Items Tagged ‘Baltimore Sun’

January 6th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik


Reuters

‘Hidden’ celiac disease less common now in U.S.
by Shereen Lehman

Fewer people in the U.S. have celiac disease without realizing it, a new study finds. The actual proportion of people with celiac disease in the United States has not changed since 2009, researchers say. “The total prevalence is stable,” Dr. Joseph Murray told Reuters Health in a phone interview. But there are fewer people walking around with “hidden” celiac disease. “When you look at the proportion that are diagnosedReuters Logo versus undiagnosed, that's gone up dramatically. Go back six years and most patients were undiagnosed, with only about one in five getting diagnosed,” said Murray, a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota who was part of the study team.

Reach: Reuters has 196 editorial bureaus in 130 countries and 2,400 editorial staff members and covers international news, regional news, politics, social issues, health, business, sports and media.

Context: Joseph Murray, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist. Dr. Murray's research interests focus in two distinct areas: celiac disease and esophageal disorders. To learn more about celiac disease, check out this Mayo Clinic radio interview with Dr. Murray.

Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Joe Dangor

 

Today.com
The real brain food could be fresh veggies and olive oil, study finds
by Maggie Fox

People got points for light to moderate drinking — in this case about a third of drink a day to no more than three drinks a day on average for men and two for women. Dr. David Knopman, a professor of neurology TODAY Showat the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota who was not involved in the study, said this could translate to real-life benefits. “Loss of brain volume is an inevitable part of the aging process,” Knopman told NBC News. “A bigger brain is in general better for you because at least in late life, it makes a person more resistant to the effects of brain diseases,” he added.

Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show.

Context: David Knopman, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist.  Dr. Knopman is involved in research in late-life cognitive disorders, such as mild cognitive impairment and dementia. Dr. Knopman's specific interests are in the very early stages of Alzheimer's disease, in cognitive impairment due to stroke (cerebrovascular disease) and in cognitive impairment due to frontotemporal degeneration.

Contacts: Susan Barber Lindquist, Traci Klein

 

Post-Bulletin
Brewer has FAITH in Rochester
by Brett Boese

When Mayo Clinic Dr. LaPrincess Brewer took the stage last month in Charlotte, N.C., Jackie Johnson couldn't help beaming with pride. Johnson, a vocal advocate within Rochester's Black community, hasn't stopped singing Brewer's praises as the Brewer's success has resonated across the country, even as it flies under the radar locally. Brewer's FAITH program, an acronym for Fostering African-AmericanLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaper Improvement in Total Health, was among the featured attractions at the 28th annual Healthy Churches 2020 National Conference that was held in her hometown. Its initial success in Baltimore and the ensuing impact in Minnesota since Brewer arrived at Mayo in 2013 has prompted significant accolades for the charismatic 35-year-old cardiologist.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context: LaPrincess Brewer, M.D., M.P.H., has a primary research focus in developing strategies to reduce and ultimately eliminate cardiovascular disease health disparities in racial and ethnic minority populations and in underserved communities through health promotion and community-based participatory research. Dr. Brewer also has special interest in increasing minority and women's participation in cardiovascular clinical trials through mobile health (mHealth) interventions. Additionally, she has published work on faith-based interventions for cardiovascular disease prevention, racial differences in weight maintenance and psychosocial factors influencing cardiac risk factors.

Contact: Ethan Grove

 

ABC News
US News and World Report Releases List of Best Diets
by Gillian Mohney

Every year many Americans make a New Year's resolution to lose weight, but finding ways to drop pounds and keep them off is difficult. Today, U.S. News and World Report released its annual list of the best diets, ABC News logoaccording to nutrition and medical experts. The diets were chosen by a panel of nutritionists, dietary consultants, physicians and other experts convened by U.S News and World Report. Mayo Clinic Diet: This diet is broken into two parts. The first part requires no calorie counting, but dieters are stuck with meals made up of healthy foods including whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and healthy fats, as well as at least 30 minutes of physical activity a day.

Reach: ABC News Online has more than 28.8 million unique visitors to its site each month. ABC’s World News Tonight with David Muir averages about 9.2 million viewers each night.

Additional coverage:
HealthDay, Plant-Based Diets Score Big for Healthy Weight Loss
WATE6 Knoxville, U.S. News and World Report ranks top diets
FOX News, US News ranks best diet plans for 2017
Atlanta Journal-ConstitutionWant to lose weight? Experts say these are the best diets of 2017
FOX4 Dallas, Lose weight faster by tracking habits

Context:  As the second edition of The Mayo Clinic Diet hits store shelves, the diet plan has been named Best Commercial Diet by U.S. News & World Report.  “We are honored to be recognized for a weight-loss method that offers lasting results,” says Donald Hensrud, M.D., medical editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet and director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. Learn more about the Mayo Clinic by watching this Mayo Clinic Minute or read more about it on Mayo Clinic Network. “The Mayo Clinic Diet is much more than a diet,” Dr. Hensrud says. “It’s a lifestyle program in which people can eat great-tasting food and feel better right away ─ even while they lose weight. More importantly, these lifestyle changes are sustainable and can improve long-term health as people reach and maintain a healthy weight.”

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

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Tags: ABC News, Affordable care act, Albert Lea Tribune, alternative medicine, anxiety, arthritis, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Attn:, Baltimore Sun, Becker’s Hospital Review, Beloit Daily News, Billings Gazette


November 18th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Washington Post
The one thing missing from the debate over Obamacare, according to a top doctor
by Carolyn Y. Johnson

President-elect Donald Trump’s promise to repeal the Affordable Care Act while preserving some key elements has triggered rampant speculation about the future of American health care — and plunged millions of patients who benefit from the law into deep uncertainty aboutWashington Post newspaper logo the future of their coverage. Little is known about the replacement plan that will ultimately emerge. But one voice angling to shape future policy is the leader of the Mayo Clinic, neurologist John Noseworthy. “Patients are getting frustrated and fearful and anxious that they can’t have access to the care that’s best suited for them,” Noseworthy said. “How can you have a great country if our citizens can’t get access to world class health care? It’s actually not a bad time to reassess.”

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Albuquerque Journal, The Journal

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Forbes
Are Naproxen and Ibuprofen Sometimes Risky? A Controversial Study Of Celebrex Raises Concerns
by Matthew Herper

A study released today may mean that the painkiller celecoxib, once sold under the brand name Celebrex, is safer than prescription doses of Forbes Pharma and Healthcare logoibuprofen or naproxen. That is if the study, which is already controversial, means anything at all. … “It’s fascinating that Celebrex is not worse, and may have a small trend to being better,” says Rekha Mankad, director of the cardio-rheumatology clinic at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester. “I as a cardiologist I would prefer that nobody take any of these drugs on a long-term basis ever.” Still she says, it’s better for patients to get non-steroidal drugs like these than opioids, which are often the next option.

Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: CBS News

Context: Rekha Mankad, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Mankad's interests include gender disparities that exist in regards to heart disease, the relationship between autoimmune diseases and coronary artery disease and gender differences in valvular heart disease.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

CNN
Crawling has some fitness experts going gaga
by Jacqueline Howard

On any given morning, as the sun peeks over the horizon, Danielle Johnson can be found crawling down the hallways of her Rochester, CNN LogoMinnesota, home. It may sound bizarre, but Johnson crawls every day to strengthen her core muscle groups. "You can crawl in many ways. You can crawl on your hands and knees. You can also prop up on your toes and just hover, one or two inches above the ground, which is really going to pull in those core muscles and work those muscles effectively," said Johnson, a physical therapist at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program.

Reach: Cable News Network (CNN) is a worldwide news and information network providing live, continuous coverage of news from around the globe, 24 hours a day. CNN online received more than 55 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Huffington Post
A Culture of Legacy
by Marcia McMullen

The recent passing of a cultural icon in health care revealed a rare glimpse into how a successful 150-year-old brand built on a clear mission and Huffington Post Logoexacting processes which ultimately became its culture. Dr. William J. Mayo’s clarity of mission, “The needs of the patient come first.” set into a motion a defining statement that would withstand not only time, but also cultural shifts and leadership changes. One of those change leaders, Sr. Generose Gervais, OSF, administrator and executive director emeritus, Saint Marys Campus-Mayo Clinic Hospital, recently passed away at the age of 97.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique visitors.

Previous coverage in the October 21, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Sister Generose Gervais, long-time administrator of Saint Marys Hospital and president of the Poverello Foundation, passed away peacefully recently in the hospital she served for many years. She was 97. Sister Generose will be remembered for her tireless work on behalf of patients and the staff of Saint Marys Hospital. Her hospital ministry focused on perpetuating the Franciscan legacy, specifically nurturing the values of respect, integrity, compassion, healing, teamwork, innovation, excellence and stewardship among all Mayo Clinic staff. “Sister Generose was known for her faith, her quiet leadership, her wise counsel, her dedication to patients and staff, her sense of humor and the example of service that she lived every day,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic. “Mayo Clinic was blessed by her presence for more than 60 years.” More information about Sister Generose can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network and Mayo Clinic in the Loop.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

New York Times
Q&A: A look at the cancer some believe linked to Vietnam War

…Bile duct cancer is unusual because it can be prevented in some cases. Pills can wipe out liver flukes early on, but the medicine is not effective in later stages after the worms have died and scarring has occurred. Surgery is possible in some cases, but the survivalThe New York Times newspaper logo rate is only about 30 percent for five years, said Dr. Gregory Gores, a gastroenterologist and executive dean of research at Mayo Clinic. Affected countries, such as Vietnam and Laos, have not conducted extensive research to determine the extent of the problem. The world’s highest rate of cholangiocarcinoma — about 84 new cases per 100,000 people — is found in northeastern Thailand where many people eat a popular raw fish dish.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Additional coverage: WTOP Washington, Star Tribune, Associated Press

Context: Gregory Gores, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist.  Dr. Gores research is focused on mechanisms of liver cell death, especially apoptosis. He employs disease-relevant models to unravel the fundamental cellular processes contributing to liver injury during cholestasis and fatty liver diseases. In addition, Dr. Gores' lab is also interested in the mechanisms by which cancer cells escape from cell death in order to undergo malignant transformation and metastases.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

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Tags: ABC News, Affordable care act, aging, Albuquerque Journal, AliveCor, alzheimer's disease, Angela Lunde, Arizona Daily Sun, Associated Press, Attn:, AZ Big Media, Baltimore Sun


December 18th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in tMayo Clinic in the News Logohe News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Note:  This edition of Mayo Clinic in the News will be the last issue of 2015. We will see you again in early 2016.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Wall Street Journal
Is Lab Testing the ‘Wild West’ of Medicine?
by Thomas Burton

Descending in darkness, a FedEx cargo jet touched down on a runway at 5:44 a.m., filled with hundreds of identical, raspberry-colored boxes. A truWSJ Bannerck painted the same color soon sped the boxes, all human blood and cell samples, to more than 40 laboratories at the nearby Mayo Clinic, based here…Dr. Michael O’Sullivan, creator of Mayo Medical Laboratories, the operation that tests outside samples, also was its original delivery network. He drove around southern Minnesota to pick up vials and slides. Before long, the business grew large enough to support a fleet of vans. A sales force was added by 1986 and now has more than 100 employees.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Additional coverage:

Wall Street Journal — Video: Inside the Mayo Clinic Diagnostic Testing Labs; Yahoo! Health Canada

Becker’s Hospital Review — FDA wants to crack down on lab-developed tests: 3 things to know by Emily Rappleye…2. Cost

Context: Mayo Medical Laboratories is a global reference laboratory operating within Mayo Clinic's Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology. Mayo Medical Laboratories staff collaborates with clinicians to provide knowledge of, and access to, the latest testing and treatment guidance. We provide clinical laboratory testing to support health care systems, hospitals, specialty clinics, and other clinical laboratories all working toward expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

USA Today
Study suggests link between flavor in e-cigarettes and lung disease
by Mary Bowerman

Researchers at the Harvard University T.H. Chan USA Today newspaper logoSchool of Public Health
tested 51 types of flavored e-cigarettes and flavor canisters for diacetyl, acetoin, and 2,3-pentanedione; three chemicals known to cause respiratory problems in factory workers…With around 7,000 e-cigarette flavors on the market, consumers are essentially at the mercy of the manufacturers, with little hope of knowing what chemicals are used in the products, according to Taylor Hays, director of Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center. “There are no FDA regulations on these products. It’s the Wild West of e-cigarettes,” Hays told USA TODAY Network.

Reach: USA TODAY  has an average daily circulation of 4.1 million which includes print, various digital editions and other papers that use their branded content.

Additional coverage:
USA TODAY — Survey: Teens still intrigued by e-cigarettes; KARE11Times of India

Context: Dr. Taylor Hays is director of the Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center. The Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center (NDC) was one of the first centers in the country to focus exclusively on treatments for tobacco dependence. The NDC's model of care has now become the standard in many medical centers around the United States. The treatment team at the center offers you support and works with you to help develop the motivation and skills needed to stop using tobacco.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein


Wisconsin Public Radio
Physician Burnout Is Bad For Patients

A new study by the Mayo Clinic shows that burnout among physicians is bad, and getting worse. We find out how that affects patients, and what needs to change. Host:Wisconsin Public Radio  Veronica Rueckert Guest(s):  Tait Shanafelt Producer(s): Judith Siers-Poisson.

Reach: Wisconsin Public Radio consists of 34 radio stations programmed by seven regional studios and carrying programming on three content networks: the Ideas Network, the NPR News and Classical Network and the All Classical Network.

Additional coverage: Healthcare Dive

Context: Burnout among U.S. physicians is getting worse. An update from a three-year study evaluating burnout and work-life balance shows that American physicians are worse off today than they were three years earlier. These dimensions remained largely unchanged among U.S. workers in general, resulting in a widening gap between physicians and U.S. workers in other fields. The study conducted by Mayo Clinic researchers in partnership with the American Medical Association compared data from 2014 to metrics they collected in 2011 and found that now more than half of U.S. physicians are experiencing professional burnout. The findings appear in Mayo Clinic Proceedings“Burnout manifests as emotional exhaustion, loss of meaning in work, and feelings of ineffectiveness,” says Tait Shanafelt, M.D., “What we found is that more physicians in almost every specialty are feeling this way and that’s not good for them, their families, the medical profession, or patients.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Washington Post
Don’t forget about vaccinations, even if you think you’re too old for them
by Emily Sohn

R.D. Zimmerman had been to northern Africa and the Caribbean, spent lots of time in Russia, and visited Mexico multiple times.Washington Post newspaper logo But a couple of weeks after returning home to Minneapolis in April from a visit to Cabo, on the southern tip of Baja California, he developed a persistent cough that landed him in the emergency room with an unexpected diagnosis: hepatitis A…But anecdotal evidence suggests that Zimmerman’s experience is common, says Greg Poland, director of the Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group in Rochester, Minn. He sees patients every week who come home from trips with illnesses they could have avoided, including hep A, which often comes from consuming contaminated food or water.

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post averages 518,700, and Sunday circulation averages 736,800.

Context: Gregory Poland, M.D. is director of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. The Vaccine Research Group works to improve the health of individuals across the world by pursuing challenges posed by infectious diseases and bioterrorism through clinical, laboratory and epidemiologic vaccine research.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Washington Post
Proposed budget for Alzheimer’s research may rise by over 50 percent
by Tara Bahrampour

The spending deal Congress reached Tuesday night includes an unprecedented increase in funding for Alzheimer’s rWashington Post newspaper logoesearch: $350 million in fiscal 2016. If approved by the White House, it will increase government spending on the disease by over 50 percent… “It’s perhaps some of the most encouraging news we’ve had on Alzheimer’s disease in several years,” said Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging and the Mayo Alzheimer’s Research Center. “This is truly very, very exciting in the field.”

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post averages 518,700, and Sunday circulation averages 736,800.

Context: Under the federal spending bill, released this week, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) would receive $200 million for President Obama’s Precision Medicine initiative and a $350 million increase for Alzheimer’s research funding in 2016. “We applaud the agreement for the first increase in research funding for the NIH in over a decade. This significant act recognizes the importance of funding research and innovation in our nation,” says Gregory Gores, M.D., executive dean for Research at Mayo Clinic. “The increase in funding and commitment to research in areas such as precision medicine and Alzheimer’s disease would support discovery and translation to bring forward new treatments for our patients.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Susan Barber Lindquist, Sharon Theimer

 

News4Jax
Flu deaths reported; Doctors urge people get shot
by Ashley Mitchem

Doctors are encouraging people to get the flu shot as new details emerge about some of the first flu deaths of the season… Vandana Bhide with News Jax 4 LogoMayo Clinic believes the flu is just beginning to spread this season. “I think it's early in the season, so we're going to see more activity in January and February,” said Bhide.

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville.

Context: Vandana Bhide, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic Hospital Internal Medicine physician. More information on flu shots can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

ABC15 Arizona
Mayo Clinic Cardiologist talks about blood pressure

Todd Hurst, M.D., Mayo Clinic Cardiologist, joined the hosts of Sonoran Living Live to discuss the prevalence of high blood pressure is in theABC affiliate, channel 15 in Arizona U.S., simple life style changes that can help lower blood pressure and how you can easily monitor your blood pressure at home.

Reach:  KNXV-TV, ABC 15, is the ABC television station affiliate in Phoenix, Arizona.

Additional coverage on ABC15:

ABC15 Arizona — Rally for Red: You've seen the commercials, but what is A-fib?

ABC15 Arizona  — Mayo Clinic News Network: Reduce your blood pressure with these 10 tips from the Mayo Clinic 

Context: R. Todd Hurst, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Mayo Clinic's Division of Cardiovascular Diseases is one of the largest and most integrated in the United States, with locations in Arizona, Florida, Minnesota and several communities throughout Mayo Clinic Health System. Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota include more than 200 cardiologists and 1,100 allied health staff trained in caring for heart patients.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

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Tags: “teleconcussion” evaluation, a-fib or atrial fibrillation, ABC15 Arizona, Alzheimer's and dementia care, Alzheimer's Research, Alzheimer's Trial, American Medical Association, Autism Treatment cost coverage, Baltimore Sun, Becker’s Health IT & CIO Review, Becker’s Hospital Review, Behavioral Neurology at Mayo Clinic


June 18th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In The News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

 

MSNBC Morning Joe
Mayo clinic offers patient care to Walmart employees

Dr. John Noseworthy talks about the Mayo Clinic's relationship with Walmart and why they will offer patient care to theMorning Joe MSNBC company's employees.

Reach: MSNBC provides in-depth analysis of daily headlines, political commentary and informed perspectives. MSNBC’s home on the Internet is tv.msnbc.com. Joe Scarborough hosts “Morning Joe,” with co-hosts Mika Brzezinski and Willie Geist, featuring interviews with top politicians and newsmakers, as well as in-depth analysis of the day’s biggest stories. Morning Joe has about 375,000 viewers daily.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. 

Contact: Traci Klein

 

FOX News
Sunday Morning Futures, Joining me now is Dr. John Noseworthy

He is president and CEO of the Mayo Clinic. And he is with us on set. Good to see you, John. Thanks so much for joining Sunday Morning Futures Fox Newsus…So I want to get your take, really, on a couple of things. I want to talk about the subsidies issue and this pending Obamacare care ruling. But I also want to ask you about innovation, what you're doing at Mayo and, really, what's happening in health care today.

Reach:  Fox News Channel (FNC) is a cable and satellite television news channel owned by the Fox Entertainment Group, a subsidiary of News Corporation. Maria Bartiromo has covered business and the economy for more than 25 years and was one of the building blocks of business cable network CNBC. During her 20-year tenure as the face of CNBC, she launched the network’s morning program, Squawk Box; anchored The Closing Bell with Maria Bartiromo; and was the anchor and managing editor of the nationally syndicated On the Money with Maria Bartiromo, formerly The Wall Street Journal Report with Maria Bartiromo. Bartiromo joined FOX Business Network (FBN) as Global Markets Editor in January 2014.  She is the anchor of Opening Bell with Maria Bartiromo on FBN (weekdays from 9-11 AM/ET) and Sunday Morning Futures with Maria Bartiromo (Sundays at 10 AM/ET) on FOX News Channel (FNC).

Additional Coverage:
Wall Street Journal
How Mayo, Kaiser Permanente Keep Health Costs Down

At WSJ's CFO Conference, Wall Street Journal Video logoPresident and CEO of Mayo Clinic John H. Noseworthy, M.D. and Chairman and CEO of Kaiser Permanente Bernard J. Tyson discussed their cost-saving health care systems.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. 

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville to create lung restoration center
by Charlie Patton

In 2014, the number of people on the waiting list for a lung transplant in the U.S. outnumbered the number of donor lungs available by about 650. The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville and United Therapeutics Corp., a biotechnology company, are collaborating now on the creation of a lungFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo restoration center on Mayo’s Jacksonville campus that should ultimately double the number of lungs available for transplant in the U.S. “This is a big deal,” said Gianrico Farrugia, chief executive officer of Mayo in Jacksonville. “… This is not Mayo or United Therapeutics benefiting. This is the whole country benefiting.” Additional coverage: Jacksonville Business Journal, Jacksonville Post, MyInforms.com, Jacksonville City and Press, Phys.Org

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, and United Therapeutics Corporation (NASDAQ: UTHR) announced recently a collaboration to build and operate a lung restoration center on the Mayo campus. The goal is to significantly increase the volume of lungs for transplantation by preserving and restoring selected marginal donor lungs, making them viable for transplantation. The restored lungs will be made available to patients at Mayo Clinic and other transplant centers throughout the United States. Construction of the center is expected to be completed in late 2017. Financial details of the agreement were not disclosed. “This collaboration is exciting because it allows Mayo Clinic to bring the latest advances in life-saving technology to transplant patients,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., chief executive officer of Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida. “Ultimately, this relationship will help Mayo Clinic expand its reach to patients who could benefit from this innovation. Increasing the number of lungs available for transplantation provides more options for patients suffering from pulmonary disease.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

ABC 15 Arizona
Mayo Clinic has heart failure treatment options

David Fortuin, M.D., Mayo Clinic Cardiologist, joined the hosts of ABC affiliate, channel 15 in ArizonaSonoran Living Live to discuss treatment options for patients with heart failure.   Surgery is an excellent option for heart failure patients -- if they can tolerate it.

Reach:  KNXV-TV, ABC 15, is the ABC television station affiliate in Phoenix, Arizona.

Context: F. David Fortiun, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Mayo Clinic's top-ranked team of cardiologists diagnoses and treats many heart conditions, including many rare and complex disorders. Mayo Clinic's Division of Cardiovascular Diseases is one of the largest and most integrated in the United States, with locations in Arizona, Florida, Minnesota and several communities throughout Mayo Clinic Health System. Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota include more than 200 cardiologists and 1,100 allied health staff trained in caring for heart patients.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Star Tribune
NBA commissioner calls Minneapolis practice site a catalyst

It had been a busy few hours for NBA commissioner Adam Silver. Tuesday night he had presented the Golden State Warriors the Larry O'Brien trophy after their series-deciding victory in Cleveland. Wednesday morning he was at TheStar Tribune newspaper logo Courts at Mayo Square, the  new 107,000-square-foot Taj Mahal-like practice facility for the Timberwolves and Lynx. The grand opening was attended by Silver, WNBA president Laurel Richie, Wolves and Lynx owner Glen Taylor and Mayo CEO Dr. John Noseworthy. Afterward, Silver called the facility — which he said was the most impressive he had seen — a catalyst for better things to come for a Wolves franchise that hasn’t seen the playoffs since 2004, but is set to pick first in next week’s draft.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:
NBA.com, Three Questions With Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine

Star TribuneHartman: NBA chief Silver impressed by where Wolves stand

Star Tribune (AP), Timberwolves hope new practice center marks the end of decade-long doldrums; teaming with Mayo

Star TribuneGallery: Wolves, with partner Mayo Clinic, open Mayo Clinic Square

Star Tribune, Wolves and Lynx open new Mayo Clinic practice facility

USA Today, KTTC, KTTC, KAAL, The Herald S.C., Washington Post, Pioneer Press, FOX9, FOX Sports, Sun Times Minneapolis, NBA.com, BringMeTheNews, KARE11, Canis Hoopus

Context: DigniMayo Clinic Square Courts logotaries from the worlds of medicine, sports, business and politics hit the court today, Wednesday, June 17, to dedicate Mayo Clinic Square in downtown Minneapolis. The event was the first in a series of grand-opening events marking the strategic collaboration of Mayo Clinic, the Minnesota Timberwolves and Minnesota Lynx. "At Mayo Clinic we pride ourselves in teamwork," said John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO of Mayo Clinic. "We are proud to be part of the team that made this day possible." More information about Mayo Clinic Square can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

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February 6th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, director, media relations

 

AP
Obama Proposes 'Precision Medicine' To End One-Size-Fits-All
by Lauran Neergaard

President Barack Obama is calling for an investment to move away from one-size-fits-all-medicine, toward an approach that tailors treatment to your genes…People with aAssociated Press Wire Service Logo rare form of cystic fibrosis now can choose a drug designed specifically to target the genetic defect causing their illness. Some medical centers, such as the Mayo Clinic, have opened "individualized medicine clinics."

Additional coverage: NY Times, WAVY Va., Star Tribune, KTTC, KMSP, ABC News, Bloomberg, Politico, Daily Mail UK

 

Florida Times-Union
New approach enables Mayo Clinic neurologist to diagnose a rare genetic condition
by Charlie Patton

When Dustin Bennett was 18 months old, his mother realized there was something wrong with him, that he was suddenly having a hard time keeping his balance when he stood upright…Finally, at the suggestion of one of the many physicians she consulted, the Bennetts made the trip from their home in Pearson, Ga., Florida Times-Union newspaper logoto Jacksonville so they could consult with Mayo Clinic neurologist Zbigniew Wszolek.

Additional coverage on this topic: Medical Xpress

Reach: 
The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Florida Times-Union
Guest column: Precision medicine is future of health care
by Physician Gianrico Farrugia, CEO of Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville

Florida Times UnionMayo Clinic has built a national research program and a national referral medical clinic to advance the benefits of these discoveries, which already are beginning to benefit patients on our Jacksonville campus. We consider precision medicine a priority and an essential part of the future of medical practice.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

 

Bloomberg
Obama Plans $215 Million Precision Medicine Effort for Cures
by Caroline Chen

Obama’s proposed funding may not be enough to support the project. “I think the polite way to say it is that it’s a good start,” said Gianrico Farrugia, chief executive Bloomberg news logoofficer of Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus and former director of Mayo’s Center for Individualized Medicine. “It is certainly really encouraging that there is alignment between the NIH and the White House, and it kick starts the thing we need to do, but it’s an initial investment just to start things,” Farrugia said by telephone.

Reach: Bloomberg has 2,300 media professionals in 146 bureaus across 72 countries. Bloomberg delivers its content across more than 400 publications, over 310 million households worldwide through Bloomberg Television and 500,000 in the New York metro area and 18.5 million subscribers through satellite radio.

Additional coverage: International Business Times, com, HealthData Management, HealthDay, FOX News, ABC News, KAAL, KMSP, Star Tribune, Chicago Tribune, Al Jazeera America

 

Star Tribune
Mayo genetic data bank could boost Obama's new 'precision medicine initiative'
by Jim Spencer

…“If we have a big data set, a big pool of people that’s varied, then that allows us to really map out not only the genome of one person, but now we can start seeing Star Tribune newspaper logoconnections and patterns and correlations that helps us refine exactly what it is that we’re trying to do with respect to treatment,” the president said at a White House ceremony, attended by Mayo Vice President Dr. Gianrico Farrugia.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Individualized medicine, also known as personalized medicine or precision medicine, means tailoring diagnosis and treatment to each patient to optimize care. Patients have experienced this kind of care for 150 years at Mayo Clinic, where teams of specialists have always worked together to find answers. More information about the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Mayo Clinic's response to President Obama's precision medicine initiative can be found here.

Previous Coverage on Precision Medicine in January, 22, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Bob Nellis, Sam Smith, Kevin Punsky

 

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October 2nd, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

HealthDay
Herceptin Best for Certain Breast Cancer Patients, Study Says

Herceptin is the best drug treatment for a type of breast cancer called HER2-positive and should remain the standard of care for that type of tumor, according to new findings from a long-term clinical trial. HER2-positive breast cancers tend to be more aggressive than other types of breast cancer, according to theHealth Day Logo Mayo Clinic… Heart safety was rated good for both groups of patients. And there was no difference in the rate of cancer spreading from the breast to the brain, study co-chair Dr. Edith Perez, director of the Breast Cancer Translational Genomics Program at the Mayo Clinic in Florida, said in a Mayo news release.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: US News & World Report

Context: Analysis of more than 8,000 women who participated in the world’s largest study of two treatments for HER2-positive breast cancer reinforces other findings from the clinical trial showing that trastuzumab (Herceptin) should remain the standard of care for this cancer, says a Mayo Clinic researcher. This study, being presented at the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) 2014 Congress in Madrid, reveals that when used as a single HER2-targeted therapy in addition to standard chemotherapy, trastuzumab offers a better outcome than does lapatinib (Tykerb), says Edith A. Perez, M.D., deputy director at large, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center and director of the Breast Cancer Translational Genomics Program at Mayo Clinic in Florida. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Paul Scotti

 

KAAL TV
Mayo Opens Spa Focusing on Overall Wellness
by Jenna Lohse

Mayo Clinic is internationally known for medical breakthroughs and lifesaving procedures, but now it's taken a new step into prevention. Doctors say it all comes down to a person's overall wellness. Mayo's new spa program called Rejuvenate just opened.  Step into a new part of Mayo Clinic's Healthy Living Program and KAAL-TV-6 logoleave the stresses in life behind for a bit. "I had my first facial today, so I’m a new believer,” said Dr. Brent Bauer, Medical Director of Rejuvenate. He says overall wellness is key. "I think it's time to ask that question how do we keep people from getting sick in the first point,” said Bauer… "A spa service such as message can lead to better outcomes, people who have had cardiac surgery for example, we've been doing some of those things in the hospital and the clinic setting for quite some time,” said Dr. Donald Hensrud, Medical Director of Mayo’s Healthy Living Program.

Reach:  KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Additional coverage:

Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic adds services at Healthy Living Program by Jeff Hansel, Mayo Clinic plans to open a spa and weight-loss program at its downtown Rochester Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center. "We are excited about taking wellness to the next level," Dr. Donald Hensrud, medical director of the Healthy Weight and Rejuvenate at Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program, said in a statement from the clinic. 

FOX 47 News, KTTC, WN.com

Context:  The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program, which launched earlier this year, is expanding its wellness offerings to include a weight management plan and spa services. The Healthy Weight Plan andRejuvenate at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program will open this fall and enhance the already popular wellness plans available for guests.  “We are excited about taking wellness to the next level,” says Donald Hensrud, M.D., the program’s medical director. “Our expanded services embrace the idea of involving the entire body and mind. No matter your age or health needs, if you’re looking to better manage stress, lose weight, get active, or eat and cook healthfully, our program offers a diverse selection of wellness options for anyone seeking whole-body wellness.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Star Tribune
Mayo opens downtown sports center
by Jeremy Olson

In the years to come, Mayo Clinic’s new sports medicine center in downtown Minneapolis will no doubt treat NBA stars, heal MLB sluggers and help promising athletes reach their potential.Star Tribune Health newspaper logo

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

Post-Bulletin, Answer Man: Mayo Clinic's Block E center opens Wednesday… What used to be called Block E, on Hennepin between Sixth and Seventh streets, has been peeled open and is covered with plastic while they work on the facade. On the third floor, the 15-screen cineplex has been gutted, and that's where the 22,000-square-foot Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center has been installed.

Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal, Mayo Clinic’s downtown Minneapolis clinic opens Wednesday by Katharine Grayson, Mayo Clinic will offer services ranging from regenerative-medicine treatments to golf-swing assessments at its downtown Minneapolis sports medicine facility opening Wednesday. The 22,000-square-foot clinic, part of a $50 million redevelopment of the Block E building, will employ about 30 people, said Medical Director Jon Finnoff in an interview.

KAAL, KARE11, WCCO, KTTC, KSTP, BringMeTheNews, Finance & Commerce

Context: Mayo Clinic announced this week the opening of Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center at Mayo Clinic Square in downtown Minneapolis. Services in the new 22,000-square-foot facility include health and well-being programs, injury prevention, EXOS (formerly Athletes’ Performance) performance solutions, physical rehabilitation and sport-specific skills programs, and diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic sports injuries for athletes of all ages. The facility will be staffed by orthopedic and physical medicine & rehabilitation physicians, physical therapists, athletic trainers, and strength and conditioning specialists, as well as EXOS performance specialists and dietitians.

sports 2

“For more than two decades, the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center has provided care for professional and international sports teams, premier athletes and weekend warriors from virtually every sport,” says Jonathan Finnoff, D.O., medical director, Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center at Mayo Clinic Square. “Our approach to integrated, multidisciplinary care to optimize performance, minimize risk and treat injury is truly a differentiator.” More information about Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center at Mayo Clinic Square in downtown Minneapolis can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

MPR
Focus on concussions transforms high school football in Minnesota
by Trisha Volpe

…"If athletes and parents and coaches and healthcare providers and administrators are aware of the problem, they understand the symptoms and signs, they're able to recognize them and maybe they're compelled to refer to a healthcare provider because of the law, then we are seeing more folks, which is a good thing," saidMPR News logo Dr. Michael Stuart, an orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine expert at Mayo Clinic.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context:  Michael Stuart, M.D. is co-director, Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

Other Mayo News on MPR:

MPR
Rat heart cells could offer clues to treating hypothermia
by Liz Baier

In a dark corner of a lab inside Mayo Clinic Hospital St. Mary's Campus, Niccole Schaible peers through a microscope into the cardiomyoctes, or muscle cells of a MPR News Logorat's heart. They're on a glass slide, nearly invisible to the naked eye. "It's kind of a cool procedure when you actually see it contracting," she said. "When you look through the microscope and actually see this thing beating."

Additional Coverage:

Brainerd Dispatch (MPR), Rat heart cells could offer clues to treating hypothermia by Liz Baier, In a dark corner of a lab inside Mayo Clinic Hospital St. Mary's Campus, Niccole Schaible peers through a microscope into the cardiomyoctes, or muscle cells of a rat's heart. They're on a glass slide, nearly invisible to the naked eye… Schaible is a graduate student of biomedical engineering and physiology at Mayo Clinic. She's using the rat's muscle cells to understand why heart failure often occurs when patients are warmed after severe hypothermia.

Austin Daily Herald, Fergus Falls Journal

MPR, Eleven years after cancer diagnosis, the bad news by Bob Collins, There’s more to define Jenna (Langer) Vancura’s life than her battle with cancer. But her illness has consumed a lot of it. The 27-year-old New Ulm, Minnesota, native spent much of her senior year in high school at the Mayo Clinic… On Tuesday, 11 years to the day since we first found my cancer, my doctors bravely told me that my body was finally succumbing to the disease. It’s that realization nobody wants to have, but most need to have at some point. My mom thanked my doctors for their honesty; it’s hard to come by.

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September 4th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich


Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

TIME
Sitting is Killing You

by Alice Park

You’ve already heard that sitting is the new smoking. Now, scientists reveal exactly how it hurts the body—and novel ways to undo the damage (without clocTime magazine logoking hours at the gym). You might want to stand up for this…All of which has doctors and health experts calling for a paradigm shift. “In the same way that standing up is an oddity now, sitting down should be,” says Dr. James Levine, director of the Mayo Clinic-Arizona State University Obesity Solutions Initiative and probably best known as the inventor of the first treadmill desk.

Reach: Time magazine has a weekly circulation of 3.3 million. Time Online receives mores than 4.6 million unique visitors to its website each month and its monthy page views are more than 32.8 million.

Additional Coverage:

Arizona Republic
Workplace treadmill desks beginning to make strides
by Ken Alltucker

Arizona Republic newspaper logo…Now entrepreneurs and exercise companies have pounced on the idea that sitting can be hazardous to your health. "It is a hidden killer if you like," said James Levine, a Mayo Clinic doctor who examined the topic in his book "Get Up! Why Your Chair is Killing You and What You Can Do About It."

ReachThe Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday. The newspaper’s website Arizona Central, averages 83 million pages views each month.

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob NellisJim McVeigh

 

KARE11
Measles shot helps eliminate woman's cancer
by Adrienne Broaddus

Stacy Erholtz battled cancer for 10 years. But now, she says her cancer is in remission after a massive dose of the measles vaccine. While her journey has been tough, her faith hasn't wavered. After returningKARE-11 TV, Minneapolis-St. Paul from a taping a segment in Los Angeles with "The Doctors," Erholtz stopped by KARE 11 to chat about her journey. She said the show will highlight her treatment…Erholtz, 49, of Pequot Lakes, was one of two patients in a Mayo Clinic clinical trial last year using virotherapy. As she sips on a diet Pepsi, she can't stop smiling as she talks about her medical miracle.

Reach: KARE is a an NBC affiliate in the Minneapolis-St.Paul market.

Additional coverage: BringMeTheNews, WTVM Ga., WFSB, KCTV Kansas CityKCBD

Previous Coverage in May 15, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: In a proof of principle clinical trial, Mayo Clinic researchers have demonstrated that virotherapy — destroying cancer with a virus that infects and kills cancer cells but spares normal tissues — can be effective against the deadly cancer multiple myeloma. The findings appear in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Two patients in the study received a single intravenous dose of an engineered measles virus (MV-NIS) that is selectively toxic to myeloma plasma cells. Both patients responded, showing reduction of both bone marrow cancer and myeloma protein. One patient, a 49-year-old woman, experienced complete remission of myeloma and has been clear of the disease for over six months. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

 

MPR
Mayo doctor's tips for stress-free living and better health

MPR News logoDr. Amit Sood, author of the "Mayo Clinic's Guide to Stress-Free Living," speaks at a Minnesota Public Radio "Healthy States" event about the ways to improve your health by alleviating stress. Gratitude, compassion, acceptance, forgiveness and focusing on the meaning of life are key.Book cover Mayo Clinic's Guide to Stress-Free Living, with female doing cartwheel

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: In The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living, Mayo Clinic stress management and resiliency expert Amit Sood, M.D., draws on decades of groundbreaking research to offer readers a scientifically proven, structured and practical approach to reducing stress. He explains the brain’s two modes — focused mode and default mode — and how an imbalance between the two produces unwanted stress, and he shares new insights about how the mind works, including its natural tendency to wander. In this easy-to-follow guide, Dr. Sood provides actionable steps to cultivate emotional and mental strength, find greater fulfillment and nurture a kind disposition. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Sood, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Ginger Plumbo, Brian Kilen

 

Chicago Defender
Black Women Move Past ‘Tuskegee Experiment’ Mistrust
by Oretha Winston

If a research survey of African American professional women is any indication, attitudes may be changing towards participation in medical research. Mayo Clinic and The Links, Incorporated Chicago Defender newspaper logoresearchers teamed up to survey members of the international women’s organization, and found that a majority of African American women surveyed are willing to or have taken part in medical research…“Our findings are highly encouraging,” says Sharonne Hayes, M.D., Mayo Clinic cardiologist, co-author of the study, and director of Mayo’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion.

Reach: The Chicago Defender covers local and national news of interest to its black readership, residing in the Chicago metropolitan area. The publication has a weekly circulation of more than 7,400 readers. The online version attracts more than 13,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Elev8

Context: If a research survey of African American professional women is any indication, attitudes may be changing towards participation in medical research. Mayo Clinic and The Links, Incorporated researchers teamed up to survey members of the international women’s organization, and found that a majority of African American women surveyed are willing to or have taken part in medical research. The results appear in the Journal of Women’s Health. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

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Tags: 3D printing, ABC15 Arizona, acute sinusitis, Adela Grando, ADHD in children, African-American, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer's diseease, Arizona Pop Warner Football, Arizona Republic, Arizona State University


August 7th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Spokesman-Review
Kootenai Health Joins Mayo Network

Kootenai Health and Mayo Clinic leaders today announced Kootenai Health as a Spokesman-Review newspaper bannermember of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a national network of like-minded organizations that share a commitment to better serving patients and their families.

Reach: The Spokesman-Review is a daily newspaper in Spokane, Washington. The Coeur D'Alene Bureau of the Spokesman-Review is located in Coeur D'Alene, Idaho, and covers the news from the western part of the state. The daily circulation of the Spokesman Review is more than 100,000 and the weekend circulation is more than 131,000.

Additional coverage:

Coeur d' Alene Press, What Kootenai Health-Mayo partnership means to you, patients
Post-Bulletin, Spokesman-Review Wash., Boise Weekly, Coeur d’Alene Press, KROC AM Radio, WorldNews.com, KREM Wash. KREM-CBS Wash., News Medical, CDA Press

Context: Kootenai Health and Mayo Clinic leaders announced this week Kootenai Health as a member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a national network of like-minded organizations that share a commitment to better serving patients and their families. The network, which began in 2011, now includes 30 member organizations that are interested in working with Mayo Clinic to improve health care delivery by sharing knowledge and promoting collaboration between physicians. As part of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, Kootenai Health physicians now have access to Mayo Clinic’s knowledge and expertise when these additional resources will be helpful, allowing many patients to avoid unnecessary travel for answers to complex medical questions. “We are working with Mayo Clinic so our patients can benefit from leading medical expertise and physician collaboration without having to leave home,” says Jon Ness, Kootenai Health CEO. “Our two organizations share the same commitment that health care should be provided close to home whenever possible.” More information about the announcement can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

AARP
8 Ways to Shape Up for Your Surgery
by Elizabeth Agnvall

Jean Hanson needed a new hip. After years of teaching P.E. and tearing up ski slopes all over the world, AARP The Magazine Logothe Sedona, Arizona, resident was in so much pain that she relied on a walker. She finally decided to have surgery at the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix, but there was just one problem: Doctors there wouldn't do the operation unless she quit smoking.

Reach:  AARP, The Magazine, has a circulation of more than 22.2 million and is published every other month.

Context: The news that you will need surgery can prompt many questions and a lot of anxiety. Beyond details about your medical condition and treatment options, what should you ask your surgeon before the operation? Whatever you need to ask to be comfortable with the decisions you make about your care, says Robert Cima, M.D., a colon and rectal surgeon and chair of Mayo’s surgical quality subcommittee. To learn more about the five questions to ask your surgeon before an operation, please go to Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Entertainment Tonight
Country Legend Glen Campbell Refuses to be Silenced by Alzheimer's

Alzheimer's has made it difficult for Glen Campbell to remember names and people, but he has no problem performing on stage. We have a look at the new documentary about his diagnosis. TheEntertainment Tonight Logo Rhinestone Cowboy, who has inspired stars like Taylor Swift to Keith Urban, refused to let his debilitating disease slow him down, and went on a final tour of 151 shows. As an extra treat, Campbell invited award-winning filmmaker James Keach along to capture every moment for the documentary Glen Campbell: I'll Be Me. The segment includes video of Glen at Mayo Clinic and of his appointment with Dr. Ronald Peterson.

Reach: Entertainment Tonight reaches more than 12 million viewers in the US and 70 other countries.

Context: Glen Campbell: I'll Be Me opens October 24. Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Prevention
9 New Discoveries About Fat That Will Clarify A Lot

…9. The circumference of your waist can tell you your heart disease risk. Women with waists over 37 inches have an 80% higher risk of conditions like heart disease, lung problems or cancer compared toPrevention logo women whose waist span was under 27 inches, according to a Mayo Clinic review published…

Reach: Prevention is published monthly with a circulation of 2.8 million.  Prevention - Online has more than 1.1 million unique visitors each month and has 9.3 million average page views each month.

Context: Having a big belly has consequences beyond trouble squeezing into your pants. It’s detrimental to your health, even if you have a healthy body mass index (BMI), a new international collaborative study led by a Mayo Clinic researcher found. Men and women with large waist circumferences were more likely to die younger, and were more likely to die from illnesses such as heart diseaserespiratory problems, and cancer after accounting for body mass index, smokingalcohol use andphysical activity. The study is published in the March edition of Mayo Clinic Proceedings. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Alyson Gonzalez

 

MPR
Are doctors misdiagnosing children with ADHD?

MPR Daily Circuit Dr. Jyoti Bhagia, Assistant Professor of psychiatry at Mayo Clinic.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context:  Jyoti Bhagia, M.D., is a psychiatrist with Mayo Clinic Children's Center. Her interests include mood disorder, ADHD and obesity.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Post-Bulletin
Pulse On Health: Become one of thousands aiding research
by Jeff Hansel

Mayo Clinic Biobank leaders say they have surpassed 40,000 participants and are "moving quickly Logo for Post-Bulletin newspapertoward our goal of 50,000." I submitted blood samples many months ago and, by my own choice, essentially gave permission for use in perpetuity for anything from disease research to drug development.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context:  Mayo Clinic and the Center for Individualized Medicine have made a significant commitment to building a scalable biorepository infrastructure, which includes two specimen processing core laboratories and several large centralized biospecimen collections. One of these biospecimen collections is the Mayo Clinic Biobank, a collection of samples, including blood and blood derivatives, and health information donated by Mayo Clinic patients. Unlike many biobanks in existence at Mayo Clinic and elsewhere, the Mayo Clinic Biobank is not focused on any particular disease. Rather, the Biobank collects samples and health information from patients and other volunteers regardless of health history. Once a participant becomes a part of the Biobank, he or she becomes a part of ongoing health research. More information on Mayo Clinic Biobank can be found here

Public Affairs Contacts: Sam SmithBob Nellis

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July 17th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

KAAL
Mayo Clinic Takes Top Spot on Best Hospitals List
by Jenna Lohse

Mayo Clinic in Rochester earns the top spot on a prestigious list of the nation's top hospitals. U.S. News and World Report ranked Mayo Clinic number one on its yearly list of the nation's best hospitals…"Oh, awesome. They know everything and if they don't know it they know where to get it,” said Peg Lesmann, who traveled to Mayo from North Dakota. "It's very well organized and run,KAAL-TV-6 logo everyone has been very friendly,” said Wayne Davis. "I’ve never seen anything go like clockwork, it's perfect," said Mary Bailey, patient at Mayo Clinic…"The fact that we're recognized for providing outstanding care in the community of outstanding health care organizations around the country, we're just very proud of that and I have to say, I think there's a little bit of a spring in our step today,” said Dr. John Noseworthy, Mayo Clinic CEO.

Reach:  KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Additional coverage:

Star TribuneMayo Clinic is ranked as top U.S. hospital by U.S. News

Baltimore Sun, Hopkins Hospital bumped from top spot to No. 3 on U.S. News ranking

ABC 15 ArizonaU.S. News and World Report ranks Mayo Clinic No. 1 in Phoenix and Arizona. Additional coverage: Tucson News

La Crosse Tribune, Gundersen, Mayo-Franciscan in top 15 Wisconsin hospitals on U.S. News list

WEAU Eau Claire, Mayo Clinic Health System recognized in annual best hospitals list

Eau Claire Leader-Telegram, Health Matters, High ranking: Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire is ranked No. 6 in Wisconsin and is recognized as the No. 1 hospital in northwestern Wisconsin in the 25th U.S. News & World Report annual America's Best Hospitals list released Tuesday. 

Endocrine Today, U.S. News & World Report announces top hospitals for endocrinology and diabetes care

US News & World Report, CNN, Huffington PostChicago Tribune, ABC News, Huffington Post, KTTC, Post-Bulletin, KSTP, New4Jax, KTTC, CBS News, MPR, KARE11, One American News, WebMD, Healio, NBC4 Calif., Twin Cities Business

Context: Mayo Clinic has achieved the highest honor in U.S. News and World Report’s ranking of top hospitalsMayo Clinic earned more number one rankings than any other provider, ranking number one or number two in 11 of the 12 specialties based on reputation, services and volumes, safety and clinical outcomes. “We have a deep commitment to delivering high-value health care that best meets patients' needs. We owe our success to truly dedicated staff that provide a seamless patient experience and the care that each individual needs,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Noseworthy, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Rebecca Eisenman

MPR
6 ways to improve childhood mental illness treatment

MPR News logoGuests: Jarrod Leffler: Child and adolescent psychologist in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychology at Mayo Clinic.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Jarrod Leffler, Ph.D., is a child and adolescent psychologist with Mayo Clinic Children's Center.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

Bloomberg Alzheimer Researchers See Protein as Target for Drugs by Michelle Cortez A protein discovered less than a decade ago appears to play a role in whether symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease emerge, suggesting another avenue for exploration in efforts to find a treatment…“This injects new vigor in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease,” said Keith Josephs, the lead author and a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, Bloombergin a telephone interview. “The world has focused on two proteins, beta amyloid and tau. TDP-43 is going to be the new kid on the block.”

Reach: Bloomberg has 2,300 media professionals in 146 bureaus across 72 countries. Bloomberg delivers its content across more than 400 publications, over 310 million households worldwide through Bloomberg Television and 500,000 in the New York metro area and 18.5 million subscribers through satellite radio.

Additional Coverage: AP, New brain protein tied to Alzheimer's disease Bloomberg, Alzheimer’s Drug Fails to Help Moderately Ill in Trials 

Tampa Bay Tribune, My FOX Philly, Gainesville Sun, WebMD, HealthDay, Star Tribune, ABC News, My FOX Phoenix

Context:  Since the time of Dr. Alois Alzheimer himself, two proteins (beta-amyloid (Aβ) and tau) have become tantamount to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). But a Mayo Clinic study challenges the perception that these are the only important proteins accounting for the clinical features of the devastating disease. In a large clinico-imaging pathological study, Mayo Clinic researchers demonstrated that a third protein (TDP-43) plays a major role in AD pathology. In fact, people whose brain was TDP positive were 10 times more likely to be cognitively impaired at death compared to those who didn’t have the protein, showing that TDP-43 has the potential to overpower what has been termed resilient brain aging. The study was published in the journal Acta Neuropathologica. “We wanted to determine whether the TDP-43 protein has any independent effect on the clinical and neuroimaging features typically ascribed to AD and we found that TDP-43 had a strong effect on cognition, memory loss and medial temporal atrophy in AD,” says Mayo Clinic neurologist Keith Josephs, M.D., the study’s lead investigator and author. “In the early stages of the disease when AD pathology was less severe, the presence of TDP-43 was strongly associated with cognitive impairment. Consequently, TDP-43 appears to play an important role in the cognitive and neuroimaging characteristics that have been linked to AD.” More information on the study, including a video interview with Dr. Josephs, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

Reuters
Mustaches may raise burn risk with home oxygen therapy
by Krystnell Storr

ReutersA new case report from U.S doctors suggests that men who use home oxygen therapy should consider a clean-shaven look to reduce their risk of serious facial burns. “If you’ve ever tried to start a campfire, you always start with some dry little twigs and once that starts - and that’s kind of the mustache - then that oxygen tubing lights on fire, it’s like a blow torch shooting up their nose,” said Dr. Andrew Greenlund of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. “So, if we can prevent it, it would be good.”

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world news, business news, technology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile, and interactive television platforms.

Additional coverage: Chicago Tribune, News Channel Daily

Context: Facial hair and home oxygen therapy can prove a dangerously combustible combination, a Mayo Clinic report published in the peer-reviewed medical journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings finds. To reach that conclusion, researchers reviewed home oxygen therapy-related burn cases and experimented with a mustachioed mannequin, a facial hair-free mannequin, nasal oxygen tubes and sparks. They found that facial hair raises the risk of home oxygen therapy-related burns, and encourage health care providers to counsel patients about the risk. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

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Tags: ABC 15 Arizona, ABC News, ABC15 Phoenix, Albert Lea Tribune, Alzheimer's Association Medical and Scientific Advisory Council, alzheimer's disease, AP, AP Associated Press, Apache Mall, Argus Leader, Arizona Newszap, Arizona Pop Warner Football


November 22nd, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

 

 

November 22, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Bloomberg In The Loop:
What's the True Cost of U.S. Healthcare?

John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO, discusses the cost of U.S. healthcare with Betty Liu Bloomberg's The Year Ahead: 2014 conference at the Art Institute of Chicago.

Reach: Bloomberg has 2,300 media professionals in 146 bureaus across 72 countries. Bloomberg delivers its content across more than 400 publications, over 310 million households worldwide through Bloomberg Television and 500,000 in the New York metro area and 18.5 million subscribers through satellite radio.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Dr. Noseworthy participated this week in the Bloomberg Business Summit Panel on “The Real Price of Health Care” at The Art Institute of Chicago.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

Wall Street Journal
Mayo Clinic CEO: Health-Care Law Off to Rough Start

Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy talks to the WSJ’s Sara Murray about why Obamacare isn’t about guaranteeing better health care quality and how their company keeps employees healthy.

Circulation: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 2.23 million copies on week days. Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Dr. Noseworthy participated in The Wall Street Journal's CEO Council this past week in Washington, D.C.  where top global CEOs gathered for a series of meetings. Dr. Noseworthy co-chaired the Health Care Innovation Task Force.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Chris Gade

FOX Business
ObamaCare too focused on insurance
, rather than quality of care?

Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy on the need to improve quality of care under ObamaCare.

Reach: FoxNews.com has more than 13 million unique visitors each month. The Willis Report is hosted by Gerri Willis and airs from 6 p.m. & 9 p.m. ET on the Fox Business Network. FBN is headquartered in News Corporation's studios in midtown Manhattan with bureaus in Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco (Silicon Valley), Washington, D.C. and London.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bryan Anderson, Chris Gade

Wall Street Journal
Special Report: The Hospital Room of the Future
by Barbara Sadick

The hospital room may be due for a checkup. Doctors and nurses, architects and designers all say the room setting has an important but largely neglected role to play in the delivery of quality care and outcomes…"With all the knowledge we've gained," says Dr. Douglas Wood, director of the Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation, "we can increasingly create an environment in the hospital to minimize the transmission of bacteria, increase the circulation of air, and reduce pain, discomfort and poor clinical outcomes." Full Health Care Report.

Circulation: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 2.23 million copies on week days. Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

Pioneer Press
St. Paul gave to them, so John Nasseff and Helene Houle gave it right back
by Maja Beckstrom

…He has contributed more than $10 million to Mayo Clinic, primarily to support neurosurgery research. Like many of his donations, it can be traced to a personal connection. Long before he amassed his fortune -- while he was still riding the bus to work -- Nasseff's then 16-year-old son Art complained of headaches. After a local doctor brushed them off, Nasseff took the boy to Mayo, where he was diagnosed with a brain tumor. Nasseff was grateful to the young surgeon, Burton Onofrio.

Reach: The St. Paul Pioneer Press has a daily circulation of 208,280 and its Sunday newspaper circulation is 284,507. Its TwinCities.com website had approximately 20.4 million page views (March 2013). Mobile page views on smartphones and tablet computers totaled more than 11.4 million in March 2013.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

Additional Mayo Clinic News Highlights This Week:
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Tags: ABC News, ABC15 Phoenix, ACA, adolescent psychologist, Affordable care act, Aguas Digital.com, AHA, alzheimer's disease, american heart association, AP Associated Press, Arizona Republic, Arizona State Univeristy


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