Items Tagged ‘Becker’s ASC Review’

March 3rd, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

USA Today
Having a baby past 35: What women should know
by Ashley May

Have a plan, and the money to execute it, before 35. Fertility doctors say women approaching 35 who want children but aren’t yet ready should look into egg or embryo freezing. Charles Coddington, professor and OB/GYN for Mayo Medical School, also advises getting a full checkup for reproductive health. After age 35, pregnancy is more difficult because of less frequent ovulation. Also, women 35-45 have aUSA Today newspaper logo 20-35% chance of miscarriage, compared with women under 35 that average a 15-20% chance of miscarriage, according to the American Pregnancy Association. … Frozen eggs of a woman younger than 35 have a greater than 50% chance of producing a live birth. Past age 40, freezing eggs or embryos will not have a great success – less than 9 percent result in live birth, Coddington said.

Reach: USA TODAY  has an average daily circulation of 4.1 million which includes print, various digital editions and other papers that use their branded content.

Context: Charles Coddington, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic ObGyn. The Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota supports women throughout their lifelong journey from childbearing age to menopause and beyond. You can learn more about Dr. Coddington's research interests here.

Contact:  Kelley Luckstein

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic investing $70 million in Mankato hospital
by Christopher Snowbeck

Mayo Clinic’s regional network of medical centers is investing $70 million to expand and renovate the surgery suite and orthopedic clinic at its hospital in Mankato. The project includes a $65 million upgrade to the Star Tribune newspaper logohospital’s surgery facilities that is part of a broader plan to better link the Mankato campus with Mayo Clinic’s headquarters in Rochester, according to details released Friday. “Mayo Clinic is committed to the needs of patients in Mankato and the surrounding communities we serve,” said Dr. James Hebl, vice president of Mayo Clinic Health System in southwest Minnesota, in a statement.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: KROC AM, KEYC Mankato, Minneapolis/St. Paul Business, Journal, Post-Bulletin, Healthcare Dive, Germany Sun, Becker’s ASC ReviewMankato Free Press

Context:  Mayo Clinic Health System today announced plans for a $65 million hospital surgical suite expansion in Mankato. Construction is expected to begin later this year. “Mayo Clinic is committed to the needs of patients in Mankato and the surrounding communities we serve,” says James Hebl, M.D., vice president of Mayo Clinic Health System in Southwest Minnesota. “The projects are an investment in our patients, our staff and the needs of our communities. Providing access to outstanding care in state-of-the-art facilities closer to where patients live is of paramount importance, and is the driving force behind the decision to dedicate substantial resources to these initiatives.” More information about the expansion can be found here.

Contact:  Micah Dorfner

 

Star Tribune
Mayo earnings hit by Medicaid, labor costs
by Christopher Snowbeck

Mayo Clinic's net income slipped last year as the Rochester-based health care giant spent more on staffing for growth initiatives, and saw more losses on patients with Medicaid coverage. Even so, the overall results being released Monday show "it was a strong year," said Kedrick Adkins Jr., the clinic's chief financial officer. Mayo posted $475 million in net income on $11 billion in revenue, down about 10 percent from 2015Star Tribune newspaper logo net income of $526.4 million, according to the clinic's latest financial report.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: KTTC, Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal, Dotmed.comBecker’s Hospital Review, Healthcare Dive

Context: With more than 1.3 million patients seeking Mayo Clinic’s expertise yearly, the institution continues its work to provide the best care to every patient through integrated clinical practice, education and research. Mayo Clinic reported a strong financial position in 2016, with contributions of $466 million to its pension plan for staff and more than $600 million in capital projects. “The outstanding work of Mayo Clinic employees is the engine that drives our mission to our patients, advances important research and educational initiatives, and positions our institution as a key voice for the future of health care,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic. “Our strong financial performance enables Mayo to hire and retain the best talent, and invest in technology, facilities and our staff as we strive to deliver the best outcomes and service to our patients.”

Contact:  Susan Barber Lindquist

 

 

KAAL
Mayo Clinic Performs Rare In-Womb Surgery to Give Baby New Chance at Life
by Marissa Collins

An Austin mom and her baby are doing well after her pregnancy took an unexpected turn. Nineteen weeks in, doctors told her something was wrong with her unborn baby … Her baby was diagnosed with a severe KAAL 6 News Rochester Logoform of Spina Bifida halfway through her pregnancy. “Once the baby is being formed the babies back does not close. The spine does not close, so the nerves can be open," says Dr. Rodrigo Ruano, Director at Mayo Clinic Fetal Diagnostic and Intervention Center.

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Context: The Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota supports women throughout their lifelong journey from childbearing age to menopause and beyond. The Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine staff care for women experiencing high-risk pregnancies related to obstetric, medical, surgical or genetic complications.

Contact:  Kelley Luckstein

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Tags: AccuWeather, Action News Jax, acupuncture, Albert Lea Tribune, allergies, alzheimers, Andy Sandness, Anya Guy, ASH Clinical News, Associated Press, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Austin Daily Herald


December 16th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Chicago Tribune
Is bone broth the next hot health trend?
by Alison Bowen

Jason Ewoldt, a dietitian at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program in Rochester, Minn., said patients often ask him about something new they've read about. People often think, he said, "if a little bit's good, maybe a lot is better." But far from assuming what's best is tripling your boneChicago Tribune Logo broth intake after reading about its benefits, he said, "that's not necessarily the case." He said some people consider bone broth a magic elixir, crediting it with improving joint function and gut health.

Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 384,000 and a weekend circulation of more than 686,000.

Context: Jason Ewoldt is a dietitian at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program, which is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

HealthDay
Was football safer back in the day?

In a finding that suggests football used to be a less dangerous sport, a small study shows that men who played in high school in the 1950s and Health Day Logo1960s may not be at increased risk for dementia or memory problems…"What we can say is, for that era, football did not increase the risks of neurodegenerative disease compared with other sports," said senior researcher Dr. Rodolfo Savica, a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: NWI Times, Healthline, KTTC, WebMD, KIMT, CBS News, Medical News TodayWTAJ Pennsylvania, MSN

Context: A Mayo Clinic study published online recently in Mayo Clinic Proceedings found that varsity football players from 1956 to 1970 did not have an increased risk of degenerative brain diseases compared with athletes in other varsity sports. The researchers reviewed all the yearbooks and documented team rosters for Mayo High School and Rochester High School, now called John Marshall High School. The high school football players were compared with non-football playing athletes who were swimmers, basketball players and wrestlers. More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Reuters
Rural U.S. babies hardest hit by opiate addiction at birth
by Lisa Rapaport

These babies may have central nervous system issues like seizures and tremors, gastrointestinal problems and feeding difficulties, breathing challenges, as well as unstable body temperatures. “It is clear that neonatal abstinence syndrome is a growing problem across the country,” saidReuters Logo Dr. William Carey, a pediatric researcher at Mayo Clinic Children’s Center in Rochester, Minnesota. “While some state-level data has suggested that neonatal abstinence syndrome disproportionately affected rural counties, this is the first study to show that rural communities throughout America are particularly affected by this epidemic,” Carey, who wasn’t involved in the study, added by email.

Reach: Reuters has 196 editorial bureaus in 130 countries and 2,400 editorial staff members and covers international news, regional news, politics, social issues, health, business, sports and media.

Additional coverage: Yahoo! Sports

Context: William Carey, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic pediatrician with Mayo Clinic Children's Center. Mayo Clinic Children's Center pediatric and adolescent medicine specialists provide comprehensive care for the diagnosis and treatment of a wide range of diseases and conditions.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Tonic
The First Legit Study of Stem Cells and Arthritis Had Surprising Results
by Evy Pitt Stoller

According to a study led by the Mayo Clinic's Shane Shapiro, an orthopedic and sports medicine physician, the recent use of bone marrow stem Tonic cells in painful, arthritic joints has dramatically increased, while exactly how well the treatment works—or how safe it is—has yet to be made clear. "So many of these therapies are going on without the science to back it up," he says. "We weren't comfortable offering this treatment to patients until we or someone else had studied it in a rigorous fashion."

Reach: Tonic is a website hosted by Vice covering health and wellness, science, health issues, world health news and other topics.

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida have conducted the world’s first prospective, blinded and placebo-controlled clinical study to test the benefit of using bone marrow stem cells, a regenerative medicine therapy, to reduce arthritic pain and disability in knees. The researchers say such testing is needed because there are at least 600 stem cell clinics in the U.S. offering one form of stem cell therapy or another to an estimated 100,000-plus patients, who pay thousands of dollars, out of pocket, for the treatment, which has not undergone demanding clinical study.“Our findings can be interpreted in ways that we now need to test — one of which is that bone marrow stem cell injection in one ailing knee can relieve pain in both affected knees in a systemic or whole-body fashion,” says the study’s lead author, Shane Shapiro, M.D., a Mayo Clinic orthopedic physician. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Twin Cities Business
Mayo Researchers Land Patent For Non-Invasive Pancreatic Cancer Test
by Don Jacobson

The same Mayo Clinic research team that developed the Cologuard DNA-based stool test for colorectal cancer has also been working on similar technology for the early detection of pancreatic cancer. After encouraging early studies, they have now landed a patent for their methods. Dr.Twin Cities Business Magazine Logo David Ahlquist, a Mayo Clinic medical professor and consultant in its division of gastroenterology and hepatology, led the team that, late in the last decade, developed the genomic science behind the Cologuard test, which Mayo licensed in 2009 to Exact Sciences Corp. (NASDAQ: EXAS) of Madison, Wisconsin. Now, in a patent dated November 29, Ahlquist and Mayo colleagues Dr. John Kisiel, William R. Taylor, Tracy Yab and Douglas Mahoney were also granted rights to their method of “Detecting Neoplasm,” through which bio-samples, such as those collected from stool, can be analyzed for pancreatic cancer-related DNA biomarkers.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Context:  David Ahlquist M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist and co-inventor of the Cologuard test.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

ActionNewsJax
Air Force veteran hopes to meet donor's family after lung transplant in Jacksonville — A Georgia Air Force veteran ActionNewsJaxgot a double lung transplant at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville hours after his wife was told he was going to die… An hour after doctors said he wasn’t going to make it, two healthy lungs became available. The 21-year-old woman’s lungs were a match for Terry Junn. Doctors flew them into Mayo Clinic from Mississippi and Terry Junn went into surgery.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Related coverage: 
ActionNewsJax, Veteran gets double lung transplant in Jacksonville hours after doctors said he was going to die

Context: A lung transplant is a surgical procedure to replace a diseased or failing lung with a healthy lung, usually from a deceased donor. A lung transplant is reserved for people who have tried other medications or treatments, but their conditions haven't sufficiently improved. At Mayo Clinic, a team of doctors and staff work together to evaluate and treat people who may need lung transplants. Mayo Clinic's Transplant Center staff at Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota works together to evaluate and treat people who may need a lung transplant. Mayo Clinic offers common recommendations, evaluation processes, treatment, post-surgical care and follow-up care for lung transplant candidates at Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. Mayo Clinic uses technology to help make patient information available as needed at all three locations.

Contact: Paul Scotti

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Tags: 3D labs, ABC15 Arizona, ActionNewsJax, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimer's disease, arthritis, Becker's ASC Review, Becker’s Hospital Review, blood donation, bone broth, Boston Globe, breast cancer screening


November 4th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik


Advisory Board
Mayo Clinic got 'five stars'—but its CEO still doesn't like how CMS rates hospitals

CMS' five-star rating system for overall hospital quality—and similar systems that purport to measure health care quality—are too reductionist and need to be changed, Mayo Clinic CEO John Noseworthy argues in a Modern Healthcare op-ed. You might think, given that CMS awardedAdvisory Board Mayo Clinic five stars, that Noseworthy would praise the ratings system. But Noseworthy argues that "many measurement programs currently in use ... do not differentiate complexity of patient conditions nor account for their settings of care, which results in inaccurate reports on value."

Reach: The Advisory Board Company is a global research, technology, and consulting firm partnering with more than 165,000 leaders in more than 4,100 organizations across health care and higher education.

Previous coverage in October 28, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Hospitals & Health Networks
Experts Take on the Big Picture of Value-Based Payment
by Brian Frankie

Value-based payment is coming to health care. And its complications are something we have to understand. That was the message of panelists Hospitals and Health NetworksWednesday during a session at the H&HN Executive Forum in Chicago on value-based payment and purchasing and what can make it successful…Much of the discussion, led by moderator Robert Nesse, M.D., senior medical adviser for payment reform to the Mayo Clinic Board of Governors and former Mayo Clinic Health System CEO, focused on leveraging data to track value.

Reach: Hospitals & Health Networks is a monthly magazine with a circulation of more than 77,000 that reports on and analyzes the social, political and economic forces that shape healthcare delivery. Its website has more than 21, 000 unique visitors each month. The publication targets health care executives and clinical leaders in hospitals and health systems.

Context: Robert Nesse, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic Health System family medicine physician in Lake City, Minn. and he also serves as senior medical director, Payment Reform at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Nesse is also former CEO of Mayo Clinic Health System, a network of clinics and hospitals serving more than 70 communities in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

TIME
You Asked: Should I Go Gluten Free?
by Markham Heid

Gluten is a type of elastic grain protein that helps wheat, rye and barley hold their shape. Because of its glue-like properties, gluten is often added to other food products—pasta, sauces, crackers, baked goods—to thicken or bind those products together. “These kinds of junk foods and refinedTime magazine logo carbohydrates promote weight gain and diabetes and disease,” says Dr. Joseph Murray, a professor of medicine and a gluten researcher at Mayo Clinic. So if you’re eating a lot of cookies, crackers and other grain-based snack foods, any diet that limits your intakes of them is bound to do your health some good. “But for those who don’t suffer from celiac disease, gluten isn’t inherently bad, and gluten-free foods aren’t inherently healthy,” he says.

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Joseph Murray, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist and hepatologist with the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. Dr. Murray's research interests focus in two distinct areas: celiac disease or gluten sensitivity and enteropathy; and esophageal disorders, particularly esophageal functional disorders, particularly reflux, and the detection of atypical reflux.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Florida Times-Union
Health Notes: Mayo Cancer Center at St. Vincent’s now open
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Cancer Center at St. Vincent’s has opened. The collaboration between Mayo Clinic’s Jacksonville campus and St. Vincent’s HealthCare Florida Times-Union newspaper logobrings Mayo Clinic’s cancer services to patients in a newly built 11,500-square-foot medical suite on the St. Vincent’s Medical Center Riverside campus. Mayo Clinic is staffing the facility with physicians from its Department of Hematology/Oncology. St. Vincent’s is assuming the remaining clinical and administrative responsibilities. The cancer services include medical oncology, an infusion center for chemotherapy, and multidisciplinary disease specialized care for various types of cancer. An official blessing and dedication ceremony will be held Monday.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Previous coverage in October 21, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: To deliver Mayo Clinic’s nationally ranked comprehensive cancer care to more people in Northeast Florida, the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center located at St. Vincent’s Riverside will open to patients on Oct. 17. The collaboration between Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus and St. Vincent’s HealthCare, a part ofAscension, the nation’s largest Catholic and non-profit health system, brings Mayo Clinic’s cancer services to patients in a newly built 11,500-square-foot medical suite on the campus of St. Vincent’s Riverside. “We are excited to launch this community collaboration and we look forward to further meeting the needs of cancer patients, right here in their own community,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., CEO, Mayo Clinic in Florida.  “This community collaboration will enable patients to receive cancer care at Mayo Clinic Cancer Center at St. Vincent’s and come to Mayo’s San Pablo Road campus when they need highly complex care, such as bone marrow transplants.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

Wall Street Journal
Boy’s Cardiac Death Led to Misuse of Genetic Test, Study Says
by Ron Winslow

A 13-year-old boy’s sudden cardiac death led doctors to wrongly diagnose more than 20 of his relatives with a potentially lethal heart disorder in a case that illustrates the potential for genetic testing to go wrong… The search for a genetic cause of the teenager’s death was done with “goodWSJ Banner intentions,” said Michael Ackerman, a cardiologist and director of the Windland Smith Rice Sudden Death Genomics Laboratory at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. But “the entire clinical evaluation was a train wreck, where wrong conclusions led to wrong turns and resulted in wrong therapies.”

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: The sudden death of a 13-year-old boy resulted in more than 20 relatives to be incorrectly diagnosed as having a potentially lethal heart rhythm condition. This erroneous diagnosis occurred as a result of inappropriate use of genetic testing and incorrect interpretation of genetic test results, according to Mayo Clinic research published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. This case highlights the potential danger of genetic testing when it is used incorrectly and the great need to not only use this powerful tool carefully and wisely but to scrutinize the results with great caution, says senior author Michael J. Ackerman, M.D., Ph.D., genetic cardiologist and director of Mayo Clinic’s Windland Smith Rice Sudden Death Genomics Laboratory. “While the technological advances in genetic sequencing have been exponential, our ability to interpret the results has not kept pace,” he says. More information cane be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Additional coverage: STAT, CNN, Immortal NewsKIMT, Raw Story, Science Daily, Cardiovascular Business, Healthcare Business News, GenomeWeb, FOX News, Motherboard, News4JaxBecker’s Health IT & CIO Review, The Scientist

Contact: Traci Klein

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Tags: ActionNewsJax, advisory board, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers, ASU, bad breath, Becker's ASC Review, Becker’s Health IT & CIO Review, caffeine, Cannon Falls Beacon, Cardiovascular Business


December 18th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

This will be our last installment of our weekly highlights in 2014. We'll be back in early January 2015. Happy Holidays.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

NY Times
Ask Well: Why Do My Knees Make Noise When I Squat?
By Anahad O’Connor

That noise coming from your knees can be unnerving. But unless it is accompanied by pain, discomfort or swelling, there is no need to worry about it, New York Times Well Blogsaid Dr. Michael Stuart, a professor of orthopedic surgery and co-director of sports medicine at the Mayo Clinic.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Context:  Michael Stuart, M.D. is co-director, Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

MPR
John Noseworthy on the future of Mayo Clinic, health care

John Noseworthy, president and CEO of Mayo Clinic, joins The Daily Circuit to talk about the future of Mayo, the future of health care and how the two MPR Daily Circuit Logointersect.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Other Coverage with Dr. Noseworthy:

Dalhousie University
John Noseworthy (MD’75, PGM’78): Digital Doctoring
by Mark Campbell

Dalhousie University AlumniIn 2007, Mayo Clinic approached Dr. John Noseworthy (MD’75, PGM’78), then medical director of its Department of Development, and a team of leaders with a question: what would the world’s largest, integrated, nonprofit medical group look like in the year 2020? “We spent almost a year looking into that,” recalls Dr. Noseworthy. “We came back and said Mayo Clinic is known for caring for the sick face-to-face – for patients coming to us. As we enter a digital world, how are we going to extend our reach to serve people who do not need, or cannot come, to see us?”

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contacts: Duska Anastasijevic, Karl Oestreich

 

MPR
Mayo Clinic expansion plan is a vision for urban and walkable development
by Liz Baier

When planners of Minnesota's largest economic development project unveil a final draft this afternoon of the city's massive expansion project, they will present a new vision for downtown city life. The $6 billion Destination Medical Center aims to make Rochester a global health care hub. But it alsoMPR News Logo would make big changes to the city, among them.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Related Coverage:
KAAL, DMC Plans for Downtown Rochester Unveiled

KSTP, KAAL, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal

Context: The development plan proposed at the DMCC Board meeting  Dec. 17 is a BIG PLAN (694 pages) in support of a bold vision. And what everyone wants to know is: What’s going to happen and how much will it cost? More information can be found on the DMC blog.

Public Affairs Contact: Jamie Rothe

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
Attorney Christina Zorn appointed Mayo Florida chief administrative officer
by John Burr

Mayo Clinic has appointed an attorney,Christina Zorn, as chief administrative officer and vice chair of administration at Mayo's Jacksonville campus. Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logoShe will serve as administrative partner to Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., the incoming vice president of Mayo Clinic and CEO of the Jacksonville campus, according to a news release. Zorn begins work Jan. 1.

Reach: The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Additional coverage: Florida Times-Union

Related Coverage:Jacksonville Business Journal, 2014's retirement of the year: Bill Rupp by Colleen Jones. Mayo Clinic will have a new leader to start the new year. Bill Rupp, who has led the institution's Jacksonville campus since 2008, announced in August that he will retire from his post as vice president and CEO Dec. 31.

Context: Mayo Clinic recently appointed Christina Zorn, J.D., as chief administrative officer of its campus in Jacksonville, Fla., and vice chair of Administration, Mayo Clinic. She will serve as administrative partner to Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., incoming vice president of Mayo Clinic and chief executive officer of the Jacksonville campus, as previously announced. Zorn assumes her new role on Jan. 1. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

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Tags: 2014 William L. McGuire Memorial Lecture Award, 3D-printed implants, ABC News, ABC13 Ohio, ABC15 Ariz., advisory board, Albany Enterprise, Albert Lea Tribune, Allyn Mahowald, alzheimer's disease, AP, Arizona Republic


April 18th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic builds 'Better' app to expand its name with consumers
By Dan Browning

The Mayo Clinic wants to help you feel “Better.” That’s the name of a new mobile app service launched by the Rochester-based health care provider, in partnershipStar Tribune Business section logo with a Silicon Valley venture capital firm and an accomplished tele-medicine entrepreneur. It’s part of Mayo’s overarching goal to put the clinic’s expertise into the hands of 200 million consumers.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

KAALMayo Launches New App to Reach Patients Worldwide

Bloomberg BusinessweekEngadgetMobi health newsPost-BulletinTech CrunchHIS Talk Mobile

Context: Better, a consumer health start-up, and Mayo Clinic have launched a new way for people to navigate the complexity of the healthcare system simply and quickly.  Through a mobile device, Better provides tailored Mayo Clinic health information, 24/7 access to the clinic's experienced and highly-skilled nurses, and a Better Personal Health Assistant who helps simplify and manage people's care so they can use their time to focus on being well. More information about Better can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

Florida Times Union
Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville receives $39.5 million grant for stroke study
by Charlie Patton

…the Mayo Clinic in Florida has received a $39.5 million grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke to conduct a seven-year clinical trial Florida Times-Union newspaper logoto look at the question of whether the use of medication is as effective in preventing stroke for someone with carotid stenosis, the narrowing of a carotid artery, as surgery and the placement of a stent, a small mesh tube that holds the artery open. Leading the study, which will be called the CREST-2, will be Thomas Brott, a neurologist who is director of research at Mayo’s Jacksonville campus, and his colleague, neurologist James Meschia.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:
Jacksonville Business JournalJacksonville's Mayo Clinic gets $39.5 million stroke study grant, The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke is funding a seven-year study at the Mayo Clinic in Florida examining whether medication is as effective in preventing stroke as is surgery or stents. Thomas Brott, a neurologist who is director of research at Mayo’s Jacksonville campus, and neurologist James Meschia will lead the study,  according to the Florida Times-Union.

Post-BulletinWTEV FlaHealth-News.wsDaily Star UKTelegraph UK
St. Augustine RecordWJXX Fla.WJCT Fla

Context: Is medicine as safe and effective as surgery or stenting in preventing a stroke caused by the buildup of plaque in the carotid artery? Thomas G. Brott, M.D., a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Florida, aims to find out. “It’s a critical question. The quality medicines we have today may mean that it is not necessary to perform invasive procedures on patients who do not have warning signs of stroke,” Dr. Brott says. “More than 100,000 carotid surgeries and carotid artery stentings are performed each year in the United States on such patients at risk — and that may not be necessary.” More information, including a video interview with Dr. Brott, about the international study to test best approach to stroke prevention can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

USA TODAY
Apathy could signal brain shrinkage in old age
by Mary Bowerman

A new study suggests that as people age, they should be aware of symptoms of apathy, which may indicate a decrease in brain volume and possible brain disease...Apathy, which has similar symptoms to depression, is hard to measureUSA Today newspaper logo because the symptoms are more subtle and complex, according to Ronald Petersen, the director of the Mayo Alzheimer's Disease Research Center at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who is not associated with the study.

Reach: USA TODAY  has the highest daily circulation of any U.S. newspaper with a daily average circulation of 2.9 million, which includes print and various digital editions.

Additional coverage: KARE11

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic


Post-Bulletin
Back and Forth: The early home of Dr. Henry Plummer
by Harley Flathers

Dr. Henry Stanley Plummer, the famed Mayo Clinic physician, was born March 3, 1874 to Dr. Albert and Isabelle Plummer in the little community of Hamilton. This Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperlittle village lies a mile and a half east and a mile south of Racine on the Mower-Fillmore County road. Sonja Hoag, a retired Mayo Clinic nurse, and her retired husband, many years a preacher, live in the home where Plummer was born.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Related coverage:
Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic mobile exhibit kicks off Monday

Mayo Clinic kicks off a free, mobile 150th-anniversary tour Monday in Kingman, Ariz., at Kingman Regional Medical Center, a member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. The exhibit is scheduled to visit more than 40 communities in Minnesota, Missouri, Colorado, California, North Dakota, Washington, Illinois, Nebraska, Maryland, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky and Michigan, along with Washington, D.C., Winnipeg and Toronto, Canada.

Context: On July 1, 1907, Dr. Henry Plummer and Mabel Root, Dr. Plummer's assistant, inaugurated Mayo's system of patient registration and medical record keeping. The single-unit record was central to the new system. It brought together all of a patient's records -- clinical visits, hospital stays, laboratory tests and notes -- in a single file that traveled with the patient and was stored in a central repository. This simple system quickly became the standard for medical record keeping around the world. This year marks 150 years of continuous service to patients, and Mayo Clinic is launching a yearlong recognition that will honor a legacy of medical accomplishments and a model for the future of health care. Dr. Mayo’s sons, Drs. William and Charles Mayo, joined the practice in the late 1880’s and, with their father, created Mayo Clinic’s medical hallmark: The integrated care model that focuses a team of experts on one patient at a time and puts patients’ needs first. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. 

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein


ABC15 Ariz.
Mayo Clinic's Simulation Center helps with team approach to medicine, reenacts real-life scenarios

ABC affiliate, channel 15 in Arizona

Mayo Clinic cardiologist, David Fortuin, M.D., joined the cast of Sonoran Living Live to talk about Mayo Clinic's Multidisciplinary Simulation Center and how it's used to perfect Mayo's team approach to patient care.

Reach:  KNXV-TV, ABC 15, is the ABC television station affiliate in Phoenix, Arizona.

Context: F. David Fortuin, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist.

Public Affairs Contact: Carol Benson

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Tags: ABC News, ABC15 in Arizona, About.com, acute pancreatitis, Alexa Ray Joel, allergy sufferers, Almanac, alzheimer's disease, APOE4, astigmatism, Austin Daily Herald, back pain


November 20th, 2013

Mayo Clinic Replaces Liters of Laxative for Colonography With Four Pills

By Kelley Luckstein KelleyLuckstein

Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., has announced it has replaced the multiple liters of laxative consumed by people in preparation for a CT colonography with four pills, according to a news release. Patients undergoing CT colonography, also known as virtual colonoscopy, now take four tablets of the cleansing agent bisacodyl. Mayo instituted the new protocol this summer. "Our hope is that this will make people less anxious and more likely to get screened and will ultimately result in fewer deaths from colorectal cancer," said C. Daniel Johnson, MD, chair of the department of radiology at Mayo Clinic in Arizona, in the release.

Additional Coverage: US News & World Report, Arizona Republic,

 

Becker’s ASC Review by Rob Kurtz

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Tags: Becker's ASC Review, colonoscopy, Dr. C. Daniel Johnson, laxative


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