Items Tagged ‘Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine’

March 24th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

New York Times
The Best Exercise for Aging Muscles
by Gretchen Reynolds

Exercise is good for people, as everyone knows. But scientists have surprisingly little understanding of its cellular impacts and how those might vary by activity and the age of the exerciser. So researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., recently conducted an experiment on the cells of 72 healthy but sedentary men and women who were 30 or younger or older than 64. After baseline measures were established forThe New York Times newspaper logo their aerobic fitness, their blood-sugar levels and the gene activity and mitochondrial health in their muscle cells, the volunteers were randomly assigned to a particular exercise regimen. It seems as if the decline in the cellular health of muscles associated with aging was “corrected” with exercise, especially if it was intense, says Dr. Sreekumaran Nair, a professor of medicine and an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic and the study’s senior author.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Additional coverage: Vogue, Men's Health

Previous coverage in March 17, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in March 10, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Everyone knows that exercise is good for you, but what type of training helps most, especially when you’re older - say over 65? A Mayo Clinic study says it’s high-intensity aerobic exercise, which can reverse some cellular aspects of aging. The findings appear in Cell MetabolismMayo researchers compared high-intensity interval training, resistance training and combined training. All training types improved lean body mass and insulin sensitivity, but only high-intensity and combined training improved aerobic capacity and mitochondrial function for skeletal muscle. Decline in mitochondrial content and function are common in older adults. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Bob Nellis

 

Wall Street Journal
Medical School Seeks to Make Training More Compassionate
by Lucette Lagnado

“We found at admission that the kids look fine,” says Liselotte Dyrbye, professor of medicine at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. “It is as if they go through our training process, and they develop worsening mental health.” Dr. Dyrbye blames this on an “absurd” medical system: “It is the curriculum, it is the learning environment, it is the type of stuff you do as a [young] physician, and it is not unique to Mayo, it is not unique to Sinai.” The Mayo researcher, who studies physician well-being, says in addition to mastering vast amounts of information, medical students and residents cope with “complex patient interactions, the suffering, the deaths.” Too often, “it is not a supportive environment—students are set up to compete with each other.”

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Liselotte "Lotte" Dyrbe, M.D., MHPE, is a Mayo Clinic Primary Care Internal Medicine physician. Dr. Dyrbe focuses on the well-being of medical students, residents and physicians. Dr. Dyrbye partners with Tait D. Shanafelt, M.D., and Colin P. West, M.D., Ph.D., to direct the Mayo Clinic Department of Medicine Physician Well-Being Program.

Contact: Matt Brenden

 

Today.com
Why your doctor should measure blood pressure in both arms
by A. Pawlowski

Healthy people can have slightly different numbers between arms, but a substantial difference in the readings could signal a blockage or an abnormality, said Dr. Sharonne Hayes, director of the Women's Heart Clinic at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.  “Probably the biggest thing I see in day-to-day practice is somebody who always gets their blood pressure checked in a given arm and they’re told over and over again it’s great,” Hayes told TODAY. But when her office checks the other arm, it reveals uncontrolled high blood pressure that has gone undetected, which can potentially damage the brain and kidneys.

Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show.

Context:  Sharonne Hayes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Hayes studies cardiovascular disease and prevention, with a focus on sex and gender differences and conditions that uniquely or predominantly affect women. With a clinical base in the Women's Heart Clinic, Dr. Hayes and her research team utilize novel recruitment methods, social media and online communities, DNA profiling, and sex-specific evaluations to better understand several cardiovascular conditions. A major area of focus is spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD), an uncommon and under-recognized cause of acute coronary syndrome (heart attack) that occurs predominantly in young women.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

NBC News
Study Connects Genes to Late Onset Alzheimer’s in African-Americans
by Andrea King Collier

A study from researchers at the Mayo Clinic, published in the February issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, may show some insights into the genetics of the disease in Black Americans who develop the NBC News Logodisease after age 65.  The study's senior investigator, Dr. Nilufer Ertekin-Taner, M.D., Ph.D., a neurogeneticist and neurologist at Mayo Clinic's Florida campus says that while the reasons for these high rates of Alzheimer's in the Black community remains unknown, there could be multiple reasons. She cites "higher vascular risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol, as well as differences in genetics and/or differences in socioeconomic factors."

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Context: A Mayo Clinic research team has found a new gene mutation that may be a risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease in African-Americans. This is the first time this gene has been implicated in the development of this disease in this population. Alzheimer’s disease has been understudied in African-Americans, despite the fact that the disease is twice as prevalent in African-Americans, compared to Caucasians and other ethnic groups. This likely pathogenic variant may be unique to the African-American population, the researchers say. It has not been found in Caucasians with Alzheimer’s disease or in gene repositories from more than 60,000 subjects who are not African-Americans.  More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

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Tags: 24 Horas, Aiden Remme, AliveCor, alzheimer's disease, AMA blog, Andy Sandness, Becker’s Hospital Review, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, Bernie Brewer, BioSig, BioSpace, blood pressure


February 24th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Associated Press
AP Exclusive: Twin tragedies give survivor a new face
by Sharon Cohen

He'd been waiting for this day, and when his doctor handed him the mirror, Andy Sandness stared at his image and absorbed the enormity of the moment: He had a new face, one that had belonged to another man. His father and his brother, joined by several doctors and nurses at MayoAssociated Press Wire Service Logo Clinic, watched as he studied his swollen features. He was just starting to heal from one of the rarest surgeries in the world — a face transplant, the first at the medical center. He had the nose, cheeks, mouth, lips, jaw, chin, even the teeth of his donor. Resting in his hospital bed, he still couldn't speak clearly, but he had something to say. He scrawled four words in a spiral notebook: "Far exceeded my expectations," he wrote, handing it to Dr. Samir Mardini, who read the message to the group.

Reach: The Associated Press is a not-for-profit news cooperative, owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members. News collected by the AP is published and republished by newspaper and broadcast outlets worldwide.

Additional coverage: New York Times, STAT, Washington Post, USA TODAY, CBS Minnesota, KSTP, Louis Post-Dispatch, ABC News, MSN, NWF Daily News, AP Big Story, Stamford Advocate, Medical Xpress, CTV News, WTOP, Evening Standard, DailyMail.com, Olean Times Herald, Evening Standard, TribLivePeople, News-medical.net, Morning Ticker, KARE 11, WCCO, The West Australian, KAAL, Star Tribune, Mirror UK, BBC,CBC, US Magazine, GoMN, Chicago Tribune, KGWN, FOX News, Arizona Republic, Pioneer Press, Latinos Health, Science Alert, iTech Post, The Columbian, Eau Claire Leader-Telegram, Knoxville News Sentinel, BABW News, Canada Journal, Jackson Hole News & Guide, Counsel & HealBecker’s Hospital Review, New York Post, Herald-Whig, Sky News, Business Insider, com.au, Metro UK, UPI.com, Yahoo! Australia, The Inquisitr, WDEF, Deccan Herald, Aurora Sentinel, KRNV, Rapid City Journal, WNYT, Cortez Journal, Daily Star, Metro UK, Tri-City Herald, Tech Times, India.com, WQOW, Gephardt Daily, Hindustan Times, Pulse Headlines, KBMT, Sumter Item, ABC13 Houston, FuturismStar TribuneNew York Times, RedOrbit, Catholic Online, NBC 6 South Florida, The HitavadaBecker’s Hospital Review, NBC ChicagoTCT magazine

Context:  A multidisciplinary team of surgeons, physicians and other health professionals recently completed a near-total face transplant on a Wyoming man on Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus. The extensive, life-changing surgery will improve the patient’s ability to chew, swallow, speak, breathe and smell. The recipient, Andrew Sandness, is a 32-year-old man from eastern Wyoming whose face was devastated by a gunshot wound at the age of 21. He is doing well. “I am absolutely amazed at the outcome so far,” says Sandness. “I am now able to chew and eat normal food, and the nerve sensation is slowly improving, too. My confidence has improved, and I’m feeling great ― and grateful. I am so thankful to my donor and the donor’s family, and to all of the people who have supported me throughout this process.” For more information on the face transplant, the following segments are available on Mayo Clinic News Network:

Mayo Clinic announces successful face transplant on Wyoming man

Mayo Clinic Radio: Face transplant — how the surgical team prepared

Transforming a life: Mayo Clinic announces its first face transplant

Contact:  Ginger Plumbo

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo researcher Abba Zubai is sending stem cells for study on the International Space Station
by Charlie Patton

As a boy growing up in Nigeria, Abba Zubair dreamed of becoming an astronaut. But as he prepared to apply to college, an advisor told him to Florida Times-Union newspaper logofind a different path. “He said it may be a long time before Nigeria sends rockets and astronauts into space, so I should consider something more practical,” Zubair saud. He decided to become a physician, and is currently the medical and scientific director of the Cell Therapy Laboratory at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. And while he’ll almost certainly never get to make a journey outside the Earth’s atmosphere himself, if the weather stays good Saturday he’ll be sending a payload into space.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage: Action News Jax, Augustine Record, KTIV, Spaceflight Now, KTTCTechnology Networks

Context: Consider it one physician’s giant leap for mankind. Today, the latest rocket launch from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, included a payload of several samples of donated adult stem cells from a research laboratory at Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus. The launch by SpaceX, an American aerospace manufacturer and space transport services company, is part of NASA’s commercial resupply missions to the International Space Station. The biological cells come from the laboratory of Abba Zubair, M.D., Ph.D., who says he has eagerly awaited the launch following several delays over the past couple of years. Dr. Zubair, who specializes in cellular treatments for disease and regenerative medicine, hopes to find out how the stem cells hold up in space. He says he’s eager to know whether these special cells, which are derived from the body’s bone marrow, can be more quickly mass-produced in microgravity and used to treat strokes. Microgravity is the condition in which people or objects appear to be weightless. The effects of microgravity can be seen when astronauts and objects float in space. Microgravity refers to the condition where gravity seems to be very small. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Kevin Punsky

 

USA Today
Can't sleep? When is it time to seek professional help
by Mary Bowerman

It’s no secret that Americans aren’t getting enough sleep. For those who are self-medicating or tossing and turning, it may be time to look at your sleeping habits once and for all, according to Timothy Morgenthaler, co-director of Mayo’s Center for Sleep Medicine in Rochester. "I think it'sUSA Today newspaper logo becoming increasingly clear that sleep is a vital component of health; for many years we've been aware of nutrition and exercise, and I think we now realize that sleep is very closely entwined with overall health," Morgenthaler said.

Reach: USA TODAY  has an average daily circulation of 4.1 million which includes print, various digital editions and other papers that use their branded content.

Context: Timothy Morgenthaler, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine physician who also practices in Mayo Clinic's Center for Sleep Medicine.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

KARE 11
Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup
by Pat Evans

New findings about America’s heart health awareness, opinions, and behaviors have been uncovered as part of the Mayo Clinic National Health KARE-11 LogoCheckup, which first launched in January 2016 and provides a quick pulse on consumer health opinions and behaviors at multiple times throughout the year. “The Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup helps us to better understand the health knowledge and practices of all Americans, beyond the patients that walk through our doors,” says John Wald, M.D., Medical Director for Public Affairs at Mayo Clinic.

Reach: KARE-TV is the NBC affiliate serving the Minneapolis-Saint Paul market.

Additional coverage: KGUN TucsonCNBCKAALKXLY Spokane

Context: A new survey by Mayo Clinic revealed that more than two-thirds of African-Americans are concerned about their heart health (71 percent), which is significantly more than Caucasian (41 percent) or Hispanic (37 percent) respondents. Respondents from the South (51 percent) were also significantly more likely to express concern than those in the Northeast (39 percent) or West (35 percent). These findings were uncovered as part of the Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup, which first launched in January 2016 and provides a quick pulse on consumer health opinions and behaviors at multiple times throughout the year. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

FOX 13 Tampa Bay
Vaccine could prevent breast, ovarian, lung cancer
by Dr. Joette Giovinco

It's a dream many parents would welcome for their children: a vaccine that could prevent breast, ovarian and some lung cancers. It'Fox 13 Tampa Bay Logos also the dream of immunology professor Dr. Keith Knutson. "The hope is we can develop vaccines before the development of cancer much in the way that we use a polio vaccine or a flu vaccine," Dr. Knutson tells us in in his Mayo Clinic Jacksonville laboratory.

Reach:  Fox 13 is the Fox affiliate in Tampa Bay, Florida.

Context: Researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have been awarded a $13.3 million, five-year federal grant to test a vaccine designed to prevent the recurrence of triple-negative breast cancer, a subset of breast cancer for which there are no targeted therapies. The grant, the Breakthrough Award from the U.S. Department of Defense’s Breast Cancer Research Program, will fund a national, phase II clinical trial testing the ability of a folate receptor alpha vaccine to prevent recurrence of this aggressive cancer following initial treatment. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Knutson, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

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Tags: AAN, ABC News, ABC13 Houston, acupuncture, Alain Elkann, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimers, Ambient Clinical, Andy Sandness, anxiety, AP Big Story, Arizona Republic


November 23rd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

STAT
Mayo leaders: A nine-fold path to preventing burnout

We’ve talked about burnout before, and it seems like lots of hospitals have ideas to combat it. Well, Mayo Clinic has some more ideas – nine of them, to be precise. In the issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings released today, Dr. Tait Shanafelt, director of Mayo’s Program on Physician Well-STAT Logo of Boston Globebeing, and Dr. John Noseworthy, Mayo’s CEO, say administrators can’t force doctors to fight this battle on their own. “Burnout is a system issue, and addressing it is the shared responsibility of both the individuals and health care organizations,” Shanafelt writes.

Reach: STAT covers the frontiers of health and medicine including science labs, hospitals, biotechnology board rooms, and political back rooms. Hosted by The Boston Globe, STAT launched on November 5, 2015. The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Additional coverage: News-Medical.net, Cardiovascular Business, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, FierceHealthcare

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic have been documenting the rise and costs of physician burnout for more than a decade. Now, they are proposing nine strategies that health care organizations can use to reverse the trend and limit the risk to patients and their medical staff. Tait Shanafelt, M.D., director of Mayo Clinic’s Program on Physician Well-being, and John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic, offer the nine-point plan in the current issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings“Research has shown that more than half of U.S. physicians are experiencing symptoms of burnout, and the rate is increasing,” says Dr. Shanafelt, first author of the article. “Unfortunately, many organizations see burnout as a personal problem to be addressed by the individual physician. It is clear, however, that burnout is a system issue, and addressing it is the shared responsibility of both the individuals and health care organizations.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Washington Post
A non-pill treatment for many chronic illnesses: Exercise

Exercise isn’t good only for building muscle and losing weight. “If a pill could give you all benefits of exercise, it would be the best pill around,” Washington Post newspaper logosays Edward Laskowski, co-director of Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine and a specialist in physical medicine and rehabilitation. Yet doctors underprescribe exercise, even though research shows that it can deliver comparable benefits to drugs and surgery with fewer side effects, according to a recent review in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. Here’s how to safely get the disease-fighting benefits of exercise…

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Edward Laskowski, M.D., co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center, a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, sports performance optimization, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Huffington Post
Why You Might Be Losing Your Sense of Taste As You Age
by Bill Ward

Our mouths perceive just five elements — sweet, sour, bitter, salt and umami (glutamate). They also can tell if there’s fat in food, said Dr. Erin O’Brien, a rhinologist in the Mayo Clinic’s Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Rochester, Minn. “As you chew food, the flavor is released andHuffington Post Logo you smell it through the back of the nose,” O’Brien said. “If you’re eating strawberry ice cream, your tongue will tell you it’s sweet, but it won’t know the flavor. The nose tells you it’s strawberry. That’s the difference between taste and flavor.”

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique viewers.

Context: Erin O'Brien, M.D, is a Mayo Clinic otorhinolaryngology (ENT). The Department of Otorhinolaryngology (ear, nose and throat or ENT) at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota provides a full range of medical and surgical services for pediatric and adult patients with head and neck disorders and diseases.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

FirstCoastNews
A day in the life of a cancer survivor; Judi Zitiello
by Keitha Nelson-Williams

Eighty-five percent of people diagnosed with pancreatic cancer will die with-in six months. Judi Zitiello was diagnosed in 2014, and she's still First Coast News Logoliving to this day. But every three months, as she goes to the Mayo Clinic for a CT scan, life stands still for the mother of four and grandmother of seven with one on the way…FCN sat down with Dr. Pashtoon Kasi, M.D. Assistant Professor, GI Oncology at the Mayo Clinic to discuss the lethal cancer and why there are so few survivors. "The tumor itself it's a pretty unforgiving disease," said Kasi. "Unlike some of the other tumors this causes a lot of dense fibrous tissue around it. So a lot of the drugs are not able to get to it."

Reach: First Coast News refers to two television stations in Jacksonville, Florida. WJXX, the ABC affiliate and WTLV, the NBC affiliate.

Context: Pashtoon Kasi, M.B.B.S. is a Mayo Clinic oncologist and hematologist. An avid runner, Judi Zitiello, 66, was forced into a six-week hiatus when she developed a meniscus tear in early 2014. The retired financial executive was always active – exercising, hosting dinner parties, and volunteering to run the JT Townsend Foundation, a Jacksonville, Florida, philanthropic organization. Judi wasn’t too concerned about the downtime at first. She knew her body would take time to heal. But the pain lingered. Then Judi began losing weight and her energy waned. "I didn't have the energy to get off the couch. I didn’t feel well. I was just not myself," Judi recalls. Still, she thought it must be related to her knee injury. But when she began experiencing severe itching on her arms and torso, and her stool turned a clay color, Judi knew it was time to see someone other than the physical therapist. Little did she realize she would be starting a fight against pancreatic cancer. You can read more about Judi's story on Sharing Mayo Clinic and Mayo Clinic in the Loop.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

Arizona Republic
Ask a Doc: Making surgery safer for high-risk bleeders

Question: What research is underway to help those at high risk for bleeding during medical procedures? Answer: As Arizona Republic newspaper logoa vascular interventional radiologist at Mayo Clinic, I treat patients with a wide range of vascular diseases and disorders. When I’m not performing procedures, I’m in the lab researching ways to improve current therapies, making the experience even safer and more effective for our patients, especially those who are at high risk for bleeding… — Dr. Rahmi Oklu

Reach: The Arizona Republic has daily circulation of more than 180,000 and its website azcentral.com has more than 2.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic, Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are developing a biomaterial that has potential to protect patients at high risk for bleeding in surgery. The Nov. 16 cover article, “An Injectable Shear-Thinning Biomaterial for Endovascular Embolization,” in the journal Science Translational Medicine reports on a universal shear-thinning biomaterial that may provide an alternative for treating vascular bleeding. The study’s lead co-author Rahmi Oklu, M.D., Ph.D., a vascular interventional radiologist at Mayo Clinic’s Arizona campus, explains shear-thinning biomaterial offers many advantages over metallic coils, the current gold standard. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

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Tags: ABC15 Arizona, acupuncture, Affordable care act, aging, alcohol, Alzforum, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers, Aneurysm, Arizona Republic, Becker’s Hospital Review, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine


October 28th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Modern Healthcare
Commentary: Why Mayo Clinic wants to rethink how hospital quality is graded
by Dr. John Noseworthy

You may have seen the news: Mayo Clinic was one of a small number of hospitals in the country awarded a five-star rating by the CMS on its Hospital Compare website when the ratings were released in July. Mayo was also named the top hospital in the country by U.S. News and World Report in its annual Best Hospitals Honor Roll. What may be surprising, in light of these accolades, is our concern about the wayModern Healthcare value is being measured.

Reach: Modern Healthcare is the industry's leading source of healthcare business and policy news, research and information. The magazine covers health care policy, Medicare/Medicaid, and health care from a business perspective. Modern Healthcare magazine is ranked No. 1 in readership among healthcare executives and deemed a "must-read" by the who's who in healthcare. Modern Healthcare has more than 72,0000 paid magazine subscribers and its website receives more than 568,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

KSTP
Targeted Therapy Means Lung Cancer Doesn’t Have to be a Death Sentence
by Kevin Doran

…Katherine Bensen has a charmed life. A wonderful marriage and four beautiful kids. But it all changed December 31, 2014. "And I was diagnosed with Adenocarcinoma of the lungs, which is stage 4, and a KSTP-5 Twin Citiesnonsmoking lung cancer."…Initially, Katherine was told her only option was chemo, and she had 6 to 12 months to live. But, then she discovered she was a candidate for targeted therapy, which she received at Mayo Clinic.

Reach: KSTP-TV is the ABC affiliate in Minneapolis that broadcasts on channel 5. KSTP-TV Online has more than 503,000 unique visitors each month. It is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., and is the only locally-owned and operated broadcasting company in the Twin Cities. KSTP-TV first broadcast in April 1948, and was the first television station to serve the upper Midwest.

Context: Julian Molina,M.D., Ph.D, is an oncologist with the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. Dr. Molina's research focuses on drug development/phase I clinical trials, lung cancer, and head and neck malignancies including thyroid cancer.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

MPR
Photos: A walk through Mayo Clinic's healing art
by Catharine Richert

Auguste Rodin, Andy Warhol and Alexander Calder never trained a doctor, performed surgery or cured a disease. But their timeless art, on display around Mayo Clinic, still offers a kind of medicine. "The arts do have a healing aspect. They improve the quality of experience for patients," Dr. Paul Scanlon, a specialist in pulmonary and critical care medicine, said as he walked a reporter and photographer recently aroundMPR News logo some of Mayo's most notable pieces.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Art is an important part of the Mayo Clinic healing environment. Mayo's history is also vital to the foundation of the clinic and an integral part of the patient-focused care model. Tour guides and greeters in these areas serve by sharing their love of history and art to enhance patients' care experience at Mayo Clinic. Mayo Clinic Center for Humanities in Medicine supports the primary value of Mayo Clinic, the needs of the patient come first, by integrating the arts and expressions of human culture into the healing environment. Paul Scanlon, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic specialist in pulmonary and critical care medicine. Dr. Scanlon also chairs Mayo's Humanities in Medicine Committee, which provides leadership for integrating the arts, history and ethics in the medical environment to support the Mayo Clinic ideal that the needs of the patient come first. The Center`s programs and research in the humanities serve patients, families, caregivers and the larger community, promoting the compassionate delivery of healthcare.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Arizona Republic
Our View: Mayo Clinic and ASU are rethinking the best doctor you've ever had

"Innovative" is one of those words that gets overused. But it fits when Arizona State University and the Mayo Clinic describe their new team effort. This partnership not only offers Arizona an innovative way to run Arizona Republic newspaper logoa medical school, it brings prestige to the Valley and the state. Most importantly, it focuses on preparing doctors for changes -- known and unknown -- that will affect their patients in the future.

Reach: The Arizona Republic has daily circulation of more than 180,000 and its website azcentral.com has more than 2.6 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:

Phoenix Business Journal, ASU, Mayo to build $200M innovation center in Phoenix

Arizona Republic, Mayo, ASU join forces on new medical school

Arizona Republic, Mayo, ASU team up on Scottsdale med school

Modern Healthcare, ASU, Mayo Clinic recruit students for new med school, training program

Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, 5 things to know about ASU, the Mayo Clinic partnership to transform healthcare education KJZZ

ABC15 Arizona, News-medical.net, KTAR-Radio, TriValley Central, Arizona Daily Star, FierceHealthcareKJZZ

Context:  Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University have announced the launch of a comprehensive new model for health care education and research: the Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University Alliance for Health Care. The goal of the alliance is to innovate health care delivery to improve patient care, accelerate cutting-edge research discoveries, and transform medical education. The alliance further links two of the Phoenix area’s most recognizable institutions. ASU recently was named the nation’s No. 1 “most innovative” university by U.S. News & World Report.Mayo Clinic earned the No. 1 top ranking nationally on 2016 U.S. News & World Report's Honor Roll of America's Best Hospitals, as well as the No. 1 spots for top hospitals in Arizona and Phoenix, Minnesota and Florida. The formalized alliance provides cohesion to a collection of joint projects, which have evolved over the past decade and sets the stage for many more. This expansion promises growing impact and scale. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic New Network and on Mayo Medical School's website.

Contact:  Jim McVeigh

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Tags: ABC15 Arizona, Albert Lea Tribune, alcohol consumption, AliveCor, AllAfrica.com, Alzforum, alzheimers, Anesthesiology News, Arizona Daily Star, Arizona Republic, Arizona State University, Artificial pancreas


October 14th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

MPR
Your genes can affect how medications work in your body

Doctors are learning about a new tool that can help them determine what the best treatment option is for each individual patient. It's called individualized medicine and it's the topic of a conference happening this week at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester. MPR's Phil Picardi spoke with Dr.MPR News logo Keith Stewart, who is the director of the Mayo Clinic's Center for Individualized Medicine.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Keith Stewart, M.B., Ch.B is a Mayo Clinic hematologist and director of Mayo's Center for Individualized Medicine.  Individualized medicine, also known as personalized medicine or precision medicine, means tailoring diagnosis and treatment to each patient to optimize care. Patients have experienced this kind of care for a century and a half at Mayo Clinic, where teams of specialists have always worked together to find answers.

Contact: Susan Buckles

 

TIME
The Case for Being Messy
by Tim Harford

Messy disruptions will be most powerful when combined with creative skill. The disruption puts an artist, scientist or engineer in unpromising Time magazine logoterritory—a deep valley rather than a familiar hilltop…We’re often told that good work comes from the ability to focus, to shut out distractions. To choose from a plethora of self-help tips along these lines, a Mayo Clinic psychologist, Dr Amit Sood, advises us to focus more effectively by turning off the TV, logging out of email and taking up “attention training” to “train your brain.”

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Amit Sood, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in General Internal Medicine and the Cancer Center. Dr. Sood is editor of the  Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness and The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Wall Street Journal
Can New Smartphone Apps Help Migraine Sufferers?
by Laura Johannes

David Dodick, a professor of neurology and director of headache medicine at Mayo Clinic, in Phoenix, says some migraine sufferers may not need the apps if they have obvious triggers, such as alcohol use or menstruation. More likely to benefit are people whose migraine attacks occur whenWSJ Banner several triggers “stack” on top of each other. “For example, you’re an accountant and it’s tax time, you’re stressed, sleep-deprived and you have a glass of wine to unwind. All those factors together have pushed you over the edge,” suggests Dr. Dodick, who is president of the International Headache Society.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: David Dodick, M.D. is a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Huffington Post
What Your Body Type Can Reveal About Your Health
by Deborah Long

It’s important to know which body type you are, because your health risks vary accordingly. A quick look in the mirror should tell you whether you’re an apple or a pear, but if you’re not sure, you can ask your doctor next time you have a physical. Michael Jensen, M.D., an endocrinologist Huffington Post Logowith the Mayo Clinic, is an expert on the health risks associated with excess weight. He has spent fully three decades studying the risks overweight patients face and is considered a pioneer of correlating how body type – or where excess weight is carried – relates to the likelihood of developing various diseases. His research has led him to conclude that there is no question that one body type is especially at risk for life-threatening conditions.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique visitors.

Context:  Michael Jensen, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Jensen and his lab study the effects of obesity and how body fat (adipose tissue) and body fat distribution influence health. The regulated uptake, storage and release of fatty acids from adipose tissue play a major role in determining its health effects.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic hits 30th year in Jacksonville by Mayo Clinic hits 30th year in Jacksonville
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville opened to patients 30 years ago, including 2,700 people from 30 states who already made appointments. By today’s standards, the facility was a small scale operation: One medical building, 37 physicians, 158 other employees. Contrast that to what MayoFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo is today — a medical center today that sprawls over 18 buildings and a parking garage on the campus located off San Pablo Road. Four-hundred-ninety-five physicians and scientists — many researchers with doctorates — and 4,664 other employees work there.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida is celebrating 30 years of providing high-quality medical care in Northeast Florida. Since the clinic opened in 1986, more than 600,000 unique patients from all 50 states and 143 countries have come to the Florida campus for Mayo’s unique, patient-centered approach to medical care. “Innovation is in our DNA at Mayo Clinic,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., CEO, Mayo Clinic in Florida. “Through three decades of growth, Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida has invested in people, space and technology to carry forward the vision of our founders and meet the needs of patients, today and into the future.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

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Tags: A.L.S., alzheimer's disease, arthritis, ATRI, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, birth control, body type, brain tumor, Business Insider, canker sores, CBS News, Cuddle Cot


August 12th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Buzzfeed
What You Should Know About Zika If You’re Going To The Olympics
by Anthony Rivas

So much so that athletes from around the world — mostly golfers, but also basketball players and cyclists — have given up their chance at winning gold over concerns that they might get infected. Meanwhile, lots of other spectators getting ready to fly down are probably wondering,BuzzFeed Logo “Is it really worth the risk?” …For men and women who don’t plan on having kids anytime soon, “the impact of the Zika virus on you is probably going to be very minimal,” Tosh said. In fact, about 80% of people who become infected “have absolutely no symptoms whatsoever.”

Reach: BuzzFeed receives more than 15.7 million unique visitors each month to its website and targets pop culture and social media enthusiasts.

Additional coverage:
HealthDay, Zika Won't Pose Risks at the Olympics: Health Experts
Hospitals & Health Networks, Clinical Vaccine Trials Underway; Rio Olympics See Few Mosquitoes by Matt O’Connor

Context: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued an emergency travel advisory after health officials in Florida identified local transmission of Zika virus in a Miami neighborhood. The CDC advisory recommends pregnant women and their partners avoid nonessential travel to Lynwood, a neighborhood in Miami, Florida where the Zika virus is active. Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist Dr. Pritish Tosh says, "It is somewhat unprecedented for a travel advisory to be issued to a very specific neighborhood. That's a testament to the strength of the epidemiology that has been going on, and how well the CDC and other health authorities have been working at this." More information, including a video interview with Dr. Tosh, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Bob Nellis, Deb Balzer

 

Chicago Tribune
Dirty baby: Just how clean does your child need to be?
by Bill Daley

Cleanliness may be next to godliness, or so the old rhyme scolded us, but is it healthiest — particularly for babies and children? "People are very Chicago Tribune Logoconcerned, almost preoccupied, with their child touching a surface that is not clean," said Dr. Angela C. Mattke, a pediatrician at the Mayo Clinic Children's Center in Rochester, Minn. "Early exposure to their environment full of germs, bacteria and viruses is not a bad thing." "Not everything a child touches should be sterilized," she added. "You don't have to wash their hands every time."

Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 384,000 and a weekend circulation of more than 686,000.

Context: Angela Mattke, M.D. is a pediatrician with Mayo Children's Center which is rated in all US News & World Report pediatric specialty categories and is the only children’s hospital in the five-state region to rank in all 10 specialties.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Chicago Tribune
Crawling: The next best core workout?
by Alison Bowen

Your next best exercise doesn't involve equipment, running, jumping or even standing. "Make the floor your friend," says Danielle Johnson, a physical therapist at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program in Rochester, Minn. As a working mom, Johnson is always looking for ways toChicago Tribune Logo challenge exercise norms. "We're looking for things that are a little outside of the box sometimes," she said. Crawling is one of those things. She said it's an "amazing core exercise" that also benefits the legs, shoulders, arms and chest.

Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 384,000 and a weekend circulation of more than 686,000.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life. The program is research-driven around diet, exercise and resiliency, and, when all of these are connected, they encompass the power needed to make sustainable changes. For more information, visit https://healthyliving.mayoclinic.org/.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Wall Street Journal
At the Rio Olympics, Women Athletes Bump Against a Gold Ceiling
by Kevin Helliker and Matthew Futterman

Sports scientists say there is no physiological reason for shortening courses for female athletes or, for that matter, games such as tennis, where women play the best out of three sets versus best of five for men. In WSJ Bannerfact, some research suggests women are built to go farther than men, if at a slower pace. While that remains unproven, the notion that women have inferior endurance capacities has been debunked. “That’s totally anachronistic,” says Michael Joyner, a former competitive marathoner who studies sports science at the Mayo Clinic.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Related coverage:
ABC News, Olympic Swimmer Katie Ledecky Blows Competition Out of the Water
Business Insider, Why Katie Ledecky's Olympic world record Sunday night is even more amazing than you think
Business Insider, Here's an exact breakdown of why 6'4" Michael Phelps has the perfect body for swimming
Business Insider, The internet is driving athletes to do crazy things no one knew were possible
Tech Insider, People are stronger and faster than ever before, but the reason why isn’t what you think

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist.  Dr. Joyner's research team is interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

TIME
What Is Cupping? Here’s What You Need to Know
by Alexandra Sifferlin

…There is a difference between how cupping is practiced in traditional Chinese medicine and how it is used in Western medicine, says Dr. Brent Bauer, director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program. Bauer says a traditional Chinese medicine practitioner would likely offer cupping as part of a larger integrative health check, which might include recommendations around nutrition and otherTime magazine logo health things, and not just as a one-off therapy. “It’s kind of an American phenomena, I think, to consider cupping by itself,” he says.

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:
HealthDayDoes 'Cupping' = Success for Olympic Athletes?
Live ScienceMichael Phelps' Weird Bruises: Does Cupping Therapy Really Work?
Jakarta Post, Phelps puts spotlight on cupping
CCTV-AmericaIt works for Michael Phelps, so we tried “cupping” for the first time

Context:  Brent Bauer, M,D., is director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program. As director of the program, Dr. Bauer has broad and varied research interests. Since its founding in 2001, the program has promoted a collaborative spirit that enables researchers from both within and outside Mayo Clinic to share resources, ideas and expertise regarding research in this exciting realm.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

WCCO-Radio
Mayo Clinic ranks #1 in latest US News and World Report Rankings

Interview with Dr. John Noseworthy and Dave Lee.

WCCO-AM Dave LeeReach: WCCO radio, a CBS owned and operated affiliate in Minneapolis, boasts one of the largest coverage areas in the country as it reaches into portions of North and South Dakota during the day. At night, the station’s signal typically reaches across many U.S. states and Canadian provinces.

Additional coverage:
KTAR-TV, US News & World Report grades Phoenix’s Mayo Clinic top hospital in Arizona
Arizona Daily Star, U.S. News & World Report ranks Tucson hospital third in state
Healio, Mayo Clinic ranked as top hospital for neurology and neurosurgery
WIBW-TV, New ranking proves patients are in good hands at Stormont Vail Health 

Previous coverage in August 5, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Mayo Clinic was named the best hospital in the nation in U.S. News & World Report’s annual list of top hospitals published online today. In addition, Mayo Clinic is ranked No. 1 in more specialties than any other hospital in the country. Mayo Clinic took the No. 1 spot in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. It also ranked No. 1 in the Phoenix metro area and in the Jacksonville metro area. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Twin Cities Business
Mayo’s New Blood Test Could Predict Chances Of Experiencing A Heart Attack
by Sam Schaust

Mayo Clinic launched a new type of blood test on Wednesday that is the first-of-its-kind in the U.S. With the new test, measurements are taken from blood concentrations of plasma ceramides, a class of lipids highly linked to cardiovascular disease events, such as a heart attack. It’s believed the test could even predict the chance of a cardiovascular event as much as a year before it occurs. “Through our strongTwin Cities Business Magazine Logo collaboration with Zora Biosciences, we hope our new test will improve the evaluation of individuals at risk for cardiovascular disease,” said Jeff Meeusen, co-director of Mayo’s Cardiovascular Laboratory Medicine Group.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Additional coverage:
Clinical Lab Products, Mayo Clinic Launches Blood Test to Assess Heart Attack Risk

Context: Mayo Clinic has launched a new type of blood test that will be used to predict adverse cardiovascular events in patients with progressing coronary artery disease (CAD). The test measures blood concentrations of plasma ceramides, a class of lipids that are highly linked to cardiovascular disease processes. Researchers say this test is especially useful for patients with CAD when it does not improve with treatment or for young patients with premature CAD. The new test will help clinicians identify at-risk individuals and is available to Mayo Clinic patients and health care providers worldwide through Mayo Medical Laboratories (MML). MML is the reference laboratory of Mayo Clinic, offering advanced laboratory testing and pathology services to more than 5,000 health care organizations in more than 60 countries. MML collaborated on the test with Zora Biosciences Oy, a diagnostics discovery company based in Finland that specializes in cardiovascular disease. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Gina Chiri-Osmond

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Tags: ABC News, accupuncture, Addyson Cordes, AOL News, arthritis, Astrobiology, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, Best Hospitals, blood test, brain tumor, Breast Cancer, breast microbiome


July 1st, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

NBC News
Google Partners With Harvard, Mayo Clinic for Symptom Search Feature

Google is rolling out a new health feature called symptom search, which is designed to pinpoint a potential problem when you search symptoms — from your mobile device.nbcnews.com

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: KAAL-TV

Previous coverage in June 24, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: When people seek information on health-related symptoms, many turn to the internet, and Google in particular, as the first stop. Now, when consumers access Google’s mobile search for information about certain symptoms, they will get facts on relevant related medical conditions up front on their smartphone or other mobile device. For example, a symptom search — even one using common language free of medical terminology like “my tummy hurts” or “nose blocked” — will show a list of related conditions. For individual symptoms like “headache,” searchers will see overview information as well as have the ability to view self-treatment options and suggestions of when to seek help from a healthcare professional.  To ensure quality and accuracy, teams of doctors, including expert clinicians at Mayo Clinic, have written or reviewed individual symptom information and evaluated related conditions. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

WCCO-TV
Doctors At Mayo Clinic Using Viruses To Fight Cancer

Doctors at Mayo Clinic are using deadly viruses to fight a deadly disease. Just last month, the Food and Drug Administration gave breakthrough status to a cancer therapy that uses the polio virus to combat brain WCCO-TV 4tumors. “We do have one of the oldest programs, not just in this country, but in the world,” Dr. Eva Galanis said. Galanis leads the Mayo’s virus therapy program, which started in 1994. It uses a number of viruses to attack cancer cells.

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

Additional coverage: MSN.com

Context: Evanthia "Eva" Galanis, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic is an orthopedic oncologist with Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. Dr. Galanis has a long-standing interest in developing novel therapeutic approaches for cancer treatment. The focus of her laboratory is to develop and optimize novel virotherapy approaches with special emphasis on paramyxoviruses. A number of different strategies are tested, including use of therapeutic transgenes; trackable markers; combinations with small molecules, cytotoxic agents and radiation therapy; re-targeting of viral strains against tumor-specific antigens; development of novel viral delivery approaches; and exploration of immunomodulatory methods to modify humoral and innate immunity as a means of optimizing virotherapy efficacy.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Florida Times-Union
'Giving my kidney a send-off:' Jacksonville woman starts a kidney donation chain stretching to 9 people
by Matt Soergel

Jennifer Tamol was plenty nervous the evening before she went to the hospital to donate one of her kidneys to a complete stranger, someone in Minnesota who was awaiting his or her chance for a new, better life…She decided four years ago to donate a kidney, and reached out to Mayo Clinic. She took a week’s worth of vacation then to go through a battery of tests, and was tested periodically after that. There were a couple of Florida Times-Union newspaper logofalse alarms where she thought there was a suitable recipient, though something went awry each time.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Martin Mai, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic nephrologist and also chair of the division of transplant medicine at Mayo Clinic in Florida.  Mayo Clinic's kidney transplant doctors and surgeons use proven innovations to successfully treat people with kidney failure and complications of diabetes and other diseases. Their experience in using minimally invasive surgery, new medicines to prevent organ rejection and specialized procedures makes Mayo Clinic a leader in transplant outcomes. Mayo Clinic surgeons perform more than 600 kidney transplants a year, including for people with very challenging kidney conditions who need special solutions and surgeries. And Mayo Clinic kidney transplant teams in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota are leaders in living-donor kidney transplants. People who receive a kidney from a living donor usually have fewer complications than those who receive a kidney from a deceased donor.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

TIME
Electronic health records and digital clerical work are strongly linked to burnout
by Mandy Oaklander

Of all professionals in the U.S., doctors experience some of the highest rates of burnout: the feeling of being so emotionally exhausted from work that you start to feel indifferent about those you’re serving. Time magazine logoResearchers at the Mayo Clinic looked at several months of 2014 survey data from 6,560 U.S. physicians measuring features of work life, including burnout and electronic use. Even after controlling for factors like age, sex, specialty and the number of hours doctors work per week, the researchers found a strong link between burnout and time spent doing digital work.

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:
ReutersBecker’s Orthopedic & Spine, HealthLeaders Media, KAAL-TV, KIMT-TVKTTC-TV, HealthDay, Health Data Management, Deccan Chronicle, Science Daily, Headlines & Global NewsFOX News, Tech Times, Doctors Lounge

Context: The growth and evolution of the electronic environment in health care is taking a toll on U.S. physicians. That’s according to a national study of physicians led by Mayo Clinic which shows the use of electronic health records and computerized physician order entry leads to lower physician satisfaction and higher rates of professional burnout. The findings appear in Mayo Clinic Proceedings“Electronic health records hold great promise for enhancing coordination of care and improving quality of care,” says Tait Shanafelt, M.D., Mayo Clinic physician and lead author of the study. “In their current form and implementation, however, they have had a number of unintended negative consequences including reducing efficiency, increasing clerical burden and increasing the risk of burnout for physicians.” In collaboration with investigators from the American Medical Association (AMA), researchers from Mayo Clinic assembled a national sample of U.S. physicians using the AMA Physician Masterfile, a near complete record of alMl U.S. physicians. The survey included validated instruments to assess burnout, as well as items developed specifically for the study to evaluate the electronic practice environment of the participating physicians. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Wall Street Journal
How Telemedicine Is Transforming Health Care
by Melinda Beck

At the Mayo Clinic, doctors who treat out-of-state patients can follow up with them via phone, email or web chats when they return home, but they can only discuss the conditions they treated in person. “If the patient wants to talk about a new problem, the doctor has to be licensed in that state to discuss it. If not, the patient should talk to his primary-care physician about it,” says Steve Ommen, a cardiologist whoWSJ Banner runs Mayo’s Connected Care program.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Steve Ommen, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist and is also medical director of Connected Care. Telehealth is simply using digital information and communication technologies, such as computers and mobile devices, to manage your health and well-being. Telehealth, also called e-health or m-health (mobile health), includes a variety of health care services, including but not limited to:

  • Online support groups
  • Online health information and self-management tools
  • Email and online communication with health care providers
  • Electronic health records
  • Remote monitoring of vital signs, such as blood pressure, or symptoms
  • Video or online doctor visits

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Huffington Post
This Is What A Poop Transplant Actually Looks Like
by Anna Almendrala

The procedure might sound disgusting and messy, but as the video clip from VICE shows, the procedure typically takes place in an extremely well-controlled and sterile hospital environment, and takes less than 10 minutes to complete. In the clip, doctors from the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota inject a mix of healthy poop and saline into a patient suffering from C-diff, and you won’t feel like gagging even once.Huffington Post Logo

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique visitors.

Context: Stephanie Bennett chronicle's her story in an In the Loop feature and her physician Sahil Khanna, M.B.B.S., a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist, discusses fecal transplant treatment of C. difficile at Mayo.

Contact: Joe Dangor

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Tags: ABC13 Houston, African American women, aging, alzheimer's disease, Austin Herald, autoimmune neurological disorders, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, brain waves, Brain-eating amoeba, Bring Me the News, bronchopleural fistulas, C. diff


April 1st, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Wall Street Journal
Cancer Treatment’s New Direction
by Ron Winslow

Evan Johnson had battled a cold for weeks, endured occasional nosebleeds and felt so fatigued he struggled to finish his workouts at the gym. But it was the unexplained bruises and chest pain that ultimately sent the then 23-year-old senior at theWSJ Banner University of North Dakota to the Mayo Clinic. There a genetic test revealed a particularly aggressive form of acute myeloid leukemia..…Dr. Kasi and his Mayo colleagues—Naseema Gangat, a hematologist, and Shahrukh Hashmi, a transplant specialist—are among the authors of an account of Mr. Johnson’s case published in January in the journal Leukemia Research Reports.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Naseema Gangat, M.B.B.S., is a Mayo Clinic hematologist, Shahrukh, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic hematologist and transplant specialist and Pashtoon Kasi is a Mayo oncology fellow. Evan Johnson’s case was published in the the journal Leukemia Research Reports and is an example of Mayo Clinic’s multidisciplinary-team based care approach. 

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

New York Times
On C.T.E. and Athletes, Science Remains in Its Infancy
by Benedict Carey

In the best study to determine risk so far, published in December, a research team at a Mayo Clinic bank in Jacksonville found The New York Times newspaper logoC.T.E. in 21 of 66 brains of people who had played contact sports. It found no evidence of the disorder in 198 people with no record of playing such sports. But the authors said they had no way to know whether those 21 former athletes had symptoms linked to C.T.E.; some had other neurological disorders as well when they died. “These are very early days, and we badly need larger studies, that include both athletes and nonathletes,” said Dr. Dennis Dickson, the study’s senior author.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Related coverage:

Washington Post — Dale Earnhardt Jr. plans to donate his brain for concussion research

Previous coverage in March 19, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in Dec. 4, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in Dec. 4, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Scientists have recently found evidence that professional football players are susceptible to a progressive degenerative disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which is caused by repetitive brain trauma. Now, researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have discovered a significant and surprising amount of CTE in males who had participated in amateur contact sports in their youth. About one-third of these men whose brains had been donated to the Mayo Clinic Brain Bank had evidence of CTE pathology. CTE only can be diagnosed posthumously.More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic will begin construction on two new buildings, costing $100 million, this year
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville announced Tuesday that it will begin $100 million in major construction projects this year. It will begin construction this summer on what Mayo officials are calling “a destination medical building” that will provideFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo integrated services for complex cancers, as well as neurologic and neurosurgical care. The 150,000-square-foot building will have four stories with the potential to add 11 more stories. More than 126,000 patients are expected to visit in the first year after the building opens.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:

WJXT-TV Jacksonville — Mayo Clinic announces $100M expansion;  WOKV-RadioJacksonville Daily Record, Jacksonville Business Journal, First Coast News, Twin Cities Business, WOKV-TV Florida

Context: Advancing its position as the premier medical destination center for health care in the Southeast, Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida will invest $100 million in major construction projects building on its 150-year history of transforming health care and the patient experience. This summer, Mayo Clinic will begin constructing an innovative destination medical building that will provide integrated services needed for complex cancer, as well as neurologic and neurosurgical care. Initially rising four stories, the 150,000-square-foot building has the potential for 11 more stories. More than 126,000 patients are expected to visit the first year the building opens. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Fast Company
Mayo Clinic Technology Said To Alleviate Nausea From VR
by Dahniel Terdiman

VR sickness could soon be a thing of the past, thanks to new technology developed at the famed Mayo Clinic. Today, the clinic Fast Companyannounced that it has licensed its patented galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) technology to the Los Angeles-based entertainment company vMocion. GVS is aimed at helping to alleviate the nausea problem many people have when using virtual reality systems. The idea is to incorporate GVS into a platform, known as 3v—which stands for virtual, vestibular, and visual—into VR and augmented reality systems, giving users what they call a three-dimensional movement experience.

Reach: Fast Company's editorial focus is on innovation in technology, ethonomics (ethical economics), leadership, and design. Written for, by, and about the most progressive business leaders, Fast Company and FastCompany.com inspire readers and users to think beyond traditional boundaries, lead conversations, and create the future of business.

Additional coverage: Forbes, Electronic Specifier, Engadget, (e) Science News, Digital Journal, Tech Crunch

Context:  Mayo Clinic and Mocion, LLC, an entertainment technology company, today announced it is making available Mayo Clinic’s patented Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation (GVS) technology specifically for use in virtual reality and augmented reality. vMocion’s 3v™ Platform (which stands for virtual, vestibular and visual) incorporates this patented GVS technology, which adds a complete sense of three-dimensional movement for the first time into a virtual reality or augmented reality environment. vMocion has been granted the exclusive, global, perpetual license for Mayo Clinic’s GVS patents and algorithms within all media and entertainment categories and will offer the 3v Platform to other media and entertainment companies through a licensing agreement. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

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Tags: "MoodCheck", acute myeloid leukemia, AdWeek, Albuquerque Journal, Alzheimer's disease (AD), Anesthesiology News, Becker’s Hospital Review, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, benchmarks of good health, bioengineer replacement tissue, bladder cancer, BLR.com


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