Items Tagged ‘blood pressure’

March 24th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

New York Times
The Best Exercise for Aging Muscles
by Gretchen Reynolds

Exercise is good for people, as everyone knows. But scientists have surprisingly little understanding of its cellular impacts and how those might vary by activity and the age of the exerciser. So researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., recently conducted an experiment on the cells of 72 healthy but sedentary men and women who were 30 or younger or older than 64. After baseline measures were established forThe New York Times newspaper logo their aerobic fitness, their blood-sugar levels and the gene activity and mitochondrial health in their muscle cells, the volunteers were randomly assigned to a particular exercise regimen. It seems as if the decline in the cellular health of muscles associated with aging was “corrected” with exercise, especially if it was intense, says Dr. Sreekumaran Nair, a professor of medicine and an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic and the study’s senior author.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Additional coverage: Vogue, Men's Health

Previous coverage in March 17, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in March 1o, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Everyone knows that exercise is good for you, but what type of training helps most, especially when you’re older - say over 65? A Mayo Clinic study says it’s high-intensity aerobic exercise, which can reverse some cellular aspects of aging. The findings appear in Cell MetabolismMayo researchers compared high-intensity interval training, resistance training and combined training. All training types improved lean body mass and insulin sensitivity, but only high-intensity and combined training improved aerobic capacity and mitochondrial function for skeletal muscle. Decline in mitochondrial content and function are common in older adults. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Bob Nellis

 

Wall Street Journal
Medical School Seeks to Make Training More Compassionate
by Lucette Lagnado

“We found at admission that the kids look fine,” says Liselotte Dyrbye, professor of medicine at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. “It is as if they go through our training process, and they develop worsening mental health.” Dr. Dyrbye blames this on an “absurd” medical system: “It is the curriculum, it is the learning environment, it is the type of stuff you do as a [young] physician, and it is not unique to Mayo, it is not unique to Sinai.” The Mayo researcher, who studies physician well-being, says in addition to mastering vast amounts of information, medical students and residents cope with “complex patient interactions, the suffering, the deaths.” Too often, “it is not a supportive environment—students are set up to compete with each other.”

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Liselotte "Lotte" Dyrbe, M.D., MHPE, is a Mayo Clinic Primary Care Internal Medicine physician. Dr. Dyrbe focuses on the well-being of medical students, residents and physicians. Dr. Dyrbye partners with Tait D. Shanafelt, M.D., and Colin P. West, M.D., Ph.D., to direct the Mayo Clinic Department of Medicine Physician Well-Being Program.

Contact: Matt Brenden

 

Today.com
Why your doctor should measure blood pressure in both arms
by A. Pawlowski

Healthy people can have slightly different numbers between arms, but a substantial difference in the readings could signal a blockage or an abnormality, said Dr. Sharonne Hayes, director of the Women's Heart Clinic at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.  “Probably the biggest thing I see in day-to-day practice is somebody who always gets their blood pressure checked in a given arm and they’re told over and over again it’s great,” Hayes told TODAY. But when her office checks the other arm, it reveals uncontrolled high blood pressure that has gone undetected, which can potentially damage the brain and kidneys.

Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show.

Context:  Sharonne Hayes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Hayes studies cardiovascular disease and prevention, with a focus on sex and gender differences and conditions that uniquely or predominantly affect women. With a clinical base in the Women's Heart Clinic, Dr. Hayes and her research team utilize novel recruitment methods, social media and online communities, DNA profiling, and sex-specific evaluations to better understand several cardiovascular conditions. A major area of focus is spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD), an uncommon and under-recognized cause of acute coronary syndrome (heart attack) that occurs predominantly in young women.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

NBC News
Study Connects Genes to Late Onset Alzheimer’s in African-Americans
by Andrea King Collier

A study from researchers at the Mayo Clinic, published in the February issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, may show some insights into the genetics of the disease in Black Americans who develop the NBC News Logodisease after age 65.  The study's senior investigator, Dr. Nilufer Ertekin-Taner, M.D., Ph.D., a neurogeneticist and neurologist at Mayo Clinic's Florida campus says that while the reasons for these high rates of Alzheimer's in the Black community remains unknown, there could be multiple reasons. She cites "higher vascular risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol, as well as differences in genetics and/or differences in socioeconomic factors."

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Context: A Mayo Clinic research team has found a new gene mutation that may be a risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease in African-Americans. This is the first time this gene has been implicated in the development of this disease in this population. Alzheimer’s disease has been understudied in African-Americans, despite the fact that the disease is twice as prevalent in African-Americans, compared to Caucasians and other ethnic groups. This likely pathogenic variant may be unique to the African-American population, the researchers say. It has not been found in Caucasians with Alzheimer’s disease or in gene repositories from more than 60,000 subjects who are not African-Americans.  More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

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Tags: 24 Horas, Aiden Remme, AliveCor, alzheimer's disease, AMA blog, Andy Sandness, Becker’s Hospital Review, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, Bernie Brewer, BioSig, BioSpace, blood pressure


March 10th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Wall Street Journal

Zika Linked to Heart Problems
by Betsy McKay

In a study conducted at the Institute of Tropical Medicine in Caracas, Venezuela, researchers identified nine patients who developed heart rhythm disorders and other serious cardiovascular complications while they had Zika. “While we anticipated that we would see cardiovascular effects from Zika, we were surprised at the severity of the findings,” said Karina Gonzalez Carta, a cardiologist and research fellow at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who led the study. She provided details of the findings to reporters ahead of the American College of Cardiology’s Annual Scientific Session in Washington where the findings will be presented.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Additional coverage: New York Times, HealthDay, ABC News, Associated Press, Star Tribune, KTTC, TIME, FOX News, Twin Cities Business, WebMD, Medical Xpress

Context: Zika also may have serious effects on the heart, new research shows in the first study to report cardiovascular complications related to this virus, according to data being presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 66th Annual Scientific Session. In a study at the Institute of Tropical Medicine in Caracas, Venezuela, of nine adult patients with Zika and no previous history of cardiovascular disease, all but one developed a heart rhythm problem and two-thirds had evidence of heart failure. It is known that Zika can cause microcephaly, a severe birth defect in babies born to women infected with the virus, and Guillain-Barré syndrome, a neurological condition that can lead to muscle weakness and, in severe cases, paralysis. “We know that other mosquito-borne diseases, such as dengue fever and chikungunya virus, can affect the heart, so we thought we might see the same with Zika. But we were surprised by the severity, even in this small number of patients,” says Karina Gonzalez Carta, M.D., cardiologist and research fellow at Mayo Clinic and the study’s lead author. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Traci Klein

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
Mayo Clinic announces $70.5 million expansion in Jacksonville
by Derek Gilliam

Mayo Clinic took another step toward becoming the "premier destination medical center in the Southeast" with an $70.5 million expansion plan. That follows an already active development cycle for Mayo Clinic's Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logoFlorida Campus that's located in Jacksonville. The hospital has invested more than $300 million in expanding its hospital campus. That has allowed for the global hospital system to grow their employee base to 5,900 in Jacksonville, according to Mayo Clinic. “We are extremely grateful to the family of Dan and Brenda Davis for their generous and unyielding support for Mayo Clinic,” said Dr. Gianrico Farrugia, vice president of Mayo Clinic and CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Reach:  The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals

Additional coverage:
First Coast News, Mayo Clinic continues rapid expansion with two new projects announced Tuesday
WOKV JacksonvilleMayo Clinic plans $70 million construction project
Florida Times-UnionMayo Clinic continues rapid expansion with two new projects announced Tuesday
Jacksonville Business Journal, How Mayo Clinic plans to make Jacksonville a medical destination

Context: Over the past two years Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus has erupted with substantial growth in major construction projects and new staff to serve a fast-growing patient population, especially those who require complex medical care. During this time, Mayo Clinic has invested more than $300 million in major construction projects and added 900 new staff as it advances its status as the premier destination medical center in the Southeast. Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus now has about 5,900 employees and contributes roughly $2 billion to the Florida economy. As part of this economic boom, Mayo Clinic today announced another major construction project on its Florida campus – an investment of $70.5 million to add four floors for a total of five to Mayo Building South and remodel existing space in the Davis Building. The project will add 80,000 new square feet and renovate 40,000 existing square feet. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

 

Star Tribune
Mayo spending $217 million on construction in Rochester
by Christopher Snowbeck

Mayo Clinic plans to spend $217 million on construction projects at its St. Marys hospital campus in Rochester. The project, announced Thursday, would help the clinic grow its patient volume and provide those patients better service in more efficient facilities, said Dr. Robert Cima, medical director for the Rochester hospital operations at the Mayo Clinic. “We anticipate continued growth in our patient visits,” Cima said inStar Tribune newspaper logo an interview. “We’ve been seeing that steadily year after year. This is really a commitment to providing access to as many patients as possible.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:
KAALMayo Clinic Giving Saint Marys Campus $217 Million Expansion, Upgrade
KTTCMayo Clinic approves $217 million expansion for its Saint Marys Campus
KIMTMayo Clinic unveils $217 million construction project
KAAL,  In-Depth at 6:30: Impact of Saint Marys
Twin Cities BusinessMayo Clinic Spending $458M To Renovate, Expand Its MN, FL Campuses
Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic to invest $217M to expand, upgrade Saint Marys

Context: The Mayo Clinic Board of Trustees approved plans for enhanced and increased procedural and patient-dedicated facilities at Mayo Clinic Hospital – Rochester, Saint Marys Campus. Mayo Clinic will invest $217 million in the growth and modernization of Saint Marys Campus, while also relocating and upgrading its Cardiac Surgery facilities. Both sets of projects will address the needs of an increasingly complex patient population, rising inpatient volume and innovative practice, while providing the highest level of safe, efficient and affordable care. “These enhancements further Mayo Clinic’s mission of advancing the practice by investing in our facilities to help ensure we provide the best possible care for our patients,” says C. Michel Harper, M.D., executive dean for practice at Mayo Clinic. “The improvement of our facilities is a natural extension of Mayo Clinic’s efforts to provide both a modern and coordinated health care environment.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Kelly Reller

 

CNN
Interval training exercise could be a fountain of youth
by Susan Scutti

Looking for a fountain of youth? You may need to search no further than your sneakers. "Any exercise is better than being sedentary," said Dr. Sreekumaran Nair, senior author of the study and a diabetes CNN Logoresearcher at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. However, Nair noted that high-intensity interval training (HIIT), in particular, is "highly efficient" when it comes to reversing many age-related changes.

Reach: Cable News Network (CNN) is a worldwide news and information network providing live, continuous coverage of news from around the globe, 24 hours a day. CNN online received more than 55 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional coverage: Daily Mail, New Scientist, Express UK, Ask Men, FOX News

Context:  Everyone knows that exercise is good for you, but what type of training helps most, especially when you’re older - say over 65? A Mayo Clinic study says it’s high-intensity aerobic exercise, which can reverse some cellular aspects of aging. The findings appear in Cell Metabolism. Mayo researchers compared high-intensity interval training, resistance training and combined training. All training types improved lean body mass and insulin sensitivity, but only high-intensity and combined training improved aerobic capacity and mitochondrial function for skeletal muscle. Decline in mitochondrial content and function are common in older adults. High-intensity intervals also improved muscle protein content that not only enhanced energetic functions, but also caused muscle enlargement, especially in older adults. The researchers emphasized an important finding: Exercise training significantly enhanced the cellular machinery responsible for making new proteins. That contributes to protein synthesis, thus reversing a major adverse effect of aging. However, adding resistance training is important to achieve significant muscle strength. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Woman’s Day
10 Simple Tips That Will Help You Prevent Alzheimer's Disease
by Stacey Colino

Many women fear losing their mental faculties as they age, and consider the future to be the luck of the draw. In fact, 44% of 1,200 adults surveyed by the Marist Institute for Public Opinion were more scared of getting Alzheimer's disease than cancer, stroke, heart disease or diabetes. What you may not realize is just how much you can protect yourself. "We all have the power to influence how our brains age," says RonWoman's Day Logo
Petersen, MD, PhD, director of Mayo Clinic's Alzheimer's Disease Research Center in Rochester, MN. "What you do at midlife will have late-life benefits on the health of your brain and heart." Know the facts, then take simple steps to get on track.

Reach: Woman’s Day reaches a monthly audience of more than 3.3 million. Its website receives more than 4.7 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Today.com
5 steps that helped this woman shed 68 pounds and transform her life

When Jacqueline Gilmore-Jackson’s mother passed away, she turned to food for comfort. It wasn’t uncommon for her to snack mindlessly and eat at odd hours, even enjoying dinner at midnight. Since that sad time in 2010, her weight slowly increased. In March, she applied to participate in the Woman’s Day Live Longer and Stronger Challenge. The magazine selected five women from across the country to receive nutrition and exercise counseling from Joy Bauer and guidance from experts at Mayo Clinic to lose weight and improve their health.

Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show.

Context: The Live Longer & Stronger challenge—headed by Joy Bauer, RDN, with guidance from experts at Mayo Clinic—is about more than just lowering the numbers on the scale. Some of these women walked more steps than they'd ever dreamed possible, while others cut out medications they'd been taking for years, leading to greater happiness and healthier hearts.

Contact:  Traci Klein

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Tags: 1011 News Nebraska, ABC News, ACL, aging, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimer's disease, Andy Sandness, Ask Men, Associated Press, athletes, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, blood pressure


February 10th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Neurology Today
The Neurologist as National Health Care Leader: Mayo Clinic's John H. Noseworthy, MD, FAAN
by Gina Shaw

John H. Noseworthy, MD, discusses his pathway from a passion in multiple sclerosis research and clinical practice to heading up the Mayo Clinic enterprise as its president and chief executive officer…Today, the world of health care knows John H. Noseworthy, MD, FAAN, as the influentialNeurology Today Logo president and chief executive officer (CEO) of the Mayo Clinic. But the world of neurology, and of multiple sclerosis (MS) research, might be very different today had Dr. Noseworthy elected to pursue the medical specialty he had originally planned on: cardiology.

Reach:  Neurology Today is the official publication of the American Academy of Neurology. The magazine is published monthly and has a circulation of more than 24,000.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

NBC News
Doctors Push for Flu Immunizations After Surge of Cases Nationwide

According to the Centers for Disease Control, 40 states are reporting widespread flu activity — with more than 30,000 reported cases in the U.S. NBC News LogoInterview with Dr. Pritish Tosh, Infectious Diseases, Mayo Clinic.

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Context: Pritish Tosh, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist. Dr. Tosh is interested in emerging infections and preparedness activities related to them, ranging from collaborating with the Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group in basic science vaccine development to hospital systems research related to pandemic preparedness. Influenza is a viral infection that attacks your respiratory system — your nose, throat and lungs. Influenza, commonly called the flu, is not the same as stomach "flu" viruses that cause diarrhea and vomiting.

Contacts: Bob Nellis, Sharon Theimer

 

Today
Red Dress Awards: Meet two women who’ve made heart-healthy changes

The Woman’s Day Red Dress Awards, the premiere event to spotlight the fight against heart disease among women, are Tuesday night, and Hoda Kotb will be a presenter. Nutritionist Joy Bauer and cardiologist Dr. Sharonne Hayes are joined on TODAY by two women who will be honored at the awards for meeting the challenge of making heart-healthy changes to their lives.

Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show.

Context:  Sharonne Hayes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Hayes studies cardiovascular disease and prevention, with a focus on sex and gender differences and conditions that uniquely or predominantly affect women. With a clinical base in the Women's Heart Clinic, Dr. Hayes and her research team utilize novel recruitment methods, social media and online communities, DNA profiling, and sex-specific evaluations to better understand several cardiovascular conditions. A major area of focus is spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD), an uncommon and under-recognized cause of acute coronary syndrome (heart attack) that occurs predominantly in young women.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Action News Jax
Mayo Clinic to test vaccine to prevent, treat precancerous breast lesions
by Jenna Bourne

Mayo Clinic doctors will test a vaccine to prevent women from developing precancerous breast lesions. It could someday become part of routine vaccinations for women, but the Mayo Clinic has to first put it through extensive clinical trials. The hospital is able to do that because of a $3.7 million grant from the U.S. Department of Defense…Mayo Clinic immunology professor Dr. Keith Knutson has been working on a vaccine for nearly a decade. Knutson hoped it will help hundreds of thousands of women avoid surgeries and radiation treatments. “That’s been a big problem, because treatments have side effects. And that’s something that we may be able to eliminate by boosting the body’s own natural drug making machinery, which is the immune system,” said Knutson.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Context: Researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have been awarded a $13.3 million, five-year federal grant to test a vaccine designed to prevent the recurrence of triple-negative breast cancer, a subset of breast cancer for which there are no targeted therapies. The grant, the Breakthrough Award from the U.S. Department of Defense’s Breast Cancer Research Program, will fund a national, phase II clinical trial testing the ability of a folate receptor alpha vaccine to prevent recurrence of this aggressive cancer following initial treatment. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Knutson, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Wall Street Journal
A New Device May Mean Fewer Breast-Cancer Surgeries
by Lucette Lagnado

Viewing low re-excision rates as a key indicator of quality, other institutions are highlighting their techniques to reduce second surgeries. At Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., breast surgeons point to their method of having pathologists nearby in the operating suite to examine frozen tissue samples while the patient is in surgery. Their second-surgery rates are 3.6%, though the technique is a century old, says Dr. Judy Boughey, Mayo’s surgical-research chair.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: When diagnosed with breast cancer, women may have thousands of questions running through their minds, but one they may not have immediately is: Will my choice of provider save me time and money? Mayo Clinic researchers have answered this question with what they believe are compelling statistics that may encourage women and their doctors — and the health care system at large — to consider a different way of doing business, specifically with respect to lumpectomies as a treatment for early-stage breast cancer.  The different way would be to use intraoperative frozen section analysis to determine whether the tumor was removed completely during the first surgery. Doing this in a widespread manner could save untold hours of lost work, anxiety and more for women and tens of millions of dollars.  “With the routine use of frozen section analysis of margins on Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus, we rarely — in only 3 to 5 percent of cases — require a second operation for margin re-excision,” says first author Judy Boughey, M.D., a breast surgeon in the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. “So, for over 95 percent of patients undergoing lumpectomy, only one operation is required.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Phoenix magazine
School of Doc
by Jessie Martin
This summer, the University of Arizona College of Medicine’s 50-year run as the only M.D.-granting institution in Arizona will come to an end with the debut Phoenix magazine logoof the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine in Scottsdale. It will be the third branch of the medical college, which was founded in 1972 in Rochester, Minn., followed by a sister campus in Jacksonville, Fla. Lois Krahn, a Mayo Clinic physician of 22 years, says a common misconception of this partnership is that ASU and Mayo Clinic are opening a joint medical school. “It’s important to note that we are not partnering with ASU in the legal sense. We have a very rich and productive collaboration with ASU that dates back over a decade,” Krahn says.

Reach:  Written for the residents of and visitors to the metropolitan Phoenix area, Phoenix magazine has a monthly circulation of more than 70,000.  Phoenix magazine online has more than 43,000 unique visitors each month.

Related coverage:
AMA blog, Not your grandfather’s med school: Changes trending in med ed

Context: Mayo Medical School announced that its planned expansion in Scottsdale, has received licensure by the Arizona State Board for Private Postsecondary Education, the group responsible for regulating private postsecondary degree-granting institutions within the state of Arizona will open with its first class of students this year. "This is a major milestone in our journey to open a full four-year branch campus of Mayo Medical School in Scottsdale,” says Wyatt Decker, M.D., CEO of Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Earlier this month, Mayo Medical School leaders announced they had also received endorsement for the expansion from the Liaison Committee for Medical Education (LCME), the accrediting body for medical education. More information about the medical school can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network and on the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine's website.

Contacts:  Jim McVeigh, Deborah Anderson

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Tags: ABC News, Action News Jax, Alatus development, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimers, AMA, Answer Man, Associated Press, autoimmune disease, BBC Mundo, birth control, blood pressure


December 23rd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. This will be our last edition of 2016.  Look for us again on January 6, 2017. Thank you and happy holidays.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Los Angeles Times
A senior-friendly workout to improve movement and prevent injury

Jogging outdoors, running on a treadmill or lifting weights at the gym aren’t always practical — or enjoyable — activities for everyone. However, one type of exercise works for everyone, no matter your age or ability, because it relies on improving practical movements often involved inLogo for Los Angeles Times newspaper everyday activities. “Natural movement is universal, and it’s about bringing movement back to the basics,” says Bradly Prigge, wellness exercise specialist with the Mayo Clinic’s Healthy Living Program. “It’s not about following the latest fitness craze or learning the newest secret to weight loss. Natural movement is about connecting with your body and cultivating an awareness of your full abilities.”

Reach:  The Los Angeles Times has a daily readership of 1.9 million and 2.9 million on Sunday, more than 8 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.5 million. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 128 years.

Additional coverage: Mountain Grove News-Journal

Other recent coverage in the Los Angeles Times related to Mayo Clinic's Healthy Living Program

Cosmopolitan, Do You Really Need to Take Vitamins?
WTOP Washington, Mayo Clinic expert: 4 actions for a healthy holiday season
Yahoo! News, 9 Ways to Boost Your Immune System by Michael O Schroeder
WEAU Eau ClaireTODAY INTERVIEW: Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Recipes

Previous coverage related to Mayo Clinic's Healthy Living program in the December 2, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life.

Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Joe Dangor

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic in Rochester adds customized plane to air fleet

The Mayo Clinic in Rochester has unveiled a customized $8.5 million airplane to transport high-risk patients to its facilities. The fixed-wing aircraft adds to the Mayo One fleet that was created in 1984. The program began with a single helicopter based in Rochester and now boasts four — two in Rochester, one in Mankato and one in Eau Claire, Wisconsin.Star Tribune newspaper logo

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: KSTP, Becker’s Hospital Review, KIMT

Context: While a certain red sled usually owns the flight-related headlines this month, Santa's sleigh isn't the only one getting press this December. Several news outlets, it seems, are reporting on another vehicle taking flight. But instead of delivering toys to good girls and boys, the new Mayo One airplane delivers patients in need of immediate, advanced care to Mayo Clinic. And like Santa's ride, this one also has some pretty unique features, and the equipment, medication and staff to make it function as a sky-high Emergency Department. You can read more about the new Mayo one airplane in Mayo Clinic in the Loop.

Contact:  Glenn Lyden

 

KIMT
St. Mary’s nurse returns to work after hiking accident
by DeeDee Stiepan

It’s an incredible story of survival that we first brought you in May when a St. Mary’s nurse fell 100ft while hiking in Arizona. Amber Kohnhorst spent 24 hours in extreme pain, without food or water until she was KIMT LOGOrescued by helicopter. Now, the 25-year old is back in Rochester, and it’s been quite some time since she was working as a Registered Nurse on the 5th floor at St. Mary’s Hospital. “My last shift was Friday May 13th, she tells us. “I’ve never really believed in Friday the 13th but now it kind of freaks me out.”

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Previous coverage in December 2, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Amber Kohnhorst loves animals and adventure. The trip she'd planned to Best Friends Animal Sanctuary in Utah promised both. She'd spend time volunteering at the shelter and do some hiking in nearby Cane Beds, Arizona. But what sounded like a perfect vacation quickly became a nightmare when the 25-year-old Mayo Clinic nurse fell 100 feet down a cliff during what was supposed to be a short hike. You can read more about Amber's story on Mayo Clinic In the Loop.

Contacts:  Ginger Plumbo, Kelly Reller

 

NBC News
Why Heart Attacks Are Striking Healthy Young Women
by Lauren Dunn and Parminder Deo

Researchers are discovering that SCAD heart attacks occur more frequently than once thought..."SCAD is a type of heart attack, but completely NBC News Logodifferent than the one we normally think of," says cardiologist Dr. Sharonne Hayes of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. "It's caused by a split or tear in an otherwise healthy artery that leads to a drop in blood flow to the heart leading to a heart attack."

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Context:  Sharonne Hayes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Hayes studies cardiovascular disease and prevention, with a focus on sex and gender differences and conditions that uniquely or predominantly affect women. With a clinical base in the Women's Heart Clinic, Dr. Hayes and her research team utilize novel recruitment methods, social media and online communities, DNA profiling, and sex-specific evaluations to better understand several cardiovascular conditions. A major area of focus is spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD), an uncommon and under-recognized cause of acute coronary syndrome (heart attack) that occurs predominantly in young women.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic sees innovation as key to the future

Mayo Clinic recognizes the historic changes taking place in the health care landscape. The health care provider has become famous for treating the whole patient by integrating various specialties of care. Now Mayo is going to be using its of health care innovation system as a model for generating revenue. Mayo-Jacksonville is setting aside spaces for innovators and is taking part in more collaborations.Florida Times-Union newspaper logo

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Charles Bruce, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist and serves as medical director of Mayo Clinic Ventures at Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville, Florida. James (Jim) Rogers is chair of Mayo's newly formed Business Development Department, which combines the functions of Mayo Clinic Ventures and the Office of Business Development. The new department will oversee Mayo's partnerships with external organizations, spearhead new business opportunities and support the advancement of medical technology in conjunction with Mayo Clinic leaders, entrepreneurs and inventors.

Contacts: Kevin Punsky, Duska Anastasijevic

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September 9th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

 

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Star Tribune
Mortenson picked for Destination Medical Center's Discovery Square
By Nicole Norfleet

M.A. Mortenson Co. has been chosen as the developer for the research campus of Mayo Clinic’s Destination Medical Center (DMC) in downtown Rochester. The six-block subdistrict which will be called Discovery Square is supposed to “serve as a point where physicians and scientists willStar Tribune newspaper logo come together with businesses and entrepreneurs to accelerate advancements in medical research and technology for critical advances in patient care,” according to an announcement.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: Twin Cities Business, Post-Bulletin, KAAL-TV, Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal, KIMTConstruction DiveHealthcare DesignFinance & CommerceTwin Cities Business, Post-Bulletin, KAAL-TV, Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal, KIMT

Context: Mayo Clinic announced recently that it will collaborate with M.A. Mortenson Company, a real estate development firm for Destination Medical Center’s (DMC) Discovery Square. Discovery Square will serve as a point where physicians and scientists will come together with businesses and entrepreneurs to accelerate advancements in medical research and technology for critical advances in patient care. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

US News & World Report
At Mayo Clinic, Researchers Burrow Into Burnout
by Steve Sternberg

If the Mayo Clinic – widely regarded as one of the most enlightened health systems in the world – struggles with high rates of physician burnout, US News Logono health system is immune of its physicians suffer from burnout because they have created a team, led by Dr. Tait Shanafelt, that studies professional satisfaction among physicians and other health workers…Shanafelt's residency included a month devoted to a research topic of his choice. He described his observations to his research adviser, who theorized that the residents were suffering from burnout and said, "Let's put together a team and explore it." Their resulting study of residents at University of Washington-affiliated hospitals appeared in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine in 2002.

Reach: U.S. News & World Report is a multi-platform publisher of news and information, which includes http://www.usnews.com and http://www.rankingsandreviews.com.

Context: Tait Shanaflet, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic hematologist. He is the director of the Mayo Clinic Department of Medicine Program on Physician Well-being, a clinical laboratory evaluating personal and organizational factors that contribute to physician satisfaction. His research in this area has involved physicians at all stages of their career from medical school to practice had has include several multi-center and national studies. This research is intended to identify personal and organizational factors that can be modified in order to promote physician well-being and enhance the quality of care physicians deliver. More information on his physician burnout research can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Current
MPR and Mayo Clinic team up to offer classical soundtrack
by April Simpson

Minnesota Public Radio and the Mayo Clinic are promoting health and healing through a unique partnership that launched Thursday. Research has shown that the benefits of listening to music include improved pain control and lowered anxiety and blood pressure. So MPR will curate aCurrent news logo playlist of classical compositions for the listening pleasure of patients at Mayo Clinic hospitals in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota.

Reach: Current is the nonprofit news service for and about public media in the U.S. Current publishes online daily and in print - 16 issues in 2016.

Additional coverage: Malaysia SunTwin Cities Business

Context: Patients at Mayo Clinic hospitals in Rochester; Jacksonville, Florida; and Phoenix will be able to relax to a custom blend of classical music provided by Minnesota Public Radio (MPR), beginning Sept. 1. A new agreement calls for MPR’s national programming division, American Public Media (APM) — the largest provider of classical music programming in North America — to supply up to 17 hours of streaming classical music that Mayo Clinic can distribute at no charge to patients and visitors in patient rooms. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Deb Anderson

 

WJXT Jacksonville
Pediatricians say ‘no’ to FluMist
by Ashley Harding

Since it became available several years ago, the FluMist nasal spray was a big relief. But parents, be prepared for that dreaded trip to the doctor now because it's not an option this season. "It's believed that the shot News Jax 4 Logois actually more effective," said Dr. Vandana Bhide with Mayo Clinic. She says the reason why the FluMist isn't working as well is hard to explain. "I don't think we know exactly why. I think because the injectable one is seen by the entire body in the bloodstream, perhaps the immune system responds better," said Dr. Bhide.

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville. This Week in Jacksonville is a weekly public affairs program on WJXT.

Context: Vandana Bhide, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic internist and pediatrician.

Contact: Kevin Punksy

 

STAT
Raising an alarm, doctors fight to yank hospital ICUs into the modern era
by Usha Lee McFarling

In a modern ICU, a single patient can generate 2,000 data points per day, said Dr. Brian Pickering, an anesthesiologist and critical care physician at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. In a 24-bed ICU like his, that’s 50,000 data points a day. Important information is easily lost, or forgotten. Pickering joined the Mayo Clinic nine years ago from Ireland, where patient data was still logged on a paper chart at the end of theSTAT Logo of Boston Globe bed. He was overwhelmed, he said, by electronic records in the United States that had too many tabs and screens and were difficult to navigate. “Point. Click. Point. Click. Point. Click. Back and forth,” he said. “That may work if you’ve only got one patient. But I’ve got 24 in the ICU, and any one of them could be in crisis at any minute.” With colleagues, Pickering created an “electronic intern,” called AWARE, that identifies the most important information a physician needs and highlights it, organizing it around organ systems.

Reach: STAT covers the frontiers of health and medicine including science labs, hospitals, biotechnology board rooms, and political back rooms. Hosted by The Boston Globe, STAT launched on November 5, 2015. The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Context:  Brian Pickering, M.B., B.Ch., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist. Dr. Pickering has been involved in the development of novel electronic interfaces for use in the intensive care unit (ICU) that facilitate reduced cognitive load, medical errors and resource utilization. He has extensive experience in evaluating systems of health care delivery and in the delivery of quality improvements to those systems.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

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Tags: ABC News, alcohol, alzheimers, Arcadia, Becker’s Hospital Review, blood pressure, Bloomberg, Camp Oz, Constructive Dive, Consumer Reports, Current, destination medical center


December 18th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

This will be our last installment of our weekly highlights in 2014. We'll be back in early January 2015. Happy Holidays.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

NY Times
Ask Well: Why Do My Knees Make Noise When I Squat?
By Anahad O’Connor

That noise coming from your knees can be unnerving. But unless it is accompanied by pain, discomfort or swelling, there is no need to worry about it, New York Times Well Blogsaid Dr. Michael Stuart, a professor of orthopedic surgery and co-director of sports medicine at the Mayo Clinic.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Context:  Michael Stuart, M.D. is co-director, Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

MPR
John Noseworthy on the future of Mayo Clinic, health care

John Noseworthy, president and CEO of Mayo Clinic, joins The Daily Circuit to talk about the future of Mayo, the future of health care and how the two MPR Daily Circuit Logointersect.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Other Coverage with Dr. Noseworthy:

Dalhousie University
John Noseworthy (MD’75, PGM’78): Digital Doctoring
by Mark Campbell

Dalhousie University AlumniIn 2007, Mayo Clinic approached Dr. John Noseworthy (MD’75, PGM’78), then medical director of its Department of Development, and a team of leaders with a question: what would the world’s largest, integrated, nonprofit medical group look like in the year 2020? “We spent almost a year looking into that,” recalls Dr. Noseworthy. “We came back and said Mayo Clinic is known for caring for the sick face-to-face – for patients coming to us. As we enter a digital world, how are we going to extend our reach to serve people who do not need, or cannot come, to see us?”

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contacts: Duska Anastasijevic, Karl Oestreich

 

MPR
Mayo Clinic expansion plan is a vision for urban and walkable development
by Liz Baier

When planners of Minnesota's largest economic development project unveil a final draft this afternoon of the city's massive expansion project, they will present a new vision for downtown city life. The $6 billion Destination Medical Center aims to make Rochester a global health care hub. But it alsoMPR News Logo would make big changes to the city, among them.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Related Coverage:
KAAL, DMC Plans for Downtown Rochester Unveiled

KSTP, KAAL, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal

Context: The development plan proposed at the DMCC Board meeting  Dec. 17 is a BIG PLAN (694 pages) in support of a bold vision. And what everyone wants to know is: What’s going to happen and how much will it cost? More information can be found on the DMC blog.

Public Affairs Contact: Jamie Rothe

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
Attorney Christina Zorn appointed Mayo Florida chief administrative officer
by John Burr

Mayo Clinic has appointed an attorney,Christina Zorn, as chief administrative officer and vice chair of administration at Mayo's Jacksonville campus. Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logoShe will serve as administrative partner to Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., the incoming vice president of Mayo Clinic and CEO of the Jacksonville campus, according to a news release. Zorn begins work Jan. 1.

Reach: The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Additional coverage: Florida Times-Union

Related Coverage:Jacksonville Business Journal, 2014's retirement of the year: Bill Rupp by Colleen Jones. Mayo Clinic will have a new leader to start the new year. Bill Rupp, who has led the institution's Jacksonville campus since 2008, announced in August that he will retire from his post as vice president and CEO Dec. 31.

Context: Mayo Clinic recently appointed Christina Zorn, J.D., as chief administrative officer of its campus in Jacksonville, Fla., and vice chair of Administration, Mayo Clinic. She will serve as administrative partner to Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., incoming vice president of Mayo Clinic and chief executive officer of the Jacksonville campus, as previously announced. Zorn assumes her new role on Jan. 1. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

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July 17th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

KAAL
Mayo Clinic Takes Top Spot on Best Hospitals List
by Jenna Lohse

Mayo Clinic in Rochester earns the top spot on a prestigious list of the nation's top hospitals. U.S. News and World Report ranked Mayo Clinic number one on its yearly list of the nation's best hospitals…"Oh, awesome. They know everything and if they don't know it they know where to get it,” said Peg Lesmann, who traveled to Mayo from North Dakota. "It's very well organized and run,KAAL-TV-6 logo everyone has been very friendly,” said Wayne Davis. "I’ve never seen anything go like clockwork, it's perfect," said Mary Bailey, patient at Mayo Clinic…"The fact that we're recognized for providing outstanding care in the community of outstanding health care organizations around the country, we're just very proud of that and I have to say, I think there's a little bit of a spring in our step today,” said Dr. John Noseworthy, Mayo Clinic CEO.

Reach:  KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Additional coverage:

Star TribuneMayo Clinic is ranked as top U.S. hospital by U.S. News

Baltimore Sun, Hopkins Hospital bumped from top spot to No. 3 on U.S. News ranking

ABC 15 ArizonaU.S. News and World Report ranks Mayo Clinic No. 1 in Phoenix and Arizona. Additional coverage: Tucson News

La Crosse Tribune, Gundersen, Mayo-Franciscan in top 15 Wisconsin hospitals on U.S. News list

WEAU Eau Claire, Mayo Clinic Health System recognized in annual best hospitals list

Eau Claire Leader-Telegram, Health Matters, High ranking: Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire is ranked No. 6 in Wisconsin and is recognized as the No. 1 hospital in northwestern Wisconsin in the 25th U.S. News & World Report annual America's Best Hospitals list released Tuesday. 

Endocrine Today, U.S. News & World Report announces top hospitals for endocrinology and diabetes care

US News & World Report, CNN, Huffington PostChicago Tribune, ABC News, Huffington Post, KTTC, Post-Bulletin, KSTP, New4Jax, KTTC, CBS News, MPR, KARE11, One American News, WebMD, Healio, NBC4 Calif., Twin Cities Business

Context: Mayo Clinic has achieved the highest honor in U.S. News and World Report’s ranking of top hospitalsMayo Clinic earned more number one rankings than any other provider, ranking number one or number two in 11 of the 12 specialties based on reputation, services and volumes, safety and clinical outcomes. “We have a deep commitment to delivering high-value health care that best meets patients' needs. We owe our success to truly dedicated staff that provide a seamless patient experience and the care that each individual needs,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Noseworthy, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Rebecca Eisenman

MPR
6 ways to improve childhood mental illness treatment

MPR News logoGuests: Jarrod Leffler: Child and adolescent psychologist in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychology at Mayo Clinic.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Jarrod Leffler, Ph.D., is a child and adolescent psychologist with Mayo Clinic Children's Center.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

Bloomberg Alzheimer Researchers See Protein as Target for Drugs by Michelle Cortez A protein discovered less than a decade ago appears to play a role in whether symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease emerge, suggesting another avenue for exploration in efforts to find a treatment…“This injects new vigor in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease,” said Keith Josephs, the lead author and a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, Bloombergin a telephone interview. “The world has focused on two proteins, beta amyloid and tau. TDP-43 is going to be the new kid on the block.”

Reach: Bloomberg has 2,300 media professionals in 146 bureaus across 72 countries. Bloomberg delivers its content across more than 400 publications, over 310 million households worldwide through Bloomberg Television and 500,000 in the New York metro area and 18.5 million subscribers through satellite radio.

Additional Coverage: AP, New brain protein tied to Alzheimer's disease Bloomberg, Alzheimer’s Drug Fails to Help Moderately Ill in Trials 

Tampa Bay Tribune, My FOX Philly, Gainesville Sun, WebMD, HealthDay, Star Tribune, ABC News, My FOX Phoenix

Context:  Since the time of Dr. Alois Alzheimer himself, two proteins (beta-amyloid (Aβ) and tau) have become tantamount to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). But a Mayo Clinic study challenges the perception that these are the only important proteins accounting for the clinical features of the devastating disease. In a large clinico-imaging pathological study, Mayo Clinic researchers demonstrated that a third protein (TDP-43) plays a major role in AD pathology. In fact, people whose brain was TDP positive were 10 times more likely to be cognitively impaired at death compared to those who didn’t have the protein, showing that TDP-43 has the potential to overpower what has been termed resilient brain aging. The study was published in the journal Acta Neuropathologica. “We wanted to determine whether the TDP-43 protein has any independent effect on the clinical and neuroimaging features typically ascribed to AD and we found that TDP-43 had a strong effect on cognition, memory loss and medial temporal atrophy in AD,” says Mayo Clinic neurologist Keith Josephs, M.D., the study’s lead investigator and author. “In the early stages of the disease when AD pathology was less severe, the presence of TDP-43 was strongly associated with cognitive impairment. Consequently, TDP-43 appears to play an important role in the cognitive and neuroimaging characteristics that have been linked to AD.” More information on the study, including a video interview with Dr. Josephs, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

Reuters
Mustaches may raise burn risk with home oxygen therapy
by Krystnell Storr

ReutersA new case report from U.S doctors suggests that men who use home oxygen therapy should consider a clean-shaven look to reduce their risk of serious facial burns. “If you’ve ever tried to start a campfire, you always start with some dry little twigs and once that starts - and that’s kind of the mustache - then that oxygen tubing lights on fire, it’s like a blow torch shooting up their nose,” said Dr. Andrew Greenlund of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. “So, if we can prevent it, it would be good.”

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world news, business news, technology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile, and interactive television platforms.

Additional coverage: Chicago Tribune, News Channel Daily

Context: Facial hair and home oxygen therapy can prove a dangerously combustible combination, a Mayo Clinic report published in the peer-reviewed medical journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings finds. To reach that conclusion, researchers reviewed home oxygen therapy-related burn cases and experimented with a mustachioed mannequin, a facial hair-free mannequin, nasal oxygen tubes and sparks. They found that facial hair raises the risk of home oxygen therapy-related burns, and encourage health care providers to counsel patients about the risk. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

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Tags: ABC 15 Arizona, ABC News, ABC15 Phoenix, Albert Lea Tribune, Alzheimer's Association Medical and Scientific Advisory Council, alzheimer's disease, AP, AP Associated Press, Apache Mall, Argus Leader, Arizona Newszap, Arizona Pop Warner Football


June 26th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Wall Street Journal
Obesity Is Undercounted in Children, Study Finds
by Sumathi Reddy

…A new study finds that the commonly used body-mass-index measure may fail to identify as many as 25% of children, age 4 to 18 years, who have excess body fat. The meta-analysis, scheduled for publication online in the journal Pediatric Obesity on Tuesday, reviewed 37 separate studies involving a combined The Wall Street Journal newspaper logo53,521 participants. "BMI is not capturing everybody who needs to be labeled as obese," said Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, director of preventive cardiology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who headed the study with Asma Javed, a pediatric endocrinology fellow.

Additional coverage:

KAAL, Mayo Study Finds Fault with Youth BMI Measurements
WJXT Fla., KTVZ Oreg., ANSA Italy


Wall Street Journal Lunch Break
Video: Obesity Undercounted in Children, Study Finds

A new study finds that the commonly used body mass index measure A new study finds that the Wall Street Journal Live Logocommonly used body mass index measure may leave out as many as 25% of children with excess body fat. Dr. Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, co-author of the study and director of preventive cardiology at the Mayo Clinic, joins Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero.

Context: Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Lopez-Jimenez's research program has studied obesity and cardiovascular disease from different angles, from physiologic studies assessing changes in myocardial mechanics and structural and hemodynamic changes following weight loss, to studies addressing the effect of physicians' diagnosis of obesity on willingness to lose weight and successful weight loss at follow-up.


Wall Street Journal
How to Keep Your Muscles Strong as You Age
by Laura Landrow

...For now, however, the best medicine available to maintain muscle mass and strength is less complicated and costly—namely, exercise and a healthy diet. Yet about 60% of people over 65 are insufficiently active or overtly inactive, and many have poor nutrition, says Nathan LeBrasseur, a researcher who directs the Muscle Performance and Physical Function Laboratory and the Healthy Aging and The Wall Street Journal newspaper logoIndependent Living Initiative at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Dr. LeBrasseur estimates that most people will lose approximately 30% of muscle mass over their lifetime, and as much as 50% by the time they reach their 80s or 90s.

Context: Nathan LeBrasseur, Ph.D. is a Mayo Clinic researcher and is affiliated with Mayo Clinic's Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging and Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. More information about his work can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

 

Wall Street Journal
How Bad Sitting Posture at Work Leads to Bad Standing Posture All the Time
by Jeanne Whalen

Good posture means aligning ears over the shoulders, shoulders over hips, and Wall Street Journal Life and Culture logohips over the knees and ankles…Many deskbound office workers have started standing and walking in this position, too, says Andrea Cheville, a rehabilitation physician at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. To counteract kyphosis, it is important to stretch the pectoral muscles and strengthen the trapezius muscles in the upper back, which hold the shoulder blades back, Dr. Cheville said. Remembering to keep the ears and head over the shoulders, and not jutting forward, is also important.

Context: Andrea Cheville, M.D., Mayo Clinic Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, is an expert on exercise in the elderly and also focuses on the delivery of supportive care services to optimize the functionality and quality-of-life for patients with cancer in all disease stages.

Wall Street Journal
Can Data From Your Fitbit Transform Medicine?
By Elizabeth Dwoskin

Many runners and fitness fanatics have been quick to embrace wearable wireless tracking devices for Wall Street Journal Tech Logomeasuring physical activity and calories burned. Now, a growing number of physicians are formally studying whether such "wearables" can improve patients' health by spurring people to get moving…David Cook, an anesthesiologist at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, who, along with colleagues, used Fitbit Inc.'s namesake gadget to track activity levels of cardiac-surgery patients. The researchers found that patients who moved more the day after surgery were more likely to be discharged sooner. The findings prompted the hospital to dispatch physical therapists to study patients who weren't moving as much, said Dr. Cook.

Context: David J. Cook, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

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Tags: 3D mammograms, ABC News Australia, ABC30, aging, Agnes Rapacz, Allevant Solutions, alzheimer's disease, American News Report, angina, ANSA, anti-obesity devic, AP


April 11th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Star Tribune
Novel Mayo technique improves outlook for breast cancer surgeries
by Dan Browning

Mayo Clinic likes to say that its team-based, patient-centric approach to medical care increases value. On Tuesday it released the latest evidence — research showing that a novel technique improves outcomes for women with breast cancer, the nation’s No. 2 cause of death for women, after lung cancer…“In breast cancer,Star-Tribune-Logo-300x45 what I think is critical is that multidisciplinary team,” said Dr. Judy Boughey, a professor of surgery at Mayo who was the article’s lead author. “The pathologists here are making me look good … because I’m doing the same [excision] procedure I would do anywhere else.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

KAAL, Mayo Breast Cancer Treatment Sees Success A unique process that doctors at Mayo Clinic Hospital use when removing tumors in breast cancer patients is showing results…"Obviously opening the incision delays the wound healing, increases risk for infection, and takes the patient away from work and away from their family and is associated with more stress and anxiety," Dr. Judy Boughey said.

MedicalResearch.com
Breast Cancer: Frozen Section Analysis During Lumpectomy Decreases Need For Reoperation, MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Boughey: This study showed that the rate of reoperation after lumpectomy for breast cancer was significantly lower at Mayo Clinic in Rochester compared to national data. Mayo Clinic in Rochester uses frozen section analysis of margins at time of lumpectomy to direct any margin re-excisions during the surgery and therefore has a significantly lower rate of need for a second operation to ensure clean margins. The rate of reoperation was four times higher in the national data set than in the Mayo Clinic data set.

Context: Unique laboratory testing during breast cancer lumpectomies to make sure surgeons remove all cancerous tissue spares patients the need for a repeat lumpectomy in roughly 96 percent of cases at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, a success rate much higher than the rate nationally, a Mayo study shows. During the years reviewed, 13.2 percent of breast cancer lumpectomy patients nationally had to return to the operating room within a month of their initial surgery, compared to 3.6 percent at Mayo in Rochester, which uses a technique called frozen section analysis to test excised tissue for cancer while  patient are still on the operating table. The findings are published in the journal Surgery. More information on this study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Channel12 Ariz.
First piece of Mayo Clinic proton beam installed

Channel 12 Arizona NBCCrews installed the first pieces of the new proton beam therapy center at the Mayo Clinic on Monday. The beam will work by isolating and treating cancer cells.

Reach: Channel 12 is an NBC affiliate in Phoenix, AZ.

Additional coverage: KPNX Ariz.KTVK Ariz.

Context: Mayo Clinic in Arizona broke ground in December 2011 for a $182 million facility to house Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy program — marking the beginning of a new era in cancer treatment. Steven Schild, M.D., is chair of radiation oncology at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Public Affairs Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

Becker’s Hospital Review
12 Things to Know About Mayo Clinic
by Helen Adamopoulos

Here are 12 key things to know about Rochester, Minn.-based Mayo Clinic, which was recently named one of 100 Great Hospitals in America in 2014 by Becker's Hospital Review. 1. Mayo Clinic — a nonprofit worldwide leader in medical care and research — got its start in 1864, when William Worrall Mayo, MD, opened aBeckers Hospital Review private medical practice in Rochester. The organization officially took on the Mayo Clinic name in March 1914. 2. Mayo Clinic's operating income rose 55 percent from $395.4 million in fiscal year 2012 to $612.1 million in 2013. It saw total revenue of $9.42 billion last year.

Reach: Becker's Hospital Review features up-to-date business and legal news and analysis relating to hospitals and health systems. Content is geared toward high-level hospital leaders (CEOs, CFOs, COOs, CMOs, CIOs, etc.), and we work to provide valuable content, including hospital and health system news, best practices and legal guidance specifically for these decision-makers. Each of the 12 annual issues of Becker's Hospital Review reaches a qualified audience of approximately 18,500 healthcare leaders. 

Context: On Jan. 27, 1864, English-born Dr. William Worrall Mayo first notified the public about his medical practice in Rochester, Minn., planting the seeds of what would eventually become an international medical organization with more than 59,000 expert physicians, scientists and health care professionals, attracting millions of patients from across the globe. This year marks 150 years of continuous service to patients, and Mayo Clinic is launching a yearlong recognition that will honor a legacy of medical accomplishments and a model for the future of health care.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Florida Times-Union
Editorial: A major battle to combat child obesity

Nearly four of every 10 children in our community are either overweight or flat-out obese, say area health experts…“We’re seeing so many children in our community Florida Times-Union newspaper logostruggle to be at healthy weights,” said Dr. Alva Roche Green during a recent session with the Times-Union editorial board. A pediatrician at the Mayo Clinic, Roche-Green added that it’s “not an exaggeration to say childhood obesity is at a crisis level” across Jacksonville and Florida in general.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Alva Roche Green, M.D., is a Family Medicine physician at Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Red Wing Republican-Eagle
MCHS report highlights growing improvements
by Anne Jacobson

Mayo Clinic Health System made substantial changes in 2013 toward better care and lower costs. These included more emphasis on primary care teams and launching Patient Online Services, according to MCHS officials.

Red Wing Republication Eagle logo

Reach: The Red Wing Republican Eagle has served residents of Red Wing, Minn., since 1857, The Red Wing Republican Eagle is owned by RiverTown Multimedia, a subsidiary of
Forum Communications and has a daily circulation of  more than 5,400.

Context: Mayo Clinic Health System held a public discussion on its 2013 annual report April 7 in Red Wing, Minn. Thomas Witt, M.D., president and CEO of the MCHS Cannon Falls, Lake City and Red Wing said now the three medical centers and their affiliated clinics work more seamlessly together and with the Mayo Clinic “hub” in Rochester.

Public Affairs Contact: Kristy Jacobson

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Tags: 100Reporters, 13 ABC, 8 News Now Las Vegas, ABC 7, Advance Healthcare Network, AIB Corporate Banking, allergies, Alzheimer's Disease Research Center at Mayo Clinic, Am.com, American College of Cardiology, American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Amethyst “Amy” Hiestand


March 14th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

 

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Twin Cities Business
Mayo's Operating Profits Climb 55%; CEO Talks Strategy
By Jake Anderson and Dale Kurschner

Mayo Clinic said it beat expectations in 2013, and CEO John Noseworthy, who recently spoke to Twin Cities Business about the future of health care, highlighted ongoing initiatives. “The strong commitment of our entire organization has allowed us to respond successfully to unprecedented Twin Cities Businesschange in health care,” Dr. Noseworthy said. “We have changed the very definition of Mayo Clinic and stayed true to our core mission and values.”

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Context: As Mayo Clinic recognizes its Sesquicentennial year, the not-for-profit organization reached a record 63 million people in 2013. The strong performance was bolstered by successful implementation of new care delivery models — such as the Mayo Clinic Care Network — that provide knowledge to patients, physicians and consumers in traditional and new ways. “Expanding our reach is not a new goal for us,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. “In fact, as we consider our history, growth has been a constant for 150 years.”

Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic Reports Strong Performance in 2013, Reaching More Than 63 Million People

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

Star Tribune
Stand up for yourself and your health
by Allie Shah

As a health reporter, I’ve read the research, from the National Institutes of Health to the Mayo Clinic to the American Cancer Society, all of which Star Tribune Logowarns that prolonged sitting leads to increased risks of heart disease, cancer and diabetes… So I set out to stand as much as I could for two straight days. No sitting at my desk. No sitting during meetings or meals or TV time. To help prepare for my 48-hour standoff, I consulted with a pioneer — the man who jump-started the anti-sitting movement: Dr. James Levine of the Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University, a world-renowned obesity expert and among the first to use a treadmill desk.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob NellisJim McVeigh

MinnPost
Mayo takes a big step in growing sports-medicine field with pro teams, Block E clinic
by Pat Borzi

The last thing the Mayo Clinic needs is a higher profile. Who around the world hasn’t heard of Mayo? For more than a century, Mayo’s innovative care and research brought heads of state, the rich and famous, and foreign royalty to its Rochester, Minn., campus for checkups and treatment… MinnPost“It’s a comprehensive service, one-stop shopping where you can get all your fitness-related needs met, from diagnosis of an injury to treatment of an injury to recommendations regarding injury prevention,” said Dr. Edward Laskowski, co-director of Mayo’s Sports Medicine Center.

Reach:  MinnPost is a nonprofit, nonpartisan enterprise which provides news and analysis based on reporting by professional journalists, most of whom have decades of experience in the Twin Cities media. MinnPost averages more than 78,000 unique visitors to its site each month.. In Dec. 2013, MinnPost also had 27,300 followers on Twitter and its main Facebook page was liked by 9,500-plus readers.

Context: Mayo Clinic and the Minnesota Timberwolves and Lynx announced in early February a partnership which extends the Mayo Model of Care for patients in sports medicine to the Twin Cities. The collaboration includes: 1) the opening of a Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center at 600 Hennepin, 2) designating Mayo as the preferred medical provider for the teams, and 3) utilizing the teams’ international reach to educate the public about numerous health and wellness topics.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic, Minnesota Timberwolves & Lynx Announce Collaboration

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

Steam Boat Today
Our View: Mayo network enhances patient care

The recently announced partnership between Yampa Valley Medical Center and the Mayo Clinic is good news, further solidifying the local Steamboat Today newspaper logohospital’s reputation for excellence and enhancing patient access to high-quality health care. As the newest member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, YVMC is one of 26 medical centers nationwide and only the second hospital in Colorado to achieve this distinction.

Reach: Steamboat Today is a daily newspaper serving Steamboat Springs and the surrounding areas in Routt County, Colo. with a circulation of 7,000. Its website receives more than 30,500 unique visitors each month.

Context: Mayo Clinic and Yampa Valley Medical Center officials announced this week that the Steamboat Springs hospital is the newest member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. The network connects Mayo Clinic and health care providers who are interested in working together to enhance the delivery of locally provided high quality health care. Yampa Valley Medical Center is the second hospital in Colorado to be invited to join the network. More information about the announcement can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

Arizona Central Sports
Concussion in sports documentary receives premiere at Valley’s Mayo Clinic
by Paola Boivin

My Sunday best …A powerful documentary by an Academy Award nominee made its U.S. premiere Saturday night at an unlikely place: the Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix. “Head Games: The Global Concussion Crisis” delivers an unfiltered lookedArizona Republic at one of the more-troubling story lines in today’s sports world…Following the documentary was a panel I was lucky enough to moderate and included Nowinski; former ASU and NFL standout Mike Haynes; neurologist David Dodick, director of the Concussion and Headache Program at the Mayo Clinic; and director Steve James, who also directed the Academy Award nominated “Hoop Dreams.” Additional coverage: Sports Business Daily

Reach: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday. The newspaper’s website Arizona Central, averages 83 million pages views each month.

Context: Mayo Clinic in Arizona will hosted a special sneak preview of the highly anticipated documentary, Head Games: The Global Concussion Crisis. 

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Tags: 000 steps, 10, 2013 Mayo Clinic Performance Report, ABC News, Abilene, Adirondack Enterprise NY, Advertiser-Tribune, airborne fungus, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimer's disease, antibacterial soap, antibiotics and weight gain


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