Items Tagged ‘Billings Gazette’

January 6th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik


Reuters

‘Hidden’ celiac disease less common now in U.S.
by Shereen Lehman

Fewer people in the U.S. have celiac disease without realizing it, a new study finds. The actual proportion of people with celiac disease in the United States has not changed since 2009, researchers say. “The total prevalence is stable,” Dr. Joseph Murray told Reuters Health in a phone interview. But there are fewer people walking around with “hidden” celiac disease. “When you look at the proportion that are diagnosedReuters Logo versus undiagnosed, that's gone up dramatically. Go back six years and most patients were undiagnosed, with only about one in five getting diagnosed,” said Murray, a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota who was part of the study team.

Reach: Reuters has 196 editorial bureaus in 130 countries and 2,400 editorial staff members and covers international news, regional news, politics, social issues, health, business, sports and media.

Context: Joseph Murray, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist. Dr. Murray's research interests focus in two distinct areas: celiac disease and esophageal disorders. To learn more about celiac disease, check out this Mayo Clinic radio interview with Dr. Murray.

Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Joe Dangor

 

Today.com
The real brain food could be fresh veggies and olive oil, study finds
by Maggie Fox

People got points for light to moderate drinking — in this case about a third of drink a day to no more than three drinks a day on average for men and two for women. Dr. David Knopman, a professor of neurology TODAY Showat the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota who was not involved in the study, said this could translate to real-life benefits. “Loss of brain volume is an inevitable part of the aging process,” Knopman told NBC News. “A bigger brain is in general better for you because at least in late life, it makes a person more resistant to the effects of brain diseases,” he added.

Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show.

Context: David Knopman, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist.  Dr. Knopman is involved in research in late-life cognitive disorders, such as mild cognitive impairment and dementia. Dr. Knopman's specific interests are in the very early stages of Alzheimer's disease, in cognitive impairment due to stroke (cerebrovascular disease) and in cognitive impairment due to frontotemporal degeneration.

Contacts: Susan Barber Lindquist, Traci Klein

 

Post-Bulletin
Brewer has FAITH in Rochester
by Brett Boese

When Mayo Clinic Dr. LaPrincess Brewer took the stage last month in Charlotte, N.C., Jackie Johnson couldn't help beaming with pride. Johnson, a vocal advocate within Rochester's Black community, hasn't stopped singing Brewer's praises as the Brewer's success has resonated across the country, even as it flies under the radar locally. Brewer's FAITH program, an acronym for Fostering African-AmericanLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaper Improvement in Total Health, was among the featured attractions at the 28th annual Healthy Churches 2020 National Conference that was held in her hometown. Its initial success in Baltimore and the ensuing impact in Minnesota since Brewer arrived at Mayo in 2013 has prompted significant accolades for the charismatic 35-year-old cardiologist.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context: LaPrincess Brewer, M.D., M.P.H., has a primary research focus in developing strategies to reduce and ultimately eliminate cardiovascular disease health disparities in racial and ethnic minority populations and in underserved communities through health promotion and community-based participatory research. Dr. Brewer also has special interest in increasing minority and women's participation in cardiovascular clinical trials through mobile health (mHealth) interventions. Additionally, she has published work on faith-based interventions for cardiovascular disease prevention, racial differences in weight maintenance and psychosocial factors influencing cardiac risk factors.

Contact: Ethan Grove

 

ABC News
US News and World Report Releases List of Best Diets
by Gillian Mohney

Every year many Americans make a New Year's resolution to lose weight, but finding ways to drop pounds and keep them off is difficult. Today, U.S. News and World Report released its annual list of the best diets, ABC News logoaccording to nutrition and medical experts. The diets were chosen by a panel of nutritionists, dietary consultants, physicians and other experts convened by U.S News and World Report. Mayo Clinic Diet: This diet is broken into two parts. The first part requires no calorie counting, but dieters are stuck with meals made up of healthy foods including whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and healthy fats, as well as at least 30 minutes of physical activity a day.

Reach: ABC News Online has more than 28.8 million unique visitors to its site each month. ABC’s World News Tonight with David Muir averages about 9.2 million viewers each night.

Additional coverage:
HealthDay, Plant-Based Diets Score Big for Healthy Weight Loss
WATE6 Knoxville, U.S. News and World Report ranks top diets
FOX News, US News ranks best diet plans for 2017
Atlanta Journal-ConstitutionWant to lose weight? Experts say these are the best diets of 2017
FOX4 Dallas, Lose weight faster by tracking habits

Context:  As the second edition of The Mayo Clinic Diet hits store shelves, the diet plan has been named Best Commercial Diet by U.S. News & World Report.  “We are honored to be recognized for a weight-loss method that offers lasting results,” says Donald Hensrud, M.D., medical editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet and director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. Learn more about the Mayo Clinic by watching this Mayo Clinic Minute or read more about it on Mayo Clinic Network. “The Mayo Clinic Diet is much more than a diet,” Dr. Hensrud says. “It’s a lifestyle program in which people can eat great-tasting food and feel better right away ─ even while they lose weight. More importantly, these lifestyle changes are sustainable and can improve long-term health as people reach and maintain a healthy weight.”

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

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Tags: ABC News, Affordable care act, Albert Lea Tribune, alternative medicine, anxiety, arthritis, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Attn:, Baltimore Sun, Becker’s Hospital Review, Beloit Daily News, Billings Gazette


July 8th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Wall Street Journal
Can Adults Grow Taller?
By Heidi Mitchell

Nearly everyone shrinks with age. But some people insist, often after an annual visit to their doctor, that they’ve added a half-inch or so. If they aren’t children or teens, they’re probably mistaken, says Todd Milbrandt, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.,WSJ Banner who explains the significance of physes and what makes 20 a special number. “There may be a 21-year-old patient that is young, in terms of his bone age, which is why he may still be growing in college, whereas others may have stopped when they are 13 or 14,” says Dr. Milbrandt, who does research on growth plates.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Todd Milbrandt, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon who is also affiliated with Mayo Clinic's Children's Center.  Dr. Milbrandt investigates pediatric muscle, tendon and bone dysfunction. Specifically, he is interested in re-creating naturally found tissue when that tissue is damaged. By using tissue-engineering techniques, Dr. Milbrandt looks to reform cartilage in growth arrest from childhood trauma, to prevent hip collapse in Legg-Calve-Perthes disease and to eradicate bone infections.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Twin Cities Business
Signature Mayo Heart Cell Regeneration Technique Passes Key European Trial
by Don Jacobson

A signature research project of the Mayo Clinic’s Center for Regenerative Medicine – using stem cells to treat ischemic heart failure – has proven effective on enough patients in a European clinical trial to prompt its corporate backer to accelerate commercialization efforts. The results, Twin Cities Business Magazine Logoannounced last week, heralded the first time heart cell regeneration has been shown effective in a large-scale trial and could represent a major win for the Mayo center, which began work on the concept a decade ago. The product, C-Cure, is being developed by the Belgian company Celyad S.A. under an exclusive license from Mayo. Touted as a potential paradigm-shifter in treating the dire condition, the technique was co-developed by Dr. Andre Terzic, director of the Rochester clinic’s regenerative medicine center, as one of its first big projects.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Context: Andre Terzic, M.D., Ph.D.  is director of Mayo Clinic's Center for Regenerative Medicine and a Mayo cardiologist. Mayo Clinic and center leaders believe that regenerative medicine, which makes it possible to actually repair diseased, injured or congenitally defective tissues and organs, will be a vital component of medical and surgical practice in the coming years. By harnessing the potential of regenerative medicine, Mayo Clinic is poised to create new models of health care and transform medicine and surgery.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Business Insider
USA Swimming director gave an astonishing quote about how Katie Ledecky is going to dominate and change the sport

Sheinin also spoke to Michael J. Joyner, a researcher for the Mayo Clinic, who fueled the notion that we haven’t seen an athlete like Ledecky before. Joyner illustrated what Ledecky’s dominance would look like for athletes in other sports. “She’s dominating by the widest margin inBusiness Insider international sport, winning by 1 or 2 percent,” Joyner said. “If [a runner] won the 10,000 meters by that wide a margin, they’d win by 100 meters. One or 2 percent in the Tour de France, over about 80 hours of racing, would be 30 or 40 minutes. It’s just absolutely remarkable.”

Reach: Business Insider has more than 11 million unique visitors each month. The on-line publication focuses on business news. The site provides and analyzes business news and acts as an aggregator of top news stories from around the web. Its content is sometimes cited by other, larger, publications such as The New York Times and domestic news outlets like National Public Radio.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist. His laboratory is interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss. Dr. Joyner and his team study how the nervous system regulates blood pressure, heart rate and metabolism in response to these forms of stress. They are also interested in how blood flow to muscle and skin responds to these stressors. These responses are studied in young healthy subjects, healthy older subjects and people with conditions such as heart failure.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

KIMT-TV
11-year-old heart transplant patient going home after 2 years
by DeeDee Stiepan

A young patient from Panama who has been receiving treatment following a heart transplant at Mayo Clinic will finally get to go home after living KIMTin Rochester for more than two years. But before he left, Mayo Clinic staff threw him and his family a surprise going away party on Thursday. “He’s done so much better than we could have ever imagined,” explains Jonathan Johnson, M.D., Joseph’s heart transplant surgeon. “He’s really done great and he keeps up with other kids his age and does everything we could have ever hoped — we’re really, really pleased.”

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Context: Jonathan Johnson, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic pediatric cardiologist and hear transplant surgeon. Dr. Johnson's research encompasses several different areas of pediatric cardiology. Dr. Johnson's primary focus is researching clinical outcomes in pediatric patients with congenital heart disease, as well as those with cardiomyopathy or heart failure, or those who have required heart transplantation or ventricular assist device (VAD) placement. Dr. Johnson is also interested in cardiac imaging, including fetal, transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, and studies how these imaging modalities can be used to improve patient outcomes.

Contact: Kelly Reller

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Tags: 24/7 Wall St., age-related shrinking, air ambulance, Aries Merritt, Arizona Republic, Aromatherapy, ASU Now, Becker’s Hospital Review, Billings Gazette, birth control, brain waves, brain-wave patterns



October 16th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Wall Street Journal
Exercise, Diet and Sleep Can Improve MS Symptoms
by Laura Landro

Exercise, sleep and a low-salt diet may be part of the solution for multiple sclerosis patients. Researchers are increasingly looking to lifestyle, diet and exercise, including salsa dancing, to help mitigate the often-debilitating effects of MS, which include problems with muscle control, balance, visionThe Wall Street Journal newspaper logo and thinking.…While quitting smoking, getting more sleep and reducing excess salt “are general health strategies that are good for us anyway, they are actually making a difference with respect to the behavior of the disease,” says Dean Wingerchuk, a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Phoenix.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Dean Wingerchuk, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Star Tribune (Post-Bulletin)
Mayo's airborne blood bank celebrates 30 years

On May 20, 2012, Nels Gunderson hung in the balance between life and death. His survival depended on access to first responders, rapid medical Star Tribune newspaper logostabilization and an airborne blood bank carried by the Mayo One medical helicopter. It also depended on the helicopter conveying him quickly from his back yard in Osseo, Wis., to the Mayo Clinic Hospital, Saint Marys Campus, about 90 miles away, where a surgical team was working on him less than two hours after his son dialed 911. Thirty years ago this month, Mayo One flew its first patient. To celebrate its anniversary, the airborne service offered a glimpse inside the flying hospital.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional Coverage:

Post-Bulletin, Medical helicopter safety remains Mayo One priority by Jeff Hansel… In fact, many of the safety features recommended in 2009 by Mayo One medical-helicopter experts after a spate of fate crashes around the country have been instituted. For example, said Glenn Lyden, spokesman for Mayo Clinic Medical Transport, the use of night-vision goggles has increased among providers of medical-helicopter services.

Context: Mayo Clinic Medical Transport provides ground and air medical transport services from bases in Minnesota and Wisconsin.

Public Affairs Contact: Glenn Lyden

 

Forbes
Customer Service Beyond Coupling: From Four Seasons' Hospitality To Mayo Clinic's Healthcare
by Micah Solomon

Mayo Clinic, the extraordinary Rochester, Minnesota based hospital and healthcare organization, provides what can be called “destination medicine,” as Leonard Berry terms it: the collaboration of experts from a range of specialties to provide diagnosis and treatment or a treatment plan for what are often very serious cases.Forbes magazine logo

Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 mllion unique visitors each month.

Additional Coverage:

FierceHealthcareMayo Clinic looks to changing demographics in customer service approach by Zack Budryk, A patient experience approach by the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota may represent a new front in healthcare customer service, according to Forbes. The clinic's approach, "destination medicine," brings together experts from a broad spectrum of specialties and, because entire families often visit the clinic, Mayo's room design keeps large groups of relatives and friends in mind. The design includes features like specially shaped sofas that can seat as many as a dozen visitors.

Context: Thousands of people come to Mayo Clinic each day for diagnosis and treatment of a medical problem. Many people make their own appointments and some are referred by a doctor. Most people are treated on an outpatient basis, meaning their evaluation, tests and treatments are done in the clinic, and they return to their home or lodging at the end of the day.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

 

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Tags: A.L.S., ABC-7 Fort Meyers/Naples, ABC15 Arizona, Advisory Board Daily Briefing, Anna Stoehr, Aspen Times, AT&T, Austin Daily Herald, Becker’s Spine Review, Bernice Youngman, Big Data to Knowledge, Billings Gazette


July 24th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich


Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Advisory Board

Why Mayo Clinic's CEO wants to serve 200 million patients—and how he plans to do it

Question: I've read that before you joined the Mayo Clinic—and this was decades ago—one of your first encounters with the organization was when a physician was supposed to visit your hospital for a commemorative dinner…and he missed it. Can you talk Advisory Boarda little bit about that? John Noseworthy: It was one of the two or three most pivotal moments in my life. You're right, he missed his flight—and it was because he was with a patient. I was very young and I remember thinking, "who is this man who is so humble that he would put the needs of the patient ahead of his receiving  a distinguished recognition." And then I wondered what organization could retain and keep a person like that. It was Mayo Clinic.

Reach: The Advisory Board Company is a global research, technology, and consulting firm partnering with more than 165,000 leaders in more than 4,100 organizations across health care and higher education.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

 

Wall Street Journal
Why Seven Hours of Sleep Might Be Better Than Eight
by Sumathi Reddy

…Other experts caution against studies showing ill effects from too much sleep. Illness may cause someone to sleep or spend more The Wall Street Journal newspaper logotime in bed, these experts say. And studies based on people reporting their own sleep patterns may be inaccurate. "The problem with these studies is that they give you good information about association but not causation," said Timothy Morgenthaler, president of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, which represents sleep doctors and researchers, and a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic Center for Sleep Medicine.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context:  Timothy Morgenthaler, M.D., Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, is also affiliated with the Mayo Clinic Center for Sleep Medicine. Mayo Clinic doctors trained in sleep disorders evaluate and treat adults and children. The Center for Sleep Medicine is one of the largest sleep medicine facilities in the United States. Staff in the center treats about 6,500 new people who have sleep disorders each year. The Center for Sleep Medicine is accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Public Affairs Contacts: Alyson Gonzalez, Traci Klein

 

Star Tribune
Mayo links abnormal protein in brain to Alzheimer's
by Mary Lynn Smith

…“Alzheimer’s disease symptoms have been typically thought to be produced by plaques and tangles,” said Dr. Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s disease Research Center. “Now these folks have documented that there’s a third elementStar Tribune newspaper logo that contributes to Alzheimer’s symptoms.” The protein, known as TDP-43, is normally found in the brain. But what Mayo researchers found is that when it becomes abnormal — chemically different and bunched up — a patient is more likely to show symptoms of Alzheimer’s, explained Dr. Keith Josephs, who headed the research team’s four-year study.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Related Coverage:
Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic-led study on Alzheimer's grabs worldwide attention
MPR, Alzheimer's research at Mayo may open new possibilities to investigate
KTTC, Protein discovery may be key to Alzheimer's cure
WCCO, Albuquerque Journal, MinnPost

Previous Coverage in July 17, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Highlights

Context:  Since the time of Dr. Alois Alzheimer himself, two proteins (beta-amyloid (Aβ) and tau) have become tantamount to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). But a Mayo Clinic study challenges the perception that these are the only important proteins accounting for the clinical features of the devastating disease. In a large clinico-imaging pathological study, Mayo Clinic researchers demonstrated that a third protein (TDP-43) plays a major role in AD pathology. In fact, people whose brain was TDP positive were 10 times more likely to be cognitively impaired at death compared to those who didn’t have the protein, showing that TDP-43 has the potential to overpower what has been termed resilient brain aging. The study was published in the journal Acta Neuropathologica. “We wanted to determine whether the TDP-43 protein has any independent effect on the clinical and neuroimaging features typically ascribed to AD and we found that TDP-43 had a strong effect on cognition, memory loss and medial temporal atrophy in AD,” says Mayo Clinic neurologist Keith Josephs, M.D., the study’s lead investigator and author. “In the early stages of the disease when AD pathology was less severe, the presence of TDP-43 was strongly associated with cognitive impairment. Consequently, TDP-43 appears to play an important role in the cognitive and neuroimaging characteristics that have been linked to AD.” More information on the study, including a video interview with Dr. Josephs, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Star Tribune
Mayo sees big future for personalized medicine
by Jim Spencer

Medical treatment will become more genetically specific to individuals as the 21st century progresses, the Mayo Clinic’s director of Star Tribune Business section logolaboratory medicine told a congressional subcommittee Wednesday. Dr. Frank Cockerill said that Mayo, one of the world’s leaders in specialized diagnostics, develops 150 tests per year in an attempt to become more precise in treating patients.  The Rochester-based clinic is moving toward tests that will let doctors tailor treatments that are unique to individuals, Cockerill told participants at a 21st Century Cures roundtable sponsored by the House Energy and Commerce Committee’s subcommittee on health. For instance, instead of using standard dosages, Cockerill said Mayo’s labs try to tranform scientific discoveries into “valid tests” that allow doctors to apply “specific genetic findings in a patient.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Frank Cockerill, M.D. is chair of the Mayo Clinic Department of Laboratory Medicine and PathologyMayo Clinic's Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology (DLMP) in Rochester is one of the largest clinical laboratories in the world. It is composed of more than 3,200 people working in numerous specialty laboratories performing more than 20 million tests a year. Mayo Medical Laboratories (MML) is a reference laboratory specializing in esoteric laboratory testing for health care organizations throughout the United States and around the world. MML's mission is to support the local delivery of laboratory services through the provision of exceptional reference laboratory services and by providing support services that facilitate and augment community integration efforts.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Post-Bulletin

Our view: Community can help keep Mayo Clinic at top of rankings

Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperWhat's most impressive about Mayo Clinic's No. 1 ranking as the best hospital in the country by U.S. News & World Report magazine were the consistent high marks in several categories of evaluation. The report gave Mayo No. 1 or No. 2 rankings in 11 of the 12 specialties based on reputation, services and volumes, safety and clinical outcomes.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Related Coverage:
Post-Bulletin, Pulse on Health: It's the personal care behind being No. 1 that counts
MedPage Today, Top-Ranked Hospitals Sing Own Praises
CSPAN, General Speeches: Rep. Erik Paulsen, R-Minnesota, 3rd District

Previous Coverage in July 17, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Highlights

Context: Mayo Clinic has achieved the highest honor in U.S. News and World Report’s ranking of top hospitalsMayo Clinic earned more number one rankings than any other provider, ranking number one or number two in 11 of the 12 specialties based on reputation, services and volumes, safety and clinical outcomes. “We have a deep commitment to delivering high-value health care that best meets patients' needs. We owe our success to truly dedicated staff that provide a seamless patient experience and the care that each individual needs,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Noseworthy, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Rebecca Eisenman

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Tags: "sitting disease", A.L.S., ABC News, ABC15, advisory board, Ahwatukee Foothills News, Aitkin Age, Albuquerque Journal, alzheimer's disease, Am.com, AP, Apple


June 26th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Wall Street Journal
Obesity Is Undercounted in Children, Study Finds
by Sumathi Reddy

…A new study finds that the commonly used body-mass-index measure may fail to identify as many as 25% of children, age 4 to 18 years, who have excess body fat. The meta-analysis, scheduled for publication online in the journal Pediatric Obesity on Tuesday, reviewed 37 separate studies involving a combined The Wall Street Journal newspaper logo53,521 participants. "BMI is not capturing everybody who needs to be labeled as obese," said Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, director of preventive cardiology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who headed the study with Asma Javed, a pediatric endocrinology fellow.

Additional coverage:

KAAL, Mayo Study Finds Fault with Youth BMI Measurements
WJXT Fla., KTVZ Oreg., ANSA Italy


Wall Street Journal Lunch Break
Video: Obesity Undercounted in Children, Study Finds

A new study finds that the commonly used body mass index measure A new study finds that the Wall Street Journal Live Logocommonly used body mass index measure may leave out as many as 25% of children with excess body fat. Dr. Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, co-author of the study and director of preventive cardiology at the Mayo Clinic, joins Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero.

Context: Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Lopez-Jimenez's research program has studied obesity and cardiovascular disease from different angles, from physiologic studies assessing changes in myocardial mechanics and structural and hemodynamic changes following weight loss, to studies addressing the effect of physicians' diagnosis of obesity on willingness to lose weight and successful weight loss at follow-up.


Wall Street Journal
How to Keep Your Muscles Strong as You Age
by Laura Landrow

...For now, however, the best medicine available to maintain muscle mass and strength is less complicated and costly—namely, exercise and a healthy diet. Yet about 60% of people over 65 are insufficiently active or overtly inactive, and many have poor nutrition, says Nathan LeBrasseur, a researcher who directs the Muscle Performance and Physical Function Laboratory and the Healthy Aging and The Wall Street Journal newspaper logoIndependent Living Initiative at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Dr. LeBrasseur estimates that most people will lose approximately 30% of muscle mass over their lifetime, and as much as 50% by the time they reach their 80s or 90s.

Context: Nathan LeBrasseur, Ph.D. is a Mayo Clinic researcher and is affiliated with Mayo Clinic's Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging and Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. More information about his work can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

 

Wall Street Journal
How Bad Sitting Posture at Work Leads to Bad Standing Posture All the Time
by Jeanne Whalen

Good posture means aligning ears over the shoulders, shoulders over hips, and Wall Street Journal Life and Culture logohips over the knees and ankles…Many deskbound office workers have started standing and walking in this position, too, says Andrea Cheville, a rehabilitation physician at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. To counteract kyphosis, it is important to stretch the pectoral muscles and strengthen the trapezius muscles in the upper back, which hold the shoulder blades back, Dr. Cheville said. Remembering to keep the ears and head over the shoulders, and not jutting forward, is also important.

Context: Andrea Cheville, M.D., Mayo Clinic Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, is an expert on exercise in the elderly and also focuses on the delivery of supportive care services to optimize the functionality and quality-of-life for patients with cancer in all disease stages.

Wall Street Journal
Can Data From Your Fitbit Transform Medicine?
By Elizabeth Dwoskin

Many runners and fitness fanatics have been quick to embrace wearable wireless tracking devices for Wall Street Journal Tech Logomeasuring physical activity and calories burned. Now, a growing number of physicians are formally studying whether such "wearables" can improve patients' health by spurring people to get moving…David Cook, an anesthesiologist at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, who, along with colleagues, used Fitbit Inc.'s namesake gadget to track activity levels of cardiac-surgery patients. The researchers found that patients who moved more the day after surgery were more likely to be discharged sooner. The findings prompted the hospital to dispatch physical therapists to study patients who weren't moving as much, said Dr. Cook.

Context: David J. Cook, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

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Tags: 3D mammograms, ABC News Australia, ABC30, aging, Agnes Rapacz, Allevant Solutions, alzheimer's disease, American News Report, angina, ANSA, anti-obesity devic, AP


January 14th, 2013

Gazette Opinion: A Good Match: Mayo Clinic, Billings Clinic

By Logan Lafferty loganlafferty

For decades, the Billings Clinic has worked to be the “Mayo clinic of Montana.” Now a formal affiliation will make Billings Clinic a member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. Network membership doesn’t involve any change in ownership or governance of Billings Clinic, which is a private, nonprofit organization based in Billings. Many Billings Clinic physicians, such as heart surgeon Scott Millikan, trained at Mayo. Billings Clinic physicians long have consulted Mayo specialists when caring for their Montana and Wyoming patients.

Additional Coverage: Sheridan Media, KTVQ

Billings Gazette

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January 11th, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

 

 

January 11, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

HuffPost Live
Let My Doctor Sleep
Hosted by Alicia Menendez

A new study shows that doctor fatigue raises the risk of car accidents after long shifts. How does fatigue impair medical care?

Circulation: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique viewers.

Context: This study appeared in the Dec. 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Colin West., M.D., Ph.D., the lead author, is a General Internal Medicine physician at Mayo Clinic. His research focuses primarily on physician well-being, evidence-based medicine and biostatistics, and medical education. Dr. West participated in this Google Hangout with eight other people. This function within Google Plus allows users to have live, face-to-face, multi-person video chats with chosen participants. Google Hangouts On Air are Hangouts in which the video stream displays publicly on the Google Plus profile page of the user who launched the chat. They can also be displayed on the user's YouTube channel or website.

News Release

Previous Coverage

Public Affairs Contacts: Alyson Fleming, Nick Hanson

NBC News
Is sitting the new smoking? Natalie Morales chats with viewers and experts about the growing health risk

NBC News'  Natalie Morales held a  Google+ Hangout with the    Mayo Clinic's Dr. James Levine, a leading obesity expert. Levine and Morales discussed the topic of sitting too much and how harmful it can be to your health. Dr. Levine and Morales also chatted with Howard Snitzer and Audrey Caseltine.  

Rock Center With Brian Williams
Mayo Clinic’s 10 tips on how to burn calories at work

Dr. James Levine’s obesity research at the Mayo Clinic is turning our conventional thinking about exercise on its head.  Levine says that a daily dose of exercise, while beneficial, can’t undo the damage done from sitting all day at work and at play. 

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob Nellis, Sharon Theimer

PBS Newshour
Study Shows Many Teens at Risk for Suicidal Behavior Despite Mental Health Help

A new study shows most teenagers who think about or attempt suicide have already had mental health treatment. Gwen Ifill talks to Dr. Timothy Lineberry of the Mayo Clinic and Drexel University psychologist Brian Daly about concerns over the effectiveness of current clinical treatment programs to prevent adolescent suicide.

Reach: PBS NewsHour is an hour-long evening newscast with detailed analysis of major national and international issues.

Context: Timothy Lineberry, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic psychiatrist and suicide expert.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

New York Times
Flu Widespread, Leading a Range of Winter’s Ills
by Donald G. McNeil Jr. and Katharine Q. Seelye

It is not your imagination — more people you know are sick this winter, even people who have had flu shots…Nationally, deaths and hospitalizations are still below epidemic thresholds. But experts do not expect that to remain true. Pneumonia usually shows up in national statistics only a week or two after emergency rooms report surges in cases, and deaths start rising a week or two after that, said Dr. Gregory A. Poland, a vaccine specialist at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. The predominant flu strain circulating is an H3N2, which typically kills more people than the H1N1 strains that usually predominate; the relatively lethal 2003-4 “Fujian flu” season was overwhelmingly H3N2.

Circulation: The New York Times has the third highest circulation nationally, behind USA Today (2nd) and The Wall Street Journal (1st) with 1,150,589 weekday copies circulated and 1,645,152 circulated on Sundays.

Aditional Coverage: FoxNY, The Weather Channel, Newser, Becker’s Hospital Review, Health, Austin Daily Herald, NBC Nightly News, WCCO, Fox 9, KARE 11, Mankato Free Press, KEYC, St. Peter Herald, WBBH, Duluth News Tribune, USA Today

Public Affairs Contacts: Bryan Anderson, Traci Klein

Yuma Sun
Mayo Clinic bringing particle technology to Southwest
by Joyce Lobeck

A new era in radiation therapy for cancer patients is coming to the desert Southwest, including Yuma-area residents, through a major construction project at the Phoenix campus of Mayo Clinic…Proton beam therapy is a highly targeted and precise way to administer radiation therapy, explained Dr. Steven Schild, radiation oncologist with Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Reach: The Yuma Sun’s online edition covers local and state news to people living in Yuma County, the southwest corner of Arizona. The online edition has more than 99,000 unique users per month and more than 1.4 million page views per month. The daily circulation of the print version is more than 19,000. 

Context: When fully established, the Mayo Clinic Proton Beam Therapy Program will offer one of the most technologically advanced treatment options to people with cancer. Proton beam therapy precisely targets cancer cells through the use of charged particles. While not everyone with cancer requires proton beam therapy, it is a preferred treatment for selected patients, such as children and adults with anatomically complex tumors adjacent to critical or sensitive organs and regions such as the brain, eye, spinal cord, lung, heart, liver, bowel and kidneys. Proton beam therapy is sometimes used to treat benign tumors as well. Proton beam therapy facilities are being built at Mayo Clinic’s campuses in Rochester, Minn., and Phoenix, Ariz. Groundbreaking in Rochester was in September 2011 and in Phoenix in December 2011. The first treatment rooms are expected to open by mid-2015 in Rochester and by March 2016 in Phoenix. Both facilities will be fully operational in 2017. Central to the development of this program was a gift of $100 million from longtime Mayo patient and philanthropist Richard O. Jacobson.

Public Affairs Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

Billings Gazette
Billings Clinic forms formal relationship with Mayo Clinic
By Cindy Uken

Billings Clinic announced Wednesday that it has entered into a one-year, renewable agreement with the recently created Mayo Clinic Care Network, a nationwide affiliation of health organizations. Billings Clinic, with 272 beds, is the first hospital in Montana to have passed Mayo’s review process and been selected as a member of the year-old network. It is the 12th hospital nationally to be included in the Mayo Clinic Care Network. There is also one Minnesota hospital in a separate Mayo Clinic Cancer Care Network.

Circulation: The Billings Gazette is the largest daily newspaper in Montana with more than 39,000 readers each day and serves eastern Montana, northern Wyoming and North Dakota. The paper focuses most on local, state and regional news and politics, as well as national and world news pertinent to the region. The newspaper's website has more than 328,000 unique visitors each month and has more than 4.9 million page views each month.

Addional Coverage: Mpls St. Paul Business Journal, Missoulian

Context: Mayo Clinic announced this week that Billings Clinic is the newest member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. Billings Clinic is the first health system in Montana to have passed Mayo's rigorous review process and been selected as a member of the network. Billings Clinic's group practice structure is a team-oriented community of physicians who work together in a collaborative manner to provide primary and specialty regional medical care for the entire population of Montana, the western Dakotas and northern Wyoming, with a regional population of more than half a million.

News Release: Billings Clinic Joins Mayo Clinic Care Network

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

Star Tribune
Mayo joint venture focuses effort on rural hospitals
By Jackie Crosby

Dr. Mark Lindsay's bright idea got its start in the late 1990s at a hospital in Eau Claire, Wis. That's when the Mayo Clinic pulmonologist began working on a comprehensive approach to help patients get free of ventilators and recover more quickly after an accident or surgery. The approach, which Lindsay fine-tuned and expanded to 11 rural hospitals in the Midwest, now forms the cornerstone of a new joint-venture business announced Thursday by the Mayo Clinic that will take the model to remote hospitals across the country.

Circulation: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 514,457 copies and weekday circulation is 300,330. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional Coverage:  Post Bulletin, Minneapolis St. Paul Business Journal, La Crosse Tribune, 4-Traders

Context:  Mayo Clinic and Select Medical announced the formation of a new company designed to improve medical care — specifically post-acute care — in rural America. The joint venture, called Allevant Solutions, LLC, will offer consulting services to rural hospitals and skilled nursing homes. The consulting services include methodologies, algorithms and processes which incorporate clinical services, quality improvement and business expertise developed by Mayo and Select Medical. Through these services, Allevant will enable its clients to increase the availability of post-acute care and also reduce the costs associated with providing the rehabilitative services that many patients need even after they have overcome a life-threatening illness or accident.

News Release: Mayo Clinic and Select Medical to Form Allevant Solutions

Website: Allevant Solutions

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

La Crosse Tribune
Mayo in La Crosse starts TV link with Rochester to treat strokes
by Mike Tighe

A new telecommunications method for evaluating stroke patients at the Mayo Clinic Health System in La Crosse gives neurologists at Mayo’s flagship in Rochester, Minn., a bird’s-eye view to help determine treatment. The method, called telestroke, incorporates a Skype-type link between Mayo’s emergency room in La Crosse and Rochester…“This allows the stroke neurologist to help decide which candidates go to Rochester for very specialized treatments,” said Dr. Greg Pupillo, a neurologist at the La Crosse facility, which he said treated 140 stroke patients last year.

Circulation: The La Crosse Tribune covers local and state news that is relevant to the Western Wisconsin area and has a daily circulation of more than 25,000 readers. the newspaper's online edition has more than 230,000 uniquevisitors each month and more than 6.9 million page views per month.

Context: The Neurology Department at Mayo Clinic Health System Franciscan Healthcare in La Crosse provides care for a wide variety of neurological disorders including stroke, seizures & epilepsy.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Health System Franciscan Healthcare adds telestroke program

Public Affairs Contact: Rick Thiesse

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Tags: 4-Traders, Allevant Solutions, Austin Daily Herald, Becker’s Hospital Review, Billings Clinic, Billings Gazette, Cancer, diabetes, doctor burnout, Dr. Colin West, Dr. Greg Pupillo, Dr. Gregory Poland


October 4th, 2012

Doctor Offers Precautions for Safe Hunting

By

With hunting season heading toward high gear, the Mayo Clinic put out these recommendations to be safe this fall. Errant gunshots are an obvious health risk during fall hunting season, but a range of other dangers also can send hunters to the hospital or worse: heart attacks, injured backs and broken bones are among the most common medical emergencies. Emergency medicine physician Eric Grube, D.O.,of the Mayo Clinic Health System in La Crosse, Wisc., offers several tips for a safe hunting season.

Additional coverage: Outdoor Hub, Canoe.ca, Outdoors with Frischkorn

 

Billings Gazette

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Tags: Billings Gazette, Dr. Eric Grube, hunting season, Safety


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