Items Tagged ‘asthma’

January 13th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

First Coast News
The Chat Wednesday January 11: Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa Part 1

First Coast News
The Chat Wednesday January 11: Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa Part 2

Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, Mayo Clinic neurosurgeon, joined “The Chat,” a live afternoon show on Jacksonville’s First Coast News. TheFirst Coast News Logo show’s web site breaks up the segments in two parts (see links below). The first segment focuses on his early life/career with images of his time at Johns Hopkins, and the second segment focuses on his role and work at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville.

Reach: First Coast News refers to two television stations in Jacksonville, Florida. WJXX, the ABC affiliate and WTLV, the NBC affiliate.

Previous coverage in September 23, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
Previous coverage in April 22, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, M.D., prominent neurosurgeon, researcher and educator, joined Mayo Clinic in 2016 as chair of the Department of Neurosurgery on the Florida campus, along with several members of his research team from Johns Hopkins Medicine. Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa is renown nationally and internationally as a surgeon, researcher, humanitarian and author. His laboratory has published many manuscripts and articles, submitted a number of patents and obtained three NIH grants. Students and fellows who worked with Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa have gone on to join leading neuroscience programs throughout the world. Mayo Clinic's world-renowned neurosurgeons perform more than 7,000 complex surgical procedures every year at campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota.

Contact: Kevin Punsky


Yahoo! News
Robert M. Jacobson stresses importance of flu vaccine

The Minnesota Department of Health released a report on Thursday on the increase of flu activity throughout the state. Friday afternoon, we Logo of Yahoo Newsspoke with a health professional at Mayo Clinic about the importance of getting the flu vaccine. According to the Minnesota Department of Health's report released on Thursday flu season is in full swing, and can indeed continue to increase in activity. In fact, Dr. Jacobson, a primary care physician and professor of pediatrics at Mayo Clinic, said in the last two weeks alone, there were 50 hospitalized patients in Minnesota from the flu.

Reach: Yahoo News receives more than 8.4 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: KTTC

Context:  Robert Jacobson, M.D. is a pediatrician with the Mayo Clinic Children's Center. Dr. Jacobson also serves as the medical director for the Population Health Science Program at Mayo Clinic's Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery. He also leads Mayo's Employee and Community Health (ECH) Research Initiative. You can read about his medical research here.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Wisconsin Public Radio
The Mayo Clinic Diet: Second Edition

It's the beginning of a new year, a time when many people resolve to make healthier choices--like eating a healthier diet. We learn how to improve health while losing weight with the medical editor of "The Mayo Clinic Diet." He says this plan is a lifestyle and not a diet in the traditional sense. We learn how it works.

Reach: Wisconsin Public Radio consists of 34 radio stations programmed by seven regional studios and carrying programming on three content networks: the Ideas Network, the NPR News and Classical Network and the All Classical Network.

Additional coverage: 

Post-Bulletin, The Mayo Clinic Diet earns top honor
KTTC, Mayo Clinic Diet is #1, according to U.S. News & World Report
KWLM Willmar Radio, KFGO Fargo-Moorhead, 104.7 DukeFM, WXOW La Crosse

Previous coverage in the January 6, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context:  As the second edition of The Mayo Clinic Diet hits store shelves, the diet plan has been named Best Commercial Diet by U.S. News & World Report.  “We are honored to be recognized for a weight-loss method that offers lasting results,” says Donald Hensrud, M.D., medical editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet and director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. Learn more about the Mayo Clinic by watching this Mayo Clinic Minute or read more about it on Mayo Clinic Network. “The Mayo Clinic Diet is much more than a diet,” Dr. Hensrud says. “It’s a lifestyle program in which people can eat great-tasting food and feel better right away ─ even while they lose weight. More importantly, these lifestyle changes are sustainable and can improve long-term health as people reach and maintain a healthy weight.”

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

MPR
For Rochester, becoming the 'Silicon Valley of Medicine' won't be easy
by Catharine Richert

The Destination Medical Center project wants to give Rochester a reputation for something it's never been: a magnet for tech start-ups and MPR News logoentrepreneurs. But turning the city into what the DMC calls the "Silicon Valley of Medicine" won't be easy. The DMC is a multibillion, 20-year economic development effort to remake Rochester so Mayo can better compete for both patients and top talent. It's also meant to help diversify the region's economy by attracting new businesses. But Rochester's risk-averse culture has held it back, said Jamie Sundsbak, an entrepreneur and former Mayo Clinic researcher. "When you have a large medical institution like the Mayo Clinic — a world renowned, top medical institution in the world — you get that way by eliminating risk," he said. "If you look at some of the entrepreneurial communities, risk is what they are excited about."

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: With Mayo Clinic at its heart, the Destination Medical Center (DMC) initiative is the catalyst to position Rochester, Minnesota as the world’s premier destination for health and wellness; attracting people, investment opportunities, and jobs to America’s City for Health and supporting the economic growth of Minnesota, its bioscience sector, and beyond.

Contacts: Duska AnastasijevicSusan Barber Lindquist

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Tags: 104.7 DukeFM, AccuWeather, advisory board, Albert Lea Tribune, Alzforum, apps, asthma, Austin Herald, Becker’s Hospital Review, Breast Cancer, breastfeeding, Brooke Werneburg


May 13th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic in race for Florida patients
by Christopher Snowbeck

Like college kids at spring break, the nation’s biggest names in health care are spending some serious coin in Florida. In March, the Mayo Clinic said it would spend $100 million at its hospital in Jacksonville to better position the medical center as a health care destinatioStar Tribune Logon for the southeastern U.S. It was the latest move by Mayo in Florida, where the Rochester-based clinic isn’t the only out-of-town operator that’s growing in the state.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

Becker’s Hospital Review, What is drawing Cleveland Clinic, Mayo Clinic and other AMCs to Florida?

Context: Advancing its position as the premier medical destination center for health care in the Southeast, Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida will invest $100 million in major construction projects building on its 150-year history of transforming health care and the patient experience. This summer, Mayo Clinic will begin constructing an innovative destination medical building that will provide integrated services needed for complex cancer, as well as neurologic and  neurosurgical care. Initially rising four stories, the 150,000-square-foot building has the potential for 11 more stories. More than 126,000 patients are expected to visit the first year the building opens.  More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

 

KARE11-TV
New Mayo Clinic book offers women menopause solutions

Menopause expert Dr. Stephanie Faubion, M.D., has written a new book. “The Menopause Solution: A Doctor’s Guide to: Relieving Hot Flashes,
KARE-11 LogoEnjoying Better Sex, Sleeping Well, Controlling Your Weight and Being Happy.” The book is available now at major bookstores everywhere. Dr. Faubion, Director of the Mayo Clinic’s Women’s Health Clinic, appeared on KARE 11 News to talk about her book, which covers everything from perimenopause to post-menopause, debunks common myths, uses the most up-to -date research and confronts the controversial topic of hormone therapy.

Reach: KARE-TV is the NBC affiliate serving the Minneapolis-Saint Paul market.

Additional coverage: KCTV Kansas City, A menopause expert shares ways to be happy during and after menopause; KGUN-TV Tucson, National Radio

Context: As preteens, girls often take health classes to teach them about their changing bodies during puberty. For moms-to-be, classes deal with pregnancy and newborn care. Yet, few classes are offered about menopause, a part of life that 6,000 U.S. women reach every day. A new book released today aims to address that gap. Mayo Clinic The Menopause Solution is subtitled A Doctor’s Guide to Relieving Hot Flashes, Enjoying Better Sex, Sleeping Well, Controlling Your Weight and Being Happy! “This book serves to inform women about what’s happening to their bodies, what treatment options are available and how to remain healthy in the years past menopause,” says Stephanie Faubion, M.D., medical editor of The Menopause Solution and director of the Women’s Health Clinic and Office of Women’s Health at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Faubion, a North American Menopause Society-certified menopause practitioner, is one of the nation’s leading experts on menopause and regularly treats women with menopause-related conditions. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

 

USA Today
Study: Swaddling babies may increase risk of SIDS
by Mary Bowerman

An infant that is unable to flip from his or her back to their side or stomach can safely be swaddled, according to Chris Colby, division chair of neonatology at Mayo Clinic, who is not associated with the study. He notes that swaddling is used to mirror the constricted nature of the wombUSA Today newspaper logo and promotes the baby falling asleep more quickly. "The concern is that as babies get older – even tho swaddled -- they could wiggle around and end up in a prone position, face-down, looking at the mattress," Colby said. "You have to be mindful as your baby gets older, and assess if swaddling your baby tight at 2-3 months if still a safe practice."

Reach: USA TODAY  has an average daily circulation of 4.1 million which includes print, various digital editions and other papers that use their branded content.

Context: Christopher Colby, M.D., is affiliated with Mayo Clinic Children's Center.  At Mayo Clinic Children's Center, more than 200 medical providers in 40 medical and surgical specialties offer integrated care to over 50,000 children and teenagers every year, inspiring hope and providing healing.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Rapid City Journal
Mayo oncologist pioneer in new protocols
by Tom Griffith

Talk to a patient of pioneering Mayo Clinic oncologist Dr. Mark Truty, or even the doctor himself, and you’ll find he has a tendency to deflect Rapids City Journal Logocredit for advancements in the treatment of pancreatic cancer that have changed what was once a near-certain death sentence into real hope for survival. “Subconsciously, it’s probably been a huge motivator,” Truty admitted last week. “He went through the old approach. He was diagnosed, was in terrible shape, had an operation by a surgeon who was inexperienced, suffered complications, was in the hospital for three months, and died six months later. It was a pointless exercise, and it’s a problem that continues to happen on a daily basis around the world.”

Reach: Rapid City Journal is published daily for residents of Rapid City, SD and surrounding areas. The circulation is more than 23, 200 daily and its online version has nearly 129,000 unique visitors each month.

Related coverage: 

Rapid City Journal, Spearfish man defies odds, survives bout with pancreatic cancer by Tom Griffith — Tom Hoffman will never forget the day he received his death sentence…Following nine days of tests that confirmed the diagnosis, Hoffman was introduced to Dr. Mark Truty, assistant professor and section chair of hepatoeiliary and pancreatic surgery at the famed clinic in Rochester, Minn. The doctor, part of a team of Mayo oncologists developing pioneering protocols in the treatment of pancreatic cancer, was blunt.

Context: Mark Truty, M.D., who treated Tom Hoffman of Spearfish, leads a surgical team at the Mayo Clinic that is pioneering new protocols in the treatment of pancreatic cancer that have resulted in vastly improved survival rates.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Las Vegas Review-Journal
Sleep apnea causes problems from fatigue to traffic accidents
by Apt Nadler

People with sleep apnea are more prone to become a Type 2 diabetic, because of developing a resistance to insulin. Individuals with sleep apnea are also at risk for a stroke and depression. “Sleep apnea is one of our focuses in primary care management,” said Dr. Martina Mookadam, a family medicine physician at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. “It creates a very strong physical stress on the body. If your primary careLas Vegas Review-Journal Newspaper Logo doctor fails to ask you if you have symptoms, you should bring it up. Sleep apnea can happen at any age.”

Reach: Las Vegas Review-Journal is a daily newspaper written for the residents of Las Vegas.

Context: Martina Mookadam, M.D.  is a family medicine physician at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Mayo Clinic Family Medicine doctors in Arizona provide comprehensive care for individuals of all ages at facilities in Arrowhead (Glendale) and Thunderbird (Scottsdale).

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

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Tags: advisory board, Aiden Remme, Angie Gullicksrud, Arizona Republic, Aspirin, asthma, atrial fibrillation, Becker’s Hospital Review, Bend Bulletin, brain tumor, Camp Wabi, Captain Kids Program


January 15th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly News Summary

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in tMayo Clinic in the News Logohe News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Heather Privett  with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic spending $92.7 million on buildings, equipment
by Christopher Snowbeck

Mayo Clinic announced Tuesday a plan for spending $92.7 million on facilities and equipment that includes more private rooms in Rochester, better roads near its hospital in Florida and a new airplane for transporting patients. The spending plan was approved in November by the boardStar Tribune newspaper logo of directors at Mayo, which routinely makes large infrastructure investments across its six-state network of hospitals and clinics.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: Bloomberg News online, KTTC.com, KXLT.com, Post-Bulletin

Context:  An investment of $92.7 million in facilities and equipment across Mayo Clinic through 2017 will ensure that patients from across the globe find the world-class accommodations and whole-person care they have come to expect. These efforts reinforce Mayo Clinic’s level of commitment to the Destination Medical Center (DMC) initiative by enhancing the patient experience and positioning Mayo Clinic as the premiere global destination for health and wellness. “Our hospital projects will help us meet Mayo Clinic’s responsibility to combine safe and comprehensive care with a seamless, high-quality experience for our patients and their families,” says Amy Williams, M.D., medical director of hospital operations. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

TIME
Here’s What 10 Experts Think of the Government’s New Diet Advice
by Alexandra Sifferlin

“The 2015 Dietary Guidelines build upon the 2010 Dietary Guidelines to provide information to shape policy, design food and nutrition programs, and to help Americans make healthy dietary choices. However, although the Guidelines are required and purported to be “based on Time magazine logothe preponderance of current scientific and medical knowledge”, they did not include some of the recommendations of the Scientific Advisory Committee and therefore do not describe an optimal dietary pattern. Despite some of these shortcomings, it is important to recognize that for most people, following the Dietary Guidelines will improve their nutritional status and health. — Dr. Donald Hensrud, a physician at Mayo Clinic and editor of the Mayo Clinic Diet.

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Donald Hensrud, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist and editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet Book.

Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

The Wall Street Journal
Can Echinacea Melt Winter’s Colds and Flu?
by Laura Johannes

“If you are getting plenty of fluids and plenty of rest and you want to take echinacea, it seems like a reasonable thing to do and unlikely to harm you,” says Pritish K. Tosh, associate professor at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. But people at risk for flu complications, such as pneumonia or bronchitis, should instead take an antiviral medication such as Tamiflu, he adds.WSJ Banner

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Pritish Tosh, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases expert. His research is focused in emerging infections and preparedness activities related to them, ranging from collaborating with the Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group in basic science vaccine development to hospital systems research related to pandemic preparedness.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Florida Times-Union
$10 million gift from grateful patient will underwrite Mayo Clinic's neurosurgery residency program
by Charlie Patton

As he waited to undergo spinal surgery at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville on Feb. 17, 2012, John Sonnentag promised himself that if everything Florida Times-Union newspaper logowent well, he would make significant gift to the hospital. Additional coverage: Post Bulletin, Bloomberg News Online

Reach: 
The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: A $10 million gift from a grateful patient and his wife will provide funding for a neurosurgery residency program on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus to help address the nationwide shortage of specialists in head and spine procedures. “There’s a tremendous need for training neurosurgeons in this country,” says Robert Wharen, Jr., M.D., chair of Neurosurgery at Mayo Clinic in Florida. “There is now a shortage of neurosurgeons, and that shortage is actually going to get worse, because there are more neurosurgeons retiring over the next 10 years than we are able to train.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

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Tags: ABCnews.com, ALS Stem Cell Trial, asthma, asthma and shingles, Austin Herald, BBC News, Becker’s Hospital Review, birth control pills, Bloomberg, breast cancer screening, BringMeTheNews, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)


January 8th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in tMayo Clinic in the News Logohe News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to

Heather Privett  with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

FOX Los Angeles
Dr. David Dodick of the Mayo Clinic talks concussions in sports

… So what are the truths about concussions and sports? The Mayo Clinic, hoping to get some answers out there have made soGood Day LAme of their experts available this morning. Joining us from their facility in Phoenix was Dr. David Dodick - Medical Director of the Headache Program and the Sports Neurology and Concussion Program.

Reach: Good Day-L.A. is an Emmy award-winning morning show which serves the greater Los Angeles area.

Additional coverage: Fox 11 Los Angeles   David Dodick of the Mayo Clinic talks concussions in sports

Context: David Dodick, M.D. is a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona and an expert in concussion care and director of the Mayo Clinic Concussion Program.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Wall Street Journal
New Weapons in the Fight Against Multiple Myeloma
by Ron Winslow

Few types of cancer research have witnessed more progress in the past decade than the fight against the blood cancer known as multiple WSJ Bannermyeloma… “Of all the cancers, in terms of progress in the last 10 years, multiple myeloma is at the top of the list,” says S. Vincent Rajkumar, professor of medicine and a hematologist/oncologist at the Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minn.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context:  S. Vincent Rajkumar, M.D. is a hematologist with  Mayo Clinic Cancer Center.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

MPR
The loneliness of the Alzheimer’s care giver
by Bob Collins

When I fill in for Kerri Miller on Wednesday, I’m doing a segment on Alzheimer’s. If there’s a more despicable disease, I’m unaware of it. Perhaps MPR2that’s why you don’t hear a lot of politicians criticizing a huge increase in Alzheimer’s research. “It’s perhaps some of the most encouraging news we’ve had on Alzheimer’s disease in several years,” Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging and the Mayo Alzheimer’s Research Center, told the Washington Post. “This is truly very, very exciting in the field.”

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

MPR
The story of the year 2015
by Bob Collins

…I was impressed yesterday with the show we did on immunotherapy (you can find the podcast version here). It was sparked by President Carter’s recovery from cancer, thanks — it would seem — to a drug called Keytruda, which appears to be a “magic bullet” that allows the immune system to attack cancer, and then turns it off before it attacks something it shouldn’t be attacking. Here’s the thing: My guests were cancerMPR News logo researchers: Dr. Roxana Dronca of Mayo Clinic and Dr. Christopher Pennell of the University of Minnesota, who, like all cancer researchers, get up every day and go to work, hoping for success, but more often find failure. That’s the nature of success. “I’m not the most patient person in the real life, but I learned that I can be patient in research and in the clinic,” Dr. Dronca said.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Roxana Dronca, M.D. is an oncologist with Mayo Clinic Cancer Center.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

CBS News
7 ways to recapture happiness at family holidays
by Mary Brophy Marcus

"Home for the holidays" may conjure lovely images of grandma baking cookies, piles of gifts, and long snowy walks with loved ones. But for many, the picture may not be as lovely: tight budgets, long work hours, CBS News Logoillness, stress, and long-running family tensions may dampen spirits. And long walks may be the last thing you want to take with certain curmudgeonly relatives. "Holidays are physical, emotional, and financial stress tests," Dr. Amit Sood of the Mayo Clinic told CBS News. "What should be enjoyable becomes a stressful event." Sood, a professor of medicine and the author of the books "The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living" and "The Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness," said many people try too hard to overachieve during holiday time.

Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

Context: Amit Sood, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in General Internal Medicine and the Cancer Center. The Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness combines wisdom from neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, and spirituality to help people choose contentment.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Star Tribune
The slow growth of a state biotech sector and the rise of a Destination Medical Center
by Matt McKinney

…In Rochester, city officials and others are hoping to turn that exodus into an influx of promising biotech researchers and companies. Central to that effort is Destination Medical Center, the ambitious, 20-year multibillion-dollar plan to remake the Mayo Clinic and the city itself into a global hub for health care and medical research…The Mayo Clinic will soon open its own clean-room facility for the production ofStar Tribune newspaper logo regenerative medicine products. Dr. Atta Behfar, director of the cardiac regeneration program and the Advanced Product Incubator, said it should begin manufacturing in the first quarter of next year.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: The Advanced Product Incubator (API) establishes cell-free platforms to develop regenerative therapies. Built according to Current Good Manufacturing Practices (CGMP) set forth by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the API adheres to rigorous standards of facility design, monitoring and process control. This multidisciplinary, first-of-its-kind facility bridges teams of researchers and physicians with scientific and industry experts to accelerate product development. Atta Behfar, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Behfar's lab uses state-of-the-art technologies developed at Mayo Clinic to understand heart disease at its most elemental level. With this understanding, Dr. Behfar and his colleagues are doing cardiovascular regeneration research with the aim of developing novel therapies to prevent and cure chronic heart conditions.

Contact: Karl Oestreich

 

 

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Tags: 3D Print, ABC News, Aden Munson, Adopt a Family, AK Antony, Alaska Dispatch News, Alaska Natives and colorectal cancer, Alaska News Dispatch, ALN Mag, Alzheimer’s care giver, Andrea Shaw, Angela Murad


October 1st, 2015

In the News Mayo Clinic Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

 

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

 

 

 

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor: Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Wall Street Journal
How One Family Faced Difficult Decisions About DNA Sequencing
by Amy Dockser Marcus

… Giusti realized that whole-genome or whole-exome sequencing—sequencing someone’s complete DNA or an impoWSJ Bannerrtant section of it—might yield information about the family’s cancer risk, particularly for her daughter, Nicole, 21, and her 18-year-old son, David. So, Ms. Giusti proposed an idea to A. Keith Stewart, the director of Mayo Clinic’s Center for Individualized Medicine: sequence my immediate family, and let’s study all the information. Dr. Stewart, curious about why identical twins got two different types of cancer, agreed.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Individualized medicine, also known as personalized medicine or precision medicine, means tailoring diagnosis and treatment to each patient to optimize care. Patients have experienced this kind of care for a century and a half at Mayo Clinic, where teams of specialists have always worked together to find answers. The Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine is solving the clinical challenges of today and tomorrow by bringing the latest discoveries from the research laboratory to your doctor's fingertips in the form of new genomics-based tests and treatments. A. Keith Stewart, M.D. is the center's director.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Wall Street Journal
The Price We Pay for Sitting Too Much
by Sumathi Reddy

New research is helping medical experts devise formulas for how long a typical office worker should spend sitting and standing… Michael WSJ BannerJensen, a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who specializes in obesity and diabetes, uses various ways to reduce daily sitting time that he also recommends to his patients. When he has meetings with just one or two people, he finds a place where they can walk together instead of sitting. And he tells his patients who are parents to use their children’s athletic events as a time to be on their feet. “There’s no reason you have to sit and watch those games,” Dr. Jensen said.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Additional coverage:

Good Morning America — Debunking Fitness Myths: Standing Desks; The Australian

Context: Michael Jensen, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Jensen and his lab studies the effects of obesity and how body fat (adipose tissue) and body fat distribution influence health. The regulated uptake, storage and release of fatty acids from adipose tissue play a major role in determining its health effects.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Star Tribune
Mayo receives $9M federal innovation grant
by Jeremy Olson

Mayo Clinic will receive up to $9 million in federal funding to help affiliated doctors and clinics outside Rochester adopt some of the team-basedStar Tribune newspaper logo medical techniques and integrated care that have been hallmarks of its success… “Health care is too expensive,” said Dr. Kari Bunkers, medical director for Mayo’s Office of Population Health Management. “This is our effort at reducing the high cost of health care and implementing a model that delivers more for less.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

Wall Street Journal — Grants Aim to Boost Patient Care 

Context: The Mayo Practice Transformation Network is one of 39 health care collaborative networks selected to participate in the Transforming Clinical Practice Initiative, announced today by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia M. Burwell. Mayo Clinic will receive up to $9.7 million to provide technical assistance support to help equip clinicians in the Mayo Practice Transformation Network with tools, information and network support needed to improve quality of care, increase patients’ access to information and spend health care dollars more wisely. This initiative is a collaboration between the Mayo Clinic Office of Population Health Management (OPHM) and the Mayo Clinic Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery (CSHCD). It is led by principal investigator Nilay Shah, Ph.D., health services researcher in the CSHCD, and co-principal investigator Kari Bunkers, M.D., primary care physician in the Mayo Clinic Health System and medical director of the OPHM. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Elizabeth Zimmerman Young

 

Reuters
Kids with asthma fare worse when they live with smokers
by Lisa Rapaport

Kids with asthma are more likely to have breathing problems and be hospitalized when they live with a smoker, a research review suggests…For Reuters Logoasthmatic kids, breathing in cigarette smoke was also linked to a more than tripled risk of poor lung function and 32 percent higher odds of wheezing symptoms. While the risk of smoke exposure exacerbating asthma symptoms is well known, fresh evidence on the extent of the danger posed to children may help convince some parents to abandon their cigarettes, said senior study author Dr. Avni Joshi, an allergist and immunologist at Mayo Clinic Children’s Center in Rochester, Minnesota.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world newsbusiness newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile and interactive television platforms.

Additional coverage: Yahoo! Canada, International Business Times, HealthDay, Nursing Times, CBS News, Medical Express, KYTX TexasUniversity Herald, US News & World Report, com, Medscape, Philadelphia InquirerKIMT 

Context: The risk for hospitalization doubles for kids with asthma who are exposed to secondhand smoke, according to a study led by Mayo Clinic Children’s Research Center. “The results of this review serve as a reminder to parents of just how dangerous it is to expose their children to secondhand smoke,” says Avni Joshi, M.D., senior author and pediatric allergist and immunologist at Mayo Clinic Children’s Center. “We knew that kids should not be exposed to tobacco, but how bad their asthma is likely to be with tobacco exposure was not clear. This study helped us quantify that risk, and so it informs as well as empowers us with the risk assessment. A child is twice as likely to end up in the hospital with an asthma flare if family members continue to smoke.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

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Tags: ABC News, ABC NEWS (AP), ankle sprains, antibacterial soap, AOL.com, Arkansas Online, asthma, Austin Daily Herald, AVIA Health Innovation, Becker’s Health IT & CIO Review, Boulder News, Bounce Day


September 4th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich


Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

TIME
Sitting is Killing You

by Alice Park

You’ve already heard that sitting is the new smoking. Now, scientists reveal exactly how it hurts the body—and novel ways to undo the damage (without clocTime magazine logoking hours at the gym). You might want to stand up for this…All of which has doctors and health experts calling for a paradigm shift. “In the same way that standing up is an oddity now, sitting down should be,” says Dr. James Levine, director of the Mayo Clinic-Arizona State University Obesity Solutions Initiative and probably best known as the inventor of the first treadmill desk.

Reach: Time magazine has a weekly circulation of 3.3 million. Time Online receives mores than 4.6 million unique visitors to its website each month and its monthy page views are more than 32.8 million.

Additional Coverage:

Arizona Republic
Workplace treadmill desks beginning to make strides
by Ken Alltucker

Arizona Republic newspaper logo…Now entrepreneurs and exercise companies have pounced on the idea that sitting can be hazardous to your health. "It is a hidden killer if you like," said James Levine, a Mayo Clinic doctor who examined the topic in his book "Get Up! Why Your Chair is Killing You and What You Can Do About It."

ReachThe Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday. The newspaper’s website Arizona Central, averages 83 million pages views each month.

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob NellisJim McVeigh

 

KARE11
Measles shot helps eliminate woman's cancer
by Adrienne Broaddus

Stacy Erholtz battled cancer for 10 years. But now, she says her cancer is in remission after a massive dose of the measles vaccine. While her journey has been tough, her faith hasn't wavered. After returningKARE-11 TV, Minneapolis-St. Paul from a taping a segment in Los Angeles with "The Doctors," Erholtz stopped by KARE 11 to chat about her journey. She said the show will highlight her treatment…Erholtz, 49, of Pequot Lakes, was one of two patients in a Mayo Clinic clinical trial last year using virotherapy. As she sips on a diet Pepsi, she can't stop smiling as she talks about her medical miracle.

Reach: KARE is a an NBC affiliate in the Minneapolis-St.Paul market.

Additional coverage: BringMeTheNews, WTVM Ga., WFSB, KCTV Kansas CityKCBD

Previous Coverage in May 15, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: In a proof of principle clinical trial, Mayo Clinic researchers have demonstrated that virotherapy — destroying cancer with a virus that infects and kills cancer cells but spares normal tissues — can be effective against the deadly cancer multiple myeloma. The findings appear in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Two patients in the study received a single intravenous dose of an engineered measles virus (MV-NIS) that is selectively toxic to myeloma plasma cells. Both patients responded, showing reduction of both bone marrow cancer and myeloma protein. One patient, a 49-year-old woman, experienced complete remission of myeloma and has been clear of the disease for over six months. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

 

MPR
Mayo doctor's tips for stress-free living and better health

MPR News logoDr. Amit Sood, author of the "Mayo Clinic's Guide to Stress-Free Living," speaks at a Minnesota Public Radio "Healthy States" event about the ways to improve your health by alleviating stress. Gratitude, compassion, acceptance, forgiveness and focusing on the meaning of life are key.Book cover Mayo Clinic's Guide to Stress-Free Living, with female doing cartwheel

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: In The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living, Mayo Clinic stress management and resiliency expert Amit Sood, M.D., draws on decades of groundbreaking research to offer readers a scientifically proven, structured and practical approach to reducing stress. He explains the brain’s two modes — focused mode and default mode — and how an imbalance between the two produces unwanted stress, and he shares new insights about how the mind works, including its natural tendency to wander. In this easy-to-follow guide, Dr. Sood provides actionable steps to cultivate emotional and mental strength, find greater fulfillment and nurture a kind disposition. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Sood, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Ginger Plumbo, Brian Kilen

 

Chicago Defender
Black Women Move Past ‘Tuskegee Experiment’ Mistrust
by Oretha Winston

If a research survey of African American professional women is any indication, attitudes may be changing towards participation in medical research. Mayo Clinic and The Links, Incorporated Chicago Defender newspaper logoresearchers teamed up to survey members of the international women’s organization, and found that a majority of African American women surveyed are willing to or have taken part in medical research…“Our findings are highly encouraging,” says Sharonne Hayes, M.D., Mayo Clinic cardiologist, co-author of the study, and director of Mayo’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion.

Reach: The Chicago Defender covers local and national news of interest to its black readership, residing in the Chicago metropolitan area. The publication has a weekly circulation of more than 7,400 readers. The online version attracts more than 13,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Elev8

Context: If a research survey of African American professional women is any indication, attitudes may be changing towards participation in medical research. Mayo Clinic and The Links, Incorporated researchers teamed up to survey members of the international women’s organization, and found that a majority of African American women surveyed are willing to or have taken part in medical research. The results appear in the Journal of Women’s Health. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

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Tags: 3D printing, ABC15 Arizona, acute sinusitis, Adela Grando, ADHD in children, African-American, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer's diseease, Arizona Pop Warner Football, Arizona Republic, Arizona State University


June 23rd, 2012

Children With Asthma at Higher Risk for Shingles: Study

By

Children with asthma have a higher risk for developing shingles -- a painful skin rash -- following infection with the herpes zoster virus, new research reveals. The authors noted that 1 million Americans are estimated to be infected with the herpes zoster virus every year. However, typically it's a problem that strikes men and women over the age of 60 or people with weakened immune systems… "It had previously been unknown whether asthma status poses an increased risk of shingles among children," study author Dr. Young Juhn, a pediatrician at Mayo Clinic Children's Center in Rochester, Minn., said in an academy news release. "These results suggest that asthma significantly increases the risk for shingles in children."

Additional coverage: Yahoo!, ABC News NY, Newspaper Zone

 

MSN.com

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Tags: asthma, Dr. Young Juhn, herpes zoster virus, Mayo Clinic Children's Center, shingles


December 29th, 2009

Microbes in your gut could affect asthma, weight, cancer risk, etc.

By Kelley Luckstein KelleyLuckstein

Don't look now, but your gut is teeming with microbes - as many as 100 trillion of them. It may unnerve you to know that you're providing a home to a population of bacteria and other tiny organisms but they're not just squatters; some beneficial bacteria help you digest food and can protect against infection.

 

Despite the accumulating evidence, though, the field is still in its infancy, says John DiBaise, a gastroenterologist at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona and an author of the study. That means it's far too early to try to manipulate your own gut bacteria through probiotics or prebiotics with an eye to losing pounds.

 

Chicago Daily Herald, 12/28/09

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Tags: asthma, Cancer, microbes, Weight


October 20th, 2009

Asthma and Swine Flu: What You Need to Know

By Kelley Luckstein KelleyLuckstein

With the H1N1 vaccine becoming more widely available, news that asthma is the most common chronic medical condition found among people hospitalized for severe complications of H1N1 hits close to home for asthmatics and loved ones of people with the lung condition…

 

U.S. News consulted James Li, chairman of the Division of Allergy at the Mayo Clinic and coauthor of an article on H1N1 and asthma that was published this month in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

 

US News and World Report by January Payne, 10/16/09

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Tags: asthma, H1N1, swine flu


August 28th, 2009

Adherence Drives Success of Asthma Therapy

By Kelley Luckstein KelleyLuckstein

Oral controller medications led to better asthma outcomes compared with inhaled steroids because patients were more likely to take the drugs, an analysis of community-based treatment data showed.

 

When adherence was not an issue, inhaled corticosteroids reduced the risk of emergency department visits and hospitalization and were associated with lower treatment costs, Hiangkat Tan, of HealthCore in Wilmington, Del., and colleagues reported in the August issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

 

However, adherence to inhaled steroids was so poor that the medication had little impact on disease control.

"When adherence to inhaled corticosteroid therapy cannot be achieved, a leukotriene modifier may be a reasonable choice for monotherapy," the authors concluded.

 

MedPage Today by Charles Bankhead, 8/27/2009

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Tags: asthma, Mayo Clinic Proceedings


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