

Chicago Tribune
Dirty baby: Just how clean does your child need to be?
by Bill Daley

Cleanliness may be next to godliness, or so the old rhyme scolded us, but is it healthiest — particularly for babies and children? "People are very Chicago Tribune Logoconcerned, almost preoccupied, with their child touching a surface that is not clean," said Dr. Angela C. Mattke, a pediatrician at the Mayo Clinic Children's Center in Rochester, Minn. "Early exposure to their environment full of germs, bacteria and viruses is not a bad thing." "Not everything a child touches should be sterilized," she added. "You don't have to wash their hands every time."

Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 384,000 and a weekend circulation of more than 686,000.

Context: Angela Mattke, M.D. is a pediatrician with Mayo Children's Center which is rated in all US News & World Report pediatric specialty categories and is the only children’s hospital in the five-state region to rank in all 10 specialties.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Chicago Tribune
Crawling: The next best core workout?
by Alison Bowen

Your next best exercise doesn't involve equipment, running, jumping or even standing. "Make the floor your friend," says Danielle Johnson, a physical therapist at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program in Rochester, Minn. As a working mom, Johnson is always looking for ways toChicago Tribune Logo challenge exercise norms. "We're looking for things that are a little outside of the box sometimes," she said. Crawling is one of those things. She said it's an "amazing core exercise" that also benefits the legs, shoulders, arms and chest.

Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 384,000 and a weekend circulation of more than 686,000.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life. The program is research-driven around diet, exercise and resiliency, and, when all of these are connected, they encompass the power needed to make sustainable changes. For more information, visit https://healthyliving.mayoclinic.org/.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Wall Street Journal
At the Rio Olympics, Women Athletes Bump Against a Gold Ceiling
by Kevin Helliker and Matthew Futterman

Sports scientists say there is no physiological reason for shortening courses for female athletes or, for that matter, games such as tennis, where women play the best out of three sets versus best of five for men. In WSJ Bannerfact, some research suggests women are built to go farther than men, if at a slower pace. While that remains unproven, the notion that women have inferior endurance capacities has been debunked. “That’s totally anachronistic,” says Michael Joyner, a former competitive marathoner who studies sports science at the Mayo Clinic.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Related coverage:
ABC News, Olympic Swimmer Katie Ledecky Blows Competition Out of the Water
Business Insider, Why Katie Ledecky's Olympic world record Sunday night is even more amazing than you think
Business Insider, Here's an exact breakdown of why 6'4" Michael Phelps has the perfect body for swimming
Business Insider, The internet is driving athletes to do crazy things no one knew were possible
Tech Insider, People are stronger and faster than ever before, but the reason why isn’t what you think

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist.  Dr. Joyner's research team is interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

TIME
What Is Cupping? Here’s What You Need to Know
by Alexandra Sifferlin

…There is a difference between how cupping is practiced in traditional Chinese medicine and how it is used in Western medicine, says Dr. Brent Bauer, director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program. Bauer says a traditional Chinese medicine practitioner would likely offer cupping as part of a larger integrative health check, which might include recommendations around nutrition and otherTime magazine logo health things, and not just as a one-off therapy. “It’s kind of an American phenomena, I think, to consider cupping by itself,” he says.

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:
HealthDayDoes 'Cupping' = Success for Olympic Athletes?
Live ScienceMichael Phelps' Weird Bruises: Does Cupping Therapy Really Work?
Jakarta Post, Phelps puts spotlight on cupping
CCTV-AmericaIt works for Michael Phelps, so we tried “cupping” for the first time

Context:  Brent Bauer, M,D., is director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program. As director of the program, Dr. Bauer has broad and varied research interests. Since its founding in 2001, the program has promoted a collaborative spirit that enables researchers from both within and outside Mayo Clinic to share resources, ideas and expertise regarding research in this exciting realm.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

WCCO-Radio
Mayo Clinic ranks #1 in latest US News and World Report Rankings

Interview with Dr. John Noseworthy and Dave Lee.

WCCO-AM Dave LeeReach: WCCO radio, a CBS owned and operated affiliate in Minneapolis, boasts one of the largest coverage areas in the country as it reaches into portions of North and South Dakota during the day. At night, the station’s signal typically reaches across many U.S. states and Canadian provinces.

Additional coverage:
KTAR-TV, US News & World Report grades Phoenix’s Mayo Clinic top hospital in Arizona
Arizona Daily Star, U.S. News & World Report ranks Tucson hospital third in state
Healio, Mayo Clinic ranked as top hospital for neurology and neurosurgery
WIBW-TV, New ranking proves patients are in good hands at Stormont Vail Health 

Previous coverage in August 5, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Mayo Clinic was named the best hospital in the nation in U.S. News & World Report’s annual list of top hospitals published online today. In addition, Mayo Clinic is ranked No. 1 in more specialties than any other hospital in the country. Mayo Clinic took the No. 1 spot in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. It also ranked No. 1 in the Phoenix metro area and in the Jacksonville metro area. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Twin Cities Business
Mayo’s New Blood Test Could Predict Chances Of Experiencing A Heart Attack
by Sam Schaust

Mayo Clinic launched a new type of blood test on Wednesday that is the first-of-its-kind in the U.S. With the new test, measurements are taken from blood concentrations of plasma ceramides, a class of lipids highly linked to cardiovascular disease events, such as a heart attack. It’s believed the test could even predict the chance of a cardiovascular event as much as a year before it occurs. “Through our strongTwin Cities Business Magazine Logo collaboration with Zora Biosciences, we hope our new test will improve the evaluation of individuals at risk for cardiovascular disease,” said Jeff Meeusen, co-director of Mayo’s Cardiovascular Laboratory Medicine Group.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Additional coverage:
Clinical Lab Products, Mayo Clinic Launches Blood Test to Assess Heart Attack Risk

Context: Mayo Clinic has launched a new type of blood test that will be used to predict adverse cardiovascular events in patients with progressing coronary artery disease (CAD). The test measures blood concentrations of plasma ceramides, a class of lipids that are highly linked to cardiovascular disease processes. Researchers say this test is especially useful for patients with CAD when it does not improve with treatment or for young patients with premature CAD. The new test will help clinicians identify at-risk individuals and is available to Mayo Clinic patients and health care providers worldwide through Mayo Medical Laboratories (MML). MML is the reference laboratory of Mayo Clinic, offering advanced laboratory testing and pathology services to more than 5,000 health care organizations in more than 60 countries. MML collaborated on the test with Zora Biosciences Oy, a diagnostics discovery company based in Finland that specializes in cardiovascular disease. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Gina Chiri-Osmond

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Tags: ABC News, accupuncture, Addyson Cordes, AOL News, arthritis, Astrobiology, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, Best Hospitals, blood test, brain tumor, Breast Cancer, breast microbiome


October 2nd, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

HealthDay
Herceptin Best for Certain Breast Cancer Patients, Study Says

Herceptin is the best drug treatment for a type of breast cancer called HER2-positive and should remain the standard of care for that type of tumor, according to new findings from a long-term clinical trial. HER2-positive breast cancers tend to be more aggressive than other types of breast cancer, according to theHealth Day Logo Mayo Clinic… Heart safety was rated good for both groups of patients. And there was no difference in the rate of cancer spreading from the breast to the brain, study co-chair Dr. Edith Perez, director of the Breast Cancer Translational Genomics Program at the Mayo Clinic in Florida, said in a Mayo news release.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: US News & World Report

Context: Analysis of more than 8,000 women who participated in the world’s largest study of two treatments for HER2-positive breast cancer reinforces other findings from the clinical trial showing that trastuzumab (Herceptin) should remain the standard of care for this cancer, says a Mayo Clinic researcher. This study, being presented at the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) 2014 Congress in Madrid, reveals that when used as a single HER2-targeted therapy in addition to standard chemotherapy, trastuzumab offers a better outcome than does lapatinib (Tykerb), says Edith A. Perez, M.D., deputy director at large, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center and director of the Breast Cancer Translational Genomics Program at Mayo Clinic in Florida. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Paul Scotti

 

KAAL TV
Mayo Opens Spa Focusing on Overall Wellness
by Jenna Lohse

Mayo Clinic is internationally known for medical breakthroughs and lifesaving procedures, but now it's taken a new step into prevention. Doctors say it all comes down to a person's overall wellness. Mayo's new spa program called Rejuvenate just opened.  Step into a new part of Mayo Clinic's Healthy Living Program and KAAL-TV-6 logoleave the stresses in life behind for a bit. "I had my first facial today, so I’m a new believer,” said Dr. Brent Bauer, Medical Director of Rejuvenate. He says overall wellness is key. "I think it's time to ask that question how do we keep people from getting sick in the first point,” said Bauer… "A spa service such as message can lead to better outcomes, people who have had cardiac surgery for example, we've been doing some of those things in the hospital and the clinic setting for quite some time,” said Dr. Donald Hensrud, Medical Director of Mayo’s Healthy Living Program.

Reach:  KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Additional coverage:

Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic adds services at Healthy Living Program by Jeff Hansel, Mayo Clinic plans to open a spa and weight-loss program at its downtown Rochester Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center. "We are excited about taking wellness to the next level," Dr. Donald Hensrud, medical director of the Healthy Weight and Rejuvenate at Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program, said in a statement from the clinic. 

FOX 47 News, KTTC, WN.com

Context:  The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program, which launched earlier this year, is expanding its wellness offerings to include a weight management plan and spa services. The Healthy Weight Plan andRejuvenate at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program will open this fall and enhance the already popular wellness plans available for guests.  “We are excited about taking wellness to the next level,” says Donald Hensrud, M.D., the program’s medical director. “Our expanded services embrace the idea of involving the entire body and mind. No matter your age or health needs, if you’re looking to better manage stress, lose weight, get active, or eat and cook healthfully, our program offers a diverse selection of wellness options for anyone seeking whole-body wellness.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Star Tribune
Mayo opens downtown sports center
by Jeremy Olson

In the years to come, Mayo Clinic’s new sports medicine center in downtown Minneapolis will no doubt treat NBA stars, heal MLB sluggers and help promising athletes reach their potential.Star Tribune Health newspaper logo

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

Post-Bulletin, Answer Man: Mayo Clinic's Block E center opens Wednesday… What used to be called Block E, on Hennepin between Sixth and Seventh streets, has been peeled open and is covered with plastic while they work on the facade. On the third floor, the 15-screen cineplex has been gutted, and that's where the 22,000-square-foot Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center has been installed.

Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal, Mayo Clinic’s downtown Minneapolis clinic opens Wednesday by Katharine Grayson, Mayo Clinic will offer services ranging from regenerative-medicine treatments to golf-swing assessments at its downtown Minneapolis sports medicine facility opening Wednesday. The 22,000-square-foot clinic, part of a $50 million redevelopment of the Block E building, will employ about 30 people, said Medical Director Jon Finnoff in an interview.

KAAL, KARE11, WCCO, KTTC, KSTP, BringMeTheNews, Finance & Commerce

Context: Mayo Clinic announced this week the opening of Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center at Mayo Clinic Square in downtown Minneapolis. Services in the new 22,000-square-foot facility include health and well-being programs, injury prevention, EXOS (formerly Athletes’ Performance) performance solutions, physical rehabilitation and sport-specific skills programs, and diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic sports injuries for athletes of all ages. The facility will be staffed by orthopedic and physical medicine & rehabilitation physicians, physical therapists, athletic trainers, and strength and conditioning specialists, as well as EXOS performance specialists and dietitians.

sports 2

“For more than two decades, the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center has provided care for professional and international sports teams, premier athletes and weekend warriors from virtually every sport,” says Jonathan Finnoff, D.O., medical director, Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center at Mayo Clinic Square. “Our approach to integrated, multidisciplinary care to optimize performance, minimize risk and treat injury is truly a differentiator.” More information about Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center at Mayo Clinic Square in downtown Minneapolis can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

MPR
Focus on concussions transforms high school football in Minnesota
by Trisha Volpe

…"If athletes and parents and coaches and healthcare providers and administrators are aware of the problem, they understand the symptoms and signs, they're able to recognize them and maybe they're compelled to refer to a healthcare provider because of the law, then we are seeing more folks, which is a good thing," saidMPR News logo Dr. Michael Stuart, an orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine expert at Mayo Clinic.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context:  Michael Stuart, M.D. is co-director, Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

Other Mayo News on MPR:

MPR
Rat heart cells could offer clues to treating hypothermia
by Liz Baier

In a dark corner of a lab inside Mayo Clinic Hospital St. Mary's Campus, Niccole Schaible peers through a microscope into the cardiomyoctes, or muscle cells of a MPR News Logorat's heart. They're on a glass slide, nearly invisible to the naked eye. "It's kind of a cool procedure when you actually see it contracting," she said. "When you look through the microscope and actually see this thing beating."

Additional Coverage:

Brainerd Dispatch (MPR), Rat heart cells could offer clues to treating hypothermia by Liz Baier, In a dark corner of a lab inside Mayo Clinic Hospital St. Mary's Campus, Niccole Schaible peers through a microscope into the cardiomyoctes, or muscle cells of a rat's heart. They're on a glass slide, nearly invisible to the naked eye… Schaible is a graduate student of biomedical engineering and physiology at Mayo Clinic. She's using the rat's muscle cells to understand why heart failure often occurs when patients are warmed after severe hypothermia.

Austin Daily Herald, Fergus Falls Journal

MPR, Eleven years after cancer diagnosis, the bad news by Bob Collins, There’s more to define Jenna (Langer) Vancura’s life than her battle with cancer. But her illness has consumed a lot of it. The 27-year-old New Ulm, Minnesota, native spent much of her senior year in high school at the Mayo Clinic… On Tuesday, 11 years to the day since we first found my cancer, my doctors bravely told me that my body was finally succumbing to the disease. It’s that realization nobody wants to have, but most need to have at some point. My mom thanked my doctors for their honesty; it’s hard to come by.

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July 17th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

KAAL
Mayo Clinic Takes Top Spot on Best Hospitals List
by Jenna Lohse

Mayo Clinic in Rochester earns the top spot on a prestigious list of the nation's top hospitals. U.S. News and World Report ranked Mayo Clinic number one on its yearly list of the nation's best hospitals…"Oh, awesome. They know everything and if they don't know it they know where to get it,” said Peg Lesmann, who traveled to Mayo from North Dakota. "It's very well organized and run,KAAL-TV-6 logo everyone has been very friendly,” said Wayne Davis. "I’ve never seen anything go like clockwork, it's perfect," said Mary Bailey, patient at Mayo Clinic…"The fact that we're recognized for providing outstanding care in the community of outstanding health care organizations around the country, we're just very proud of that and I have to say, I think there's a little bit of a spring in our step today,” said Dr. John Noseworthy, Mayo Clinic CEO.

Reach:  KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Additional coverage:

Star TribuneMayo Clinic is ranked as top U.S. hospital by U.S. News

Baltimore Sun, Hopkins Hospital bumped from top spot to No. 3 on U.S. News ranking

ABC 15 ArizonaU.S. News and World Report ranks Mayo Clinic No. 1 in Phoenix and Arizona. Additional coverage: Tucson News

La Crosse Tribune, Gundersen, Mayo-Franciscan in top 15 Wisconsin hospitals on U.S. News list

WEAU Eau Claire, Mayo Clinic Health System recognized in annual best hospitals list

Eau Claire Leader-Telegram, Health Matters, High ranking: Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire is ranked No. 6 in Wisconsin and is recognized as the No. 1 hospital in northwestern Wisconsin in the 25th U.S. News & World Report annual America's Best Hospitals list released Tuesday. 

Endocrine Today, U.S. News & World Report announces top hospitals for endocrinology and diabetes care

US News & World Report, CNN, Huffington PostChicago Tribune, ABC News, Huffington Post, KTTC, Post-Bulletin, KSTP, New4Jax, KTTC, CBS News, MPR, KARE11, One American News, WebMD, Healio, NBC4 Calif., Twin Cities Business

Context: Mayo Clinic has achieved the highest honor in U.S. News and World Report’s ranking of top hospitalsMayo Clinic earned more number one rankings than any other provider, ranking number one or number two in 11 of the 12 specialties based on reputation, services and volumes, safety and clinical outcomes. “We have a deep commitment to delivering high-value health care that best meets patients' needs. We owe our success to truly dedicated staff that provide a seamless patient experience and the care that each individual needs,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Noseworthy, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Rebecca Eisenman

MPR
6 ways to improve childhood mental illness treatment

MPR News logoGuests: Jarrod Leffler: Child and adolescent psychologist in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychology at Mayo Clinic.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Jarrod Leffler, Ph.D., is a child and adolescent psychologist with Mayo Clinic Children's Center.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

Bloomberg Alzheimer Researchers See Protein as Target for Drugs by Michelle Cortez A protein discovered less than a decade ago appears to play a role in whether symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease emerge, suggesting another avenue for exploration in efforts to find a treatment…“This injects new vigor in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease,” said Keith Josephs, the lead author and a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, Bloombergin a telephone interview. “The world has focused on two proteins, beta amyloid and tau. TDP-43 is going to be the new kid on the block.”

Reach: Bloomberg has 2,300 media professionals in 146 bureaus across 72 countries. Bloomberg delivers its content across more than 400 publications, over 310 million households worldwide through Bloomberg Television and 500,000 in the New York metro area and 18.5 million subscribers through satellite radio.

Additional Coverage: AP, New brain protein tied to Alzheimer's disease Bloomberg, Alzheimer’s Drug Fails to Help Moderately Ill in Trials 

Tampa Bay Tribune, My FOX Philly, Gainesville Sun, WebMD, HealthDay, Star Tribune, ABC News, My FOX Phoenix

Context:  Since the time of Dr. Alois Alzheimer himself, two proteins (beta-amyloid (Aβ) and tau) have become tantamount to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). But a Mayo Clinic study challenges the perception that these are the only important proteins accounting for the clinical features of the devastating disease. In a large clinico-imaging pathological study, Mayo Clinic researchers demonstrated that a third protein (TDP-43) plays a major role in AD pathology. In fact, people whose brain was TDP positive were 10 times more likely to be cognitively impaired at death compared to those who didn’t have the protein, showing that TDP-43 has the potential to overpower what has been termed resilient brain aging. The study was published in the journal Acta Neuropathologica. “We wanted to determine whether the TDP-43 protein has any independent effect on the clinical and neuroimaging features typically ascribed to AD and we found that TDP-43 had a strong effect on cognition, memory loss and medial temporal atrophy in AD,” says Mayo Clinic neurologist Keith Josephs, M.D., the study’s lead investigator and author. “In the early stages of the disease when AD pathology was less severe, the presence of TDP-43 was strongly associated with cognitive impairment. Consequently, TDP-43 appears to play an important role in the cognitive and neuroimaging characteristics that have been linked to AD.” More information on the study, including a video interview with Dr. Josephs, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

Reuters
Mustaches may raise burn risk with home oxygen therapy
by Krystnell Storr

ReutersA new case report from U.S doctors suggests that men who use home oxygen therapy should consider a clean-shaven look to reduce their risk of serious facial burns. “If you’ve ever tried to start a campfire, you always start with some dry little twigs and once that starts - and that’s kind of the mustache - then that oxygen tubing lights on fire, it’s like a blow torch shooting up their nose,” said Dr. Andrew Greenlund of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. “So, if we can prevent it, it would be good.”

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world news, business news, technology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile, and interactive television platforms.

Additional coverage: Chicago Tribune, News Channel Daily

Context: Facial hair and home oxygen therapy can prove a dangerously combustible combination, a Mayo Clinic report published in the peer-reviewed medical journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings finds. To reach that conclusion, researchers reviewed home oxygen therapy-related burn cases and experimented with a mustachioed mannequin, a facial hair-free mannequin, nasal oxygen tubes and sparks. They found that facial hair raises the risk of home oxygen therapy-related burns, and encourage health care providers to counsel patients about the risk. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

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June 19th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Wall Street Journal
Effort Seeks to Reduce Ear-Tube Surgeries for Small Children
By Sumathi Reddy

Parents of young, otherwise healthy children fear them like the plague: ear infections…Contributing to a desire by doctors and parents to avoid surgery are concerns about the use of general anesthesia in young children. Researchers and doctors are exploring devices that would enable ear-tube procedures to be The Wall Street Journal newspaper logoperformed using alternatives. Preceptis Medical, a Plymouth, Minn., company, is testing a device, the Hummingbird, that uses nitrous oxide instead of general anesthesia in clinical trials at four sites, including the Mayo Clinic…Randall Flick, director of the Mayo Clinic Children's Center, said his and other studies show the risk seems to occur after multiple exposures.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Randall Flick, M.D. is director of Mayo Clinic Children's Center. For 150 years, Mayo Clinic has provided trusted answers for children and their parents. Mayo Clinic Children's Center includes providers from over 40 medical and surgical specialties, all focused on children's health care needs.

Public Affairs Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Traci Klein

 

Science Friday
Pre-Surgery Routine Needs an Update

Says Doc, For years, patients preparing for colon surgery have been told to stick to a liquid diet and do a colon cleanse. The only problem? There's not much science to back up those suggestions, says Robert Science FridayCima of the Mayo Clinic. He and his Mayo colleagues subscribe instead to the “enhanced recovery” approach, which spares patients the fasting and heavy narcotics in favor of regular meals and over-the-counter painkillers. Surgery is like running a marathon, he says, and the body needs to be in a normal state to brace for the big event.

Reach: Science Friday is a weekly science talk show, broadcast live over public radio stations nationwide from 2-4pm Eastern time as part of NPR's 'Talk of the Nation' programming. Each week, we focus on science topics that are in the news and try to bring an educated, balanced discussion to bear on the scientific issues at hand.

Context: Robert Cima, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic surgeon and chair of Mayo’s surgical quality subcommittee.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

KSTP
Burnsville Father and Son Hope for Gift of Life
by Naomi Pescovitz

As Minnesota families celebrate dads this Father's Day, a Burnsville family is especially grateful for another year together. Last winter, David Costello's double organ transplant saved his life. This year, theKSTP-TV Eyewitness News Log Costellos are hoping for the gift of life once again. David Costello waited four and a half years to finally get the call. "My phone lit up, the ID said Mayo Clinic," Costello said.

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Context: Mayo Clinic Transplant Center, with transplant services in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota, performs more transplants than any other medical center in the world.

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

Orlando Business Journal
Brevard County hospital first in C. Fla. to join Mayo Clinic network
by Matthew Richardson

Parrish Medical Center in Brevard County has formed a partnership with Mayo Clinic— the first hospital in the Central Florida area to do sOrlando Business Journal newspaper logoo, reports News 13. Parrish is now the 29th member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, under the umbrella of the original Mayo Clinic. The century-old, renowned nonprofit is focused on medical care and research, helping millions every year.

Additional coverage:

Florida Today, Parrish to benefit from Mayo's expertise

Bay News 9Parrish Medical Center joins Mayo Clinic network

Post-Bulletin, KROC AM, Becker’s Hospital ReviewStamford Advocate, Cincinnati Finance, EMoney Daily,Virtual-Strategy magazine, Townhall Finance, Review Seeker, News13 Fla., MoneyShow.com, Minyanville, KVVU Las Vegas, Financial Content, KAIT 8 Ark., Florida Today

Context: Mayo Clinic and Parrish Medical Center officials have announced Parrish Medical Center (PMC) as the 29th member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. PMC is the first Central Florida member of the network and the third in Florida. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

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May 8th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Prevention
The Hidden Type of Alzheimer's Doctors Miss
by Markham Heid

…The study team examined the brains of more than 1,800 confirmed Alzheimer's patients. They found the types of protein blockages and tangles associated with the hippocampal sparing form of Alzheimer's in 11% of those brain specimens. InPrevention logo this subtype, one type of protein called tau forms "tangles" in the parts of brain that control behavior, motor awareness, speech, and vision, explains Melissa Murray, PhD, who led the Mayo Clinic research team.

Reach: Prevention is published monthly with a circulation of 2.8 million.  Prevention - Online has more than 1.1 million unique visitors each month and has 9.3 million average page views each month.

Additional coverage: HealthDay, Alzheimer's Variation May Often Go Unrecognized: Study; Canada Journal, Health.com, Aetna InteliHealth, Bayoubuzz Health, BioPortfolio, DoctorsLounge, Hawaii News Now, Counsel & Heal, Innovations Report, KAIT Ark., FOX19 Ohio

Context: Neuroscientists at Mayo Clinic in Florida have defined a subtype of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) that they say is neither well recognized nor treated appropriately. The variant, called hippocampal sparing AD, made up 11 percent of the 1,821 AD-confirmed brains examined by Mayo Clinic researchers — suggesting this subtype is relatively widespread in the general population. The Alzheimer’s Association estimates that 5.2 million Americans are living with AD. And with nearly half of hippocampal sparing AD patients being misdiagnosed, this could mean that well over 600,000 Americans make up this AD variant, researchers say. More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

TIME
11 Reasons Why You’re Not Losing Belly Fat

…You’re getting older, As you get older, your body changes how it gains and loses weight. Both men and women experience a declining metabolic rate, or the number of calories theTime banner body needs to function normally. On top of that, women have to deal with menopause. “If women gain weight after menopause, it’s more likely to be in their bellies,” says Michael Jensen, MD, professor of medicine in the Mayo Clinic’s endocrinology division.

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Michael Jensen, MD. is an endocrinologist and diabetes expert.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

 

KAAL
Mayo Clinic Rolls Out Mobile Exhibit to Celebrate 150 Years
by Hannah Tran

150 years of service. Mayo Clinic is celebrating 15 decades of care and it wants to share its KAAL TV logogsuccess across the nation. For the past 18 months, Mayo staff have worked on a mobile exhibit to encapsulate its accomplishments and development in core values. "This exhibit is showing the story of Mayo Clinic to the people," said CEO John Noseworthy, who addressed an audience outside of the exhibit before preliminary tours commenced.

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Additional coverage:

Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic's big-rig exhibit arrives Tuesday
KTTC, Mayo Celebrates 150 Years of Medicine
La Crosse Tribune, 500 tour Mayo's 150th anniversary exhibit
KTTC, Mayo Clinic celebrates 150 years of service with traveling exhibit
Post-Bulletin, 150 years: Franciscan sisters integral to Mayo Clinic's development
Post-Bulletin, Mayo at 150: Brothers' values continue to guide clinic
Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic didn't profit from major discovery
KIMT Online (video), In-Forum, N.D.

Context: Mayo Clinic's traveling mobile exhibit has begun its journey. In 2014, we honor 150 years of serving humanity. This is one way Mayo Clinic can give back – to thank the patients and friends who’ve been part of our story, and share our vision with the public. People from all walks of life turn to Mayo Clinic … so we’re reaching out, bringing Mayo Clinic to the people. This exhibit is sponsored by the Mayo Clinic Sesquicentennial Committee with generous support from many patients and friends. 

Public Affairs ContactsRebecca EisenmanRick Thiesse, Kelley Luckstein

 

MSNBC Morning Joe
How diet impacts brain function in seniors

Dr. John Noseworthy and Dr. Rosebud Roberts, both of the Mayo Clinic, join Morning Morning JoeJoe to discuss 150 years of the Mayo Clinic. Dr. Roberts also discusses how a poor diet in old age can impact the brain.

Reach: MSNBC provides in-depth analysis of daily headlines, political commentary and informed perspectives. MSNBC’s home on the Internet is tv.msnbc.com. Joe Scarborough hosts “Morning Joe,” with co-hosts Mika Brzezinski and Willie Geist, featuring interviews with top politicians and newsmakers, as well as in-depth analysis of the day’s biggest stories. Morning Joe has about 375,000 viewers daily.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic President and CEO, and Rosebud Roberts, M.B., Ch.B.. appeared on Morning Joe May 8. Dr. Roberts' research  focuses on identifying risk factors for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia, both diseases of aging that affect memory and thinking skills. People who develop diabetes and high blood pressure in middle age are more likely to have brain cell loss and other damage to the brain, as well as problems with memory and thinking skills, than people who never have diabetes or high blood pressure or who develop it in old age, according to a new study published in the March 19, 2014, online issue of Neurology. Middle age was defined as age 40 to 64 and old age as age 65 and older. More information about the research can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Duska Anastasijevic

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic announces it is more than halfway to its goal of raising $3 billion from private benefactors by the end of 2017
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Clinic, which has campuses in Rochester, Minn., Scottsdale, Ariz., and Jacksonville, is in the midst of a $3 billion fundraising campaign that will be formallyFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo announced Friday in Rochester. The campaign, which began with a “quiet phase” in 2010 and has already achieved 58.5 percent of its goal, “addresses reliable funding as the biggest barrier to medical breakthroughs,” said Cheryl Hadaway, chief development officer for Mayo Clinic.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic asks grateful patients to help endow its top treatment
By Jeff Hansel

Mayo Clinic today announced a $3 billion philanthropic fundraising campaign to help pay Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperfor research, as federal funding has become less reliable because of budget cuts. Mayo has raised more than half the money, or $1.7 billion, as the quiet phase of the campaign began in 2010. The campaign will continue untilDec. 31, 2017.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: To accelerate the pace of research, solve unmet needs of patients and improve the quality of health care,Mayo Clinic today announced a philanthropic campaign to raise $3 billion by Dec. 31, 2017, strengthening Mayo’s strategic priorities in patient care, research and education. “Reliable funding is the biggest barrier to advance medical breakthroughs that can benefit patients suffering from diseases,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. “Traditional funding sources, such as federal grants, cannot cover the cost of discovering cutting-edge science and implementing those solutions in clinical practice.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Newtwork and campaign website.

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November 1st, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

 

 

November 1, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Fortune
Mayo Clinic's cure for an ailing medical system
by Geoff Colvin

When you run the world's largest private medical practice, you don't just respond to sweeping changes in health care -- you can also influence them. That's one goal of Mayo Clinic chief Dr. John Noseworthy, who wants Washington to consider quality and effectiveness when reimbursing health care providers, a change he believes would benefit Mayo and motivate others to improve.

Reach:  FORTUNE has a circulation of more than 845,000 readers. It's website receives more than 4.5 million unique visitors each month.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Sharon Theimer

USA Today
Guest column: The case against fighting
by Michael Stuart, David Dodick and Aynsley Smith

Fighting is not tolerated in the sport of ice hockey, except at the junior and professional levels in the USA and Canada. In our opinion, hockey without fighting is a better and safer game… Stuart, Dodick and Smith are with the Mayo Clinic.

Reach: USA Today has the highest daily circulation of any U.S. newspaper with a daily average circulation of 2.9 million, which  includes print and various digital editions.

Context: Mayo Clinic’s Sports Medicine Center held Ice Hockey Summit II: Action on Concussion on Oct. 8–9, 2013. The summit brought together top scientists, trainers, coaches, officials, retired professional players and manufacturers from across the United States, Canada and Europe to discuss concussion-related issues, including the science of concussion, impact on youth athletes and hockey community response.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

ABC News Radio
More Research Needed on E-Cigarettes, Say Experts

E-cigarettes still pose more questions than answers for health officials.  The American Association for Cancer Research is discussing the new tobacco-less smoking devices in Maryland at its international meeting, and a panel of experts agree more research is needed to determine any associated risks. A major question related to electronic cigarettes is how they will be regulated. Panel participant Dr. Scott Leischow of the Mayo Clinic says everyone's waiting for the Food and Drug Administration to possibly begin regulating the product in some way.

Reach: ABC News Radio provides hourly newscasts and news headlines for a network of affiliates for more than 2,000 affiliates and is the largest commercial radio news organization in the United States.

Additional E-Cigarette Coverage: East Idaho News, Augusta Chronicle, Health, HealthDay, News92 Houston, Ruidoso Free Press N.M., Cancer Research, DoctorsLounge, MedicineNet, Newsday, MSN Healthy Living, Washington Times, Ciencias Médicas News, El Nuevo Dia,

Context: E-cigarettes are becoming increasingly popular and widely available as the use of regular cigarettes drops. Recently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that e-cigarette use by children doubled from 2011 and 2012. The health effects of e-cigarettes have not been effectively studied and the ingredients have little or no regulation. Mayo Clinic's Nicotine Dependence Center experts are available to discuss what people should know before trying e-cigarettes.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Experts: What Should You Know About E-cigarettes?

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

KARE11
Options for women at high risk for breast cancer

Dr. Sandhya Pruthi, a Mayo Clinic Breast Clinic specialist, talked to KARE Saturday about options for women who have a high risk of breast cancer. After skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the United States with more than 238,000 new diagnoses estimated this year. Prevention and early detection is important in order to offer the best treatment options if cancer is found.

Reach: KARE is a an NBC affiliate in the Minneapolis-St.Paul market.

Context: Sandhya Pruthi, M.D. is the principal investigator at Mayo Clinic for several nationwide multicenter breast cancer chemoprevention trials; these are interdisciplinary efforts with the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. She is also actively involved in cancer education for both patients and health care providers.

Public Affairs Contact: Joe Dangor

Orlando Sentinel
Daily walk cuts dementia risk, studies show

Everyone knows walking is good exercise, but it has another benefit: a daily 20-minute walk can also cut the risk of dementia by 40 percent, studies show. Taking those findings a step further, neurologists at Jacksonville's Mayo Clinic are studying whether getting patients immobilized by disease to walk can also help stave off mental decline. Dr. Jay Van Gerpen, a neurologist who specializes in gait, is recruiting Parkinson's patients from across the state for a study to help them stay on their feet and retain brain health.

Reach: The Orlando Sentinel has a daily circulation of more than 162,000. The newspaper serves central Florida. It's website has more than 1.1 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Jay Van Gerpen, M.D., is a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

Additional Mayo Clinic News Highlights This Week:
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Tags: : ABC News Radio, AERO-News Network, Affordable care act, ANI News, Arc Minnesota, arthritis, Arthritis Today, Augusta Chronicle, autism, Aviation International News, Aynsley Smith, BEAUTFY


October 19th, 2012

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

 

 

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Wall Street Journal
New Tactics To Treat Artery Disease That Harms Legs
by Ron Winslow

Doctors are seeking better ways to help patients suffering from artery blockages that obstruct blood flow to the legs—an area of treatment that has been lacking despite well-established methods for preventing and treating the same disease when it occurs in the heart…"Most patients with peripheral artery disease can be managed conservatively," said Verghese Mathew, a cardiologist who treats both heart and PAD patients at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Still, except for patients with a severe form of the disease, there is little consensus among doctors about whether to treat symptomatic patients aggressively with balloons and other devices or to rely first on medication and exercise programs, said Dr. Mathew, who wasn't involved with the NIH study.

Circulation: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is tops in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 2 million copies on weekdays.

Context: Verghese Mathew, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist who also has an appointment with the Mayo Clinic Gonda Vascular Center.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

Real Simple
Check: Your Guide to Digestive Health
By Julia Edelstein

Your digestive tract—a.k.a. “the second brain”—is a smart system that is acutely sensitive to your feelings. Here’s how to keep it healthy (and happy)….“Which came first, the chicken or the egg?” It’s the same with digestive issues and anxiety. “We don’t know whether stress is causing the bowel to go wrong or the bowel going wrong is causing mental stress,” says Gershon. That said, there’s no question that “adding a singular stressful event on top of chronic stress makes chronic digestive symptoms worse,” says Yuri Saito, M.D., a gastroenterologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

Reach: Real Simple has more more than seven million readers of its print magazine and more than 3.4 million unique visitors to its web site each month.

Context: Yuri Saito Loftus, M.D.,  Mayo Clinic Gastroenterology and Hepatology, is engaged in clinical care of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and other gastrointestinal motility disorders, and she also has an active research program studying patients with IBS, constipation and diarrhea.

Public Affairs Contacts: Alyson Fleming, Brian Kilen

Reuters
Therapy, exercise aid in chemo-related menopause
by Genevra Pittman

Younger women who are thrust into menopause because of breast cancer treatment may get some relief from talk therapy and regular exercise, a new study from the Netherlands suggests…"More research is needed on behavioral interventions such as relaxation therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy to understand more about how these things are helpful and for whom," Debra Barton from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota told Reuters Health in an email. "However, the data so far appear very promising."

Circulation:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world news, business news, technology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile, and interactive television platforms.

Additional Coverage: Chicago Tribune

Context:  Debra L. Barton, R.N., Ph.D. , who co-wrote an editorial in the Journal of Clinical Oncology Online Oct. 8, 2012 accompanying the new study, said women in this position should talk with their doctors about exercise and therapy options to find a plan that's best for them. "The thing that is important for women to keep in mind, is that behaviors, if not practiced or utilized, will not be beneficial in the same way that medications not taken will not help," Barton added. "It is important that women think through the ‘how' and ‘when' of using any behavioral strategy, make a definite plan and stick to the routine in order to maximize any benefit." Her research centers on symptom management in cancer survivors. Effective management of short- and long-term sequelae of the disease and treatment is the objective of this research.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Nick Hanson

USA Today
High-carb diet is linked to early Alzheimer's
by Janice Lloyd

Older people who load up their plates with carbohydrates have nearly four times the risk of developing mild cognitive impairment, a study out Tuesday finds. Sugars also played a role in the development of MCI, often a precursor to Alzheimer's disease, according to the report in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. Eating more proteins and fats offer some protection from MCI…Not everyone with MCI goes on to develop Alzheimer's disease, but many do, says lead author Rosebud Roberts, a professor in the department of epidemiology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Circulation: USA TODAY has a circulation of 1.8 million and a readership of 3.1 million. USA TODAY websites have 26.3 million unique visitors a month.

WCCO Radio
Mayo Clinic: Sugar-Rich Diets Linked To Cognitive Impairment In Seniors

A Mayo Clinic study has found a link between sugar-rich diets and brain function in seniors. Mayo researchers tracked people over 70 and found that those with diets high in carbohydrates and sugar have nearly four times the risk of developing mild cognitive impairment. “Sugar is good for your brain because you derive your energy from sugar,” said lead author Dr. Rosebud Roberts. “Your brain derives its energy from sugar. But too much sugar is bad for your brain.” 

Additional coverage: All Voices, RedOrbit, Times of India, Food Product Design, KAAL, WMAQ Chicago, Laboratory Equipment, Durango Herald, Post-Bulletin, KurzweilAI, IT World, WLTX S.C., KAAL, MinnPost, Huffington Post, Medical News Today

Context: People 70 and older who eat food high in carbohydrates have nearly four times the risk of developing mild cognitive impairment, and the danger also rises with a diet heavy in sugar, Mayo Clinic researchers have found. Those who consume a lot of protein and fat relative to carbohydrates are less likely to become cognitively impaired, the study found. The findings are published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.

News Release

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Arthritis Today
How Fat Affects Arthritis
by Andrea Kane

If you were to ask people to name a health problem related to obesity, odds are good they’d say “heart disease” or “diabetes.” And they’d be right; those two chronic diseases have a very strong relationship to excess weight. They are the safe bets… “Weight plays an important role in joint stress, so when people are very overweight, it puts stress on their joints, especially their weight-bearing joints, like the knees and the hips,” says Eric Matteson, MD, chair of the rheumatology division at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Circulation: Arthritis Today has a circulation of 715,000.

Context: Eric Matteson, M.D. is chair of Rheumatology at Mayo Clinic. The Division of Rheumatology provides diagnosis and treatment of diseases affecting the joints and connective tissue (rheumatic diseases), including more than 100 types of arthritis and many autoimmune diseases. Doctors in the division have been trained in internal medicine and rheumatology. Besides caring for patients, medical staff are also involved in research and in training new rheumatologists.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

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Tags: All Voices, alzheimer's disease, arthritis, Arthritis Today, Breast Cancer, Cancer, carbohydrates, Chicago Tribune, chronic diseases, constipation, diarrhea, Dr. Debra Barton


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