Items Tagged ‘AskMayoExpert’

March 19th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

ESPN
Latest studies: Brain disease from contact sports more common
by Steve Fainaru and Mark Fainaru-Wada

Latest studies: Brain disease from contact sports more common. Armed with the new definition, researchers at the Mayo Clinic searched for signs of CTE among thESPN Outside the Linese 7,000 brains that are preserved at the clinic's Jacksonville, Florida, location. Kevin Bieniek, a postdoctoral research fellow in the Mayo Clinic's Department of Neuroscience, initially narrowed the number to a more manageable 1,800 in an effort to limit his sample to people who participated in contact sports. Bieniek then spent months combing through medical records, obituaries and other resources.

Reach: ESPN Outside the Lines is a sports program that focuses on the most significant sports news of the day. The program airs at 1 pm ET each week day and at 9 am ET on Sundays. ESPN averaged 2.1 million viewers in 2015.

Previous coverage in Dec. 4, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in Dec. 4, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Scientists have recently found evidence that professional football players are susceptible to a progressive degenerative disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which is caused by repetitive brain trauma. Now, researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have discovered a significant and surprising amount of CTE in males who had participated in amateur contact sports in their youth. About one-third of these men whose brains had been donated to the Mayo Clinic Brain Bank had evidence of CTE pathology. CTE only can be diagnosed posthumously.More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

US News & World Report
Asians and Obesity: Looks Can Be Deceiving
by Anna Medaris Miller

While only 11 percent of Asian-Americans are obese, they develop obesity-related complications – namely, hypertension and diabetes – at lower BMIs than do people of other backgrounds,
US News Wellness Logoresearch shows… "The educated [Asian] population knows that they're getting diabetes and hypertension and all these things at a much lower BMI, but if you're in a culture where everybody's really fat and you're thin, you tend to go around and think, 'Well, I'm protected,'" says Dr. Michael Jensen, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, who studies how body fat, and its distribution, influences health. "But [you] may not be.

Reach: U.S. News & World Report is a multi-platform publisher of news and information, which includeshttp://www.usnews.com and http://www.rankingsandreviews.com.

Context:  Michael Jensen, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Jensen and his lab study the effects of obesity and how body fat (adipose tissue) and body fat distribution influence health. The regulated uptake, storage and release of fatty acids from adipose tissue play a major role in determining its health effects.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

US News & World Report
What to Eat, Drink and Do to Relieve Constipation
by Michael O. Schroeder

“Exercises help the intestines squeeze and relax and act more normally,” says Dr. Amy Foxx-Orenstein, a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona.  For those with limited mobility, she adds, Pilates done lying on the floor or tai chi can alsoUS News Wellness Logo assist in stimulating blood flow and intestinal activity, which may help get things going.

Reach: U.S. News & World Report is a multi-platform publisher of news and information, which includes http://www.usnews.com and http://www.rankingsandreviews.com.

Additional coverage: Yahoo! Finance Canada

Context: Amy Foxx-Orienstein, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

The Boston Globe
A new antidote to aging
by Kevin Hartnett

In a sense, your body is a junkyard, slowly filling up with defective cells that clutter your vital organs. The accumulation of Boston Globe Logothese cells—known as senescent cells—has long been thought to be an important reason why people deteriorate physically as they age. “The removal of cells had the same effect as not accumulating senescent cells to begin with,” says Jan van Deursen, a researcher at the Mayo Clinic and coauthor of the paper. “It had profound beneficial effects.”

Reach: The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Related coverage: MoneyLife, BCIndian.com

Previous coverage in Feb. 5, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic have shown that senescent cells – cells that no longer divide and accumulate with age – negatively impact health and shorten lifespan by as much as 35 percent in normal mice. The results, which appear today in Nature, demonstrate that clearance of senescent cells delays tumor formation, preserves tissue and organ function, and extends lifespan without observed adverse effects. “Cellular senescence is a biological mechanism that functions as an ‘emergency brake’ used by damaged cells to stop dividing,” says Jan van Deursen, Ph.D., Chair of Biochemistry and Molecular biology at Mayo Clinic, and senior author of the paper. “While halting cell division of these cells is important for cancer prevention, it has been theorized that once the ‘emergency brake’ has been pulled, these cells are no longer necessary.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Bob Nellis, Megan Forliti

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic, Boston Scientific team up to develop devices
By Joe Carlson

Passing a wire through a diseased heart valve is a bit like threading a wet noodle into a garden hose while the tap water is flowing. Passing a wire across a heavily calcified heart valve is the first step in many modern procedures to repair or replace it.Star Tribune newspaper logo But threading it through the jet of blood streaming out of the patient's narrowed valve can be a major technical challenge, especially since knocking bits of built-up calcium can trigger serious health problems. Doctors at Mayo Clinic recently had an idea: What if they could aim the wire at the valve using a special catheter with a small funnel on the end to capture the blood flow and center the gadget right above the jet? That idea will be put to use in a human clinical trial later this year as part of a collaboration between Mayo and Boston Scientific Corp. — a long-running collaboration being publicly unveiled Wednesday morning.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:
Boston Business Journal — Boston Scientific to speed up research thanks to suspension of device tax

HIT ConsultantMedical Physics Web, Post Bulletin, KTTC, Twin Cities Business, Star Tribune, MedCity News

Context: Boston Scientific Corporation (NYSE: BSX) and Mayo Clinic announced this week a continuing collaboration where the two organizations share intellectual property and stimulate the rapid development of medical devices to address unmet clinical needs. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

KTTC-TV
Mayo Clinic to open a nanotechnology lab on Jacksonville, FL campus; will enhance cancer research efforts by Frannie Smith

Mayo Clinic is expanding its cancer research efforts with the opening of a nanotechnology lab at the Florida campus. Mayo KTTC TV logoClinic's location in Jacksonville, Florida has been given a $2 million grant from the state to open up the lab. The lab is a key part of Mayo's nanomedicine program.

Reach: KTTC is an NBC affiliate that serves the Rochester, Minn. area including the towns of Austin, Mason City, Albert Lea and Winona. Its website receives more than 73,300 unique visitors each month.

Context: With support from the state of Florida, Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus has opened a state-of-the-art laboratory for nanotechnology research, an emerging field of science that studies and applies materials that are the size of an atom. The laboratory is a key part of Mayo Clinic’s new Translational Nanomedicine Program. The goal is to develop, test and apply tiny materials in diagnosing and treating patients, particularly those with cancer. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

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Tags: “benzos, , AAMC, ABC 15 Arizona, ABC News, AJMC.com, alzheimer's disease, America Unraveled, Amyloidosis, antidote to aging, AOL News, Archer racing in Trans Am Series


January 30th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

FOX Business
Mayo Clinic CEO on state of health care

Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy discusses his priorities for 2015, patient care and technology in the U.S. and the development and cost of Hepatitis C therapies.

Opening Bell Fox BusinessReach: FoxNews.com has more than 13 million unique visitors each month. Fox Business Network is headquartered in News Corporation's studios in midtown Manhattan with bureaus in Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco (Silicon Valley), Washington, D.C. and London.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

MPR
At Mayo, brain device offers hope for toughest epilepsy cases
by Liz Baier

After nine years of epileptic seizures and no success stopping them, Sheri Finstad was
MPR News logoready to try an experiment. In October, she came to Rochester, where Mayo Clinic doctors implanted a device in her brain designed to deliver mild electrical pulses and record the brain's reaction… "We can see exactly what our stimulation does to the ongoing activity in the brain," said Finstad's neurologist, Dr. Matt Stead. "That will allow us ... hopefully to understand better what patterns and types of stimulation are most likely to suppress their propensity toward seizures."

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Matt Stead., M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

The Atlantic
Attention: A Muscle to Strengthen
by James Hamblin

"Today is Thursday, the day of Meaning." That's the message at the very top of the page. And from there down, almost everything about Amit Sood's website,The Atlantic Magazine Logo stressfree.org, is couched in the self-help jargon that scientists instinctively dismiss. So it's especially interesting that Sood is a physician, a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic, no less.

Reach: The Atlantic was founded in 1857, produces 10 issues a year and has 1.2 million readers each month. The magazine also has a number of platforms on the web including The Atlantic, TheAtantic.com, AtlanticLIVE, Atlantic Mobile, The Atlantic Wire and The Atlantic Cities

Additional coverage: Government Executive

Context: In The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living, Mayo Clinic stress management and resiliency expert Amit Sood, M.D., draws on decades of groundbreaking research to offer readers a scientifically proven, structured and practical approach to reducing stress. He explains the brain’s two modes — focused mode and default mode — and how an imbalance between the two produces unwanted stress, and he shares new insights about how the mind works, including its natural tendency to wander. In this easy-to-follow guide, Dr. Sood provides actionable steps to cultivate emotional and mental strength, find greater fulfillment and nurture a kind disposition. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Sood, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts:
Ginger Plumbo, Brian Kilen

 

USA Today
The simple concussion test the NFL does not use
by Nancy Armour

… The Mayo Clinic weighed in on Tuesday, throwing its support behind the King-USA Today Football Helmet LogoDevick with a first-of-its-kind licensing agreement. "Mayo Clinic certainly wouldn't endorse, support or be associated with something they didn't thoroughly vet, and this was thoroughly vetted. The data speaks for itself," said Dr. David Dodick, a neurologist who heads Mayo's Concussion Program. "Is it perfect? No, nothing is perfect," Dodick said. "But is it a valuable tool that can be used pitchside, rinkside and on the sideline to report the suspicion of a concussion? Absolutely."

Reach: USA TODAY  has the highest daily circulation of any U.S. newspaper with a daily average circulation of 4.1 million, which includes print, various digital editions and other  papers that use their branded content.

Additional coverage: Quad-City Times, KARE11, Post-Bulletin, KEYC Mankato, PT Products, Rock Hill Herald, KIMT

Context: Concussions are in the national spotlight for the damage being done to student and professional athletes. Determining when an athlete should be removed from play is a major challenge in preventing injury. Athletes routinely deny symptoms.

King-Devick test logoThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that between 1.6 and 3.8 million students have concussions every year. In an effort to bring awareness and increase concussion screening, Mayo Clinic has agreed to a licensing agreement withKing-Devick Test Inc., which has developed a proven indicator of ocular motor, visual and cognitive function for concussion detection and evaluation on the sidelines of sporting events to help with the decision to sideline athletes to prevent injury. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

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Tags: 2015 Great Minds Gala, 3-D technology, Abigail Van Buren Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, alcoholic, Alibaba unit, alternative behavioral therapies, Altru Health System & Clinics, alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer's Disease Awareness and Dementia-Care Programs, American Journal of Roentgenology, Amit Sood, Amyloidosis


May 25th, 2012

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By

May 25, 2012

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations
oestreich.karl@mayo.edu

NY Times Well Blog
A Richer Life by Seeing the Glass Half Full
by Jane Brody

A more classical definition from the Mayo Clinic: “Optimism is the belief that good things will happen to you and that negative events are temporary setbacks to be overcome.”… It’s important not to neglect the power of positive thinking. Both Dr. Segerstrom and the Mayo researchers recommend taking a few minutes at the end of each day to write down three positive things that happened that day, ending the day on an upbeat note. The Mayo researchers offered these additional suggestions…

Circulation: The New York Times has the third highest circulation nationally, behind USA Today (2nd) and The Wall Street Journal (1st) with 1,150,589 weekday copies circulated and 1,645,152 circulated on Sundays.

Context: Jane Brody frequently quotes Mayo Clinic experts, refers to Mayo Clinic studies and cites other Mayo Clinic references in her writing.

Public Affairs Contact: klein.traci@mayo.edu

FOX News
Rate of C. difficile infection increasing dramatically among children
by Alex Crees

Mayo Clinic researchers found the incidence of C. difficile infection in children was more than 12 times higher between 2004 and 2009, compared to the rates between 1991 and 1997. The number of infections rose from 2.6 cases per every 100,000 children to 32.6 cases per 100,000 in the selected time periods…“These were expected results with some surprising elements,” lead study author Dr. Sahil Khanna, from the Mayo Clinic Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, told FoxNews.com.

Reach: FoxNews.com has more than 13 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Mayo Clinic issued a news release May 17 about the study which was presented by Mayo Clinic researchers during Digestive Disease Week 2012. The study provides clear evidence that the number of people contracting the hard-to-control and treat bacterial infection Clostridium difficile (C. difficile or C. diff) is increasing, and that the infection is commonly contracted outside of the hospital.

Public Affairs Contact: kilen.brian@mayo.edu

NPR Shots Blog
Dangerous Gut Bacteria Move Outside Hospitals, Infect Kids
by Ted Burnham
Mayo Clinic researcher Sahil Khanna and his colleagues have found that children are contracting the disease at ever-higher rates, too. And most of them are being infected outside of hospitals. He presented the findings at the annual Digestive Disease Week medical conference ending today. Although C. diff infections were first documented in the late 1970s, Khanna tells Shots, "there haven't been any studies of children in and outside the hospital." So he and fellow researchers examined data from Olmsted County, Minn., where they had access to detailed records for the entire community, going back decades. Additional coverage: Environmental Expert, Huffington Post, WebMD, News Medical, Medical Xpress, Georgia Public Broadcasting, North Country Public Radio (NY), Capital Public Radio (Calif)

Reach: The NPR Shots Blog covers news about health and medicine. It is written and reported by NPR’s Science Desk.

Context: Mayo Clinic issued a news release May 17 about the study which was presented by Mayo Clinic researchers during Digestive Disease Week 2012. The study provides clear evidence that the number of people contracting the hard-to-control and treat bacterial infection Clostridium difficile (C. difficile or C. diff) is increasing, and that the infection is commonly contracted outside of the hospital.

Public Affairs Contact: kilen.brian@mayo.edu

ABC News
Sleep Apnea Treatment May Prevent Hypertension

Sleep apnea may prove to be a treatable cause of high blood pressure, according to research released today that suggests wearing a special breathing mask at night may protect apnea patients from the hypertension. Most people think of obstructive sleep apnea as a snoring disorder. Although many sufferers snore, apnea is characterized by short episodes in which the patient's upper airway narrows or closes, reducing the flow of oxygen to the body and brain. …Dr. Virend Somers, a sleep apnea and heart disease researcher at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., cautioned that the results of the two studies are suggestive "but not definitive that CPAP is protective of the cardiovascular system."

Circulation: ABCNews.com is the official website for ABC News.

Context: Virend Somers, M.D., Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic phsyician with joint appointments in cardivascular diseases and hypertension, is often sought out for his expert persepective.

Public Affairs Contacts: hanson.nicholas@mayo.edu, klein.traci@mayo.edu

MPR
Should young athletes be screened for heart conditions?

University of Minnesota football player Gary Tinsley was found dead April 6 of a heart condition at the age of 22. The Hennepin County Medical Examiner said he died of an enlarged heart.  Sudden cardiac arrest is the leading cause of death in young athletes, but what factors contribute to this heightened risk in otherwise healthy individuals? Some physicians believe that mandatory EKG screening for young athletes is the key to saving lives, while others believe the screening is too costly and would do more harm than good....Mike Ackerman, cardiologist and professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic, will also join the discussion.  "HCM [hypertrophic cardiomyopathy] is a death sentence to athletics," he said. "Right now guidelines say if you have this disease you're disqualified from all sports... It's a one-size-fits-all approach, we just say, 'you're disqualified.' We need to individualize the athlete, the risk, the disease."

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Mike Ackerman, M.D, a Mayo Clinic cardiologist, appeared as a guest on the Daily Circuit May 21 to talk about sudden cardiac arrest.

Public Affairs Contacts: klein.traci@mayo.edu, hanson.nicholas@mayo.edu

Phoenix Business Journal
ASU Health Services to join Mayo Clinic Care Network
by Angela Gonzales

ASU Health Services will join the Mayo Clinic Care Network that allows ASU to tap into Mayo Clinic’s services and tools, including AskMayoExpert, a tool that provides disease management and treatment recommendations, and eConsults, which will allow ASU doctors to electronically connect with Mayo experts on specific questions. Additional coverage: ASU News, Toronto Telegraph, Ahwatukee Foothills News

Reach: The Phoenix Business Journal is one of 63 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Context: Mayo Clinic in Arizona issued a news release May 18 announcing that Arizona State University Health Services will join the Mayo Clinic Care Network to bring enhanced services to ASU students. Through this collaboration, ASU Health Services will have access to the latest Mayo Clinic expertise to help care for their patients and improve their health.

Public Affairs Contact: mcveigh.jim@mayo.edu

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic Jacksonville plans $100 million expansion
by Roger Bull

Mayo Clinic Jacksonville is planning a nearly $100 million expansion that will include a 40 percent increase in beds and a separate primary care clinic. The expansion will come in two projects and is expected to result in 250 construction jobs and 400 permanent employees at the clinic. The largest project is a two-story, $80 million addition on the top of its six-story hospital at the main campus on San Pablo Road. That will increase the square footage from 730,000 to 842,000 and the beds from 214 to 304. "We're just running at a high occupancy," said Bob Brigham, chief administrative officer. "We call it a red light when the morning census exceeds the number of beds. "By the end of the day, we have to get them all taken care of." Additional coverage:  Action News Jax, St. Augustine Record Fla., Topix.com, Jacksonville Business Journal, Post-Bulletin, BringMeTheNews, Jacksonville Business Journal.

Circulation: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Mayo Clinic in Florida issued a news release May 21 announcing the expansion on Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida.

Public Affairs Contact: punsky.kevin@mayo.edu

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic study: Special light can detect pancreatic cancer
by Charlie Patton

Pancreatic cancer, a frequently deadly form of cancer, is difficult to diagnose in its early stages. But a new pilot study at the Mayo Clinic's Jacksonville campus was able to detect pancreatic cancer 100 percent of the time using a special light that measures changes in cells and blood vessels in the small intestine during a routine endoscopy. Gastroenterologist Michael Wallace, chief of gastroenterology and hepatology at Mayo, gave a report on the pilot study Monday in San Diego during the international Digestive Disease Week 2012, the world's largest gathering of physicians and researchers who treat disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Additional coverage: Jacksonville Business Journal, Science Codex, MSNBC, MyHealthNewsDaily, Toronto Telegraph

Circulation: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Mayo Clinic in Florida issued a news release May 21. Michael Wallace, M.D., a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic in Florida, focuses research on advanced imaging systems for the detection and treatment of early cancers and pre-cancerous lesions of the gastrointestinal tract.

Public Affairs Contact: punsky.kevin@mayo.edu

Chicago Tribune
Robots useful in hysterectomies
by Andrea Brown

A common operation in the United States, hysterectomies are now going high-tech as many surgeons embrace robotics as another tool to help them do their jobs better…The Mayo Clinic in Arizona, one of the first institutions to use robotic laparoscopy, pioneered the technique in the early 2000s, said Dr. Rosanne Kho, assistant professor and fellowship program director in the clinic's Division of Urogynecology, Department of Gynecological Surgery.

Circulation:  The Tribune’s average weekday circulation is more about 425,000. Average Sunday circulation is more than 781,000. According to the Tribune, its newspaper reaches more than five million consumers while covering 76% of the market.

Context: Rosanne Ko, M.D., is a gynecologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Public Affairs Contact: mcveigh.jim@mayo.edu

Kansas City Star
Deal gives Mayo Clinic a foothold in St. Joseph
by Eric Adler

Patients wanting to tap the expertise of Mayo Clinic physicians will no longer have to travel 400 miles to Minnesota to do so. St. Joseph-based Heartland Health on Wednesday announced an arrangement with the famed Rochester, Minn., research hospital to become part of its Mayo Clinic Care Network…“It allows us to extend our brand and our reach,” said physician David Hayes, medical director of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, who announced the alignment at a ceremony in St. Joseph. “And it allows us to extend it with organizations we are comfortable with.” Additional coverage: HealthLeaders Media, Post-Bulletin, KQTV St. Joseph, Kansas City Business Journal, News Press Now, Modern Healthcare, St. Joseph News-Press, NECN Mass. (AP), : The Republic Ind., Fierce Healthcare, St. Louis Today, Washington Examiner, St. Joseph Post, Springfield News-Leader, Columbia Missourian, KCTV 5

Reach: The Kansas City Star has a daily circulation of 553,200 daily and 770,300 on Sunday. Kansascity.com, its website has more than 3.8 million unique visitors and 28 million page views a month.

Context: Mayo Clinic held a news conference May 23 announcing Heartland Health, based in St. Joseph, MO., is joining the Mayo Clinic Care Network. The network extends Mayo Clinic's knowledge and expertise to physicians and providers interested in working together in the best interest of their patients. Heartland Health's physicians will have Mayo Clinic expertise at their fingertips, including the ability to connect with Mayo Clinic physicians, who can help them care for their patients and improve their systems and the health of their communities. For more information, refer to the news release.

Public Affairs Contacts: anderson.bryan@mayo.edu, lowreyschrandt.sherri@mayo.edu

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic's Everest researchers reflect on expedition
by Edie Grossfield

Mayo Clinic researchers Bryan Taylor and Amine Issa returned a week ago from an expedition to Mount Everest base camp in Nepal. Now, back in Rochester with the rest of the six-man team, Taylor, 29, and Issa, 27, took a break Thursday from their post-expedition paperwork to talk about their trip. It was clear the two had become close friends during the challenging expedition, as they joked back and forth about things that happened and shared similar views about the good and bad of their travels. Related Post-Bulletin coverage.

Circulation: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: Amine Issa, Ph.D., and Bryan Taylor, Ph.D., sat down for a chat with Post-Bulletin reporter Eddie Grossfield after they returned from the Everest expedition. Mayo Clinic's research expedition has been chronicled on the Advancing the Science blog.

Public Affairs Contact: nellis.robert@mayo.edu

For more coverage of Mayo Clinic in the News, please link to our news clip blog here.

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

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Tags: ABC News, Anne Issa, AskMayoExpert, ASU Health Services, Bryan Taylor, C. Difficile, Chicago Tribune, David Hayes, Digestive Disease Week 2012, Division of Gastroenterology, Dr. Michael Wallace, Dr. Rosanne Kho


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