Items Tagged ‘Austin Herald’

January 13th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

First Coast News
The Chat Wednesday January 11: Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa Part 1

First Coast News
The Chat Wednesday January 11: Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa Part 2

Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, Mayo Clinic neurosurgeon, joined “The Chat,” a live afternoon show on Jacksonville’s First Coast News. TheFirst Coast News Logo show’s web site breaks up the segments in two parts (see links below). The first segment focuses on his early life/career with images of his time at Johns Hopkins, and the second segment focuses on his role and work at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville.

Reach: First Coast News refers to two television stations in Jacksonville, Florida. WJXX, the ABC affiliate and WTLV, the NBC affiliate.

Previous coverage in September 23, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
Previous coverage in April 22, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, M.D., prominent neurosurgeon, researcher and educator, joined Mayo Clinic in 2016 as chair of the Department of Neurosurgery on the Florida campus, along with several members of his research team from Johns Hopkins Medicine. Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa is renown nationally and internationally as a surgeon, researcher, humanitarian and author. His laboratory has published many manuscripts and articles, submitted a number of patents and obtained three NIH grants. Students and fellows who worked with Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa have gone on to join leading neuroscience programs throughout the world. Mayo Clinic's world-renowned neurosurgeons perform more than 7,000 complex surgical procedures every year at campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota.

Contact: Kevin Punsky


Yahoo! News
Robert M. Jacobson stresses importance of flu vaccine

The Minnesota Department of Health released a report on Thursday on the increase of flu activity throughout the state. Friday afternoon, we Logo of Yahoo Newsspoke with a health professional at Mayo Clinic about the importance of getting the flu vaccine. According to the Minnesota Department of Health's report released on Thursday flu season is in full swing, and can indeed continue to increase in activity. In fact, Dr. Jacobson, a primary care physician and professor of pediatrics at Mayo Clinic, said in the last two weeks alone, there were 50 hospitalized patients in Minnesota from the flu.

Reach: Yahoo News receives more than 8.4 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: KTTC

Context:  Robert Jacobson, M.D. is a pediatrician with the Mayo Clinic Children's Center. Dr. Jacobson also serves as the medical director for the Population Health Science Program at Mayo Clinic's Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery. He also leads Mayo's Employee and Community Health (ECH) Research Initiative. You can read about his medical research here.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Wisconsin Public Radio
The Mayo Clinic Diet: Second Edition

It's the beginning of a new year, a time when many people resolve to make healthier choices--like eating a healthier diet. We learn how to improve health while losing weight with the medical editor of "The Mayo Clinic Diet." He says this plan is a lifestyle and not a diet in the traditional sense. We learn how it works.

Reach: Wisconsin Public Radio consists of 34 radio stations programmed by seven regional studios and carrying programming on three content networks: the Ideas Network, the NPR News and Classical Network and the All Classical Network.

Additional coverage: 

Post-Bulletin, The Mayo Clinic Diet earns top honor
KTTC, Mayo Clinic Diet is #1, according to U.S. News & World Report
KWLM Willmar Radio, KFGO Fargo-Moorhead, 104.7 DukeFM, WXOW La Crosse

Previous coverage in the January 6, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context:  As the second edition of The Mayo Clinic Diet hits store shelves, the diet plan has been named Best Commercial Diet by U.S. News & World Report.  “We are honored to be recognized for a weight-loss method that offers lasting results,” says Donald Hensrud, M.D., medical editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet and director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. Learn more about the Mayo Clinic by watching this Mayo Clinic Minute or read more about it on Mayo Clinic Network. “The Mayo Clinic Diet is much more than a diet,” Dr. Hensrud says. “It’s a lifestyle program in which people can eat great-tasting food and feel better right away ─ even while they lose weight. More importantly, these lifestyle changes are sustainable and can improve long-term health as people reach and maintain a healthy weight.”

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

MPR
For Rochester, becoming the 'Silicon Valley of Medicine' won't be easy
by Catharine Richert

The Destination Medical Center project wants to give Rochester a reputation for something it's never been: a magnet for tech start-ups and MPR News logoentrepreneurs. But turning the city into what the DMC calls the "Silicon Valley of Medicine" won't be easy. The DMC is a multibillion, 20-year economic development effort to remake Rochester so Mayo can better compete for both patients and top talent. It's also meant to help diversify the region's economy by attracting new businesses. But Rochester's risk-averse culture has held it back, said Jamie Sundsbak, an entrepreneur and former Mayo Clinic researcher. "When you have a large medical institution like the Mayo Clinic — a world renowned, top medical institution in the world — you get that way by eliminating risk," he said. "If you look at some of the entrepreneurial communities, risk is what they are excited about."

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: With Mayo Clinic at its heart, the Destination Medical Center (DMC) initiative is the catalyst to position Rochester, Minnesota as the world’s premier destination for health and wellness; attracting people, investment opportunities, and jobs to America’s City for Health and supporting the economic growth of Minnesota, its bioscience sector, and beyond.

Contacts: Duska AnastasijevicSusan Barber Lindquist

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: 104.7 DukeFM, AccuWeather, advisory board, Albert Lea Tribune, Alzforum, apps, asthma, Austin Herald, Becker’s Hospital Review, Breast Cancer, breastfeeding, Brooke Werneburg


July 1st, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

NBC News
Google Partners With Harvard, Mayo Clinic for Symptom Search Feature

Google is rolling out a new health feature called symptom search, which is designed to pinpoint a potential problem when you search symptoms — from your mobile device.nbcnews.com

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: KAAL-TV

Previous coverage in June 24, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: When people seek information on health-related symptoms, many turn to the internet, and Google in particular, as the first stop. Now, when consumers access Google’s mobile search for information about certain symptoms, they will get facts on relevant related medical conditions up front on their smartphone or other mobile device. For example, a symptom search — even one using common language free of medical terminology like “my tummy hurts” or “nose blocked” — will show a list of related conditions. For individual symptoms like “headache,” searchers will see overview information as well as have the ability to view self-treatment options and suggestions of when to seek help from a healthcare professional.  To ensure quality and accuracy, teams of doctors, including expert clinicians at Mayo Clinic, have written or reviewed individual symptom information and evaluated related conditions. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

WCCO-TV
Doctors At Mayo Clinic Using Viruses To Fight Cancer

Doctors at Mayo Clinic are using deadly viruses to fight a deadly disease. Just last month, the Food and Drug Administration gave breakthrough status to a cancer therapy that uses the polio virus to combat brain WCCO-TV 4tumors. “We do have one of the oldest programs, not just in this country, but in the world,” Dr. Eva Galanis said. Galanis leads the Mayo’s virus therapy program, which started in 1994. It uses a number of viruses to attack cancer cells.

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

Additional coverage: MSN.com

Context: Evanthia "Eva" Galanis, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic is an orthopedic oncologist with Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. Dr. Galanis has a long-standing interest in developing novel therapeutic approaches for cancer treatment. The focus of her laboratory is to develop and optimize novel virotherapy approaches with special emphasis on paramyxoviruses. A number of different strategies are tested, including use of therapeutic transgenes; trackable markers; combinations with small molecules, cytotoxic agents and radiation therapy; re-targeting of viral strains against tumor-specific antigens; development of novel viral delivery approaches; and exploration of immunomodulatory methods to modify humoral and innate immunity as a means of optimizing virotherapy efficacy.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Florida Times-Union
'Giving my kidney a send-off:' Jacksonville woman starts a kidney donation chain stretching to 9 people
by Matt Soergel

Jennifer Tamol was plenty nervous the evening before she went to the hospital to donate one of her kidneys to a complete stranger, someone in Minnesota who was awaiting his or her chance for a new, better life…She decided four years ago to donate a kidney, and reached out to Mayo Clinic. She took a week’s worth of vacation then to go through a battery of tests, and was tested periodically after that. There were a couple of Florida Times-Union newspaper logofalse alarms where she thought there was a suitable recipient, though something went awry each time.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Martin Mai, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic nephrologist and also chair of the division of transplant medicine at Mayo Clinic in Florida.  Mayo Clinic's kidney transplant doctors and surgeons use proven innovations to successfully treat people with kidney failure and complications of diabetes and other diseases. Their experience in using minimally invasive surgery, new medicines to prevent organ rejection and specialized procedures makes Mayo Clinic a leader in transplant outcomes. Mayo Clinic surgeons perform more than 600 kidney transplants a year, including for people with very challenging kidney conditions who need special solutions and surgeries. And Mayo Clinic kidney transplant teams in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota are leaders in living-donor kidney transplants. People who receive a kidney from a living donor usually have fewer complications than those who receive a kidney from a deceased donor.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

TIME
Electronic health records and digital clerical work are strongly linked to burnout
by Mandy Oaklander

Of all professionals in the U.S., doctors experience some of the highest rates of burnout: the feeling of being so emotionally exhausted from work that you start to feel indifferent about those you’re serving. Time magazine logoResearchers at the Mayo Clinic looked at several months of 2014 survey data from 6,560 U.S. physicians measuring features of work life, including burnout and electronic use. Even after controlling for factors like age, sex, specialty and the number of hours doctors work per week, the researchers found a strong link between burnout and time spent doing digital work.

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:
ReutersBecker’s Orthopedic & Spine, HealthLeaders Media, KAAL-TV, KIMT-TVKTTC-TV, HealthDay, Health Data Management, Deccan Chronicle, Science Daily, Headlines & Global NewsFOX News, Tech Times, Doctors Lounge

Context: The growth and evolution of the electronic environment in health care is taking a toll on U.S. physicians. That’s according to a national study of physicians led by Mayo Clinic which shows the use of electronic health records and computerized physician order entry leads to lower physician satisfaction and higher rates of professional burnout. The findings appear in Mayo Clinic Proceedings“Electronic health records hold great promise for enhancing coordination of care and improving quality of care,” says Tait Shanafelt, M.D., Mayo Clinic physician and lead author of the study. “In their current form and implementation, however, they have had a number of unintended negative consequences including reducing efficiency, increasing clerical burden and increasing the risk of burnout for physicians.” In collaboration with investigators from the American Medical Association (AMA), researchers from Mayo Clinic assembled a national sample of U.S. physicians using the AMA Physician Masterfile, a near complete record of alMl U.S. physicians. The survey included validated instruments to assess burnout, as well as items developed specifically for the study to evaluate the electronic practice environment of the participating physicians. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Wall Street Journal
How Telemedicine Is Transforming Health Care
by Melinda Beck

At the Mayo Clinic, doctors who treat out-of-state patients can follow up with them via phone, email or web chats when they return home, but they can only discuss the conditions they treated in person. “If the patient wants to talk about a new problem, the doctor has to be licensed in that state to discuss it. If not, the patient should talk to his primary-care physician about it,” says Steve Ommen, a cardiologist whoWSJ Banner runs Mayo’s Connected Care program.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Steve Ommen, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist and is also medical director of Connected Care. Telehealth is simply using digital information and communication technologies, such as computers and mobile devices, to manage your health and well-being. Telehealth, also called e-health or m-health (mobile health), includes a variety of health care services, including but not limited to:

  • Online support groups
  • Online health information and self-management tools
  • Email and online communication with health care providers
  • Electronic health records
  • Remote monitoring of vital signs, such as blood pressure, or symptoms
  • Video or online doctor visits

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Huffington Post
This Is What A Poop Transplant Actually Looks Like
by Anna Almendrala

The procedure might sound disgusting and messy, but as the video clip from VICE shows, the procedure typically takes place in an extremely well-controlled and sterile hospital environment, and takes less than 10 minutes to complete. In the clip, doctors from the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota inject a mix of healthy poop and saline into a patient suffering from C-diff, and you won’t feel like gagging even once.Huffington Post Logo

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique visitors.

Context: Stephanie Bennett chronicle's her story in an In the Loop feature and her physician Sahil Khanna, M.B.B.S., a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist, discusses fecal transplant treatment of C. difficile at Mayo.

Contact: Joe Dangor

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: ABC13 Houston, African American women, aging, alzheimer's disease, Austin Herald, autoimmune neurological disorders, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, brain waves, Brain-eating amoeba, Bring Me the News, bronchopleural fistulas, C. diff


June 10th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Pioneer Press
John Noseworthy: Telemedicine will increase access to care, reduce costs

As the American Telemedicine Association convened in Minneapolis last month for its annual conference, it was inSt. Paul Pioneer Pressteresting to recall that a little more than 20 years ago, another ATA conference was held in Minnesota. It was in Rochester and featured a Mayo Clinic-trained physician and astronaut conducting the first telemedicine conference from space. Since that time, telemedicine – the remote delivery of health care through a secure video or computer link – has experienced profound progress, increasing access to care while also lowering the cost of care.

Reach: The St. Paul Pioneer Press has a daily circulation of more than 194,000 Its TwinCities.com website receives moire than 1.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contacts: Duska Anastasijevic, Karl Oestreich

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic wins a key building block for medicine's future

About a week ago, the federally funded NIH announced a five-year, $142 million grant to Mayo Clinic to establish the “world’s largest research-Star Tribune newspaper logocohort biobank for the Precision Medicine Initiative Cohort Program.” This difficult-to-understand appellation likely limited celebration in the state over this welcome news. But here’s a helpful translation from Mayo’s Dr. Stephen Thibodeau, who will oversee the biobank: This, he said during an interview, is a “big deal.’’

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Previous coverage in June 3, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Mayo Clinic will be awarded $142 million in funding over five years by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to serve as the national Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) Cohort Program biobank. The biobank will hold a research repository of biologic samples, known as biospecimens, for this longitudinal program that aims to enroll 1 million or more U.S. participants to better understand individual differences that contribute to health and disease to advance precision medicine. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Colette Gallagher

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic unveils plans for expanded research space
by Matt McKinney

The Mayo Clinic will add 2 million square feet of research space in downtown Rochester in less than 20 years, a key piece of its Destination Medical Center (DMC) plan. The plan, announced Tuesday by the clinic, will create an urban bioresearch campus to drive the quest for new curesStar Tribune newspaper logo as private researchers collaborate with Mayo doctors on the frontiers of medicine, said Mayo CEO John Noseworthy.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: Post-Bulletin, KIMT-TV, Washington Times, KTTC-TV, BloombergFinance & Commerce, Capitol ReportDuluth News Tribune, Austin Herald, KIMT-TV, Pioneer Press, Bemidji Pioneer, NH Voice, MPR, KAAL-TVBoston Globe

Context: Mayo Clinic announced the next major step in realizing Destination Medical Center’s (DMC) vision of creating Discovery Square, a first-of-its-kind urban bioresearch campus that brings together renowned physicians, researchers, scientists and entrepreneurs to address unmet patient needs in an ultramodern setting for science innovation. Mayo Clinic is initiating a process to identify a strategic real estate development firm to expand its Rochester, Minnesota, campus by building more than 2 million square feet on Mayo Clinic-owned land as research, commercial and product development space over the next 20 years. This is in addition to Mayo’s current research footprint in Rochester of 1.3 million square feet. Discovery Square, which will include Mayo and other private businesses, is a key milestone for DMC, the largest public-private partnership in Minnesota state history, and one of the largest economic development initiatives in the U.S. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Karl Oestreich


SELF magazine
10 Signs Of Skin Cancer You Shouldn’t Ignore
by Amy Marturana

Along with outdoor happy hours and weekends at the beach, summertime calls for an important reminder of skin cancer risk. Since you’re Self Magazine Logoprobably spending more time in the sun wearing less clothes, it’s important to take note of any new or different growths on your skin. “Most skin cancers really are not symptomatic,” Aleksandar Sekulic, M.D., principal for Stand Up To Cancer’s Melanoma Research Alliance Dream Team and Mayo Clinic dermatologist, tells SELF. That means a cancerous spot won’t hurt, or even itch most of the time. “Occasionally people will say a red and scaly spot has become more red and tender, but most true cancers are asymptomatic.”

Reach:  Self magazine has a monthly circulation of more than 1.4 million readers and is geared toward active, educated women who are interested in health, fitness, career issues and relationship balance.

Context: Aleksandar Sekulic, M.D., Ph.D. is a Mayo Clinic dermatologist. Dr. Sekulic is also affiliated with Mayo Clinic Cancer Center.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: A.L.S., ABC News, acute coronary syndrome, adjuvant chemotherapy, allergy season, Amber Kohnhorst, AMEInfo, American Cancer Society, Amy Davis, Aneurysm, AOL, Arizona Daily Star


January 29th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Heather Privett  with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Post-Bulletin
Bug-zapping 'robots' help prevent infections
by Jeff Kiger

Mayo Clinic is rolling out a number of "bug zapper-like" devices to help battle bacteria and reduce potentially deadLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaperly patient infections. Unlike other U.S. hospitals, Mayo Clinic has seen the C-diff infections decline in recent years. However, they still have about 200 cases a year, said Dr. Priya Sampathkumar, chair of Mayo Clinic's infection control committee in Rochester. Mayo Clinic has not seen any C-diff-related deaths in at least two years, she added.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Additional coverage: Med City Beat, KTTCKIMT

Context: Mayo Clinic has added robots in its fight against Clostridium difficile (C-diff) bacteria. In the U.S., C-diff is one of the most common infections patients can get while receiving care at a health care facility. C-diff can cause a variety of symptoms, including potentially deadly diarrhea. A recent national report shows some progress in reducing C-diff infections; however, more work remains. “C-diff is extremely distressing for our patients,” says Priya Sampathkumar, M.D., chair of Mayo Clinic’s infection control committee on Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus. “It can be debilitating, decrease quality of life and can even result in death.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Twin Cities Public Television (Almanac)
Senator Franken, Mayo health survey, more capitol art

Dr. John Wald appeared to talk about Mayo Clinic National Health Check-Up. Dr. Wald's interview is the second one in the line up and appears at 13:15 of the program.

Reach:  Twin Cities Public Television's "Almanac" program is a Minnesota institution. It has occupied the 7 o'clock time slot on Friday nights for more than a quarter of a century. It is the longest-running prime time TV program ever in the region. "Almanac" is a time capsule, a program of TPTrecord that details our region's history and culture during the past twenty five years. The hour-long mix of news, politics and culture is seen live statewide on the six stations of the Minnesota Public Television Association. Almanac was the first Minnesota TV show that virtually everyone in the state could watch together. The program's unusual format has been copied by numerous PBS stations around the country and it has led to Almanac being honored with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting's award for Best Public Affairs Program. Almanac has also earned six regional Emmy awards.

Previous coverage in January 22, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context:  According to the first-ever Mayo Clinic National Health Check-Up, most Americans experience barriers to staying healthy, with their work schedule as the leading barrier (22 percent), particularly among men and residents of the Northeast. While work schedule is a top barrier for women, as well, they are significantly more likely than men to cite caring for a child, spouse or parent. “The Mayo Clinic National Health Check-Up takes a pulse on Americans’ health opinions and behaviors, from barriers to getting healthy to perceptions of aging, to help identify opportunities to educate and empower people to improve their health,” says John T. Wald, M.D., Medical Director for Public Affairs at Mayo Clinic. “In this first survey, we’re also looking at ‘health by the decades’ to uncover differences as we age.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

New York Times (Well blog)
The Health Benefits of Knitting
by Jane E. Brody

New York Times Well Blog…Perhaps most exciting is research that suggests that crafts like knitting and crocheting may help to stave off a decline in brain function with age. In a 2011 study, researchers led by Dr. Yonas E. Geda, a psychiatrist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., interviewed a random sample of 1,321 people ages 70 to 89, most of whom were cognitively normal, about the cognitive activities they engaged in late in life.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: Yonas Geda, M.D, is a Mayo Clinic psychiatrist. Dr. Geda's research interests can be found here and you can learn more about his study here.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Robb Report
Six Life-Changing Ways to Eat Healthier in the New Year
by Janice O’Leary

Earlier this month, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) released their first update in five years to the national dietary Robb Report Health & Wellness Logorecommendations. For many physicians and scientists who contributed to the report upon which these guidelines are based, the federally approved guidelines are a watered-down version of the original suggestions because they eliminated such advice as cutting back on red and processed meat, says Dr. Donald Hensrud, MD, medical director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program and editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet.

Reach:  The Robb Report is a monthly magazine with a circulation of more than 101,000. Its website has more than 632,000 unique visitors each month. Robb Report Health & Wellness covers methods for healthy and fulfilling lifestyles.

Context: Donald Hensrud, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist and editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet Book.

Contact:  Kelley Luckstein
Mpls. St. Paul Magazine
Mind + Body Revolution
by Dara Moskowitz Grumdahl

Peek into Minnesota’s leading hospitals, health care systems, doctor’s offices, and psychiatry practices today and you’ll see hundreds of examples Mpls-St. Paul Magazaine logoof integrative medicine. At the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program, throat cancer survivors learn new cooking methods and cardiac patients fill yoga classes led by yogis specializing in Reiki, an energy-based healing therapy. Dr. Deborah Rhodes, an internist at the Mayo Clinic, emphasizes that wellness goes beyond soothing white robes and pretty smells. “If you want to optimize cancer outcomes based on true data, we don’t see anywhere to go but with integrative medicine,” she says.

Reach:  Published for the residents of the Twin Cities, Minneapolis-St. Paul Magazine has a monthly circulation of more than 68,000.

Context: Deborah Rhodes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician with multiple departments.  Dr. Rhodes studies the application of a new breast imaging device, molecular breast imaging, to breast cancer screening. The long-term goal of Dr. Rhodes' research is to develop an individualized approach to breast cancer screening that incorporates breast density, age, and other factors that impact breast cancer risk and mammography sensitivity. The goal of an individualized approach to screening is to improve breast cancer detection while minimizing both the cost of screening and the harms associated with false-positive results and overdiagnosis.

Contact:  Kelley Luckstein

 

Star Tribune
Skipping lunch? Your doctor wants you to think again
by Allie Shah

Just one in five Americans steps away from his or her desk to eat lunch, studies show. Working straight through the day without a break can lead Star Tribune newspaper logoto higher levels of stress, mental fatigue, physical exhaustion and eventually burnout. “It’s really important that people keep in perspective the big picture — that they will really burn out,” said Dr. John Murphy, a family physician with Mayo Clinic Health System. “That lunch break is critically important.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: John Murphy, M.D. is a Family Medicine physician with Mayo Clinic Health System in Sparta, WI.

Contact: Rick Thiesse

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: "bug zapper-like" devices battle bacteria, #FlexForAnn, $6 billion Destination Medical Center, a zoonotic disease, A.L.S., ABC News, Afilbercept costs $1800 per dose, Aflibercept given for macular degeneration, afternoon slump, Albert Lea Tribune, Albuequerque Journal, Almanac


January 15th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly News Summary

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in tMayo Clinic in the News Logohe News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Heather Privett  with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic spending $92.7 million on buildings, equipment
by Christopher Snowbeck

Mayo Clinic announced Tuesday a plan for spending $92.7 million on facilities and equipment that includes more private rooms in Rochester, better roads near its hospital in Florida and a new airplane for transporting patients. The spending plan was approved in November by the boardStar Tribune newspaper logo of directors at Mayo, which routinely makes large infrastructure investments across its six-state network of hospitals and clinics.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: Bloomberg News online, KTTC.com, KXLT.com, Post-Bulletin

Context:  An investment of $92.7 million in facilities and equipment across Mayo Clinic through 2017 will ensure that patients from across the globe find the world-class accommodations and whole-person care they have come to expect. These efforts reinforce Mayo Clinic’s level of commitment to the Destination Medical Center (DMC) initiative by enhancing the patient experience and positioning Mayo Clinic as the premiere global destination for health and wellness. “Our hospital projects will help us meet Mayo Clinic’s responsibility to combine safe and comprehensive care with a seamless, high-quality experience for our patients and their families,” says Amy Williams, M.D., medical director of hospital operations. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

TIME
Here’s What 10 Experts Think of the Government’s New Diet Advice
by Alexandra Sifferlin

“The 2015 Dietary Guidelines build upon the 2010 Dietary Guidelines to provide information to shape policy, design food and nutrition programs, and to help Americans make healthy dietary choices. However, although the Guidelines are required and purported to be “based on Time magazine logothe preponderance of current scientific and medical knowledge”, they did not include some of the recommendations of the Scientific Advisory Committee and therefore do not describe an optimal dietary pattern. Despite some of these shortcomings, it is important to recognize that for most people, following the Dietary Guidelines will improve their nutritional status and health. — Dr. Donald Hensrud, a physician at Mayo Clinic and editor of the Mayo Clinic Diet.

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Donald Hensrud, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist and editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet Book.

Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

The Wall Street Journal
Can Echinacea Melt Winter’s Colds and Flu?
by Laura Johannes

“If you are getting plenty of fluids and plenty of rest and you want to take echinacea, it seems like a reasonable thing to do and unlikely to harm you,” says Pritish K. Tosh, associate professor at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. But people at risk for flu complications, such as pneumonia or bronchitis, should instead take an antiviral medication such as Tamiflu, he adds.WSJ Banner

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Pritish Tosh, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases expert. His research is focused in emerging infections and preparedness activities related to them, ranging from collaborating with the Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group in basic science vaccine development to hospital systems research related to pandemic preparedness.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Florida Times-Union
$10 million gift from grateful patient will underwrite Mayo Clinic's neurosurgery residency program
by Charlie Patton

As he waited to undergo spinal surgery at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville on Feb. 17, 2012, John Sonnentag promised himself that if everything Florida Times-Union newspaper logowent well, he would make significant gift to the hospital. Additional coverage: Post Bulletin, Bloomberg News Online

Reach: 
The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: A $10 million gift from a grateful patient and his wife will provide funding for a neurosurgery residency program on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus to help address the nationwide shortage of specialists in head and spine procedures. “There’s a tremendous need for training neurosurgeons in this country,” says Robert Wharen, Jr., M.D., chair of Neurosurgery at Mayo Clinic in Florida. “There is now a shortage of neurosurgeons, and that shortage is actually going to get worse, because there are more neurosurgeons retiring over the next 10 years than we are able to train.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: ABCnews.com, ALS Stem Cell Trial, asthma, asthma and shingles, Austin Herald, BBC News, Becker’s Hospital Review, birth control pills, Bloomberg, breast cancer screening, BringMeTheNews, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)


July 30th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

 

Memphis Daily News
Methodist Joins Mayo Clinic Care Network
by Andy Meek

Methodist Healthcare has joined the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a partnership that’s been about a year in the making and adds the Memphis-based institution to a national network of health care providers. Hospital officials and Mayo representatives announced the partnership ThursdayMemphis Daily News morning in the “innovation studio” inside Methodist University Hospital, at 1265 Union Ave.

Reach: The Memphis Daily News covers construction, real estate, the courts and local business activity in the Memphis, TN area and receives more than 163,000 unique visitors each month on it website.

Additional coverage:

Memphis Commercial Appeal — Memphis-based Methodist Healthcare taps into Mayo Clinic network 

Context: Methodist Healthcare and Mayo Clinic announced today that Methodist has joined the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a national network of health care providers committed to better serving patients and their families through collaboration. Methodist Healthcare is the first health care organization in Tennessee and the mid-South to join the network. The formal agreement gives Methodist Healthcare access to the latest Mayo Clinic knowledge and promotes physician collaboration that complements local expertise. Through shared resources, more patients can get answers to complex medical questions while staying close to home. “The relationship with Mayo Clinic places physician-to-physician collaboration at the pinnacle of providing high-quality, patient- and family-centered care for all of Methodist’s patients,” says Michael Ugwueke, president and chief operating officer, Methodist Healthcare. “More than a relationship between two well-known organizations, this is truly collaboration for sharing medical knowledge and Mayo Clinic expertise, while providing tools and resources for our physicians to further enhance patient care.”

Contact: Rhoda Madson

 

CNBC
Battle coming for blockbuster cholesterol drugs
by Dan Mangan

And you CNBC logothought the fight over prices of cancer and hepatitis drugs was hot.…"[With] recent trends in insurance coverage [that] put a heavy financial burden on patients without-of-pocket expenses, you quickly see that the situation is not sustainable." - Dr. Ayalew Tefferi, Mayo Clinic.

Reach: With CNBC in the U.S., CNBC in Asia Pacific, CNBC in Europe, Middle East and Africa, CNBC World and CNBC HD, CNBC is the provides real-time financial market coverage and business information to approximately 371 million homes worldwide, including more than 100 million households in the United States and Canada.

Additional coverage: 

The Boston Globe — Doctors object to drug costs

The British Medical Journal US oncologists call for government regulation to curb drug price rises 

Doctors Lounge (HealthDay)  Oncologists Offer Strategies for Reducing Cost of Cancer Drugs 

Ring of Fire  Hospitals and Doctors Protesting Pharmaceutical Companies Inflated Drug Prices 

Healio — Oncologists criticize high drug costs, propose cost-cutting measures 

FierceHealthFinance — Oncology doctors push back against cost of cancer drugs

Medscape  Oncologists Protest High Prices of Cancer Drugs, Again 

The Globe and Mail (Reuters)  Experts support call for lower cancer drug prices 

Science 2.0  How To Make Cancer Drugs More Affordable - Mix Naivete And Someone Else's Money 

Previous coverage in the July 24, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: A group of 118 of the nation's leading cancer experts have drafted a prescription for reducing the high cost of cancer drugs and voiced support for a patient-based grassroots movement demanding action on the issue. Their recommendations and support are outlined in a commentary, co-authored by the group, in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.  "High cancer drug prices are affecting the care of patients with cancer and our health care system," says lead author Ayalew Tefferi, M.D., a hematologist at Mayo Clinic. "The average gross household income in the U.S. is about $52,000 per year. For an insured patient with cancer who needs a drug that costs $120,000 per year, the out-of-pocket expenses could be as much as $25,000 to $30,000 – more than half their average household income." More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

The Boston Globe
Alzheimer’s drugs show some promise in recent studies
by Robert Weisman

Clinical data released Wednesday contained encouraging findings — but also reasons for caution — on a pair of experimental drugs to treat Alzheimer’s disease, an affliction robbing tens of millions of people worldwide of their memory and cognition…The study results “suggest that theBoston Globe Logo field is moving in the right direction,” said Dr. Ronald C. Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, a national leader who treated the late President Reagan and has been treating country music singer Glen Campbell.

Reach: The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: "We Honor Veterans" program, alirocumab (Praluent), Alzheimer's data, Alzheimer's patients., antibiotics over-prescribed, Apervita, Arizona Public Media, Austin Herald, AVIA, Bloomberg, Boston Globe, brain tumors


May 28th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

Wall Street Journal
Big Bets on Proton Therapy Face Uncertain Future

Six new proton-beam centers are set to start delivering state-of-the-art radiation to cancer patients around the country by year’s end. Ten more are expected by 2018, bringing the U.S. total to 30—many the size of a football field and costing between $100 million and $200 million to build.The Wall Street Journal newspaper logoThe projects, long in the works, will enter an uncertain market. Proton-beam therapy, a highly precise form of radiation, has been dogged by a lack of evidence that it is better than traditional radiation despite costing significantly more… Some hospitals have turned to private donations, rather than private equity, to finance proton operations. Next month, the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., plans to start treating patients at its $180 million proton center, one of two built with the help of a $100 million gift.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has the largest print circulation in America with 1.4 million (60 percent) of a total of 2.3 million. Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Mayo Clinic hosted a grand opening event for the Richard O. Jacobson Building, home to the Mayo Clinic proton beam therapy program on May 9. The new facility will begin treating patients in late June. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Joe Dangor, Jim McVeigh, Traci Klein

 

Health Leaders Media
Shriners Hospitals joins Mayo Clinic network to enhance physician collaboration

Mayo Clinic expertise will now be available to patients and providers at Shriners Hospitals for Children as part of a new network relationship HealthLeadersbetween the health care systems. Shriners Hospitals, with 22 locations throughout North America, announced Tuesday that it has joined the national Mayo Clinic Care Network.

Reach: HealthLeaders magazine focuses on the healthcare industry and has a monthly circulation of more than 40,000. HealthLeaders Online receives more than 43,000 unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional coverage: Tampa Bay Business Journal, Shriners Hospitals joins Mayo Clinic network; Tampa Tribune, Tampa Bay Times, Benzinga

Context: Mayo Clinic and Shriners Hospitals for Children today announced Shriners Hospitals for Children as a member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a national network of organizations committed to better serving patients and their families through physician collaboration. The network will allow Shriners Hospitals for Children, a national health care system, to offer providers and patients convenient access to additional expertise from Mayo Clinic. The closer relationship will enhance the delivery of local care and promote peace of mind as providers and patients make health care decisions. “With Mayo Clinic’s similar mission of providing the best care to every patient through integrated clinical practice, education and research, a relationship will give Shriners Hospitals the opportunity to further transform children’s lives,” said Dale W. Stauss, Chairman of the Board of Directors for Shriners Hospitals for Children. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Fast Company
The $6.5 Billion, 20-Year Plan To Transform An American City
by Neal Ungerleider

The Mayo Clinic is located in the small city of Rochester (pop. 111,000), about a two-hour drive from Minneapolis, Minnesota. And it is, right this minute, competing fiercely for a small-but-extremely-lucrative slice of the global medical tourism industry. The wealthy American, European,Fast Company east Asian, and Gulf Arab patients who have been the clinic’s bread and butter have been instead choosing to get treatment abroad or at domestic rivals like Baltimore’s Johns Hopkins University or the Cleveland Clinic. But that may be changing—and the reason, if not the construction, is simple: the Destination Medical Center.

Reach: Fast Company's editorial focus is on innovation in technology, ethonomics (ethical economics), leadership, and design. Written for, by, and about the most progressive business leaders, Fast Company and FastCompany.com inspire readers and users to think beyond traditional boundaries, lead conversations, and create the future of business.

Additional coverage:  Builder Magazine

Context: Destination Medical Center (DMC) is an innovative economic development initiative to secure Minnesota's status as a global medical destination now and in the future. The latest updates on DMC can be found on the DMC blog.

Contact: Jamie Rothe

 

Star Tribune
Doctor burnout is a rising problem in Minnesota medicine
by Jeremy Olson

… Mayo Clinic researchers, however, found that doctors can shield patients for only so long, and that left undetected burnout can lead to Star Tribune newspaper logomedication errors and other mistakes. “By the time you start seeing effects on patients, physicians have gotten so rundown that they’re just not able to buffer patients from what they’re feeling anymore,” said Dr. Colin West, a Mayo internist who has co-written several burnout studies.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Burnout is a common problem among U.S. doctors and studies suggest it adversely impacts quality of care and patient satisfaction. Many factors impact how physicians perceive their career. A new study suggests there’s an interesting correlation between physician burnout and the effectiveness of their supervisors. That’s what researchers found at Mayo Clinic when they undertook a large internal study on the satisfaction of physicians and the leadership qualities of their supervisors. The findings appear in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: "Extreme Breastfeeding" series, alzheimers, American Journal of Transplantation, amyloid, Anticoagulation After Ablation, AP, Arizona Public Media, ASU Obesity Solutions, Austin Herald, Becker’s Hospital Review, Benzinga, Birth control implant


October 24th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

NY Times
Is It Really Dementia?
By Paula Span

…Perhaps another 25 percent of patients actually have other types of dementia, like Lewy body or frontotemporal — scarcely happy news, but because these diseases have different trajectories The New York Times newspaper logoand can be exacerbated by the wrong drugs, the distinction matters…In trying to tell the difference — not a job for amateurs — one key consideration is age, said Dr. Ronald C. Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic’s Alzheimer’s center. Dementia is highly age-related, he pointed out.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field and chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Duska Anastasijevic

 

HealthDay
Two-Pronged Program Looks Best for Helping Smokers Quit

…Taking a prescription medication with brief advice was also more effective than unaided attempts to quit. However, smokers who used over-the-counter nicotine replacement therapy with no counseling had a reduced Health Day Logosuccess rate, according to the study in the October issue of the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings…Smoking cessation is one of the most important health behavior changes that physicians can encourage in their patients, Dr. J. Taylor Hays, director of the Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center in Rochester, Minn., said in the news release.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center (NDC) was one of the first centers in the country to focus exclusively on treatments for tobacco dependence. The NDC's model of care has now become the standard in many medical centers around the United States. The treatment team at the center offers you support and works with you to help develop the motivation and skills needed to stop using tobacco.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein


Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic extends telemedicine tests to Austin kiosks

by Matt McKinney

If an employee at the Mayo Clinic Health System’s Austin campus feels ill, help is just a few steps away, thanks to an experiment underway this month. A kiosk outfitted with basic medical instruments and a high-definition video link has started taking patients for a new telemedicine project known as “Mayo Connected Care.” The kiosks, manufactured by HealthSpot of Dublin, Ohio, have been undergoing tests at Mayo since February, said Star Tribune newspaper logoMark Ciota, the CEO for Mayo Clinic Health System sites in Austin and Albert Lea.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Mayo Clinic is committed to reducing health care expenses and improving access to medical services through a new telemedicine pilot project called Mayo Clinic Health Connection, now available at Mayo Clinic Health System in Austin. The Mayo Clinic Health Connection trials a telehealth delivery system to meet patient’s needs through the HealthSpot® platform, which combines robust cloud-based software and a private walk-in kiosk that offer solutions to care for patients in their place of work. The system will be piloted with Mayo Clinic Health System employees in Albert Lea and Austin before potentially being deployed to other local employers. More information can be found  in the news release: Mayo Clinic Health Connection News Release FINAL 10 2 14.

Public Affairs Contact: Tami Yokiel


Star Tribune
Health care providers readying for a wave of nurse retirees

by Lee Schafer

Star Tribune Business section logoThese days, even the renowned Mayo Clinic in Rochester is scrambling to fill holes in its nursing staff as baby boomers continue to retire. Not that the folks at Mayo are particularly worried. “We’ve seen this before,” said Pam Johnson, Mayo Clinic’s chief nursing officer. “It ebbs and flows. Some years we’ve hired 40 or 50 and some we’ve had up to 500. This year ago it will probably be somewhere in between.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Every year, more than 1 million patients from all 50 states and nearly 150 countries choose Mayo Clinic for their medical care. Mayo Clinic has a legacy of inspiring hope and contributing to health and well-being by providing the best care to every patient through integrated clinical practice, education and research. Mayo Clinic nurses practice in 60 specialties across a variety of locations, including Phoenix/Scottsdale, Ariz.; Jacksonville, Fla.; Rochester, Minn.; and Mayo Clinic Health System in Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin and Georgia. Career opportunities include positions in perioperative (surgical) nursing, hospital (inpatient) nursing and ambulatory (outpatient) nursing. Join a team where the potential for personal growth is unlimited and colleagues inspire you to stretch and grow beyond your boundaries. More information on Mayo Clinic nursing careers can be found here.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bryan Anderson, Alyson Gonzalez

 

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: ABC News, ACOs, aging, American News Report, Apple, Arab News, Argentina Star, Arizona Republic, Austin Daily Herald, Austin Herald, Beloit Daily News, Benzinga


September 13th, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

 

 

September 13, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

AP (Pioneer Press)
More Americans exercise while they work
by Sam Hananel

Glued to your desk at work? Cross that off the list of excuses for not having the time to exercise. A growing number of Americans are standing, walking and even cycling their way through the workday at treadmill desks, standup desks or other moving workstations…It’s been a decade since scientific studies began to show that too much sitting can lead to obesity and increase the risk of developing diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease. Even going to the gym three times a week doesn’t offset the harm of being sedentary for hours at a time, said Dr. James Levine, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic.

Reach: The Associated Press is a not-for-profit news cooperative, owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members. News collected by the AP is published and republished by newspaper and broadcast outlets worldwide.

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob Nellis, Sharon Theimer

TIME
The Personalized Flu Shot
by Alice Park

Dr. Greg Poland is expecting a lot of questions--and confusion--from his patients this flu season. For the first time, U.S. health officials will distribute six influenza vaccines, up from four last year. "Instead of the one-size-fits-all approach, we are moving to vaccines ... for individual patients," says Poland, director of the Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group.

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Related Coverage:
Waseca County News, The facts about vaccinations

Context: The next flu shot season will include several new vaccine options for consumers, Mayo Clinic vaccine expert Gregory Poland, M.D., says. Fearful of needles? There's now an influenza vaccination just for you. Allergic to eggs? It won't stop you from getting a flu shot. The new choices move influenza vaccinations closer to the personalized approach long sought by immunologists including Dr. Poland, but they may also prove bewildering to patients, he says.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Expert Explains New Vaccine Options for Next Influenza Season

Mayo Clinic News Network: Flu Vaccines - Changes & Choices for 2013

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob Nellis, Sharon Theimer

FOX9
Mayo Clinic hosts 'Transform' event to talk health care innovation
by Lindsey LaBelle

The Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation hosted annual conference called Transform, and FOX 9 medical expert Dr. Archelle Georgiou both attended and spoke about her work. The conference focused on innovative health ideas happening in pockets around the country that have the potential to change healthcare for the greater good, and also, to highlight ideas that can be used so the health care system works better for patients and families.

Reach: Minneapolis-St.Paul is the 16th largest television market in the United States with 1.7 million TV homes.  FOX 9 News (WFTC) typically has good viewership for its 9 p.m., newscast, but lags behind its competitors at 5, 6 and 10 p.m.

Additional Coverage:

Hospitals & Health Networks
Maybe it's Time to Nix the Word 'Patient'

Hospitals & Health Networks
Come on, Health Care, Bust Out of Your Box

FOX47
Mayo Clinic hosts national leaders during 'Transform' healthcare summit

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic conference: Technology will transform health care

KAAL
Middle Schoolers Present at Mayo Clinic's Transform Symposium

Context: The Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation held Transform 2013, its sixth multidisciplinary symposium focused on transforming the way health care is experienced and delivered, Sept. 8–10 in Rochester, Minn. Dozens of speakers from a wide array of backgrounds will look through different lenses to understand a larger picture of health care today. Topics include new models of care delivery, the uncertainty of change in the health care landscape, the intersection of business and health care innovation and how to scale programs to large populations.

News Release: Mayo Clinic to Hold Sixth Symposium on Transforming Health Care Delivery

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

KAAL
Mayo Clinic's Social Presence Among the Best
by Jenna Lohse
…An international bestselling author has ranked Mayo Clinic amongst the top companies in the nation for using social media. As Mayo Officials tell us, it's hard to be a leading organization without an online presence. "The history at Mayo Clinic has all been about our reputation being made by word of mouth,” said Lee Aase, Director of Mayo Clinic’s Center for Social Media…"We need to step out of our office and we need to find ways to reach families, to give them to messages to help them live healthy lives and this is a very efficient and effective way to do that,” said Brian Lynch, Mayo Clinic General Pediatrician.

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Context: In 2010, Mayo Clinic announced the creation of a Center for Social Media to accelerate effective application of social media tools throughout Mayo Clinic and to spur broader and deeper engagement in social media by hospitals, medical professionals and patients to improve health globally.  "Mayo Clinic believes individuals have the right and responsibility to advocate for their own health, and that it is our responsibility to help them use social media tools to get the best information, connect with providers and with each other, and inspire healthy choices," explains Mayo Clinic president and CEO John Noseworthy, M.D. "Through this center we intend to lead the health care community in applying these revolutionary tools to spread knowledge and encourage collaboration among providers, improving health care quality everywhere."

Public Affairs Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Nick Hanson

NBC Latino
What parents should know about children and food allergies

With children heading back to school, parents have to be ready for food allergies. A recent CDC study revealed that food allergies increased in children under 18 years from 1997 to 2011, affecting five percent of children under the age of 5 years old. NBC Latino’s Dr. Joe Sirven, Mayo Clinic Arizona, has some tips that every family should know about children and food allergies.

Reach: NBC Latino is an English-language wesbite aimed at Hispanics featuring news and general interest information.

Context: Joseph Sirven, M.D., is chair of neurology at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Dr. Sirven’s research pertains to all facets of the diagnosis and management of seizures and epilepsy.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

MPR
Mayo Clinic extends waiting period between blood donations

by Elizabeth Baier

A new Mayo Clinic policy that requires blood donors to wait longer periods between donations could lead to a drop in the clinic's blood supply. In May, the Mayo Clinic extended the waiting period between blood donations from 8 to 12 weeks, aiming to avoid iron loss in frequent donors…To make up for the shortage, the clinic has started a campaign to convince people to donate one more time, said Blood Donor Center Medical Director Manish Gandhi said.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Additional Coverage: KSTP

Context: As few as 3 percent of Americans eligible to donate blood do, and fear and anxiety are common reasons why many decline to give. U.S. hospitals are always in need of new donors; at Mayo Clinic, that need is heightened by concern about iron deficiency in frequent givers. Mayo recently began requiring people to wait 12 weeks rather than eight between donations, a change that means an estimated 10 percent drop in its blood supply. To inspire more people to give blood, Manish Gandhi, M.D., medical director of the Mayo Clinic Blood Donor Center, addresses six common blood donation phobias.

News Release: Not a Blood Donor? Mayo Clinic Expert Addresses 6 Fears That Stop People from Giving

Mayo Clinic News Network: Manish Gandhi, M.D., medical director of the Mayo Clinic Blood Donor Center, addresses several common blood donation phobias, including fear of needles, fear of the sight of blood and fear of fainting.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic moves ahead in heart stem-cell research
by Jeff Hansel

Researchers at Mayo Clinic in Rochester are looking for new ways to repair a heart that doesn't beat properly in the days following a heart attack. Traditionally, a person with an irregular heartbeat — a problem known medically as dyssynchrony — gets treated with a pacemaker to coach the heart back into normal rhythm. But that's ineffective for about a third of patients, said Dr. Andre Terzic, director of the Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine.

Circulation: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Additional Coverage: MedCity News

Context: Mayo Clinic researchers have found a way to resynchronize cardiac motion following a heart attack using stem cells. Scientists implanted engineered stem cells, also known as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, into damaged regions of mouse hearts following a heart attack. This regenerative approach successfully targeted the origin of abnormal cardiac motion, preventing heart failure. The findings appear in the September issue of the Journal of Physiology. "The discovery introduces — for the first time — stem cell-based 'biological resynchronization' as a novel means to treat cardiac dyssynchrony," says Andre Terzic, M.D., Ph.D., senior author of the study. Dr. Terzic is the Michael S. and Mary Sue Shannon Family Director, Center for Regenerative Medicine, and the Marriott Family Professor of Cardiovascular Diseases Research.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Restores Disrupted Heartbeat with Regenerative Intervention

Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic Restores Disrupted Heartbeat with Regenerative Intervention

Public Affairs Contact: Jennifer Schutz

Huffington Post Live
Obese Teens & Eating Disorders

A new report by the Mayo Clinic says overweight and obese children and teens who lose weight are at significant risk for developing eating disorders, but their symptoms are often overlooked. Dr. Leslie Sim joins us to discuss her findings.

Reach: HuffPost Live is an online streaming video network produced by the Huffington Post. It features videos relating to current events, entertainment, politics, technology and other topics of interest. The network streams original content Monday through Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. ET. The site receive more than 550,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional Coverage:

USA Today
Teens who beat obesity at risk for eating disorders

LA Times, Business Standard, CBS News, WebMD, Yahoo! Shine Canada, Design&Trend, WDTV W.V., WBAY Wis., Health.com, Science World Report, Headlines & Global News, WXYC Mich., WRAL N.C., WSMV Tenn., KSAZ, Huffington Post, Tucson Citizen, HealthCanal, HealthDay, Science2.0, MPR, Newsday

Context: Obese teenagers who lose weight are at risk of developing eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, Mayo Clinic researchers imply in a recent Pediatrics article. Eating disorders among these patients are also not being adequately detected because the weight loss is seen as positive by providers and family members. In the article, Mayo Clinic researchers argue that formerly overweight adolescents tend to have more medical complications from eating disorders and it takes longer to diagnose them than kids who are in a normal weight range. This is problematic because early intervention is the key to a good prognosis, says Leslie Sim, Ph.D., an eating disorders expert in the Mayo Clinic Children's Center and lead author of the study.

News Release: Obese Teenagers Who Lose Weight at Risk for Developing Eating Disorders

Mayo Clinic News Network: Lead author of the study Leslie Sim, Ph.D., L.P., talks about the research

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Wisconsin Public Radio
Hospitals Try Adding Round-The-Clock Remote Patient Monitoring
by Maureen McCollum

Mayo Clinic Health System in La Crosse and Eau Claire are the latest hospitals that will introduce technology to monitor critical care patients remotely…Carrie Apuan is the director of patient care in Mayo’s La Crosse critical care unit. She says if a patient has pneumonia, their vital signs can trend downward slowly and may not be noticed immediately by staff in La Crosse.

Reach: Wisconsin Public Radio serves approximately 300,000 listeners each week throughout Wisconsin and adjoining states on two networks. 

Additional Coverage:

KEYC Mankato
Enhanced Care in Intensive Care Unit 

KSTP
Critically Ill Patients Benefit from New Mayo Clinic Program
 
Austin Herald,  Clinical Innovation + Technology, FierceHealthIT

Context: Critically ill patients are benefiting from a new program designed to improve care and shorten hospital stays. Mayo Clinic's Enhanced Critical Care program offers 24/7 remote monitoring of the sickest patients at six Mayo Clinic Health System hospitals. "It's like having an extra set of eyes on every patient," says Dany Abou Abdallah, M.D., a pulmonologist and director of the critical care unit in Eau Claire. "With this program, operations center nurses and physicians continuously review patients' vital signs and other data. The minute they notice a potential problem, they can alert the local care team."

News Release: Critically Ill Patients at Mayo Clinic Health System Receive Additional Level of Care

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Paul Meznarich

Arizona Republic
The Power Of Bioscience Research
by Greg Stanton, Michael Crow and Wyatt Decker

When state leaders launched an ambitious plan to invest in the biosciences a decade ago, they did so for a simple reason: to break free from our economic handcuffs to only a few industries…Our state couldn’t ask for a better anchor: Mayo Clinic’s 200-acre campus in the north Valley. In less than two years, Mayo will open a massive 380,000-square foot, $130 million cancer center, as well as a $180 million proton-beam therapy center — one of only a few in the West. The cancer center will create more than 800 permanent jobs over the next decade, 1,000 construction jobs, and make Mayo’s unique model of patient-centered medical care even more accessible to those who live here. 

Circulation: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday. The newspaper’s website Arizona Central, averages 83 million pages views each month.

Context: Greg Stanton is mayor of Phoenix. Michael Crow is president of Arizona State University. Wyatt Decker is vice president and chief executive officer of Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Mayo Clinic in Arizona celebrated 25 years in the southwest in 2012. Mayo Clinic in Arizona now spans two campuses, comprising more than 400 acres of land, and has added two research buildings on the Scottsdale campus, while the Phoenix campus includes a 244-bed hospital, specialty clinic, housing for transplant and cancer patients and leased space for a child care center as well as hospice and a hotel. Offsite family medicine practices were also added in Scottsdale and Glendale, Ariz.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Celebrates 25 Years in Arizona

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

To unsubscribe: To remove your name from the global distribution list, send an email to Emily Blahnik with the subject: UNSUBSCRIBE from Mayo Clinic in the News.

View full entry

Tags: Angie Stransky, anorexia nervosa, AP, Arizona Republic, Arizona State University, Associated Press, Austin, Austin Herald, Barb Spurrier, bioscience, blood, blood donation phobias


Contact Us · Privacy Policy