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February 10th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Neurology Today
The Neurologist as National Health Care Leader: Mayo Clinic's John H. Noseworthy, MD, FAAN
by Gina Shaw

John H. Noseworthy, MD, discusses his pathway from a passion in multiple sclerosis research and clinical practice to heading up the Mayo Clinic enterprise as its president and chief executive officer…Today, the world of health care knows John H. Noseworthy, MD, FAAN, as the influentialNeurology Today Logo president and chief executive officer (CEO) of the Mayo Clinic. But the world of neurology, and of multiple sclerosis (MS) research, might be very different today had Dr. Noseworthy elected to pursue the medical specialty he had originally planned on: cardiology.

Reach:  Neurology Today is the official publication of the American Academy of Neurology. The magazine is published monthly and has a circulation of more than 24,000.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

NBC News
Doctors Push for Flu Immunizations After Surge of Cases Nationwide

According to the Centers for Disease Control, 40 states are reporting widespread flu activity — with more than 30,000 reported cases in the U.S. NBC News LogoInterview with Dr. Pritish Tosh, Infectious Diseases, Mayo Clinic.

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Context: Pritish Tosh, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist. Dr. Tosh is interested in emerging infections and preparedness activities related to them, ranging from collaborating with the Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group in basic science vaccine development to hospital systems research related to pandemic preparedness. Influenza is a viral infection that attacks your respiratory system — your nose, throat and lungs. Influenza, commonly called the flu, is not the same as stomach "flu" viruses that cause diarrhea and vomiting.

Contacts: Bob Nellis, Sharon Theimer

 

Today
Red Dress Awards: Meet two women who’ve made heart-healthy changes

The Woman’s Day Red Dress Awards, the premiere event to spotlight the fight against heart disease among women, are Tuesday night, and Hoda Kotb will be a presenter. Nutritionist Joy Bauer and cardiologist Dr. Sharonne Hayes are joined on TODAY by two women who will be honored at the awards for meeting the challenge of making heart-healthy changes to their lives.

Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show.

Context:  Sharonne Hayes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Hayes studies cardiovascular disease and prevention, with a focus on sex and gender differences and conditions that uniquely or predominantly affect women. With a clinical base in the Women's Heart Clinic, Dr. Hayes and her research team utilize novel recruitment methods, social media and online communities, DNA profiling, and sex-specific evaluations to better understand several cardiovascular conditions. A major area of focus is spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD), an uncommon and under-recognized cause of acute coronary syndrome (heart attack) that occurs predominantly in young women.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Action News Jax
Mayo Clinic to test vaccine to prevent, treat precancerous breast lesions
by Jenna Bourne

Mayo Clinic doctors will test a vaccine to prevent women from developing precancerous breast lesions. It could someday become part of routine vaccinations for women, but the Mayo Clinic has to first put it through extensive clinical trials. The hospital is able to do that because of a $3.7 million grant from the U.S. Department of Defense…Mayo Clinic immunology professor Dr. Keith Knutson has been working on a vaccine for nearly a decade. Knutson hoped it will help hundreds of thousands of women avoid surgeries and radiation treatments. “That’s been a big problem, because treatments have side effects. And that’s something that we may be able to eliminate by boosting the body’s own natural drug making machinery, which is the immune system,” said Knutson.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Context: Researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have been awarded a $13.3 million, five-year federal grant to test a vaccine designed to prevent the recurrence of triple-negative breast cancer, a subset of breast cancer for which there are no targeted therapies. The grant, the Breakthrough Award from the U.S. Department of Defense’s Breast Cancer Research Program, will fund a national, phase II clinical trial testing the ability of a folate receptor alpha vaccine to prevent recurrence of this aggressive cancer following initial treatment. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Knutson, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Wall Street Journal
A New Device May Mean Fewer Breast-Cancer Surgeries
by Lucette Lagnado

Viewing low re-excision rates as a key indicator of quality, other institutions are highlighting their techniques to reduce second surgeries. At Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., breast surgeons point to their method of having pathologists nearby in the operating suite to examine frozen tissue samples while the patient is in surgery. Their second-surgery rates are 3.6%, though the technique is a century old, says Dr. Judy Boughey, Mayo’s surgical-research chair.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: When diagnosed with breast cancer, women may have thousands of questions running through their minds, but one they may not have immediately is: Will my choice of provider save me time and money? Mayo Clinic researchers have answered this question with what they believe are compelling statistics that may encourage women and their doctors — and the health care system at large — to consider a different way of doing business, specifically with respect to lumpectomies as a treatment for early-stage breast cancer.  The different way would be to use intraoperative frozen section analysis to determine whether the tumor was removed completely during the first surgery. Doing this in a widespread manner could save untold hours of lost work, anxiety and more for women and tens of millions of dollars.  “With the routine use of frozen section analysis of margins on Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus, we rarely — in only 3 to 5 percent of cases — require a second operation for margin re-excision,” says first author Judy Boughey, M.D., a breast surgeon in the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. “So, for over 95 percent of patients undergoing lumpectomy, only one operation is required.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Phoenix magazine
School of Doc
by Jessie Martin
This summer, the University of Arizona College of Medicine’s 50-year run as the only M.D.-granting institution in Arizona will come to an end with the debut Phoenix magazine logoof the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine in Scottsdale. It will be the third branch of the medical college, which was founded in 1972 in Rochester, Minn., followed by a sister campus in Jacksonville, Fla. Lois Krahn, a Mayo Clinic physician of 22 years, says a common misconception of this partnership is that ASU and Mayo Clinic are opening a joint medical school. “It’s important to note that we are not partnering with ASU in the legal sense. We have a very rich and productive collaboration with ASU that dates back over a decade,” Krahn says.

Reach:  Written for the residents of and visitors to the metropolitan Phoenix area, Phoenix magazine has a monthly circulation of more than 70,000.  Phoenix magazine online has more than 43,000 unique visitors each month.

Related coverage:
AMA blog, Not your grandfather’s med school: Changes trending in med ed

Context: Mayo Medical School announced that its planned expansion in Scottsdale, has received licensure by the Arizona State Board for Private Postsecondary Education, the group responsible for regulating private postsecondary degree-granting institutions within the state of Arizona will open with its first class of students this year. "This is a major milestone in our journey to open a full four-year branch campus of Mayo Medical School in Scottsdale,” says Wyatt Decker, M.D., CEO of Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Earlier this month, Mayo Medical School leaders announced they had also received endorsement for the expansion from the Liaison Committee for Medical Education (LCME), the accrediting body for medical education. More information about the medical school can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network and on the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine's website.

Contacts:  Jim McVeigh, Deborah Anderson

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Tags: ABC News, Action News Jax, Alatus development, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimers, AMA, Answer Man, Associated Press, autoimmune disease, BBC Mundo, birth control, blood pressure


October 14th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

MPR
Your genes can affect how medications work in your body

Doctors are learning about a new tool that can help them determine what the best treatment option is for each individual patient. It's called individualized medicine and it's the topic of a conference happening this week at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester. MPR's Phil Picardi spoke with Dr.MPR News logo Keith Stewart, who is the director of the Mayo Clinic's Center for Individualized Medicine.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Keith Stewart, M.B., Ch.B is a Mayo Clinic hematologist and director of Mayo's Center for Individualized Medicine.  Individualized medicine, also known as personalized medicine or precision medicine, means tailoring diagnosis and treatment to each patient to optimize care. Patients have experienced this kind of care for a century and a half at Mayo Clinic, where teams of specialists have always worked together to find answers.

Contact: Susan Buckles

 

TIME
The Case for Being Messy
by Tim Harford

Messy disruptions will be most powerful when combined with creative skill. The disruption puts an artist, scientist or engineer in unpromising Time magazine logoterritory—a deep valley rather than a familiar hilltop…We’re often told that good work comes from the ability to focus, to shut out distractions. To choose from a plethora of self-help tips along these lines, a Mayo Clinic psychologist, Dr Amit Sood, advises us to focus more effectively by turning off the TV, logging out of email and taking up “attention training” to “train your brain.”

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Amit Sood, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in General Internal Medicine and the Cancer Center. Dr. Sood is editor of the  Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness and The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Wall Street Journal
Can New Smartphone Apps Help Migraine Sufferers?
by Laura Johannes

David Dodick, a professor of neurology and director of headache medicine at Mayo Clinic, in Phoenix, says some migraine sufferers may not need the apps if they have obvious triggers, such as alcohol use or menstruation. More likely to benefit are people whose migraine attacks occur whenWSJ Banner several triggers “stack” on top of each other. “For example, you’re an accountant and it’s tax time, you’re stressed, sleep-deprived and you have a glass of wine to unwind. All those factors together have pushed you over the edge,” suggests Dr. Dodick, who is president of the International Headache Society.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: David Dodick, M.D. is a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Huffington Post
What Your Body Type Can Reveal About Your Health
by Deborah Long

It’s important to know which body type you are, because your health risks vary accordingly. A quick look in the mirror should tell you whether you’re an apple or a pear, but if you’re not sure, you can ask your doctor next time you have a physical. Michael Jensen, M.D., an endocrinologist Huffington Post Logowith the Mayo Clinic, is an expert on the health risks associated with excess weight. He has spent fully three decades studying the risks overweight patients face and is considered a pioneer of correlating how body type – or where excess weight is carried – relates to the likelihood of developing various diseases. His research has led him to conclude that there is no question that one body type is especially at risk for life-threatening conditions.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique visitors.

Context:  Michael Jensen, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Jensen and his lab study the effects of obesity and how body fat (adipose tissue) and body fat distribution influence health. The regulated uptake, storage and release of fatty acids from adipose tissue play a major role in determining its health effects.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic hits 30th year in Jacksonville by Mayo Clinic hits 30th year in Jacksonville
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville opened to patients 30 years ago, including 2,700 people from 30 states who already made appointments. By today’s standards, the facility was a small scale operation: One medical building, 37 physicians, 158 other employees. Contrast that to what MayoFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo is today — a medical center today that sprawls over 18 buildings and a parking garage on the campus located off San Pablo Road. Four-hundred-ninety-five physicians and scientists — many researchers with doctorates — and 4,664 other employees work there.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida is celebrating 30 years of providing high-quality medical care in Northeast Florida. Since the clinic opened in 1986, more than 600,000 unique patients from all 50 states and 143 countries have come to the Florida campus for Mayo’s unique, patient-centered approach to medical care. “Innovation is in our DNA at Mayo Clinic,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., CEO, Mayo Clinic in Florida. “Through three decades of growth, Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida has invested in people, space and technology to carry forward the vision of our founders and meet the needs of patients, today and into the future.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

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Tags: A.L.S., alzheimer's disease, arthritis, ATRI, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, birth control, body type, brain tumor, Business Insider, canker sores, CBS News, Cuddle Cot


July 29th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Washington Post
Complex jobs and social ties appear to help ward off Alzheimer’s, new research shows
by Tara Bahrampour

The studies support previous findings that more stimulating lifestyles are associated with better cognitive outcomes later in life, and bolster the importance of intellectual engagement, said Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging and the Mayo Alzheimer’s Research Center. “Physical activity has been reasonably well-documented, but with intellectual activity the data get pretty soft…these two studies speakWashington Post newspaper logo to that,” he said. “What it may mean is the development of Alzheimer’s Disease or cognitive change with aging need not be a passive process; you can do something about it…staying intellectually active whether it be your job or other kinds of activities may actually be beneficial.”

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: NBC News

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

CBS News
Memory loss is not necessarily the first sign of dementia
by Ruslan Guzov

Memory loss may not always be the first warning sign that dementia is brewing -- changes in behavior or personality might be an early clue…"It's important for us to recognize that not everything's forgetfulness," CBS News Logosaid Dr. Ron Petersen, the Mayo Clinic's Alzheimer's research chief. He wasn't involved in developing the behavior checklist but said it could raise awareness of the neuropsychiatric link with dementia.

Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

Additional coverage: Associated Press

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

 

Washington Post
Men may get Alzheimer’s as much as women; we just haven’t known how to spot it
by Tara Bahrampour

Looking at the State of Florida’s brain bank, researchers at the Mayo Clinic found Alzheimer’s in 1,625 of 2,809 people who had donated their brains for autopsies. The donors were almost equally divided: 51 percent men and 49 percent women. But contrary to what has been seen in the general population, the Alzheimer’s cases in the brain bank were much more evenly divided: 54 percent of cases were women and 46Washington Post newspaper logo percent were men… It is hard to diagnose the disease in people under 70, according to Melissa Murray, an assistant professor at the Mayo Clinic’s department of neuroscience, who presented the study. “If you don’t know what the disease is then you can’t give even the modicum of treatment that we have available,” Murray said, noting that symptoms in men are often mistaken for cortico-basal syndrome, frontotemporal dementia, or other conditions.

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:

CBS News, 1 in 5 Alzheimer's cases may be misdiagnosed

Florida Times-Union, Mayo clinic study finds mens Alzheimer' misdiagnosed more often than women

ABC News, HealthDay, Neurology Today, Telegraph UK, Express UK, Daily MailActionNewsJax

Context: Mayo neuroscientist Melissa E. Murray, Ph.D., led the study, which suggests a high number of men are not accurately diagnosed during their lifetime. The Alzheimer’s Association issued a news release today about the research findings, which Dr. Murray is presenting at the 2016 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Toronto. “While it is well accepted that age is the strongest risk factor for Alzheimer’s, there is an enormous need to understand interacting factors that contribute to the development of the disease,” says Dr. Murray, assistant professor of Neuroscience on Mayo’s Jacksonville campus. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Star Tribune (Associated Press)
Behavior changes offer clues that dementia could be brewing
by Lauran Neergaard

If validated, the checklist could help doctors better identify people at risk of brewing Alzheimer's and study changes over time. "It's important for us to recognize that not everything's forgetfulness," said Dr. Ron Star Tribune LogoPetersen, the Mayo Clinic's Alzheimer's research chief. He wasn't involved in developing the behavior checklist but said it could raise awareness of the neuropsychiatric link with dementia.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: Chicago Daily Herald, Post-Bulletin, Kansas City Star

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber LindquistDuska Anastasijevic

 

STAT
Promising Alzheimer’s treatment flops in new trial, crushing hopes
by Damian Garde

A closely watched treatment for Alzheimer’s disease came up short in a late-stage trial, marking the latest setback in a field wracked by years of failure. The drug, from biotech company TauRx, did no better than a sugar pill at improving patients’ scores on tests of cognitive and physical function, according to data presented early Wednesday at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Toronto. The studySTAT Logo of Boston Globe looked at roughly 900 patients with mild to moderate forms of Alzheimer’s. “I must say I’m disappointed by the results,” said Dr. David Knopman, a Mayo Clinic neurologist not involved with the study.

Reach: STAT covers the frontiers of health and medicine including science labs, hospitals, biotechnology board rooms, and political back rooms. Hosted by The Boston Globe, STAT launched on November 5, 2015. The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Additional coverage:

CNN, Does it pass the 'smell test'? Seeking ways to diagnose Alzheimer's early

Reuters, TauRx Alzheimer's drug fails in large study; some benefit seen

New York Times, USA Today, MedPage TodayFOX News, Huffington Post, NBC News

Contacts: Susan Barber LindquistDuska Anastasijevic

 

 

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic researcher wins international award
by Brett Boese

A Mayo Clinic scientist received a prestigious international award Monday at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference that's being hosted in Canada. Dr. Guojun Bu, a neuroscientist at Mayo's Florida Logo for Post-Bulletin newspapercampus, received the 2016 MetLife Foundation Major Award for Medical Research in Alzheimer's Disease, which is given annually to the top scientist in this field of study. Bu and his research lab have produced more than 220 peer-reviewed articles on Alzheimer's over the past 20 years that have been cited more than 10,000 times. That work is widely recognized as being some of the most significant in the field.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context:  Guojun Bu, Ph.D., a neuroscientist onMayo Clinic’s Florida campus, will receive the 2016 MetLife Foundation Major Award for Medical Research in Alzheimer’s Disease ─ one of the most prestigious awards given annually to the top scientist in this field of study. The award was presented to Dr. Bu today at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Toronto. Over the past 20 years, Dr. Bu and his medical research lab have produced more than 220 peer-reviewed articles that have been cited more than 10,000 times. Colleagues and other Alzheimer’s researchers say his team’s contributions to Alzheimer’s research rank among the most significant in the field. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

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Tags: "liquid biopsies", 9&10 News (Michigan), Abby Bartz, ABC News, ActionNewsJax, Adult coloring, Allie Wergin, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers, Amber Kohnhorst, Andra Palmer, Anesthesiology News


July 8th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Wall Street Journal
Can Adults Grow Taller?
By Heidi Mitchell

Nearly everyone shrinks with age. But some people insist, often after an annual visit to their doctor, that they’ve added a half-inch or so. If they aren’t children or teens, they’re probably mistaken, says Todd Milbrandt, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.,WSJ Banner who explains the significance of physes and what makes 20 a special number. “There may be a 21-year-old patient that is young, in terms of his bone age, which is why he may still be growing in college, whereas others may have stopped when they are 13 or 14,” says Dr. Milbrandt, who does research on growth plates.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Todd Milbrandt, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon who is also affiliated with Mayo Clinic's Children's Center.  Dr. Milbrandt investigates pediatric muscle, tendon and bone dysfunction. Specifically, he is interested in re-creating naturally found tissue when that tissue is damaged. By using tissue-engineering techniques, Dr. Milbrandt looks to reform cartilage in growth arrest from childhood trauma, to prevent hip collapse in Legg-Calve-Perthes disease and to eradicate bone infections.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Twin Cities Business
Signature Mayo Heart Cell Regeneration Technique Passes Key European Trial
by Don Jacobson

A signature research project of the Mayo Clinic’s Center for Regenerative Medicine – using stem cells to treat ischemic heart failure – has proven effective on enough patients in a European clinical trial to prompt its corporate backer to accelerate commercialization efforts. The results, Twin Cities Business Magazine Logoannounced last week, heralded the first time heart cell regeneration has been shown effective in a large-scale trial and could represent a major win for the Mayo center, which began work on the concept a decade ago. The product, C-Cure, is being developed by the Belgian company Celyad S.A. under an exclusive license from Mayo. Touted as a potential paradigm-shifter in treating the dire condition, the technique was co-developed by Dr. Andre Terzic, director of the Rochester clinic’s regenerative medicine center, as one of its first big projects.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Context: Andre Terzic, M.D., Ph.D.  is director of Mayo Clinic's Center for Regenerative Medicine and a Mayo cardiologist. Mayo Clinic and center leaders believe that regenerative medicine, which makes it possible to actually repair diseased, injured or congenitally defective tissues and organs, will be a vital component of medical and surgical practice in the coming years. By harnessing the potential of regenerative medicine, Mayo Clinic is poised to create new models of health care and transform medicine and surgery.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Business Insider
USA Swimming director gave an astonishing quote about how Katie Ledecky is going to dominate and change the sport

Sheinin also spoke to Michael J. Joyner, a researcher for the Mayo Clinic, who fueled the notion that we haven’t seen an athlete like Ledecky before. Joyner illustrated what Ledecky’s dominance would look like for athletes in other sports. “She’s dominating by the widest margin inBusiness Insider international sport, winning by 1 or 2 percent,” Joyner said. “If [a runner] won the 10,000 meters by that wide a margin, they’d win by 100 meters. One or 2 percent in the Tour de France, over about 80 hours of racing, would be 30 or 40 minutes. It’s just absolutely remarkable.”

Reach: Business Insider has more than 11 million unique visitors each month. The on-line publication focuses on business news. The site provides and analyzes business news and acts as an aggregator of top news stories from around the web. Its content is sometimes cited by other, larger, publications such as The New York Times and domestic news outlets like National Public Radio.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist. His laboratory is interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss. Dr. Joyner and his team study how the nervous system regulates blood pressure, heart rate and metabolism in response to these forms of stress. They are also interested in how blood flow to muscle and skin responds to these stressors. These responses are studied in young healthy subjects, healthy older subjects and people with conditions such as heart failure.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

KIMT-TV
11-year-old heart transplant patient going home after 2 years
by DeeDee Stiepan

A young patient from Panama who has been receiving treatment following a heart transplant at Mayo Clinic will finally get to go home after living KIMTin Rochester for more than two years. But before he left, Mayo Clinic staff threw him and his family a surprise going away party on Thursday. “He’s done so much better than we could have ever imagined,” explains Jonathan Johnson, M.D., Joseph’s heart transplant surgeon. “He’s really done great and he keeps up with other kids his age and does everything we could have ever hoped — we’re really, really pleased.”

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Context: Jonathan Johnson, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic pediatric cardiologist and hear transplant surgeon. Dr. Johnson's research encompasses several different areas of pediatric cardiology. Dr. Johnson's primary focus is researching clinical outcomes in pediatric patients with congenital heart disease, as well as those with cardiomyopathy or heart failure, or those who have required heart transplantation or ventricular assist device (VAD) placement. Dr. Johnson is also interested in cardiac imaging, including fetal, transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, and studies how these imaging modalities can be used to improve patient outcomes.

Contact: Kelly Reller

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Tags: 24/7 Wall St., age-related shrinking, air ambulance, Aries Merritt, Arizona Republic, Aromatherapy, ASU Now, Becker’s Hospital Review, Billings Gazette, birth control, brain waves, brain-wave patterns


May 20th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Forbes
How Women Are Leading The Charge In Changing Healthcare
by Sarah Hedgecock

“We’re transforming from a passive patient to an empowered patient,” MedImmune head Bahija Jallal said by way of introduction. And in the new world of patient empowerment, that could mean anything from finding your own doctor to taking on decades of standard healthcareForbes Pharma and Healthcare logo practice. Deborah Rhodes, an associate medical professor at Mayo Clinic, is undertaking the latter. She is disturbed by the fact that mammograms are not an effective way to find tumors in dense breasts, despite the fact that about half of all women have dense breasts. “Trying to find a tumor in a dense breast on a mammogram is like looking through a periscope trying to find enemy ships in dense water,” she said. “The problem is you don’t know how many enemy ships you’re failing to see until you use a better tool to spot them.”

Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Deborah Rhodes, M.D., is a physician with Mayo Clinic's Breast Diagnostic Clinic. Dr. Rhodes studies the application of a new breast imaging device, molecular breast imaging, to breast cancer screening. The long-term goal of Dr. Rhodes' research is to develop an individualized approach to breast cancer screening that incorporates breast density, age, and other factors that impact breast cancer risk and mammography sensitivity. Dr. Rhodes recently spoke at Forbes Women's Summit 2016.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

NBC News
White House Goes With Its Gut, Backs New Microbiome Project
by Maggie Fox

Anyone who watched "The Martian" learned that crops cannot grow without partner organisms in the soil. Now the White House wants to NBCNewsComencourage research into the microbiome: the microbes living in and on animals, the dirt, oceans and the atmosphere...The Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine says it will open a $1.4 million Microbiome Clinic offering whole-genome sequencing, checking patients to see if their bodies harbor antibiotic-resistant "superbugs, and offering fecal transplants — the experimental new way of cleaning out killer Clostridium infections with transplants of "healthy" poop from donors.

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:

STAT, Obama administration to launch microbiome initiative, heeding scientists’ calls
KAAL-TV, Mayo Clinic Creating New "Microbiome Clinic"
KTTC-TVFederal government to back microbiome research

Context: The Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine joined the National Microbiome Initiative sponsored by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). More than 100 institutions committed to advance microbiome research in areas such as health care, food safety and security, environmental protection, and bioenergy production. In support of the National Microbiome Initiative Mayo Clinic is committed to establishing a Microbiome Clinic, offering clinical services, diagnostics and patient education. “The new clinic will focus on improving the care of the individual patient through knowledge of the human microbiome,” says Purna Kashyap, M.B.B.S. , consultant in gastroenterology, associate director of the Mayo Clinic Microbiome Program. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Colette Gallagher

 

Chicago Tribune
Looking beyond the obvious superfoods
by Bill Daley

Dr. Donald Hensrud, medical director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program in Rochester, Minn., said people should Chicago Tribune Logotry to focus on "patterns of eating" rather than specific foods themselves. To focus on the blueberry — as one of his patients did, going so far as to ask how many to eat each day — means excluding the benefits of other berries out there. Variety means obtaining different nutrients, as each food has its own nutritional profile, Hensrud says.

Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of nearly 385,000 and its website has more than 13.5 million unique visitors each month.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life. Donald Hensrud, M.D. is the program’s medical director.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Prevention magazine
"I Got Lung Cancer Even Though I Never Smoked"
by Hallie Levine

Linda Wortman was perfectly healthy, athletic, and enjoying her work as a flight attendant when she found out she had lung cancer….The next Prevention logofew weeks were agony. So when I got a call from the Mayo Clinic asking if I wanted to join a research study on meditation and paced breathing, I agreed. I would have done anything at that point to feel better. Dr. Amit Sood sent me a DVD with instructions to do 15 minutes of breathing exercises in the morning and another 15 at night, but I ended up doing them for hours at a time. Meditating calmed my mind and body; I really feel like it saved me.

Reach:  Prevention magazine has a monthly circulation of more than 1.5 million readers and covers practical health information and ideas on healthy living. Its website has nearly 1.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Amit Sood, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in General Internal Medicine and the Cancer Center. Dr. Sood is editor of the  Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness and The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

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Tags: ABC15 Arizona, aging, air purifiers, alzheimers, Arkansas Online, Attn:, B12, birth control, bladder cancer, carotid-artery stenosis, Center for Individualized Medicine, chest pain


September 17th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor: Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

News4Jax
Is it time to redefine high blood pressure?
by Crystal Moyer

Results of a study by the National Institutes of Health show a change in the treatment of high blood pressure may save lives…."The findings were surprising. I think theyNews Jax 4 Logo were even surprising to the folks that put this trial together,” said Dr. William Haley, principal investigator for Mayo Clinic. "Compared to the usual goal blood pressure that's been traditional, that a goal blood pressure of 120 was found to be associated with much lower risk of cardiovascular diseases and stroke and significant lowered risk of death."

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville.

Additional coverage: Florida Times-Union, South Florida Reporter

Context: Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus was the nation’s second largest recruiting site, and largest in the Southeast, to participate in a landmark study that has found maintaining systolic blood pressure at a target of 120 greatly reduced the risk of cardiovascular complications and death in older adults with high blood pressure. “It’s been widely assumed that if you’re older, it’s OK to have a higher blood pressure, and this study challenges that notion,” said William E. Haley, M.D., principal investigator for Mayo Clinic of the SPRINT study and a nephrologist at Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

First Coast News
Mayo Clinic awarded $13.3 million grant to test cancer vaccine
by Keitha Nelson

The Mayo Clinic has received a $13.3 million dollar grant from the U.S. Department of
First Coast News LogoDefense's Breast Cancer Research Program to fund a clinical trial. Researchers believe they now have a vaccine that could bring new found hope to those who have been told in the past that there are no targeted therapies for the disease they're fighting… "What we want to do is intervene during that period between conventional therapy and when they relapse and see if we can boost the body's immune defenses to fight off that relapse," said Dr. Keith Knutson in the Department of Immunology at Mayo Clinic's Florida campus.

Reach: First Coast News refers to three television stations in Jacksonville, Florida. WJXX, the ABC affiliate; WTLV, the NBC affiliate; and WCWJ, the CW affiliate.

Additional coverage:

Florida Times-Union — Jacksonville's Mayo Clinic gets $13.2 million grant for new breast cancer study

KAAL — Mayo Receives Grant to Start Clinical Trials for Breast Cancer Vaccine

Jacksonville Daily Record, BioFlorida, Jacksonville Metro Bugle, KSTP

Context: Researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have been awarded a $13.3 million, five-year federal grant to test a vaccine designed to prevent the recurrence of triple-negative breast cancer, a subset of breast cancer for which there are no targeted therapies. The clinical trial, which will enroll 280 patients at multiple clinical sites, is expected to begin early in 2016. More information, including an interview with the principal investigator, Keith Knutson, Ph.D., can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

KIMT
School-based flu shot clinics

For the seventh year, Mayo Clinic is teaming up with the Olmsted Medical Center, Olmsted County Public Health and schools in the county for the school-basedKIMT LOGO clinics…“It can spread easily and then they bring it home to their family members and the community that are susceptible like the elderly and so vaccinating school aged children has helped dramatically decrease illness in the older population without them even being vaccinated,” says Jennifer Brickley, the Program Coordinator.

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Additional coverage: KTTC, FOX47

Context: “Everyone needs to get the flu vaccine every year, and, this year, the school-based immunization program of Olmsted County is bigger than ever, making it easier for more families to get their school children vaccinated on time,” says Robert Jacobson, M.D., pediatrician and medical director of the Employee and Community Health Immunization Program at Mayo Clinic. “This year, for the first time, we will bring the flu vaccine program to every middle school in the county and four of the seven high schools. That’s great news for parents.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

ABC News
Infant Twins Share Heartbreaking Cancer Diagnosis
by Nicole Pelletiere

After nine months in the womb together, a set of 3-month-old twin girls, Kenedi and ABC News logoKendal, are now sharing something else -- the same heartbreaking cancer diagnosis…On Aug. 17, following a bone marrow biopsy, Breyfogle received confirmation that her twins both had acute myeloid leukemia…On Aug. 19, Kenedi and Kendal were admitted into the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Two days later, the girls received their first rounds of chemotherapy. "This one is very rare and to have both identical twins have it at the same time, at least at the Mayo Clinic, in our group we have never seen it," said Dr. Shakila Khan, division chair of pediatric hematology-oncology at the clinic.

Reach:  ABCNews.com is the official website for ABC News. Its website receives more than 16.9 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Growing your baby,WJBF Ga., FOX News, FOX29 Philadelphia

Context: Experts from Mayo Clinic's Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology in Minnesota work as part of a multispecialty team to provide customized care for children and adolescents who have blood disorders or cancer. Shakila Khan, M.D., chairs the division and is a pediatric hematologist and oncologist.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

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Tags: 3-month-old twin girls share cancer, 3D technology for the medical field, 3D-printed ribs, ABC News, ABC15 Phoenix, ABCnews.com, acute myeloid leukemia, adjuvant chemotherapy, Albuquerque Journal, anti-bacterial soap, AP, Arizona Capital Times


July 3rd, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

New York Times

Medical Boards Draft Plan to Ease Path to Out-of-State and Online Treatment
by Robert Pear

Officials representing state medical boards across the country have drafted a model law that would make it much easier for doctors licensed in one state to treat patients in other states, whether in person, by videoconference or online…The Mayo Clinic, in Minnesota, for example, has established links with more than two dozen hospitals The New York Times newspaper logoand health systems…“Cross-border licensure is a strategic imperative as we move forward in this brave new world,” said Kathleen M. Harrington, who is in charge of government relations at Mayo.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Context: In stroke telemedicine, also called telestroke, doctors who have advanced training in the nervous system (neurologists) remotely evaluate people who've had acute strokes and make diagnoses and treatment recommendations to emergency medicine doctors at other sites. Doctors communicate using digital video cameras, Internet telecommunications, robotic telepresence, smartphones and other technology.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Fortune
Test-driving the Mayo Clinic's new plan for healthy living
by Larry Armour

The famed clinic has a fresh approach to helping patients stick with a fitness program. I went to check it out. I’m sharing a gym in Rochester, Minn., with 16 men and women. We are part of a pilot program for a new venture called the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Plan. We were told to wear comfortable clothes and athletic shoes, butFortune magazine logo the hardcore workout we all expected never shows up. Instead, we are introduced to a concept called NEAT, which stands for Non-Exercise Activity Thermogenesis.

Reach: FORTUNE has a circulation of more than 845,000 readers.  It's website receives more than 4.5 million unique visitors each month.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is designed to help people break down barriers, dispel myths and give participants a comprehensive wellness experience tailored to their individual goals. What makes this program unique is that it doesn’t end once the person leaves the campus; it offers ongoing support long after the person returns home. “Mayo has been dedicated to the health and wellness of individuals for 150 years, and this program continues that tradition by offering life-changing experiences to people seeking whole-person wellness who want to maximize their health,” says Donald Hensrud, M.D., medical director, Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. “We’re committed to partnering with each participant to design an individualized wellness plan to help them reach their wellness goals so that their success continues once they return home and are immersed back into the reality of their busy lives.” More information on Mayo's Healthy Living Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

MPR
Researchers, advocates see better ALS therapies on the horizon

This weekend marks the anniversary of one of pro sports' most poignant moments: Baseball great Lou Gehrig, standing before microphones near home plate at Yankee Stadium on July 4, 1939 as a standing-room only crowd honored him as one of the most famous players of his time...There are two stem cell therapy trials going on atMPR-News-300x45 Mayo Clinic. Both involve using stem cells grown from a participant's stomach fat. One is looking at the safety of injecting ALS patients with varying doses of their stem cells. The other trial uses a patient's stem cells, modified with growth factors, and reintroduced into the patient's spinal fluid. Researchers hope those tweaked stem cells will protect cells that control movement from further damage and death from ALS. Dr. Anthony Windebank, with the Center for Regenerative Medicine at Mayo, calls the fledgling therapy a "radically new kind of treatment." 

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Additional Coverage:

Men’s HealthGehrig's Final, Finest At-Bat

Post-Bulletin, Gehrig honored, 75 years after speech 


Context:
 Seventy-five years ago, on July 4th 1939, baseball legend Lou Gehrig delivered the famous speech bidding farewell to the ballpark and his fans. Two weeks before Gehrig had been diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Accompanied by his wife, Eleanor, Lou left Mayo Clinic with the devastating diagnosis on June 20th 1939, a day after his 36th birthday. He died in June two years later, not quite 38 years old, of the rare neurological disease that would come to bear his name.

ALS is a type of progressive motor neuron disease that typically strikes at middle to later life and causes nerve cells in spinal cord, brain stem and brain to gradually break down and die. These nerve cells are responsible for muscle function so eventually, ALS can affect the ability to control the muscles needed to move, speak, eat and breathe.

While ALS still evades cure and effective treatment, researchers at Mayo Clinic are conducting a Phase I clinical trial in the hope that they can guide newly grown stem cells to become protective of neuromuscular function.

“We use fat-derived mesenchymal stem cells from the patient's own body. These cells are modified in the laboratory and delivered through a spinal tap into the fluid around the patient's nervous system to promote neuron survival,” explains neurologist Anthony Windebank, M.D, deputy director for discovery in the Center for Regenerative Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Rochester. “We hope that the growth factors that they are producing will help protect and promote the survival of nerve cells and therefore slow down or arrest the progression of ALS. If we can halt an ALS patient's loss of cells at 20 to 30 percent, that person’s function would be well-preserved," says Dr. Windebank. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Post Bulletin
Hockey players get cognitive training from Mayo Clinic staff
by Jeff Hansel

Mayo Clinic's new Rochester training center for elite athletes has taken a cue from the Israeli military. The facility, in the Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center, this year Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperbegan cognitive training designed to increase hockey players' "hockey sense" — their awareness of where the puck and other players are on the ice. It uses "applied cognitive engineering" developed with USA Hockey…Dr. Michael Stuart, co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center, said athletes can actually improve their ability to anticipate what's going to happen on the ice based on the location of the puck or other players, including "both teammates and opponents."

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center is a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, sports performance optimization, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

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Tags: 3D mammography, A.L.S., AftenPosten, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimer's disease, Apple, Arthritis Today, Augie Nieto, autism spectrum disorder, birth control, Bloomberg Businessweek, BMI


May 8th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Prevention
The Hidden Type of Alzheimer's Doctors Miss
by Markham Heid

…The study team examined the brains of more than 1,800 confirmed Alzheimer's patients. They found the types of protein blockages and tangles associated with the hippocampal sparing form of Alzheimer's in 11% of those brain specimens. InPrevention logo this subtype, one type of protein called tau forms "tangles" in the parts of brain that control behavior, motor awareness, speech, and vision, explains Melissa Murray, PhD, who led the Mayo Clinic research team.

Reach: Prevention is published monthly with a circulation of 2.8 million.  Prevention - Online has more than 1.1 million unique visitors each month and has 9.3 million average page views each month.

Additional coverage: HealthDay, Alzheimer's Variation May Often Go Unrecognized: Study; Canada Journal, Health.com, Aetna InteliHealth, Bayoubuzz Health, BioPortfolio, DoctorsLounge, Hawaii News Now, Counsel & Heal, Innovations Report, KAIT Ark., FOX19 Ohio

Context: Neuroscientists at Mayo Clinic in Florida have defined a subtype of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) that they say is neither well recognized nor treated appropriately. The variant, called hippocampal sparing AD, made up 11 percent of the 1,821 AD-confirmed brains examined by Mayo Clinic researchers — suggesting this subtype is relatively widespread in the general population. The Alzheimer’s Association estimates that 5.2 million Americans are living with AD. And with nearly half of hippocampal sparing AD patients being misdiagnosed, this could mean that well over 600,000 Americans make up this AD variant, researchers say. More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

TIME
11 Reasons Why You’re Not Losing Belly Fat

…You’re getting older, As you get older, your body changes how it gains and loses weight. Both men and women experience a declining metabolic rate, or the number of calories theTime banner body needs to function normally. On top of that, women have to deal with menopause. “If women gain weight after menopause, it’s more likely to be in their bellies,” says Michael Jensen, MD, professor of medicine in the Mayo Clinic’s endocrinology division.

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Michael Jensen, MD. is an endocrinologist and diabetes expert.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

 

KAAL
Mayo Clinic Rolls Out Mobile Exhibit to Celebrate 150 Years
by Hannah Tran

150 years of service. Mayo Clinic is celebrating 15 decades of care and it wants to share its KAAL TV logogsuccess across the nation. For the past 18 months, Mayo staff have worked on a mobile exhibit to encapsulate its accomplishments and development in core values. "This exhibit is showing the story of Mayo Clinic to the people," said CEO John Noseworthy, who addressed an audience outside of the exhibit before preliminary tours commenced.

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Additional coverage:

Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic's big-rig exhibit arrives Tuesday
KTTC, Mayo Celebrates 150 Years of Medicine
La Crosse Tribune, 500 tour Mayo's 150th anniversary exhibit
KTTC, Mayo Clinic celebrates 150 years of service with traveling exhibit
Post-Bulletin, 150 years: Franciscan sisters integral to Mayo Clinic's development
Post-Bulletin, Mayo at 150: Brothers' values continue to guide clinic
Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic didn't profit from major discovery
KIMT Online (video), In-Forum, N.D.

Context: Mayo Clinic's traveling mobile exhibit has begun its journey. In 2014, we honor 150 years of serving humanity. This is one way Mayo Clinic can give back – to thank the patients and friends who’ve been part of our story, and share our vision with the public. People from all walks of life turn to Mayo Clinic … so we’re reaching out, bringing Mayo Clinic to the people. This exhibit is sponsored by the Mayo Clinic Sesquicentennial Committee with generous support from many patients and friends. 

Public Affairs ContactsRebecca EisenmanRick Thiesse, Kelley Luckstein

 

MSNBC Morning Joe
How diet impacts brain function in seniors

Dr. John Noseworthy and Dr. Rosebud Roberts, both of the Mayo Clinic, join Morning Morning JoeJoe to discuss 150 years of the Mayo Clinic. Dr. Roberts also discusses how a poor diet in old age can impact the brain.

Reach: MSNBC provides in-depth analysis of daily headlines, political commentary and informed perspectives. MSNBC’s home on the Internet is tv.msnbc.com. Joe Scarborough hosts “Morning Joe,” with co-hosts Mika Brzezinski and Willie Geist, featuring interviews with top politicians and newsmakers, as well as in-depth analysis of the day’s biggest stories. Morning Joe has about 375,000 viewers daily.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic President and CEO, and Rosebud Roberts, M.B., Ch.B.. appeared on Morning Joe May 8. Dr. Roberts' research  focuses on identifying risk factors for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia, both diseases of aging that affect memory and thinking skills. People who develop diabetes and high blood pressure in middle age are more likely to have brain cell loss and other damage to the brain, as well as problems with memory and thinking skills, than people who never have diabetes or high blood pressure or who develop it in old age, according to a new study published in the March 19, 2014, online issue of Neurology. Middle age was defined as age 40 to 64 and old age as age 65 and older. More information about the research can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Duska Anastasijevic

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic announces it is more than halfway to its goal of raising $3 billion from private benefactors by the end of 2017
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Clinic, which has campuses in Rochester, Minn., Scottsdale, Ariz., and Jacksonville, is in the midst of a $3 billion fundraising campaign that will be formallyFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo announced Friday in Rochester. The campaign, which began with a “quiet phase” in 2010 and has already achieved 58.5 percent of its goal, “addresses reliable funding as the biggest barrier to medical breakthroughs,” said Cheryl Hadaway, chief development officer for Mayo Clinic.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic asks grateful patients to help endow its top treatment
By Jeff Hansel

Mayo Clinic today announced a $3 billion philanthropic fundraising campaign to help pay Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperfor research, as federal funding has become less reliable because of budget cuts. Mayo has raised more than half the money, or $1.7 billion, as the quiet phase of the campaign began in 2010. The campaign will continue untilDec. 31, 2017.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: To accelerate the pace of research, solve unmet needs of patients and improve the quality of health care,Mayo Clinic today announced a philanthropic campaign to raise $3 billion by Dec. 31, 2017, strengthening Mayo’s strategic priorities in patient care, research and education. “Reliable funding is the biggest barrier to advance medical breakthroughs that can benefit patients suffering from diseases,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. “Traditional funding sources, such as federal grants, cannot cover the cost of discovering cutting-edge science and implementing those solutions in clinical practice.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Newtwork and campaign website.

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Tags: 150 Great Places to Work in Healthcare, 5K training, Aaron Taylor, acute myeloid leukemia, adult-onset diabetes, Aetna InteliHealth, affordable housing, Alabama.com, alzheimer's disease, Arkansas, arthritis, ASCO


January 31st, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Modern Healthcare
Symptoms, diagnosis and a prescription: How we can modernize healthcare in America
by Dr. John Noseworthy

Modern Healthcare

It is a tough time in many ways for our country—and for patients. The slow economy, the rapid growth in our aging population, the rising cost of healthcare and the new healthcare law have come together to make this a time of great change in how healthcare is delivered and paid for in the U.S.

Reach: Modern Healthcare, published by Crain Communications, is a healthcare news weekly that provides hospital executives with healthcare business news. The magazine specifically covers healthcare policy, Medicare/Medicaid, and healthcare from a business perspective. It also publishes a daily e-newsletter titled Modern Healthcare’s Daily Dose. The weekly publication has a circulation of more than 70,000 and its online site receives more than 29,700 unique visitors each month.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer,  Karl Oestreich

Reuters
U.S. says results encouraging for healthcare delivery reforms
By David Morgan

The Obama administration on Thursday reported what it called encouraging results from efforts to reduce healthcare costs and improve the quality of care for more than 5 million Medicare beneficiaries under Obamacare. As part of President Barack Obama's healthcare reform law, the Reutersefforts center around more than 360 accountable care organizations (ACOs), which are networks of doctors, hospitals and other providers specially organized to help move Medicare away from traditional fee-for-service medicine..."Today's report reflects important steps. More work is needed to modernize our antiquated Medicare payment system and base payment on evidence-based quality measures and proven patient outcomes," said Dr. John Noseworthy, chief executive of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, which is not part of the government's program.

Reach: Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing newsworld newsbusiness newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal financestock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, videomobile, and interactive television platforms.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

MPR
Mayo Clinic CEO John Noseworthy on the State of the Union

By Tom Crann

Minnesota got a brief shout-out in the State of the Union speech last night when President Obama pointed to the founder of Punch Pizza for the company's minimum wage practices. But Dr. John Noseworthy, President and CEO of the Mayo Clinic, was also at theMPR-News-300x45 address. Noseworthy spoke with MPR News' Tom Crann the State of the Union, the Affordable Care Act and the Mayo Clinic's 150th anniversary.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Additional coverage: KAALPost-Bulletin, KTTCKIMT, C-SPAN

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

KSTP
Mayo Clinic Celebrates 150th Year Anniversary
by Ellen Galles

The Mayo Clinic is celebrating 150 years. In that time, the clinic has brought the world dozens of medical breakthroughs like cortisone and the heart-lung machine. But some of the most KSTP-TV Eyewitness News Logimportant medical breakthroughs could be yet to come…Doctors like Anthony Windebank are researching to see if stem cells can be used to regenerate vital organs in patients who have heart disease, kidney disease and Lou Gehrig's Disease.

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Additional Sesquicentennial coverage: Post-BulletinKSTP morning show, Politico

Context: On Jan. 27, 1864, English-born Dr. William Worrall Mayo first notified the public about his medical practice in Rochester, Minn., planting the seeds of what would eventually become an international medical organization with more than 59,000 expert physicians, scientists and health care professionals, attracting millions of patients from across the globe.

This year marks 150 years of continuous service to patients, and Mayo Clinic is launching a yearlong recognition that will honor a legacy of medical accomplishments and a model for the future of health care.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic Commemorates 150th Anniversary in 2014

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

Florida Times-Union
Progress for Jacksonville, but big hurdles ahead, quality-of-life report says
by Steve Patterson

…“We see Jacksonville’s potential and have raised our expectations. This community demands to reach a higher standard,” said William Rupp, CEO of Mayo Clinic, who chaired the committeeFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo behind JCCI’s 29th annual progress report.

Circulation: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: William Rupp, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vice president and CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

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Tags: Aguas Digital.com, Albert Lea Tribune, alcohol, Amber Sherman, Ana Gregg, Anti-VEGF drugs, AP, Assisi Heights, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Atlanta storm, Austin Daily Herald, Bemidji Pioneer


July 9th, 2012

About Birth Control: Clearing Up Misconceptions About Contraception

By

In this lesson, students read about the current debate over health care coverage for birth control. They research the different options currently available for birth control, participate in a class forum on contraception, and discuss their own views regarding health care coverage for contraception…In addition to textbooks and other reliable class materials, students may find the following resources especially helpful in their research: the Times health guide to Birth Control and Family Planning, Planned Parenthood’s guide to birth control options, the Mayo Clinic’s birth control options and the KidsHealth listing of birth control options.

 

NY Times Blog

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Tags: birth control, Planned Parenthood


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