Items Tagged ‘Austin Daily Herald’

March 3rd, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

USA Today
Having a baby past 35: What women should know
by Ashley May

Have a plan, and the money to execute it, before 35. Fertility doctors say women approaching 35 who want children but aren’t yet ready should look into egg or embryo freezing. Charles Coddington, professor and OB/GYN for Mayo Medical School, also advises getting a full checkup for reproductive health. After age 35, pregnancy is more difficult because of less frequent ovulation. Also, women 35-45 have aUSA Today newspaper logo 20-35% chance of miscarriage, compared with women under 35 that average a 15-20% chance of miscarriage, according to the American Pregnancy Association. … Frozen eggs of a woman younger than 35 have a greater than 50% chance of producing a live birth. Past age 40, freezing eggs or embryos will not have a great success – less than 9 percent result in live birth, Coddington said.

Reach: USA TODAY  has an average daily circulation of 4.1 million which includes print, various digital editions and other papers that use their branded content.

Context: Charles Coddington, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic ObGyn. The Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota supports women throughout their lifelong journey from childbearing age to menopause and beyond. You can learn more about Dr. Coddington's research interests here.

Contact:  Kelley Luckstein

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic investing $70 million in Mankato hospital
by Christopher Snowbeck

Mayo Clinic’s regional network of medical centers is investing $70 million to expand and renovate the surgery suite and orthopedic clinic at its hospital in Mankato. The project includes a $65 million upgrade to the Star Tribune newspaper logohospital’s surgery facilities that is part of a broader plan to better link the Mankato campus with Mayo Clinic’s headquarters in Rochester, according to details released Friday. “Mayo Clinic is committed to the needs of patients in Mankato and the surrounding communities we serve,” said Dr. James Hebl, vice president of Mayo Clinic Health System in southwest Minnesota, in a statement.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: KROC AM, KEYC Mankato, Minneapolis/St. Paul Business, Journal, Post-Bulletin, Healthcare Dive, Germany Sun, Becker’s ASC ReviewMankato Free Press

Context:  Mayo Clinic Health System today announced plans for a $65 million hospital surgical suite expansion in Mankato. Construction is expected to begin later this year. “Mayo Clinic is committed to the needs of patients in Mankato and the surrounding communities we serve,” says James Hebl, M.D., vice president of Mayo Clinic Health System in Southwest Minnesota. “The projects are an investment in our patients, our staff and the needs of our communities. Providing access to outstanding care in state-of-the-art facilities closer to where patients live is of paramount importance, and is the driving force behind the decision to dedicate substantial resources to these initiatives.” More information about the expansion can be found here.

Contact:  Micah Dorfner

 

Star Tribune
Mayo earnings hit by Medicaid, labor costs
by Christopher Snowbeck

Mayo Clinic's net income slipped last year as the Rochester-based health care giant spent more on staffing for growth initiatives, and saw more losses on patients with Medicaid coverage. Even so, the overall results being released Monday show "it was a strong year," said Kedrick Adkins Jr., the clinic's chief financial officer. Mayo posted $475 million in net income on $11 billion in revenue, down about 10 percent from 2015Star Tribune newspaper logo net income of $526.4 million, according to the clinic's latest financial report.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: KTTC, Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal, Dotmed.comBecker’s Hospital Review, Healthcare Dive

Context: With more than 1.3 million patients seeking Mayo Clinic’s expertise yearly, the institution continues its work to provide the best care to every patient through integrated clinical practice, education and research. Mayo Clinic reported a strong financial position in 2016, with contributions of $466 million to its pension plan for staff and more than $600 million in capital projects. “The outstanding work of Mayo Clinic employees is the engine that drives our mission to our patients, advances important research and educational initiatives, and positions our institution as a key voice for the future of health care,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic. “Our strong financial performance enables Mayo to hire and retain the best talent, and invest in technology, facilities and our staff as we strive to deliver the best outcomes and service to our patients.”

Contact:  Susan Barber Lindquist

 

 

KAAL
Mayo Clinic Performs Rare In-Womb Surgery to Give Baby New Chance at Life
by Marissa Collins

An Austin mom and her baby are doing well after her pregnancy took an unexpected turn. Nineteen weeks in, doctors told her something was wrong with her unborn baby … Her baby was diagnosed with a severe KAAL 6 News Rochester Logoform of Spina Bifida halfway through her pregnancy. “Once the baby is being formed the babies back does not close. The spine does not close, so the nerves can be open," says Dr. Rodrigo Ruano, Director at Mayo Clinic Fetal Diagnostic and Intervention Center.

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Context: The Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota supports women throughout their lifelong journey from childbearing age to menopause and beyond. The Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine staff care for women experiencing high-risk pregnancies related to obstetric, medical, surgical or genetic complications.

Contact:  Kelley Luckstein

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: AccuWeather, Action News Jax, acupuncture, Albert Lea Tribune, allergies, alzheimers, Andy Sandness, Anya Guy, ASH Clinical News, Associated Press, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Austin Daily Herald


October 21st, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Forbes
Mind Over Money: How To Balance Mental Well-being With Busy Careers From Mayo Clinic's Dr. Sood
by Jennifer Wang

… “The good people are very good at feeling bad about themselves,” Dr. Amit Sood advises on a panel at FORBES’ Under 30 Summit. “If you’re feeling bad, it means you’re a good person, it means that you’re sensitive and you care.” Sood, who founded the Mayo Clinic Resilience Program and chairs its Mind Body Initiative, says the keys to maintaining a positive state of mind are looking at things from a biggerForbes magazine logo perspective, finding meaning in what you’re doing, and focus on the journey instead of obsessing over outcomes.

Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Amit Sood, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in General Internal Medicine and the Cancer Center. Dr. Sood is editor of the  Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness and The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living. Dr. Sood was a panel member at the Forbes 30 Under 30 Summit recently in Boston where his panel addressed 6,000 participants on “How to win in the markets without losing their minds.”

Contact: Traci Klein

 

MPR
How significant is the latest Alzheimer's research
by Cathy Wurzer

A new insight into how a natural enzyme affects memory-loss in mice is getting a lot of attention for what it might mean for humans with Alzheimer's disease. World-renowned Alzheimer's researcher Karen Ashe at MPR News logothe University of Minnesota recently published her findings in the journal Nature Medicine. She found she was able to reverse memory loss in mice by lowering an enzyme called caspase-2. She'll be partnering with researchers at the Mayo Clinic to work on advancing this discovery. Morning Edition host Cathy Wurzer spoke with Ron Petersen, the director of the Mayo's Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, for more on the subject.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

KTTC
Mayo Clinic researchers develop way to detect prostate cancer recurrence sooner
by Chris Yu

For the first time, Mayo Clinic researchers mapped patterns of prostate cancer recurrence using the latest imaging technology, allowing doctors to detect recurrence sooner… According to urological surgeon Dr. Jeffrey Karnes, conventional bone and CT scans cannot identify sites of recurrence when the PSA level is lower than 10 … "Potentially find it sooner,  intervene sooner, and hopefully, that translates into betterKTTC TV logo outcomes for our patients," said Dr. Karnes.

Reach: KTTC is an NBC affiliate that serves the Rochester, Minn. area including the towns of Austin, Mason City, Albert Lea and Winona. Its website receives more than 73,300 unique visitors each month.

Context: R. Jeffrey Karnes, M.D. is a Mayo clinic urologist. Dr. Karnes research interests include: prostate cancer outcomes following radical prostatectomy, staging and surgery for advanced prostate cancer (special interest), prostate cancer biomarker discovery and implementation, bladder cancer urine markers, prostate and bladder cancer clinical trials and active surveillance in prostate cancer.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
Vincent's patients now have access to Mayo Clinic's cancer care
by Alexa Epitropoulos

The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center – a collaboration between St. Vincent's and Mayo – is now open to patients at St. Vincent's Riverside campus. The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, which is housed in a 11,500-square-Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logofoot medical suite on the same grounds as St. Vincent's, will offer cancer services to patients visiting the hospital starting on Oct. 17.

Reach:  The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals

Additional coverage: News4Jax broadcast, News4Jax, WJCT

Context: To deliver Mayo Clinic’s nationally ranked comprehensive cancer care to more people in Northeast Florida, the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center located at St. Vincent’s Riverside will open to patients on Oct. 17. The collaboration between Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus and St. Vincent’s HealthCare, a part ofAscension, the nation’s largest Catholic and non-profit health system, brings Mayo Clinic’s cancer services to patients in a newly built 11,500-square-foot medical suite on the campus of St. Vincent’s Riverside. “We are excited to launch this community collaboration and we look forward to further meeting the needs of cancer patients, right here in their own community,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., CEO, Mayo Clinic in Florida.  “This community collaboration will enable patients to receive cancer care at Mayo Clinic Cancer Center at St. Vincent’s and come to Mayo’s San Pablo Road campus when they need highly complex care, such as bone marrow transplants.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

KAAL
Remembering a Treasure: Rochester Honors the Life and Legacy of Sister Generose
by Ben Henry

Rochester spent Tuesday remembering and honoring one of Mayo Clinic’s strongest pillars of success, Sister Generose Gervais. Sister Generose died October 8 peacefully in the hospital she served for many years. She was 97-years-old. "It's been her life of service for me that has touched so many by the thousands day after day and night after night,” said former Mayo Clinic president and CEO Dr. Robert Waller. “She caredKAAL 6 News Rochester Logo
for patients and their families in ways beyond what medicine was able to provide.” … "Mayo Clinic has been richly blessed by this strong woman of faith. We are grateful for her selfless presence and her steady guidance. We know that her spirt lives on in the work that we do every day to serve patients," said current Mayo Clinic President and CEO Dr. John Noseworthy.

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Additional coverage:

KTTC, Plummer Building doors close for 10th time in 88 years to honor Sister Generose
KTTC, Community writes tributes to Sister Generose in memory books
Post-Bulletin, Mayo to close Plummer doors for Sister Generose
KTTC,  'Every day is a gift from God': Wisdom of Sister Generose shared during moving memorial
KTIV Sioux City'Every day is a gift from God': Wisdom of Sister Generose shared during moving memorial

Context: Sister Generose Gervais, long-time administrator of Saint Marys Hospital and president of the Poverello Foundation, passed away peacefully recently in the hospital she served for many years. She was 97. Sister Generose will be remembered for her tireless work on behalf of patients and the staff of Saint Marys Hospital. Her hospital ministry focused on perpetuating the Franciscan legacy, specifically nurturing the values of respect, integrity, compassion, healing, teamwork, innovation, excellence and stewardship among all Mayo Clinic staff. “Sister Generose was known for her faith, her quiet leadership, her wise counsel, her dedication to patients and staff, her sense of humor and the example of service that she lived every day,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic. “Mayo Clinic was blessed by her presence for more than 60 years.” More information about Sister Generose can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network and Mayo Clinic in the Loop.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: ABC15 Ariz., alzheimer's disease, Anesthesiology News, Arizona Republic, Attn:, Austin Daily Herald, backpacks, Becker’s Hospital Review, Big News Network, Bloomberg, Boston Herald, Brian Bunkers


September 30th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

ABC News
9-Year-Old Twin Sisters Dance With Bone Marrow Donor Who Saved Them
by Nicole Pelletiere

A pair of identical twin sisters from Minnesota were able to thank the man whose life-saving donation gave them the ability to be kids again.  “They fell in love with him right away,” mom Michelle Girtler, 43, of Minnesota City told ABC News today. “They took to him like they knew him their entire life. It was emotional, all of us were emotional. Lots of tears, a lot of gratitude."… This year, Elizabeth and Kathryn's doctor,ABC News logo Dr. Shakila Khan of the Mayo Clinic, submitted their story to Be the Match in hopes of setting up a meeting between them and their then anonymous donor.  The man, Ingo Gruda of Munster, Germany, was flown to Minnesota to meet with the girls over four after their transplants, Be the Match confirmed to ABC News.

Reach: ABC News Online has more than 28.8 million unique visitors to its site each month. ABC’s World News Tonight with David Muir averages about 9.2 million viewers each night.

Additional coverage: Inside Edition, KVNU-AM

Previous coverage in September 23, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Shakila Khan, M.D., is a physician with Mayo Clinic Children's Center. Dr. Khan's collaborative clinical research efforts include the Children's Oncology Group and Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium (PBMTC). She has also has served as the Mayo Clinic principal investigator for a large number of Children's Oncology Group and PBMTC protocols, and she's also the Mayo Clinic principal investigator for PBMTC.

Contact:  Sharon Theimer

 

Wall Street Journal
Trying to Break Unhealthy Habits? There’s a Coach for That
by Barbara Sadick

Changing unhealthy habits is hard, doctors say. But with Americans suffering from chronic disease in epidemic proportions, a big push is under way to get more individuals to do just that. … A Mayo Clinic study of WSJ Banner100 participants who worked with a wellness coach found that a majority had lost weight, improved nutritional habits and increased their physical activity by the end of the 12-week program. While there was some slippage in healthy behaviors at a three-month follow-up, the participants were still in better shape than before the coaching started, the study found. “Many people can implement positive lifestyle changes, but maintaining change over time is extremely difficult,” says Matthew M. Clark, a clinical psychologist at Mayo Clinic and the lead author of the study.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Several national surveys have found that approximately 15 to 20 percent of adults in the U.S. will report high levels of stress. A new study by Mayo Clinic researchers identified stress and burnout as a major problem employees face within the medical industry, leading to negative health behaviors. With rising stress levels in the workplace for employees, many companies are looking to integrate, engage and enroll employees into wellness programs. “It’s important to teach individuals to monitor their stress levels over time and practice effective, ongoing stress-reduction strategies, such as getting involved in wellness programs, this will in-turn help health care employees live a happy and health life,” says Matthew Clark, Ph.D., lead author of the study and resiliency expert at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Wall Street Journal
The Revolution in EMS Care
by Laura Landro

Much of the best equipment—including a helicopter equipped as a mobile emergency room or intensive-care unit—can be found at the Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minn. Regarded as a leader in sophisticated onboard equipment and communications, Mayo often consults with other medical transport systems to share best patient care strategies, and works with U.S. military physicians to share expertise on WSJ Bannerhow treatment of battlefield wounds might apply to civilian medicine. Mayo provides increasingly advanced pre-hospital treatment, says Scott Zietlow, a trauma surgeon and medical director of the Mayo One trauma helicopter program.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Emergency Medicine specialists work at all three Mayo Clinic locations to treat life-threatening illnesses. Teams of board-certified physicians, registered nurses, and other specially trained staff are available at all times to treat anyone seeking emergency medical care. Each year Mayo emergency care physicians see more than 80,000 patients in the emergency care setting.  Mayo Clinic Medical Transport provides ground and air medical transport services from its base in Rochester:

Contact: Glenn Lyden

 

Modern Healthcare
Q&A: ‘If Mayo was a high-cost provider, we would be cut out of many of these networks’
by Bob Herman

Mayo Clinic, which has a 150-year history as a medical practice, now operates 22 hospitals and draws patients with complex needs from all over the world to its 1,243-bed flagship facility in Rochester, Minn. The Modern Healthcareorganization has also garnered praise for insulating clinical decisions from financial incentives by paying physicians under a salary model with no productivity bonuses. … Bob Herman, Modern Healthcare's Midwest bureau chief, interviewed Mayo President and CEO Dr. John Noseworthy while he was in Chicago as co-chair of a consortium of 12 health system CEOs convened with the American Medical Association to address physician burnout.

Reach: Modern Healthcare is the industry's leading source of healthcare business and policy news, research and information. The magazine covers health care policy, Medicare/Medicaid, and health care from a business perspective. Modern Healthcare magazine is ranked No. 1 in readership among healthcare executives and deemed a "must-read" by the who's who in healthcare. Modern Healthcare has more than 72,0000 paid magazine subscribers and its website receives more than 568,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Modern Healthcare (video)Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy on physician burnout and value-based care

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Mayo Clinic has taken a leadership role in identifying solutions to address the physician burnout issue. This research has been led by  Tait Shanaflet, M.D., a Mayo Clinic hematologist. He is the director of the Mayo Clinic Department of Medicine Program on Physician Well-being, a clinical laboratory evaluating personal and organizational factors that contribute to physician satisfaction. His research in this area has involved physicians at all stages of their career from medical school to practice had has include several multi-center and national studies. This research is intended to identify personal and organizational factors that can be modified in order to promote physician well-being and enhance the quality of care physicians deliver. More information on his physician burnout research can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: DuskaAnastasijevic, Karl Oestreich

 

Arizona Republic
Many people have expressed interest in wanting to learn what is their risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease
by Dr. Richard Caselli
— Question: What is Alzheimer’s disease and is it wise to get tested for risk? Answer: Alzheimer’s disease is a degenerative disease; brain cells slowly dying. We don’t fully understand why. To some degree, degeneration is a natural process, but this accelerates that process to a pathological degree. Many people have expressed interest in wanting to learn what is their risk for developing Alzheimer’s, and that’s whereArizona Republic newspaper logo the idea of predictive testing comes in, somebody who isn’t ill today but who wants to know am I going to get this in the future.…Dr. Richard Caselli is a neurologist specializing in behavioral disorders and serves as associate director of the Alzheimer’s Disease Center at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Reach: The Arizona Republic has daily circulation of more than 180,000 and its website azcentral.com has more than 2.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Richard Caselli, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist. Dr. Caselli's research focuses on cognitive aging and the changes that can be detected before the symptomatic onset of memory loss and related symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.

Contact:  Jim McVeigh

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: ABC News, ABC2 News, Alzhheimer's, Angie Murad, Arnold Palmer, artificial sweetener, Athletic Business, Attn:, Austin Daily Herald, awake brain surgery, Be the Match, Becker's Hospital News


April 15th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

New York Times
Millions With Leg Pain Have Peripheral Artery Disease
by Jane Brody

More than eight million older Americans have a condition that can cause leg pain when they walk even short distances. The condition, called peripheral artery disease, or P.A.D., is marked by diseased or blocked arteries in the legs. More than half of those with such circulatory problems in the extremities also have coronary or cerebral artery disease, noted Dr. Iftikhar J. Kullo, The New York Times newspaper logoa cardiovascular specialist at the Mayo Clinic, in The New England Journal of Medicine in March.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: Iftikar Kullo is a Mayo Clinic cardiovascular specialist. Dr. Kullo's research interests include investigating the use of new methodologies in refining cardiovascular risk stratification. These include genetic markers, circulating biomarkers, and noninvasive tests of arterial function and structure.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Star Tribune
Mayo, GE Ventures launch technology firm near San Francisco
by Christopher Snowbeck

Mayo Clinic and GE Ventures are launching a new company near San Francisco to sell software and manufacturing services to firms developing cell and gene therapies. Pharmaceutical Star Tribune Business section logocompanies, biotech firms and health care providers are among the potential customers for Vitruvian Networks Inc., company officials said during interviews on Monday...Mayo Clinic is the largest private employer in Minnesota. Last year, the system posted $526 million in income on $10.3 billion in revenue across operations that span six states.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Other coverage:

Silicon Valley Business JournalBloomberg, Canada StandardTwin Cities BusinessHIT Consultant, Healthcare DiveBecker’s Hospital ReviewNasdaq, Fierce Pharma

Context:  GE Ventures and Mayo Clinic announced the launch of Vitruvian Networks, Inc., an independent platform company committed to accelerating access to cell and gene therapies through advanced, cloud-ready software systems and manufacturing services. Cell and gene therapy involve time and resource-intense processes to provide personalized therapies to patients. Efficient and cost-effective solutions are required to expedite the transition of promising and potentially curative therapies from early clinical trials to a portfolio of products that advances medical care. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

US News & World Report
Too Fat for Surgery
by Anna Medaris Miller

Ever since Phyllis Warr was about 10 years old, doctors told her she'd drop dead if she didn't lose weight. They told her she wouldn't be able to walk at 35. They told her weight-loss surgery was her only hope. Warr is among the more than one-third ofUS News Heath Logo Americans who are obese – a height-weight combination that makes surgeries more complicated for surgeons, more risky for patients and more costly for the health care system, according to Dr. Robert Cima, a colorectal surgeon and chair of surgical quality at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. "Across all surgical specialties, obesity is associated with increased length of hospital stay, increased readmissions, decreased rate of dismissals to home and increased cost," he said to a group of journalists attending an obesity research fellowship program in February.

Reach: U.S. News & World Report is a multi-platform publisher of news and information, which includes http://www.usnews.com and http://www.rankingsandreviews.com.

Additional coverage: Yahoo! Finance

Context: Robert Cima, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic colorectal surgeon. Mayo Clinic surgeons helped develop minimally invasive (laparoscopic) colon and rectal surgery and use these techniques on almost all surgeries. Laparoscopic procedures use smaller incisions than conventional surgery, which decreases bleeding, lessens pain and shortens both expected hospital stays and overall recovery times. They are also skilled in robotic surgery, a specialized form of laparoscopic surgery, and ileoanal anastomosis surgery that avoids the need for a permanent colostomy.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

STAT
Records found in dusty basement undermine decades of dietary advice
by Sharon Begley

Dr. Robert Frantz, a physician at the Mayo Clinic, drove 90 minutes to his childhood home, to search file cabinets. On his third trip he spied moldering, unlabeled boxes in the far corner of the basement. Inside were ancient magnetic computer tapes and STAT Logo of Boston Globereams of yellowed documents. The subject line in his email to Ramsden was “Eureka.” After getting the tapes translated into formats that modern computers can read, Ramsden and his colleagues discovered what had been hidden for nearly half a century: records on 9,423 study participants, ages 20 to 97, all living in state mental hospitals or a nursing home. It was the largest experiment of its kind.

Reach: STAT covers the frontiers of health and medicine including science labs, hospitals, biotechnology board rooms, and political back rooms. Hosted by The Boston Globe, STAT launched on November 5, 2015. The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Additional coverage: New York Times

Context: Robert Frantz, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Frantz's research is centered on the varied forms of pulmonary hypertension, pulmonary vascular disease and right heart failure, including pathophysiology, hemodynamics, causes of exercise limitation and optimal management strategies. Dr. Frantz's research includes defining best strategies for management of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Action News Jax
Mayo Clinic Jacksonville completes 3,000 liver transplants

April is Organ Donor Month, and the Mayo Clinic Jacksonville just completed its 3,000th liver transplant. The program started back in 1998. The Mayo Clinic Jacksonville is the seventh center to reach the milestone out of about 120 in the nation.ActionNewsJax

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Context: The liver transplant team at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, recently completed the 3,000th transplant since the liver program started in 1998. Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus is only the seventh transplant center in the country to complete 3,000 adult liver transplants. Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus has one of the largest liver transplant programs in the country. The combined volume of theliver transplant program at Mayo Clinic’s campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota makes it the largest overall program in the country. To date, 6,681 liver transplants have been completed at Mayo Clinic’s campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. The Florida campus leads the way with the most liver transplants. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: AARP En Espanol, Action News Jax, allergy season, alzheimer's disease, American Journal of Gastroenterology, Amyloid and Tau Markers, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Austin Daily Herald, Becker’s Hospital Review, Bloomberg, brain tumors, Breast Cancer News


February 5th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Heather Privett  with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Star Tribune
Mayo chief John Noseworthy talks about the future of health care
By Joe Carlson

Dr. John Noseworthy is best known as president and CEO of the Mayo Clinic, but he’s also a governor with the WorStar Tribune Business section logold Economic Forum (WEF). At the group’s 46th annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland, earlier this month Noseworthy spoke on a WEF panel with U.S. Health and Human
Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell and others about the future of health care. In a phone interview after the discussion, Noseworthy talked about Mayo’s work for Medicare’s value-based purchasing program on hip and knee surgeries, and whether the developing world can benefit from lessons learned in expensive health care systems in developed nations like the U.S.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

HealthLeaders Media — Mayo chief John Noseworthy talks about the future of healthcare

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Star Tribune
Device experiment program saves lives, speeds products to market: Mayo is part of a plan to get devices to market faster. 
By Jim Spencer

Ron Hall owes his life to Mayo Clinic surgeon Gustavo Oderich and a Food and Drug Administration early feasibility study that helps get medical Star Tribune Business section logodevices to market faster. In December, the 80-year-old Blue Earth County man was preparing for a wrist operation when a test showed that the major artery carrying blood through his stomach was at high risk of rupturing. Hall and his wife first thought of going to the Department of Veterans Affairs for treatment. “Then my brain clicked on that we were near the Mayo Clinic,” said Val Hall, Ron’s spouse. “And we got referred there.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Gustavo Oderich, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vascular surgeon. Dr. Oderich conducts ongoing clinical research focused on complex aortic aneurysms and treatment of mesenteric artery disease.

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic's new Jacoby Center for Breast Health consolidates services in one spot
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville’s new Robert and Monica Jacoby Center for Breast Health should create a more efficientFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo, more integrated approach to breast care, said Sarah A. McLaughlin, a breast surgeon with Mayo. The new center, which consolidates all of Mayo’s operations involving breast health on one floor, was funded by a $5 million gift from philanthropists Robert E. and Monica Jacoby of Ponte Vedra Beach.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage: Washington Times Online, Sun Herald Online, Tampa Tribune Online

Context: Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus today announced the opening of the Robert and Monica Jacoby Center for Breast Health, which was funded by a $5 million gift from Robert E. and Monica Jacoby of Ponte Vedra, Florida. The new 16,000-square-foot  multidisciplinary breast center offers patients a comprehensive array of diagnostic, treatment and after-care services for all types of breast disease, including breast cancer, in a single location. “As a state-designated Cancer Center of Excellence, Mayo Clinic continues to expand and enhance comprehensive cancer care services to make them available to more patients in Jacksonville as well as all of Florida and the Southeast,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., CEO, Mayo Clinic in Florida. “The Jacoby Center for Breast Health will have a positive impact on patients seeking high quality breast health care. We greatly appreciate the generous gift from the Jacoby family that has made the new breast health center possible on our Florida campus.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

New York Times blog
Pursuing the Dream of Healthy Aging
by Jane Brody

“Aging is by far the best predictor of whether people will develop a chronic disease like atherosclerotic heart disease, stroke, New York Times Well Blog Logocancer, dementia or osteoarthritis,” Dr. James L. Kirkland, director of the Kogod Center on Aging at the Mayo Clinic, said in an interview. “Aging way outstrips all other risk factors.”

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: James Kirkland, M.D., Ph.D. leads the  Mayo Clinic Kogod Center on Aging. Dr. Kirkland's research focuses on the impact of cellular aging (senescence) on age-related dysfunction and chronic diseases, especially developing methods for removing these cells and alleviating their effects. Senescent cells accumulate with aging and in such diseases as dementias, atherosclerosis, cancers, diabetes and arthritis.

Contacts: Bob Nellis, Megan Forliti

 

Wall Street Journal
The Small Warnings Before Cardiac Arrest
by Ron Winslow

…Say someone has a brief episode of chest pain during exercise for the first time and goes without further symptoms and, after having no further symptoms, suffers sudden cardiac arrest three weeks later. “Should that person have called 911, or soughtWSJ Banner assistance from his or her physician?” asks Roger White, an anesthesiologist and cardiac arrest expert at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. “That sort of question is left completely unanswered.”

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context:  Roger White, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist. Dr. White's research focuses on out-of-hospital cardiac arrests.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

NPR
Boosting Life Span By Clearing Out Cellular Clutter
by Nell Greenfieldboyce

Mice were much healthier and lived about 25 percent longer when scientists killed off a certain kind of cell that accumulates in NPR Shots Health Newsthe body with age… These are cells that have stopped dividing, though not necessarily because the cells themselves are old. "It's a normal cell that experienced an unusual amount of stress, and it decided to stop dividing," says Jan van Deursen, who studies senescent cells at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Rochester, Minn.

Reach: NPR's Shots blog provides news about health and medicine. The blog has more than 68,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Fast Company, Newsweek, The Telegraph UK, The Atlantic, Yahoo News, HealthDay, nature.com, The Mirror UK, The Independent UK, Fortune

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic have shown that senescent cells – cells that no longer divide and accumulate with age – negatively impact health and shorten lifespan by as much as 35 percent in normal mice. The results, which appear today in Nature, demonstrate that clearance of senescent cells delays tumor formation, preserves tissue and organ function, and extends lifespan without observed adverse effects. “Cellular senescence is a biological mechanism that functions as an ‘emergency brake’ used by damaged cells to stop dividing,” says Jan van Deursen, Ph.D., Chair of Biochemistry and Molecular biology at Mayo Clinic, and senior author of the paper. “While halting cell division of these cells is important for cancer prevention, it has been theorized that once the ‘emergency brake’ has been pulled, these cells are no longer necessary.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Bob Nellis, Megan Forliti

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: "un-Minnesotan.", ABC News, ADHD may Link to Obesity, alcohol during pregnancy, Argentina News, Austin Daily Herald, Baby & Kids Expo, Baltimore Sun blog, Bloomberg News online, Brainerd Daily Dispatch, C.T.E., caffeine


October 16th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

 

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would   like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.  Thank you.

Editor, Karl OestreichAssistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Star Tribune
Teamwork is the key to unlocking the brain's secrets
by John Noseworthy

Right now you’re using millions of cells in your brain to translate these words into conscious thought. UnderstandStar Tribune commentaries logoing language. Summoning memories. Feeling emotion. Solving problems. These are merely a fraction of the marvels made possible by the human brain. It’s the most complex and least understood part of our bodies. Despite all of the incredible medical advances made to improve our health over the last century, the brain’s inner workings, relatively speaking, remain mostly a mystery.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. 

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic, St. Vincent's to be partners on cancer center in Riverside
By Charlie Patton

St. Vincent’s HealthCare and the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville agreed to collaborate on a new cancer clinic which will be located on the campus of Florida Times-Union newspaper logoSt. Vincent’s Medical Center Riverside. St. Vincent’s will build and equip the 11,500-square-foot clinic and provide administrative and support staff. The Mayo Clinic will provide the physicians for what will be called the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center at St. Vincent’s Riverside.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:

Jacksonville Business Journal — Mayo Clinic, St. Vincent’s HealthCare to partner in cancer care; WJAX Fla., My InforumsBecker’s Hospital Review 

Context: Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus and St. Vincent’s HealthCare, a ministry of Ascension Health, are collaborating to bring Mayo Clinic’s nationally ranked cancer services to patients in a newly built medical suite on the campus of St. Vincent’s Riverside. The goal is to offer Mayo Clinic Comprehensive Cancer Center’s programs and services to more patients directly in the community. Construction of the 11,500-square-foot medical suite is expected to be completed in summer of 2016. Financial details of the agreement will not be disclosed. “We are thrilled to collaborate with a local health system that is known worldwide for delivering superior cancer care,” says Michael Schatzlein, M.D., President and CEO of St. Vincent’s HealthCare. “Every year, thousands of patients travel across the globe to be treated by Mayo Clinic physicians, and, now, St. Vincent’s will offer our patients the same high-quality care right here on our Riverside campus.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

USA Today
Health: Schoolchildren get into stand-up act
by Karen Weintraub

By now, most adults have gotten the message that slumping in a desk chair all day long isn’t very healthy. Over the last fivUSA Today newspaper logoe years, standing desks have gone from an office oddity to a staple…James Levine said his own research and others’ suggests that children benefit from any extra time to burn off energy. “If you give children the opportunity to move while learning, they will do so,” said Levine, co-director of obesity solutions at the Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University. “They’ll double the amount of daily movement.”

Reach: USA TODAY  has an average daily circulation of 4.1 million which includes print, various digital editions and other papers that use their branded content.

Additional coverage:

Reuters — Fidgeting while you work might be good for you;  Business Insider, Philly Voice, Philadelphia Inquirer, Grand Forks Herald

Context: James Levine, M.D. PH.D. is a world authority on obesity, serving as a named expert at the United Nations, an invitee to the President's Cancer Panel, and a consultant to governments internationally. He is the Dr. Richard F. Emslander Professor of Endocrinology and Nutrition Research at Mayo Clinic. He holds five tenured professorships at ASU, is the Dean's Distinguished Professor of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University, and the Regents Professor at Umea University, Sweden. He also serves as the co-director of Obesity Solutions, a collaboration between Mayo Clinic and ASU, and is the international director of Obesity Solutions' sister center in Sweden.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

U.S. News & World Report
Mayo Clinic CEO: Health Care Focuses on Outcomes, Sharing Knowledge
by Steve Sternberg

…U.S. News Hospital of Tomorrow keynote speaker Dr. John Noseworthy, president and chief executive officer at Mayo Clinic, spoke with U.S. US News Health LogoNews about some of the changes affecting the nation's health care system and Mayo's approach to improving health care for tens of thousands of patients inside – and outside – its walls. (The interview has been edited for clarity and length.)

Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Dr. Noseworthy is the U.S. News Hospital of Tomorrow keynote speaker.

Contacts: Traci Klein, Karl Oestreich 

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: "26.2 with Donna", ABC Action News Tampa, ABC News, Anti-Age Your Skin, antidepressant, AP, Arizona State University News, ASU’s Center for Sustainable Health (CSH), Austin Daily Herald, Becker’s Hospital Review, Blake Williams, BLING II trial


October 1st, 2015

In the News Mayo Clinic Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

 

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

 

 

 

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor: Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Wall Street Journal
How One Family Faced Difficult Decisions About DNA Sequencing
by Amy Dockser Marcus

… Giusti realized that whole-genome or whole-exome sequencing—sequencing someone’s complete DNA or an impoWSJ Bannerrtant section of it—might yield information about the family’s cancer risk, particularly for her daughter, Nicole, 21, and her 18-year-old son, David. So, Ms. Giusti proposed an idea to A. Keith Stewart, the director of Mayo Clinic’s Center for Individualized Medicine: sequence my immediate family, and let’s study all the information. Dr. Stewart, curious about why identical twins got two different types of cancer, agreed.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Individualized medicine, also known as personalized medicine or precision medicine, means tailoring diagnosis and treatment to each patient to optimize care. Patients have experienced this kind of care for a century and a half at Mayo Clinic, where teams of specialists have always worked together to find answers. The Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine is solving the clinical challenges of today and tomorrow by bringing the latest discoveries from the research laboratory to your doctor's fingertips in the form of new genomics-based tests and treatments. A. Keith Stewart, M.D. is the center's director.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Wall Street Journal
The Price We Pay for Sitting Too Much
by Sumathi Reddy

New research is helping medical experts devise formulas for how long a typical office worker should spend sitting and standing… Michael WSJ BannerJensen, a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who specializes in obesity and diabetes, uses various ways to reduce daily sitting time that he also recommends to his patients. When he has meetings with just one or two people, he finds a place where they can walk together instead of sitting. And he tells his patients who are parents to use their children’s athletic events as a time to be on their feet. “There’s no reason you have to sit and watch those games,” Dr. Jensen said.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Additional coverage:

Good Morning America — Debunking Fitness Myths: Standing Desks; The Australian

Context: Michael Jensen, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Jensen and his lab studies the effects of obesity and how body fat (adipose tissue) and body fat distribution influence health. The regulated uptake, storage and release of fatty acids from adipose tissue play a major role in determining its health effects.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Star Tribune
Mayo receives $9M federal innovation grant
by Jeremy Olson

Mayo Clinic will receive up to $9 million in federal funding to help affiliated doctors and clinics outside Rochester adopt some of the team-basedStar Tribune newspaper logo medical techniques and integrated care that have been hallmarks of its success… “Health care is too expensive,” said Dr. Kari Bunkers, medical director for Mayo’s Office of Population Health Management. “This is our effort at reducing the high cost of health care and implementing a model that delivers more for less.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

Wall Street Journal — Grants Aim to Boost Patient Care 

Context: The Mayo Practice Transformation Network is one of 39 health care collaborative networks selected to participate in the Transforming Clinical Practice Initiative, announced today by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia M. Burwell. Mayo Clinic will receive up to $9.7 million to provide technical assistance support to help equip clinicians in the Mayo Practice Transformation Network with tools, information and network support needed to improve quality of care, increase patients’ access to information and spend health care dollars more wisely. This initiative is a collaboration between the Mayo Clinic Office of Population Health Management (OPHM) and the Mayo Clinic Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery (CSHCD). It is led by principal investigator Nilay Shah, Ph.D., health services researcher in the CSHCD, and co-principal investigator Kari Bunkers, M.D., primary care physician in the Mayo Clinic Health System and medical director of the OPHM. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Elizabeth Zimmerman Young

 

Reuters
Kids with asthma fare worse when they live with smokers
by Lisa Rapaport

Kids with asthma are more likely to have breathing problems and be hospitalized when they live with a smoker, a research review suggests…For Reuters Logoasthmatic kids, breathing in cigarette smoke was also linked to a more than tripled risk of poor lung function and 32 percent higher odds of wheezing symptoms. While the risk of smoke exposure exacerbating asthma symptoms is well known, fresh evidence on the extent of the danger posed to children may help convince some parents to abandon their cigarettes, said senior study author Dr. Avni Joshi, an allergist and immunologist at Mayo Clinic Children’s Center in Rochester, Minnesota.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world newsbusiness newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile and interactive television platforms.

Additional coverage: Yahoo! Canada, International Business Times, HealthDay, Nursing Times, CBS News, Medical Express, KYTX TexasUniversity Herald, US News & World Report, com, Medscape, Philadelphia InquirerKIMT 

Context: The risk for hospitalization doubles for kids with asthma who are exposed to secondhand smoke, according to a study led by Mayo Clinic Children’s Research Center. “The results of this review serve as a reminder to parents of just how dangerous it is to expose their children to secondhand smoke,” says Avni Joshi, M.D., senior author and pediatric allergist and immunologist at Mayo Clinic Children’s Center. “We knew that kids should not be exposed to tobacco, but how bad their asthma is likely to be with tobacco exposure was not clear. This study helped us quantify that risk, and so it informs as well as empowers us with the risk assessment. A child is twice as likely to end up in the hospital with an asthma flare if family members continue to smoke.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: ABC News, ABC NEWS (AP), ankle sprains, antibacterial soap, AOL.com, Arkansas Online, asthma, Austin Daily Herald, AVIA Health Innovation, Becker’s Health IT & CIO Review, Boulder News, Bounce Day


September 25th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor: Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

MPR
Ceiling cracks: Women step into Mayo Clinic's top academic posts
by Elizabeth Baier

Heidi Nelson still remembers the doubters after she became Mayo Clinic's first female surgeon a quarter century ago. She haMPR2d to win credibility with colleagues — and find ways to convince patients she was the surgeon. "I had to develop a strategy where I'd walk into a room with my card, and I would engage them with eye contact and with verbal presence ... I'm Dr. Heidi Nelson, I'm a colorectal surgeon on staff. I'm here to answer questions and care for you. Here's my card,'" she recalled recently.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Sharonne Hayes, M.D., Mayo Clinic Director of Diversity and Inclusion, says encouraging and including contributions from diverse individuals is critical to Mayo's future. Mayo will be better positioned to reach its full potential and to better serve its patients when we actively bring together individuals with diverse thoughts, ideas and backgrounds; and put them to work to help create better solutions. Heidi Nelson, M.D., is chair of Mayo Clinic's Department of Surgery. Claudia Lucchinetti, M.D., is chair of Mayo Clinic's Department of Neurology.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

News4Jax
'Success Kid' helps save his father's life
by Vic Micolucci

…Besides the money, Justin says more than 500 strangers contacted Mayo Clinic to be News Jax 4 Logopotential donors. And in August, the Griner family got the call they had been waiting for: the kidney was available. It came from a matching organ donor who recently passed away. Hours later, Justin arrived at Jacksonville's Mayo Clinic and got the transplant he so desperately needed. "He's had a very good result at this point in time," said Kris Croome, MD, transplant surgeon with Mayo Clinic Jacksonville. "His kidneys started working right away."

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville.

Context: Success Kid was first chronicled in an ABCNews.com story (via “Good Morning America”) about raising money via GoFundMe for a kidney transplant for his dad and recently having that transplant at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. Mayo Clinic doctors and surgeons have experience diagnosing and treating people who have kidney disease. Each year doctors and surgeons care for more than 30,000 people who have kidney disease.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

MedCity News
Mayo Clinic’s Farrugia on the future of precision medicine: Patients are ready to engage
by Meghana Keshavan

Gianrico Farrugia, CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida, laid out his vision of the immediate future of precision medicine at this week’s Individualizing Medicine Conference inMedCity News Minnesota. He discussed the issues around patient engagement, reimbursement, data security and salience of President Barack Obama’s Precision Medicine Initiative. In terms of immediate potential, Farrugia said there are five fields worth watching: Pharmacogenomics, Liquid biopsy, Non-invasive prenatal testing, Whole genome sequencing, Microbiome.

Reach: MedCity News focuses on business, innovation and influence in healthcare. Its websites has more than 72,000 unique visitors each month.

Related coverage:

KTTC — Health specialists talk 'Precision Medicine' at conference held at Mayo Civic Center 

Medical Daily — From Preventing Side Effects To Sequencing Babies, 5 Ways Precision Medicine Will Change How Doctors Treat Patients 

MedCity News — Illumina launching ‘PopArray’ consortium to develop population health genomics test

Context: Mayo Clinic Vice President Gianrico Farrugia, M.D. addressed participants in his keynote address at the 4th annual Individualizing Medicine Conference. The core of his talk highlighted five areas in which the knowledge and know-how from the human genome will be most impactful in patient care, not just at Mayo Clinic, but anywhere in the nation and globally. “What’s in it for you?” he asked the crowd of health providers at the Mayo Civic Center in Rochester, Minn. “Individualized or precision medicine offers help for your medical practice today. You can take advantage of these advances to help your patients, to better diagnose, treat or prevent illness right now.” More information, including a video interview with Dr. Farrugia, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Action News Jax
Doctors hope new breast cancer vaccine will save lives
by Brittany Jones

Part of a nearly $13.3 million Department of Defense grant will used  in our area to develop a vaccine for breast cancer. Currently, 280 patients are participating in the trial. Dr. ActionNewsJaxKeith Knutson has been working with breast cancer patients for about ten years. "In addition to me being touched, the burden breast cancer has on society keeps me going," said Knutson.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Context: Researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have been awarded a $13.3 million, five-year federal grant to test a vaccine designed to prevent the recurrence of triple-negative breast cancer, a subset of breast cancer for which there are no targeted therapies. The clinical trial, which will enroll 280 patients at multiple clinical sites, is expected to begin early in 2016. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Knutson, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: 9/11 Responder fighting for his life, ABC News, ABC News Tampa Bay, ABCnews.com, Action News Jax, addiction to meth, Albert Lea Tribune, Albuquerque Journal, American Journal of Infection Control, Anti-Melanoma Biologic, Arcadia clinic, Arizona Republic


August 27th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Daily Mail UK
Scientists discover how to 'switch off' cancer: Remarkable breakthrough means diseased cells can be made healthy again
by Fiona Macrae

Scientists have found a code for turning off cancer, it was announced today. In exciting experiments, they made cancerous breast and bladder cells benignDaily Mail UK again...The research, from the Mayo Clinic in Florida, showed it to be missing or faulty in a range of cancers. When this happens, key genetic instructions to the cells are scrambled and they turn cancerous. A research team, led by Panos Anastasiadis, was able to reset the instructions – turning off the cancer. Experiments in a dish showed that human cells from highly dangerous bladder cancers can be made normal again.

Reach: The Daily Mail has a circulation of more than 1.4 million.

Additional coverage: Florida Times-Union, Telegraph UK, BBC, RT America, Cape Times, Independent UK, Yahoo! Italia, New Zealand Herald, Middle East Post, 9News Australia, Talk Radio News, La Verdad, The Australian Business Review, Sydney Morning Herald, KTTCBBC NewsThe National Post, Quartz, Press TV, Consumer Affairs, Engadget, UPI, WiredNature World Report, First Coast NewsRochester Post-Bulletin.

Context:  Cancer researchers dream of the day they can force tumor cells to morph back to the normal cells they once were. Now, researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have discovered a way to potentially reprogram cancer cells back to normalcy. The finding, published in Nature Cell Biology, represents “an unexpected new biology that provides the code, the software for turning off cancer,” says the study’s senior investigator,Panos Anastasiadis, Ph.D., chair of the Department of Cancer Biology on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Anastasiadis, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

NY Times
Jet Lag ‘Cures’ Aplenty, but None That Work for All
by Joan Raymond

…Doctors do know that heading west is generally easier on the body than traveling The New York Times newspaper logoeast, because it requires a person’s internal clock to “set later, not earlier,” said Dr. R. Robert Auger, a sleep specialist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. But the more time zones crossed, the tougher the jet lag. The rule of thumb to get your body clocks back in sync is about one day per time zone change, making it “very difficult for real road warriors to get acclimated,” Dr. Auger said.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: R. Robert Auger, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic sleep specialist. Mayo Clinic doctors trained in sleep disorders evaluate and treat adults and children in the Center for Sleep Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. The Center for Sleep Medicine is one of the largest sleep medicine facilities in the United States. Staff in the center treats about 6,500 new people who have sleep disorders each year. The Center for Sleep Medicine is accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic doctor has your prescription for happiness
By Allie Shah

A doctor at Rochester’s Mayo Clinic believes that he has the prescription for happiness. He isn’t arguing that we can buy happiness, but that we can achieve it. WeStar Tribune newspaper logo can train our brains to feel less stressed and increase our inner bliss, overriding even genetic tendencies toward unhappiness, said Dr. Amit Sood, author of the new book “The Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Amit Sood, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in General Internal Medicine and the Cancer Center. The Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness combines wisdom from neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, and spirituality to help people choose contentment.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Atlanta Journal-Constitution — Melanoma a highly treatable cancer, doctors say by Virginia Anderson – Doctors who treat cancer said that some of the most Atlanta Journal-Consitution myAJC logo
important advances in their field in the past five years have come in the treatment of melanoma, which is a cancer of the skin. “When we look at the big cancer meetings we have every year, the most exciting news recently has been about melanoma,” said Dr. Alan Bryce, a medical oncologist at Mayo Clinic Arizona who treats melanoma.

Reach: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution has a daily circulation of more than 168,000. Its website has more than one million unique visitors each month.

Context: Alan Bryce, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic medical oncologist. Dr. Bryce studies cancer genetics and novel therapeutics with a focus on personalized medicine. His clinical practice centers on genitourinary malignancies (prostate, kidney, bladder, and testicular cancers) and melanoma.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: 'switch off' cancer, 2-minute test for concussion, 9News Australia, ActionNewsJax, adhesion molecules, Alzheimer’s walk, appendectomy, Arizona State University News, arthritis in the cervical spine, Ask Men, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Austin Daily Herald


August 14th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

 

Wall Street Journal
When Patients Manage Doctors
by Sumathi Reddy

Victor Montori, professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., talks about the “work of being a patient,” WSJ Bannerwhich involves more than keeping up with one’s medications. Patients must also educate themselves about the health care they need, said Dr. Montori, who is also lead investigator of the clinic’s Knowledge and Evaluation Research Unit, which seeks ways to adapt care for individual patient’s needs.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Victor Montori, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Montori is interested in how knowledge is produced, disseminated and taken up in practice — and how this leads to optimal health care delivery and patient outcomes. More about his research can be found here.

Contact: Traci KleinDuska Anastasijevic

 

NY Times
Walking vs. Elliptical Machine, Redux
by Gretchen Reynolds

…Minute for minute, using an elliptical machine is likely to burn more calories than walking. According to recent estimates by the Mayo Clinic, a The New York Times newspaper logo160-pound person using an elliptical machine for an hour would burn 365 calories. The same person walking for an hour would burn 314 calories. (If that person used a stair-stepping machine, he or she would burn 657 calories, by the Mayo calculations.)

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Related coverage:

ABC News: Good Morning America — Walking vs. the Elliptical: Which Burns More Calories? Which burns more calories: walking or using an elliptical? Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Co-Director Ed Laskowski weighs in.

Context: To learn more about the estimated number of calories burned while doing various exercises for one hour, check out this chart from Mayo Clinic.

Contacts: Rhoda MadsonTraci Klein

 

MORE magazine
What You Should Do At Every Age
by Ginny Graves

Move more, sit less… Every week, get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity and two or more days of strength training that hits each muscle group. And keep this in mind: Adults who sit for more than 11 hours a day have a 12 percent iMORE Magazinencreased risk of dying prematurely. “Standing or, better yet, moving should be your default mode whenever possible,” says James Levine, MD, PhD, professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Reach: More magazine has a monthly circulation of 750,000.

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D. is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Levine currently serves as a principal investigator for National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded studies focused on improving health for immigrant families through increased activity and better nutrition, interactions between sleep and obesity, and multilevel approaches to reduce obesity in working mothers and their children. More about Dr. Levine's research can be found here.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Post-Bulletin
Mayo cancer doctors criticize high drug prices
by Paul Scott

A provocative commentary this month in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings has drawn national media attention toward the high cost of cancer Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperdrugs. Mayo Clinic hematologist Dr. Vincent Rajkumar said he knew that the 118-signature petition calling for cheaper cancer drugs would attract attention, but he could not have prepared for what awaited him as he returned to the U.S. a week after the story broke.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Additional coverage:

KARE11 — Mayo doctor challenges high cost of cancer drugs 

Previous coverage in August 7, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in July 30, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in July 24, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: A group of 118 of the nation's leading cancer experts have drafted a prescription for reducing the high cost of cancer drugs and voiced support for a patient-based grassroots movement demanding action on the issue. Their recommendations and support are outlined in a commentary, co-authored by the group, in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.  "High cancer drug prices are affecting the care of patients with cancer and our health care system," says lead author Ayalew Tefferi, M.D., a hematologist at Mayo Clinic. "The average gross household income in the U.S. is about $52,000 per year. For an insured patient with cancer who needs a drug that costs $120,000 per year, the out-of-pocket expenses could be as much as $25,000 to $30,000 – more than half their average household income." More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

The Wall Street Journal
How Does 305-Pound Jets Star D’Brickashaw Ferguson Eat His Way Into Game Shape?
by Stu Woo

Since the Jets drafted him with the fourth overall pick of the 2006 NFL Draft, D’Brickashaw Ferguson hasn’t missed a snap for the team, starting in 144 straight games at left tackle…In an effort to understand how an NFL player eats his way into playing shape during training camp, we askedWSJ Banner Ferguson and a nutrition specialist, Luke Corey of the Mayo Clinic, to analyze his diet. According to the clinic, Corey is an “expert in sports nutrition, weight management and general wellness.”

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Luke Corey is a nutrition specialist with Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine. The Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Program health care providers (physicians, physical therapists, athletic trainers, nurses and a sport psychology counselor) work collaboratively and individually to offer educational information to athletes, parents, coaches and their professional colleagues.

Contacts: Rhoda MadsonTraci Klein

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: AARP Espanol, ABC News, ABC News Good Morning America, acute liver failure, Albert Lea Tribune, Albuquerque Journal, alzheimers, Amyloid Predicts Cognitive Decline, At-Home STD Testing, athlete’s foot, Austin Daily Herald, Bill George


Contact Us · Privacy Policy