Items Tagged ‘Boston Globe’

March 10th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Wall Street Journal

Zika Linked to Heart Problems
by Betsy McKay

In a study conducted at the Institute of Tropical Medicine in Caracas, Venezuela, researchers identified nine patients who developed heart rhythm disorders and other serious cardiovascular complications while they had Zika. “While we anticipated that we would see cardiovascular effects from Zika, we were surprised at the severity of the findings,” said Karina Gonzalez Carta, a cardiologist and research fellow at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who led the study. She provided details of the findings to reporters ahead of the American College of Cardiology’s Annual Scientific Session in Washington where the findings will be presented.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Additional coverage: New York Times, HealthDay, ABC News, Associated Press, Star Tribune, KTTC, TIME, FOX News, Twin Cities Business, WebMD, Medical Xpress

Context: Zika also may have serious effects on the heart, new research shows in the first study to report cardiovascular complications related to this virus, according to data being presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 66th Annual Scientific Session. In a study at the Institute of Tropical Medicine in Caracas, Venezuela, of nine adult patients with Zika and no previous history of cardiovascular disease, all but one developed a heart rhythm problem and two-thirds had evidence of heart failure. It is known that Zika can cause microcephaly, a severe birth defect in babies born to women infected with the virus, and Guillain-Barré syndrome, a neurological condition that can lead to muscle weakness and, in severe cases, paralysis. “We know that other mosquito-borne diseases, such as dengue fever and chikungunya virus, can affect the heart, so we thought we might see the same with Zika. But we were surprised by the severity, even in this small number of patients,” says Karina Gonzalez Carta, M.D., cardiologist and research fellow at Mayo Clinic and the study’s lead author. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Traci Klein

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
Mayo Clinic announces $70.5 million expansion in Jacksonville
by Derek Gilliam

Mayo Clinic took another step toward becoming the "premier destination medical center in the Southeast" with an $70.5 million expansion plan. That follows an already active development cycle for Mayo Clinic's Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logoFlorida Campus that's located in Jacksonville. The hospital has invested more than $300 million in expanding its hospital campus. That has allowed for the global hospital system to grow their employee base to 5,900 in Jacksonville, according to Mayo Clinic. “We are extremely grateful to the family of Dan and Brenda Davis for their generous and unyielding support for Mayo Clinic,” said Dr. Gianrico Farrugia, vice president of Mayo Clinic and CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Reach:  The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals

Additional coverage:
First Coast News, Mayo Clinic continues rapid expansion with two new projects announced Tuesday
WOKV JacksonvilleMayo Clinic plans $70 million construction project
Florida Times-UnionMayo Clinic continues rapid expansion with two new projects announced Tuesday
Jacksonville Business Journal, How Mayo Clinic plans to make Jacksonville a medical destination

Context: Over the past two years Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus has erupted with substantial growth in major construction projects and new staff to serve a fast-growing patient population, especially those who require complex medical care. During this time, Mayo Clinic has invested more than $300 million in major construction projects and added 900 new staff as it advances its status as the premier destination medical center in the Southeast. Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus now has about 5,900 employees and contributes roughly $2 billion to the Florida economy. As part of this economic boom, Mayo Clinic today announced another major construction project on its Florida campus – an investment of $70.5 million to add four floors for a total of five to Mayo Building South and remodel existing space in the Davis Building. The project will add 80,000 new square feet and renovate 40,000 existing square feet. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

 

Star Tribune
Mayo spending $217 million on construction in Rochester
by Christopher Snowbeck

Mayo Clinic plans to spend $217 million on construction projects at its St. Marys hospital campus in Rochester. The project, announced Thursday, would help the clinic grow its patient volume and provide those patients better service in more efficient facilities, said Dr. Robert Cima, medical director for the Rochester hospital operations at the Mayo Clinic. “We anticipate continued growth in our patient visits,” Cima said inStar Tribune newspaper logo an interview. “We’ve been seeing that steadily year after year. This is really a commitment to providing access to as many patients as possible.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:
KAALMayo Clinic Giving Saint Marys Campus $217 Million Expansion, Upgrade
KTTCMayo Clinic approves $217 million expansion for its Saint Marys Campus
KIMTMayo Clinic unveils $217 million construction project
KAAL,  In-Depth at 6:30: Impact of Saint Marys
Twin Cities BusinessMayo Clinic Spending $458M To Renovate, Expand Its MN, FL Campuses
Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic to invest $217M to expand, upgrade Saint Marys

Context: The Mayo Clinic Board of Trustees approved plans for enhanced and increased procedural and patient-dedicated facilities at Mayo Clinic Hospital – Rochester, Saint Marys Campus. Mayo Clinic will invest $217 million in the growth and modernization of Saint Marys Campus, while also relocating and upgrading its Cardiac Surgery facilities. Both sets of projects will address the needs of an increasingly complex patient population, rising inpatient volume and innovative practice, while providing the highest level of safe, efficient and affordable care. “These enhancements further Mayo Clinic’s mission of advancing the practice by investing in our facilities to help ensure we provide the best possible care for our patients,” says C. Michel Harper, M.D., executive dean for practice at Mayo Clinic. “The improvement of our facilities is a natural extension of Mayo Clinic’s efforts to provide both a modern and coordinated health care environment.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Kelly Reller

 

CNN
Interval training exercise could be a fountain of youth
by Susan Scutti

Looking for a fountain of youth? You may need to search no further than your sneakers. "Any exercise is better than being sedentary," said Dr. Sreekumaran Nair, senior author of the study and a diabetes CNN Logoresearcher at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. However, Nair noted that high-intensity interval training (HIIT), in particular, is "highly efficient" when it comes to reversing many age-related changes.

Reach: Cable News Network (CNN) is a worldwide news and information network providing live, continuous coverage of news from around the globe, 24 hours a day. CNN online received more than 55 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional coverage: Daily Mail, New Scientist, Express UK, Ask Men, FOX News

Context:  Everyone knows that exercise is good for you, but what type of training helps most, especially when you’re older - say over 65? A Mayo Clinic study says it’s high-intensity aerobic exercise, which can reverse some cellular aspects of aging. The findings appear in Cell Metabolism. Mayo researchers compared high-intensity interval training, resistance training and combined training. All training types improved lean body mass and insulin sensitivity, but only high-intensity and combined training improved aerobic capacity and mitochondrial function for skeletal muscle. Decline in mitochondrial content and function are common in older adults. High-intensity intervals also improved muscle protein content that not only enhanced energetic functions, but also caused muscle enlargement, especially in older adults. The researchers emphasized an important finding: Exercise training significantly enhanced the cellular machinery responsible for making new proteins. That contributes to protein synthesis, thus reversing a major adverse effect of aging. However, adding resistance training is important to achieve significant muscle strength. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Woman’s Day
10 Simple Tips That Will Help You Prevent Alzheimer's Disease
by Stacey Colino

Many women fear losing their mental faculties as they age, and consider the future to be the luck of the draw. In fact, 44% of 1,200 adults surveyed by the Marist Institute for Public Opinion were more scared of getting Alzheimer's disease than cancer, stroke, heart disease or diabetes. What you may not realize is just how much you can protect yourself. "We all have the power to influence how our brains age," says RonWoman's Day Logo
Petersen, MD, PhD, director of Mayo Clinic's Alzheimer's Disease Research Center in Rochester, MN. "What you do at midlife will have late-life benefits on the health of your brain and heart." Know the facts, then take simple steps to get on track.

Reach: Woman’s Day reaches a monthly audience of more than 3.3 million. Its website receives more than 4.7 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Today.com
5 steps that helped this woman shed 68 pounds and transform her life

When Jacqueline Gilmore-Jackson’s mother passed away, she turned to food for comfort. It wasn’t uncommon for her to snack mindlessly and eat at odd hours, even enjoying dinner at midnight. Since that sad time in 2010, her weight slowly increased. In March, she applied to participate in the Woman’s Day Live Longer and Stronger Challenge. The magazine selected five women from across the country to receive nutrition and exercise counseling from Joy Bauer and guidance from experts at Mayo Clinic to lose weight and improve their health.

Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show.

Context: The Live Longer & Stronger challenge—headed by Joy Bauer, RDN, with guidance from experts at Mayo Clinic—is about more than just lowering the numbers on the scale. Some of these women walked more steps than they'd ever dreamed possible, while others cut out medications they'd been taking for years, leading to greater happiness and healthier hearts.

Contact:  Traci Klein

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Tags: 1011 News Nebraska, ABC News, ACL, aging, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimer's disease, Andy Sandness, Ask Men, Associated Press, athletes, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, blood pressure


February 17th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Twin Cities Public Television (Almanac)
Head of Mayo Clinic: John Noseworthy

Interview with Dr. John Noseworthy begins at 12:14. Almanac is hosted by Cathy Wurzer and Eric Eskola. Mary Lahammer contributes political reporting on a weekly basis.

Reach:  Twin Cities Public Television's "Almanac" program is a Minnesota institution. It has occupied the 7 o'clock time slot on Friday nights for more than a quarter of a century. It is the longest-running prime time TV program ever in the region. "Almanac" is a time capsule, a program of TPTrecord that details our region's history and culture during the past twenty five years. The hour-long mix of news, politics and culture is seen live statewide on the six stations of the Minnesota Public Television Association. Almanac was the first Minnesota TV show that virtually everyone in the state could watch together. The program's unusual format has been copied by numerous PBS stations around the country and it has led to Almanac being honored with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting's award for Best Public Affairs Program.

Related coverage:
Post-Bulletin, Political Notebook: Noseworthy talked to White House officials about travel ban

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. 

Contacts:  Kelley Luckstein, Karl Oestreich

 

KSTP
Mayo Clinic Doctors Demonstrate Dangers of Ice Fishing

Ice fishing may be a favorite pastime of many Minnesotans, but doctors say it can also be more dangerous than some realize. Mayo Clinic doctors aimed to demonstrate those dangers with the help of a mannequin they call Gus. Gus has been dinged, dented and generally doomed in a series of Mayo Clinic public education videos. Previous installments include Gus being hit by a driver who's texting, suffering a fireworks injury and receiving the Heimlich.

Reach: KSTP-TV is the ABC affiliate in Minneapolis that broadcasts on channel 5. KSTP-TV Online has more than 503,000 unique visitors each month. It is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., and is the only locally-owned and operated broadcasting company in the Twin Cities. KSTP-TV first broadcast in April 1948, and was the first television station to serve the upper Midwest.

Additional coverage: 
La Crosse TribuneAnglers beware: Ice fishing more perilous than traditional methods
KAAL, Mayo Clinic Doctors Demonstrate Dangers of Ice Fishing
Star Tribune, Mayo study finds hazards of ice fishing are many and varied

Context: Ice fishing might seem like a benign sport – for everyone except the fish. Sitting in a cozy shanty waiting for a bite, what could go wrong? A lot, Mayo Clinic surgeons have found. The ice fishing injuries they have chronicled seem more like a casualty list from an extreme sport: burns, broken bones, concussions and more. The findings are published in the American Journal of Emergency Medicine. The study team analyzed data on emergency department visits between 2009 and 2014 obtained from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System ─ All Injury Program and found 85 patients hurt while ice fishing. There may be more cases than they could find; the database collects data on emergency room visits from a nationally representative sample of roughly 100 hospitals with six or more beds, and the researchers had to search case narratives to identify ice fishing injuries. More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Sharon Theimer,  Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

News4Jax
Thousands run marathon to support breast cancer research
by Ashley Mitchem

After a decade that included nearly 100,000 runners, the Donna 26.2 marathon has become more than just a run -- it's the only marathon in the United States dedicated to breast cancer research. Donations support breast cancer research at Mayo Clinic and provide financial assistance to
those living with breast cancer.

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville. This Week in Jacksonville is a weekly public affairs program on WJXT.

Additional coverage: Florida Times-Union, First Coast News

Context: The DONNA Foundation is a non-profit organization in Northeast Florida producing the only marathon in the U.S. dedicated to breast cancer research, awareness and care.  The DONNA Foundation has helped to develop and maintain the Mayo Clinic Breast Cancer Translational Genomics Program.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

Marketplace
Mayo Clinic's hometown looks to become the 'Silicon Valley of medicine'
by Catharine Richert

If you head directly south from St. Paul, Minnesota, you'll eventually find yourself in Rochester, home of the world-renowned Mayo Clinic. For NPR Marketplace Logomore than 100 years, the city and the hospital have been synonymous. And now, a massive economic development project backed by Mayo, the city and the state aims to transform the city of more than 100,000 into a magnet for startups and entrepreneurs in medicine and other fields. Mayo BioBusiness Center Chair Jim Rogers said Rochester’s transformation is already apparent. "I can count — just about every building has a new business in the last four of five years, it seems,” he said. "It's incredible what's occurring here."

Reach: Marketplace is produced and distributed by American Public Media (APM), in association with the University of Southern California. The Marketplace portfolio of programs includes Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal, Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio, Marketplace Weekend with Lizzie O'Leary, and Marketplace Tech with Ben Johnson. Marketplace programs are currently broadcast by nearly 800 public radio stations nationwide across the United States and are heard by more than 13 million weekly listeners.

Previous coverage in the January 13, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: With Mayo Clinic at its heart, the Destination Medical Center (DMC) initiative is the catalyst to position Rochester, Minnesota as the world’s premier destination for health and wellness; attracting people, investment opportunities, and jobs to America’s City for Health and supporting the economic growth of Minnesota, its bioscience sector, and beyond.

Contacts: Duska Anastasijevic, Bob Nellis

 

CNN
For decades, women had heart attacks in silence
by Michael Nedelamn

Sharonne Hayes, a cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic and founder of its Women's Heart Clinic, originally thought it was near-impossible to do research on SCAD. She expected to see no more than one or two cases in her career. "Most of the cases were in the pathology literature, so it wasCNN Logo (thought to be) almost universally fatal," said Hayes, who has educated patients through the advocacy organization WomenHeart for over 15 years. In 2009, a woman approached her at a WomenHeart conference and asked, "What is Mayo doing about research on SCAD?" "It's probably so rare," Hayes replied. "We could never research it."

Reach: Cable News Network (CNN) is a worldwide news and information network providing live, continuous coverage of news from around the globe, 24 hours a day. CNN online received more than 55 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Context:  Sharonne Hayes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Hayes studies cardiovascular disease and prevention, with a focus on sex and gender differences and conditions that uniquely or predominantly affect women. With a clinical base in the Women's Heart Clinic, Dr. Hayes and her research team utilize novel recruitment methods, social media and online communities, DNA profiling, and sex-specific evaluations to better understand several cardiovascular conditions. A major area of focus is spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD), an uncommon and under-recognized cause of acute coronary syndrome (heart attack) that occurs predominantly in young women.

Contacts: Traci Klein, Kelley Luckstein

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Tags: 26.2 with Donna Marathon, A Tu Salud, ACA, AccuWeather, Almanac, alzheimers, AMA, Ambient Clinical Analytics, antibacterial soap, arrhythmia, Associated Press, Barron News-Shield


January 6th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik


Reuters

‘Hidden’ celiac disease less common now in U.S.
by Shereen Lehman

Fewer people in the U.S. have celiac disease without realizing it, a new study finds. The actual proportion of people with celiac disease in the United States has not changed since 2009, researchers say. “The total prevalence is stable,” Dr. Joseph Murray told Reuters Health in a phone interview. But there are fewer people walking around with “hidden” celiac disease. “When you look at the proportion that are diagnosedReuters Logo versus undiagnosed, that's gone up dramatically. Go back six years and most patients were undiagnosed, with only about one in five getting diagnosed,” said Murray, a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota who was part of the study team.

Reach: Reuters has 196 editorial bureaus in 130 countries and 2,400 editorial staff members and covers international news, regional news, politics, social issues, health, business, sports and media.

Context: Joseph Murray, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist. Dr. Murray's research interests focus in two distinct areas: celiac disease and esophageal disorders. To learn more about celiac disease, check out this Mayo Clinic radio interview with Dr. Murray.

Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Joe Dangor

 

Today.com
The real brain food could be fresh veggies and olive oil, study finds
by Maggie Fox

People got points for light to moderate drinking — in this case about a third of drink a day to no more than three drinks a day on average for men and two for women. Dr. David Knopman, a professor of neurology TODAY Showat the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota who was not involved in the study, said this could translate to real-life benefits. “Loss of brain volume is an inevitable part of the aging process,” Knopman told NBC News. “A bigger brain is in general better for you because at least in late life, it makes a person more resistant to the effects of brain diseases,” he added.

Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show.

Context: David Knopman, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist.  Dr. Knopman is involved in research in late-life cognitive disorders, such as mild cognitive impairment and dementia. Dr. Knopman's specific interests are in the very early stages of Alzheimer's disease, in cognitive impairment due to stroke (cerebrovascular disease) and in cognitive impairment due to frontotemporal degeneration.

Contacts: Susan Barber Lindquist, Traci Klein

 

Post-Bulletin
Brewer has FAITH in Rochester
by Brett Boese

When Mayo Clinic Dr. LaPrincess Brewer took the stage last month in Charlotte, N.C., Jackie Johnson couldn't help beaming with pride. Johnson, a vocal advocate within Rochester's Black community, hasn't stopped singing Brewer's praises as the Brewer's success has resonated across the country, even as it flies under the radar locally. Brewer's FAITH program, an acronym for Fostering African-AmericanLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaper Improvement in Total Health, was among the featured attractions at the 28th annual Healthy Churches 2020 National Conference that was held in her hometown. Its initial success in Baltimore and the ensuing impact in Minnesota since Brewer arrived at Mayo in 2013 has prompted significant accolades for the charismatic 35-year-old cardiologist.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context: LaPrincess Brewer, M.D., M.P.H., has a primary research focus in developing strategies to reduce and ultimately eliminate cardiovascular disease health disparities in racial and ethnic minority populations and in underserved communities through health promotion and community-based participatory research. Dr. Brewer also has special interest in increasing minority and women's participation in cardiovascular clinical trials through mobile health (mHealth) interventions. Additionally, she has published work on faith-based interventions for cardiovascular disease prevention, racial differences in weight maintenance and psychosocial factors influencing cardiac risk factors.

Contact: Ethan Grove

 

ABC News
US News and World Report Releases List of Best Diets
by Gillian Mohney

Every year many Americans make a New Year's resolution to lose weight, but finding ways to drop pounds and keep them off is difficult. Today, U.S. News and World Report released its annual list of the best diets, ABC News logoaccording to nutrition and medical experts. The diets were chosen by a panel of nutritionists, dietary consultants, physicians and other experts convened by U.S News and World Report. Mayo Clinic Diet: This diet is broken into two parts. The first part requires no calorie counting, but dieters are stuck with meals made up of healthy foods including whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and healthy fats, as well as at least 30 minutes of physical activity a day.

Reach: ABC News Online has more than 28.8 million unique visitors to its site each month. ABC’s World News Tonight with David Muir averages about 9.2 million viewers each night.

Additional coverage:
HealthDay, Plant-Based Diets Score Big for Healthy Weight Loss
WATE6 Knoxville, U.S. News and World Report ranks top diets
FOX News, US News ranks best diet plans for 2017
Atlanta Journal-ConstitutionWant to lose weight? Experts say these are the best diets of 2017
FOX4 Dallas, Lose weight faster by tracking habits

Context:  As the second edition of The Mayo Clinic Diet hits store shelves, the diet plan has been named Best Commercial Diet by U.S. News & World Report.  “We are honored to be recognized for a weight-loss method that offers lasting results,” says Donald Hensrud, M.D., medical editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet and director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. Learn more about the Mayo Clinic by watching this Mayo Clinic Minute or read more about it on Mayo Clinic Network. “The Mayo Clinic Diet is much more than a diet,” Dr. Hensrud says. “It’s a lifestyle program in which people can eat great-tasting food and feel better right away ─ even while they lose weight. More importantly, these lifestyle changes are sustainable and can improve long-term health as people reach and maintain a healthy weight.”

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

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Tags: ABC News, Affordable care act, Albert Lea Tribune, alternative medicine, anxiety, arthritis, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Attn:, Baltimore Sun, Becker’s Hospital Review, Beloit Daily News, Billings Gazette


December 16th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Chicago Tribune
Is bone broth the next hot health trend?
by Alison Bowen

Jason Ewoldt, a dietitian at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program in Rochester, Minn., said patients often ask him about something new they've read about. People often think, he said, "if a little bit's good, maybe a lot is better." But far from assuming what's best is tripling your boneChicago Tribune Logo broth intake after reading about its benefits, he said, "that's not necessarily the case." He said some people consider bone broth a magic elixir, crediting it with improving joint function and gut health.

Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 384,000 and a weekend circulation of more than 686,000.

Context: Jason Ewoldt is a dietitian at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program, which is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

HealthDay
Was football safer back in the day?

In a finding that suggests football used to be a less dangerous sport, a small study shows that men who played in high school in the 1950s and Health Day Logo1960s may not be at increased risk for dementia or memory problems…"What we can say is, for that era, football did not increase the risks of neurodegenerative disease compared with other sports," said senior researcher Dr. Rodolfo Savica, a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: NWI Times, Healthline, KTTC, WebMD, KIMT, CBS News, Medical News TodayWTAJ Pennsylvania, MSN

Context: A Mayo Clinic study published online recently in Mayo Clinic Proceedings found that varsity football players from 1956 to 1970 did not have an increased risk of degenerative brain diseases compared with athletes in other varsity sports. The researchers reviewed all the yearbooks and documented team rosters for Mayo High School and Rochester High School, now called John Marshall High School. The high school football players were compared with non-football playing athletes who were swimmers, basketball players and wrestlers. More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Reuters
Rural U.S. babies hardest hit by opiate addiction at birth
by Lisa Rapaport

These babies may have central nervous system issues like seizures and tremors, gastrointestinal problems and feeding difficulties, breathing challenges, as well as unstable body temperatures. “It is clear that neonatal abstinence syndrome is a growing problem across the country,” saidReuters Logo Dr. William Carey, a pediatric researcher at Mayo Clinic Children’s Center in Rochester, Minnesota. “While some state-level data has suggested that neonatal abstinence syndrome disproportionately affected rural counties, this is the first study to show that rural communities throughout America are particularly affected by this epidemic,” Carey, who wasn’t involved in the study, added by email.

Reach: Reuters has 196 editorial bureaus in 130 countries and 2,400 editorial staff members and covers international news, regional news, politics, social issues, health, business, sports and media.

Additional coverage: Yahoo! Sports

Context: William Carey, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic pediatrician with Mayo Clinic Children's Center. Mayo Clinic Children's Center pediatric and adolescent medicine specialists provide comprehensive care for the diagnosis and treatment of a wide range of diseases and conditions.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Tonic
The First Legit Study of Stem Cells and Arthritis Had Surprising Results
by Evy Pitt Stoller

According to a study led by the Mayo Clinic's Shane Shapiro, an orthopedic and sports medicine physician, the recent use of bone marrow stem Tonic cells in painful, arthritic joints has dramatically increased, while exactly how well the treatment works—or how safe it is—has yet to be made clear. "So many of these therapies are going on without the science to back it up," he says. "We weren't comfortable offering this treatment to patients until we or someone else had studied it in a rigorous fashion."

Reach: Tonic is a website hosted by Vice covering health and wellness, science, health issues, world health news and other topics.

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida have conducted the world’s first prospective, blinded and placebo-controlled clinical study to test the benefit of using bone marrow stem cells, a regenerative medicine therapy, to reduce arthritic pain and disability in knees. The researchers say such testing is needed because there are at least 600 stem cell clinics in the U.S. offering one form of stem cell therapy or another to an estimated 100,000-plus patients, who pay thousands of dollars, out of pocket, for the treatment, which has not undergone demanding clinical study.“Our findings can be interpreted in ways that we now need to test — one of which is that bone marrow stem cell injection in one ailing knee can relieve pain in both affected knees in a systemic or whole-body fashion,” says the study’s lead author, Shane Shapiro, M.D., a Mayo Clinic orthopedic physician. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Twin Cities Business
Mayo Researchers Land Patent For Non-Invasive Pancreatic Cancer Test
by Don Jacobson

The same Mayo Clinic research team that developed the Cologuard DNA-based stool test for colorectal cancer has also been working on similar technology for the early detection of pancreatic cancer. After encouraging early studies, they have now landed a patent for their methods. Dr.Twin Cities Business Magazine Logo David Ahlquist, a Mayo Clinic medical professor and consultant in its division of gastroenterology and hepatology, led the team that, late in the last decade, developed the genomic science behind the Cologuard test, which Mayo licensed in 2009 to Exact Sciences Corp. (NASDAQ: EXAS) of Madison, Wisconsin. Now, in a patent dated November 29, Ahlquist and Mayo colleagues Dr. John Kisiel, William R. Taylor, Tracy Yab and Douglas Mahoney were also granted rights to their method of “Detecting Neoplasm,” through which bio-samples, such as those collected from stool, can be analyzed for pancreatic cancer-related DNA biomarkers.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Context:  David Ahlquist M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist and co-inventor of the Cologuard test.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

ActionNewsJax
Air Force veteran hopes to meet donor's family after lung transplant in Jacksonville — A Georgia Air Force veteran ActionNewsJaxgot a double lung transplant at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville hours after his wife was told he was going to die… An hour after doctors said he wasn’t going to make it, two healthy lungs became available. The 21-year-old woman’s lungs were a match for Terry Junn. Doctors flew them into Mayo Clinic from Mississippi and Terry Junn went into surgery.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Related coverage: 
ActionNewsJax, Veteran gets double lung transplant in Jacksonville hours after doctors said he was going to die

Context: A lung transplant is a surgical procedure to replace a diseased or failing lung with a healthy lung, usually from a deceased donor. A lung transplant is reserved for people who have tried other medications or treatments, but their conditions haven't sufficiently improved. At Mayo Clinic, a team of doctors and staff work together to evaluate and treat people who may need lung transplants. Mayo Clinic's Transplant Center staff at Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota works together to evaluate and treat people who may need a lung transplant. Mayo Clinic offers common recommendations, evaluation processes, treatment, post-surgical care and follow-up care for lung transplant candidates at Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. Mayo Clinic uses technology to help make patient information available as needed at all three locations.

Contact: Paul Scotti

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December 9th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Los Angeles Times
A senior-friendly workout to improve movement and prevent injury

Jogging outdoors, running on a treadmill or lifting weights at the gym aren’t always practical — or enjoyable — activities for everyone. However, one type of exercise works for everyone, no matter your age or ability, because it relies on improving practical movements often involved inLogo for Los Angeles Times newspaper everyday activities. “Natural movement is universal, and it’s about bringing movement back to the basics,” says Bradly Prigge, wellness exercise specialist with the Mayo Clinic’s Healthy Living Program. “It’s not about following the latest fitness craze or learning the newest secret to weight loss. Natural movement is about connecting with your body and cultivating an awareness of your full abilities.”

Reach:  The Los Angeles Times has a daily readership of 1.9 million and 2.9 million on Sunday, more than 8 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.5 million. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 128 years.

Additional coverage: Mountain Grove News-Journal

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life.

Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Joe Dangor

 

Prevention
4 Easy Moves To Ease Your IBS Symptoms

When you're dealing with the abdominal pain, bloating, cramping, constipation, or diarrhea that comes along with irritable bowel syndrome Prevention logo(IBS), the last thing you probably want to do is exercise. Yet according to research, moving your body can decrease the pain associated with this condition that affects an estimated one in six Americans. Brent A. Bauer, MD, director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program, says many movement practices, such as yoga and tai chi, as well as meditation and guided imagery, benefit those suffering from IBS thanks to the fact that they induce the relaxation response. "This in turn balances the autonomic nervous system," says Bauer, which influences the function of many internal organs, including the digestive system.

Reach:  Prevention magazine has a monthly circulation of more than 1.5 million readers and covers practical health information and ideas on healthy living. Its website has nearly 1.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context:  Brent Bauer, M,D., is director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program. As director of the program, Dr. Bauer has broad and varied research interests. Since its founding in 2001, the program has promoted a collaborative spirit that enables researchers from both within and outside Mayo Clinic to share resources, ideas and expertise regarding research in this exciting realm.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic co-sponsoring World Stem Cell Summit
by Brett Boese

The Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine is co-sponsoring next week's World Stem Cell Summit in FloLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaperrida. More than 1,200 people are expected to attend the 12th annual event. Mayo will have a delegation of administrators, researchers and clinical experts participating in presentations and panel discussions involving stem cell discoveries, promising clinical trials and therapy options currently available.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine is a co-sponsor of the 2016 World Stem Cell Summit. More than 1,200 attendees are expected at the 12th annual event in West Palm Beach, Florida. A delegation of administrators, researchers and clinical  experts from Mayo Clinic will participate in featured presentations and panel discussions highlighting advances in discovery science, promising clinical trials and available therapies. Diverse topics to be covered include cardiovascular regeneration, restoring eyesight, and growing stem cells in a microgravity environment in space. Mayo Clinic experts also will be involved in panel discussions regarding education, consumer information and stem cell clinics. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Angela Bingham

 

KIMT
Study: Changes in how someone walks could predict decline in memory and thinking
by DeeDee Stiepan

Researchers at Mayo Clinic believe that changes in how someone walks over time could help predict if they will develop memory loss. The study KIMT LOGOanalyzed gait, which is the manner in which someone walks that includes everything from stride length to speed, even arm swing. They found that changes in those parameters were associated with decline in memory, thinking and language skills. “The goal will be to identify these individuals that develop these changes through time and potentially do something to prevent the decline if possible,” explains Rodolfo Savica, M.D. a Mayo Clinic Neurologist and lead author of the study.

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Context: Walking is a milestone in development for toddlers, but it’s actually only one part of the complex cognitive task known as gait that includes everything from a person’s stride length to the accompanying swing of each arm. A Mayo Clinic study recently published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease found that problems associated with gait can predict a significant decline in memory and thinking. More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

KAAL
3D Printing Improving Surgery Outcomes at Mayo Clinic

For nearly ten years, Rochester’s Mayo Clinic has been creating life-like models of people’s organs, vascular systems, and bones to help with surgery. This is all done using a three dimensional printer, which Mayo Clinic says says the demand for is only growing. The very first modelKAAL 6 News Rochester Logo surgeons created was a liver, and neuroradiologist Dr. Jonathon Morris says the rest was history. "So then we went into spine models, complex congenital scoliosis cases, from there we went into tumor, and then after we went into tumors we went into cancer, and then there was no turning back," Dr. Morris said.

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Context:  Mayo Clinic’s 3-D anatomic modeling program started with a realization that surgeons needed a new way to look at human anatomy that went beyond two-dimensional images. Surgeons who were planning the separation of conjoined twins in 2008 approached the Department of Radiology about producing a 3-D model of the babies’ shared liver. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Ethan Grove

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June 10th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Pioneer Press
John Noseworthy: Telemedicine will increase access to care, reduce costs

As the American Telemedicine Association convened in Minneapolis last month for its annual conference, it was inSt. Paul Pioneer Pressteresting to recall that a little more than 20 years ago, another ATA conference was held in Minnesota. It was in Rochester and featured a Mayo Clinic-trained physician and astronaut conducting the first telemedicine conference from space. Since that time, telemedicine – the remote delivery of health care through a secure video or computer link – has experienced profound progress, increasing access to care while also lowering the cost of care.

Reach: The St. Paul Pioneer Press has a daily circulation of more than 194,000 Its TwinCities.com website receives moire than 1.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contacts: Duska Anastasijevic, Karl Oestreich

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic wins a key building block for medicine's future

About a week ago, the federally funded NIH announced a five-year, $142 million grant to Mayo Clinic to establish the “world’s largest research-Star Tribune newspaper logocohort biobank for the Precision Medicine Initiative Cohort Program.” This difficult-to-understand appellation likely limited celebration in the state over this welcome news. But here’s a helpful translation from Mayo’s Dr. Stephen Thibodeau, who will oversee the biobank: This, he said during an interview, is a “big deal.’’

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Previous coverage in June 3, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Mayo Clinic will be awarded $142 million in funding over five years by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to serve as the national Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) Cohort Program biobank. The biobank will hold a research repository of biologic samples, known as biospecimens, for this longitudinal program that aims to enroll 1 million or more U.S. participants to better understand individual differences that contribute to health and disease to advance precision medicine. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Colette Gallagher

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic unveils plans for expanded research space
by Matt McKinney

The Mayo Clinic will add 2 million square feet of research space in downtown Rochester in less than 20 years, a key piece of its Destination Medical Center (DMC) plan. The plan, announced Tuesday by the clinic, will create an urban bioresearch campus to drive the quest for new curesStar Tribune newspaper logo as private researchers collaborate with Mayo doctors on the frontiers of medicine, said Mayo CEO John Noseworthy.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: Post-Bulletin, KIMT-TV, Washington Times, KTTC-TV, BloombergFinance & Commerce, Capitol ReportDuluth News Tribune, Austin Herald, KIMT-TV, Pioneer Press, Bemidji Pioneer, NH Voice, MPR, KAAL-TVBoston Globe

Context: Mayo Clinic announced the next major step in realizing Destination Medical Center’s (DMC) vision of creating Discovery Square, a first-of-its-kind urban bioresearch campus that brings together renowned physicians, researchers, scientists and entrepreneurs to address unmet patient needs in an ultramodern setting for science innovation. Mayo Clinic is initiating a process to identify a strategic real estate development firm to expand its Rochester, Minnesota, campus by building more than 2 million square feet on Mayo Clinic-owned land as research, commercial and product development space over the next 20 years. This is in addition to Mayo’s current research footprint in Rochester of 1.3 million square feet. Discovery Square, which will include Mayo and other private businesses, is a key milestone for DMC, the largest public-private partnership in Minnesota state history, and one of the largest economic development initiatives in the U.S. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Karl Oestreich


SELF magazine
10 Signs Of Skin Cancer You Shouldn’t Ignore
by Amy Marturana

Along with outdoor happy hours and weekends at the beach, summertime calls for an important reminder of skin cancer risk. Since you’re Self Magazine Logoprobably spending more time in the sun wearing less clothes, it’s important to take note of any new or different growths on your skin. “Most skin cancers really are not symptomatic,” Aleksandar Sekulic, M.D., principal for Stand Up To Cancer’s Melanoma Research Alliance Dream Team and Mayo Clinic dermatologist, tells SELF. That means a cancerous spot won’t hurt, or even itch most of the time. “Occasionally people will say a red and scaly spot has become more red and tender, but most true cancers are asymptomatic.”

Reach:  Self magazine has a monthly circulation of more than 1.4 million readers and is geared toward active, educated women who are interested in health, fitness, career issues and relationship balance.

Context: Aleksandar Sekulic, M.D., Ph.D. is a Mayo Clinic dermatologist. Dr. Sekulic is also affiliated with Mayo Clinic Cancer Center.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

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April 8th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Jimmy Kimmel Live
Jimmy Kimmel and Guillermo Learn How to Wash Their Hands

Washing your hands is very important. Jimmy wanted to make sure he was doing it right, so we got in touch with a doctor at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota named Dr Poland. He is a specialist in infectious disease and he flew all the way to LA just to teach Jimmy and Guillermo how to wash their hands.Jimmy Kimmel Live

Reach: Jimmy Kimmel Live averages more than 2.4 million viewers each night.

Context: Gregory Poland, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious disease expert. Dr. Poland and his team within the Vaccine Research Group aim to improve the health of individuals across the world by pursuing challenges posed by infectious diseases and bioterrorism through clinical, laboratory and epidemiologic vaccine research. Dr. Poland recently appeared on Jimmy Kimmel Live to demonstrate the proper hand washing technique.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Tampa Bay Times
Experts say research shows promise for a breast cancer vaccine
by Kathleen McGrory

There are vaccines to help the body fight off measles, mumps and the flu. But breast cancer? That's exactly the technology a Florida-based company is hoping to bring to the market in the Tampa Bay Timesnot-so-distant future. The company, TapImmune Inc., is teaming up with the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville to test two vaccines that could help the body fend off certain types of breast, ovarian and lung cancers. Mayo plans to launch a 280-patient clinical trial on one of the vaccines this summer. "There's a lot of potential," said Keith Knutson, the Mayo faculty member who designed the vaccine.

Reach: The Tampa Bay Times has a daily circulation of more than 166,000 readers and serves readers in the greater St. Petersburg, Tampa, and Clearwater, Florida market. Its website has more than 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have been awarded a $13.3 million, five-year federal grant to test a vaccine designed to prevent the recurrence of triple-negative breast cancer, a subset of breast cancer for which there are no targeted therapies. The grant, the Breakthrough Award from the U.S. Department of Defense’s Breast Cancer Research Program, will fund a national, phase II clinical trial testing the ability of a folate receptor alpha vaccine to prevent recurrence of this aggressive cancer following initial treatment. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Knutson, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Arizona Republic
Ask a Doc: Going vegan? Consider this

Question: Could vegans be at risk for deficiency of essential nutrients? Answer: The health benefits of a whole foods plant-based diet are well-known, but the question of essential nutrients remains….The Mayo Clinic review team recommends that health care providers monitor vegan patients for adequate blood levels of vitamin B-12, iron, ferritin, calcium and vitamin D.Arizona Republic newspaper logo

Reach: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday and has an average daily circulation of more than 261,000 readers. The newspaper’s website Arizona Republic - Online, averages more than 5.4 million unique visitors each month.

Context: The health benefits of a plant-based diet is well-known, but the question remains: Could vegans be at risk for deficiency of essential nutrients? A retrospective review by Mayo Clinic physicians recently published in the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association indicated that vegans should ensure adequate intake of a few nutrients. “We found that some of these nutrients, which can have implications in neurologic disorders, anemia, bone strength and other health concerns, can be deficient in poorly planned vegan diets,” says Heather Fields, M.D., Community and Internal Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Contrary to popular belief, "Vegans have not been shown to be deficient in protein intake or in any specific amino acids." More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

NPR
New Advances In The Understanding And Treatment Of Migraines

Severe, throbbing head pain, sensitivity to light, nausea…these are just some of the symptoms the 36 million migraine sufferers in the U.S. regularly endure…Interview with Dr. David Diane Rehm Show LogoDodick  director, migraine program at the Mayo Clinic; chair, American Migraine Foundation.

Reach: Each week, more than 2.4 million listeners across the country tune in to The Diane Rehm Show, which has grown from a small local morning call-in show on Washington’s WAMU 88.5 to one of public broadcasting’s most listened-to programs.

Context: David Dodick, M.D. is a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona and an expert in concussion care and director of the Mayo Clinic Concussion Program.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

WCCO-TV
Mayo Clinic Center Reaches Out To Young Athletes

Athletic training continues to get more sophisticated and more specialized. That is why the Mayo Clinic Center in downtown Minneapolis held a clinic Monday to bring in experts to talk to high school kids about what it really means to be a “healthy” athlete in a variety of ways. The hottest topics in high school sports are changing. The athletes of today are getting moreWCCO logo information on the total being, meaning nutrition, athleticism and over-specialization.

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

Context: Mayo Clinic now extends its global expertise in sports medicine to the Twin Cities with the opening of Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine located at Mayo Clinic Square in downtown Minneapolis, across the street from Target Center. Mayo's Sports Medicine practice also offers athletes of all ages and abilities performance training programs.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

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April 1st, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Wall Street Journal
Cancer Treatment’s New Direction
by Ron Winslow

Evan Johnson had battled a cold for weeks, endured occasional nosebleeds and felt so fatigued he struggled to finish his workouts at the gym. But it was the unexplained bruises and chest pain that ultimately sent the then 23-year-old senior at theWSJ Banner University of North Dakota to the Mayo Clinic. There a genetic test revealed a particularly aggressive form of acute myeloid leukemia..…Dr. Kasi and his Mayo colleagues—Naseema Gangat, a hematologist, and Shahrukh Hashmi, a transplant specialist—are among the authors of an account of Mr. Johnson’s case published in January in the journal Leukemia Research Reports.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Naseema Gangat, M.B.B.S., is a Mayo Clinic hematologist, Shahrukh, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic hematologist and transplant specialist and Pashtoon Kasi is a Mayo oncology fellow. Evan Johnson’s case was published in the the journal Leukemia Research Reports and is an example of Mayo Clinic’s multidisciplinary-team based care approach. 

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

New York Times
On C.T.E. and Athletes, Science Remains in Its Infancy
by Benedict Carey

In the best study to determine risk so far, published in December, a research team at a Mayo Clinic bank in Jacksonville found The New York Times newspaper logoC.T.E. in 21 of 66 brains of people who had played contact sports. It found no evidence of the disorder in 198 people with no record of playing such sports. But the authors said they had no way to know whether those 21 former athletes had symptoms linked to C.T.E.; some had other neurological disorders as well when they died. “These are very early days, and we badly need larger studies, that include both athletes and nonathletes,” said Dr. Dennis Dickson, the study’s senior author.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Related coverage:

Washington Post — Dale Earnhardt Jr. plans to donate his brain for concussion research

Previous coverage in March 19, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in Dec. 4, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in Dec. 4, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Scientists have recently found evidence that professional football players are susceptible to a progressive degenerative disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which is caused by repetitive brain trauma. Now, researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have discovered a significant and surprising amount of CTE in males who had participated in amateur contact sports in their youth. About one-third of these men whose brains had been donated to the Mayo Clinic Brain Bank had evidence of CTE pathology. CTE only can be diagnosed posthumously.More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic will begin construction on two new buildings, costing $100 million, this year
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville announced Tuesday that it will begin $100 million in major construction projects this year. It will begin construction this summer on what Mayo officials are calling “a destination medical building” that will provideFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo integrated services for complex cancers, as well as neurologic and neurosurgical care. The 150,000-square-foot building will have four stories with the potential to add 11 more stories. More than 126,000 patients are expected to visit in the first year after the building opens.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:

WJXT-TV Jacksonville — Mayo Clinic announces $100M expansion;  WOKV-RadioJacksonville Daily Record, Jacksonville Business Journal, First Coast News, Twin Cities Business, WOKV-TV Florida

Context: Advancing its position as the premier medical destination center for health care in the Southeast, Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida will invest $100 million in major construction projects building on its 150-year history of transforming health care and the patient experience. This summer, Mayo Clinic will begin constructing an innovative destination medical building that will provide integrated services needed for complex cancer, as well as neurologic and neurosurgical care. Initially rising four stories, the 150,000-square-foot building has the potential for 11 more stories. More than 126,000 patients are expected to visit the first year the building opens. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Fast Company
Mayo Clinic Technology Said To Alleviate Nausea From VR
by Dahniel Terdiman

VR sickness could soon be a thing of the past, thanks to new technology developed at the famed Mayo Clinic. Today, the clinic Fast Companyannounced that it has licensed its patented galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) technology to the Los Angeles-based entertainment company vMocion. GVS is aimed at helping to alleviate the nausea problem many people have when using virtual reality systems. The idea is to incorporate GVS into a platform, known as 3v—which stands for virtual, vestibular, and visual—into VR and augmented reality systems, giving users what they call a three-dimensional movement experience.

Reach: Fast Company's editorial focus is on innovation in technology, ethonomics (ethical economics), leadership, and design. Written for, by, and about the most progressive business leaders, Fast Company and FastCompany.com inspire readers and users to think beyond traditional boundaries, lead conversations, and create the future of business.

Additional coverage: Forbes, Electronic Specifier, Engadget, (e) Science News, Digital Journal, Tech Crunch

Context:  Mayo Clinic and Mocion, LLC, an entertainment technology company, today announced it is making available Mayo Clinic’s patented Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation (GVS) technology specifically for use in virtual reality and augmented reality. vMocion’s 3v™ Platform (which stands for virtual, vestibular and visual) incorporates this patented GVS technology, which adds a complete sense of three-dimensional movement for the first time into a virtual reality or augmented reality environment. vMocion has been granted the exclusive, global, perpetual license for Mayo Clinic’s GVS patents and algorithms within all media and entertainment categories and will offer the 3v Platform to other media and entertainment companies through a licensing agreement. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

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November 13th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editors: Carmen Zwicker, Emily Blahnik

 

HealthDay
Just One Energy Drink Sends Young Adults' Stress Hormone Levels Soaring
by Dennis Thompson

Just one energy drink can cause potentially harmful spikes in both stress hormone levels and blood pressure in young, healthy adults, a new study shows. After drinking a 16-ounce can of "Rockstar Punched," young adults had a 74 percent increase in blood levels of the "fight-or-flight"Health Day Logo hormone norepinephrine, said lead researcher stress hormone levels , a cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:

Esquire — Are Energy Drinks Slowly Killing All the Bros?

FOX9 — Mayo Clinic: Single 16-ounce energy drink can increase blood pressure 'significantly'

Additional coverage: LA Times, Univision Salud, The Daily Beast, ATTN:, Yahoo!, Steelers LoungeInverse.com, Medscape, Business Standard, Mirror UK, Daily Mail UKSeating Chair, Youth Independent  (Canada), Consumer Reports, Next Shark, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, QuartzCTV News, Tiempo Argentino

Context: New research shows that drinking one 16-ounce energy drink can increase blood pressure and stress hormone responses significantly. This raises the concern that these response changes could increase the risk of cardiovascular events, according to a study presented this week at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015. The findings also are published in the Journal of the American Medical Association“In previous research, we found that energy drink consumption increased blood pressure in healthy young adults,” says Anna Svatikova, M.D., Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic cardiology fellow and the first author. “We now show that the increases in blood pressure are accompanied by increases in norepinephrine, a stress hormone chemical, and this could predispose an increased risk of cardiac events – even in healthy people.” More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Other news from the American Heart Association's Scientific Session 2015

Wall Street Journal — Inappropriate Stent Procedures Decline, Study Shows by Ron Winslow — Researchers said Monday that unnecessary use of devices called stents to clear blockages in diseased coronary arteries fell by about 50% between 2010 and 2014. The drop came after new practice guidelines were issued in 2009 as a quality improvement strategy designed to discourage stent use in patients with stable disease and minimal symptoms of chest pain…“The absolute decline in the nonacute PCI numbers is striking,” said Dr. Raymond Gibbons, a cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic, who wasn’t involved with the study. He described the data as supporting “true quality improvement.” Additional coverage: MedPage Today

AP — Study: Even the normal-weight should watch that apple shape by Lauren Neergaard — New research suggests normal-weight people who carry their fat at their waistlines may be at higher risk of death over the years than overweight or obese people whose fat is more concentrated on the hips and thighs…"We see this with patients every day: 'My weight is fine, I can eat whatever I want,'" said study senior author Dr. Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, preventive cardiology chief at the Mayo Clinic. "These results really challenge that."

Additional coverage: USA TodayCBS News,CNN, TODAY Show, LA Times, HealthDay KARE11, Telegraph UK, KCCI Des Moines, Medscape, com, Healthline News, The GuardianABC News, Star Tribune, NY Times, NBC News, Huffington PostNews4Jax, Yahoo! UK, Scotsman, Yorkshire Evening Post, CNN EspanolDaily Star UK, The Atlantic, Economic Times, CBC Canada, Michigan Live, Kansas City Star, Independent UK, Nature World ReportABC15 Arizona (Newsy) 

Medscape — Activity Levels Drop on Nitrate Therapy in Preserved-EF Heart Failure: NEAT-HFpEF by Steve Stiles — Activity levels in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) fell while they were on isosorbide mononitrate for a month compared with a similar period on placebo, in a small randomized, crossover trial in which participants wore accelerometers for activity measurementNitrates are often used for symptom relief in patients with reduced-EF heart failure, and in the literature they are used in a substantial minority of patients with HFpEF, even though they are far less well studied in that syndrome, explain Dr. Margaret Redfield (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN) and associates in the New England Journal of Medicinereport on the study.

Reuters — Advising people about heart risk genes helped cut cholesterol: study by Julie Steenhuysen — In the study presented on Monday at the American Heart Association meeting in Orlando, Florida, researchers at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, tested the theory that incorporating genetic risk information into an assessment of a person's heart disease risk could lead to lower levels of LDL, the portion of cholesterol that leads to heart attacks and strokes…"What we found is six months after the risk disclosure, the LDL cholesterol in those who got the genetic risk information was about 10 points lower, which was statistically significant," said Dr. Iftikhar Kullo, a Mayo Clinic cardiologist who led the study, said in a telephone interview. Additional coverage: Yahoo!, FOX News, Daily Mail UK, Philadelphia Inquirer, MyInforms, News List, MedPage Today,

AP — Big study suggests steep drop in needless heart procedures by Lindsey Tanner — Fewer heart patients are getting inappropriate angioplasties, a new study suggests. The analysis showed overuse of the common procedure to open clogged heart arteries has declined dramatically since 2009 guidelines, which were aimed at curbing inappropriate use…While some signs suggest up-coding could be happening, others "suggest true quality improvement," said Dr. Raymond Gibbons, a former American Heart Association president from the Mayo Clinic. Additional coverage: Pioneer Press, NY Times

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Huffington Post
The Pressure To Perform Is Destroying Our Well-Being
by Lindsay Holmes

…Amit Sood, a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic, says that while stressful circumstances are unavoidable, it's important to regularly take HuffPost Healthy Livingstock of our physical and emotional health before it results in an incident like a collapse. Below, Sood offers some tips for anyone facing a high-pressure situation -- whether it's a job presentation, an athlete in a game or just making a decision.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique viewers.

Context: Amit Sood, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in General Internal Medicine and the Cancer Center. The Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness combines wisdom from neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, and spirituality to help people choose contentment.

Contact: Rhoda Fukishima Madson

 

CNN
Alzheimer's is a young(er) person's disease -- so get to work
by Sanjay Gupta

Giving drugs to mildly or asymptomatic people is new," agreed clinical neurologist David Knopman at the Mayo Clinic. Researchers are exploring some fringe areas asCNN Logo well. Most intriguing to me was the reason why some people form the plaques in the first place. After all, it's just too easy to chalk it up to bad luck. As it turns out, the plaques may not be all bad. Just recently, we have learned that some people with Alzheimer's have higher levels of yeast, bacteria and viruses in their brains as compared to people of similar age without the disease.

Reach: CNN.com has 74.2 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Context: David Knopman, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist. Dr. Knopman's research focuses on late-life cognitive disorders, such as mild cognitive impairment and dementia. Dr. Knopman's specific interests are in the very early stages of Alzheimer's disease, in cognitive impairment due to stroke (cerebrovascular disease) and in cognitive impairment due to frontotemporal degeneration. He is involved in epidemiology, clinical trials and diagnostic studies of these disorders.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

NPR
Will Drinking Green Tea Boost Your Metabolism? Not So Fast
by Eliza Barclay

… Other studies have established that green tea contains caffeine and catechins that NPR - The Salt Logostimulate the nervous system, which can increase thermogenesis (burning stored energy) and fat oxidation. "The caffeine in green tea could raise your metabolic rate ever so slightly, but it wouldn't have a different effect than coffee," Michael Jensen, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic, tells The Salt.

Reach:  The Salt is a blog from National Public Radio's Science Desk about what we eat and why we eat it.

Context: Michael Jensen, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Jensen and his lab study the effects of obesity and how body fat (adipose tissue) and body fat distribution influence health. The regulated uptake, storage and release of fatty acids from adipose tissue play a major role in determining its health effects.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Star Tribune
New Mayo Clinic service has health care for pilots on radar
by Chris Snowbeck

Mayo Clinic has treated plenty of pilots over the years, including many who came to Rochester by corporate jet so their CEOs could get executive physicals…With a newStar Tribune newspaper logo service called ProPilot, Mayo Clinic promises to provide not just the physicals required of pilots by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), but also preventive care that can minimize the amount of time pilots are grounded for health reasons. One of the goals is to “break the old culture of … what the FAA doesn’t know won’t hurt them,” said Dr. Clayton Cowl, chairman of Mayo Clinic’s division for preventive, occupational and aerospace medicine. “These guys end up getting substandard medical care.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

Post-Bulletin, Heard on the Street: Mayo launches health program for pilots

Aviation Pros, (from Star Tribune) New Mayo Clinic Service Has Health Care For Pilots On Radar

Context: Mayo Clinic announced this week ProPilot, a new program for corporate flight departments that offers bundled services designed to keep and get pilots back on the flight deck quickly and safely. Mayo Clinic’s Section of Aerospace Medicine is launching the Mayo Clinic ProPilot Program on its Rochester, Minnesota, campus. more information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Ginger Plumbo
Arizona Republic
Phoenix researcher secures $12 million to study pancreatic cancer
by Ken Alltucker

A pancreatic cancer researcher in metro Phoenix will spearhead a research team that secured a $12 million grant to study new drug therapies for pancreatic cancer…Dr. Arizona Republic newspaper logoDaniel Von Hoff, physician in chief of Phoenix-based Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), will head the research team, which will include scientists from the Salk Institute for Biological Studies of La Jolla, Calif., and the University of Cambridge. Mayo Clinic will also be part of the research team.

Reach: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday and has an average daily circulation of more than 261,000 readers. The newspaper’s website Arizona Republic - Online, averages more than 5.4 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:

Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology NewsTracking Cancer Progression in Real Time Using Circulating DNA 

Context: A team of researchers, including scientists from the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), has reported that analyzing circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) can track how a patient's cancer evolves and responds to treatment. In a study published recently in Nature Communications, Dr. Muhammed Murtaza  of TGen and Mayo Clinic, and colleagues, describe an extensive comparison between biopsy results and analysis of ctDNA in a patient with breast cancer. The researchers followed the patient over three years of treatment. "When patients receive therapy for advanced cancers, not all parts of the tumor respond equally, but it has been difficult to study this phenomenon because it is not practical to perform multiple, repeated tissue biopsies," said Dr. Murtaza, Co-Director of TGen's Center for Noninvasive Diagnostics, and one of the study's lead authors. "Our findings empirically show that ctDNA analysis from blood samples allows us to detect cancer mutations from multiple different tumor sites within a patient and track how each of them responds."

Contact: Jim McVeigh

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Tags: ABC News, ABC15 Arizona (Newsy), alcohol use disorder, Alternet, alzheimers, AP, Arizona Republic, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Attn:, Baby-Friendly hospitals, Bloomberg, Boston Globe


October 22nd, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would   like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.  Thank you.

Editor, Karl OestreichAssistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Harvard Business Review
Getting Rid of “Never Events” in Hospitals
by Timothy Morgenthaler, M.D., chief patient safety officer at Mayo Clinic, and Charles Harper, M.D., executive dean for practice at Mayo Clinic

Harvard Business Review Logo… A number of techniques and process-improvement tools from inside and outside the industry have been brought to bear: lean engineering to simplify and standardize care, Crew Resource Management to improve teamwork, checklists to help teams focus and improve reliability, and so on. Human factors science, which studies the relationship between human beings and systems in order to improve efficiency, safety, and effectiveness is now being applied broadly in health care in everything from information management to the design of operating rooms.

Reach: Harvard Business Review – Online provides editorial content designed to complement the coverage found in its parent print publication, which focuses on business management. The site receives more than 232,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: Timothy Morgenthaler, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine physician who also practices in Mayo Clinic's Center for Sleep Medicine. Intrinsic in Dr. Morgenthaler's  work in his role as chief safety officer is developing the capability to measure important components of patient safety, such as preventable harm, aggregated near-miss analysis, and relationship between risk conditions and serious harm events. Charles (Michel) Harper, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist who also serves as executive dean for practice at Mayo Clinic. In his role as chair of Mayo Clinic's Clinical Practice Committee, Dr. Harper and the committee's key role in not only sharing, but implementing best practices and outcomes across sites.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

NPR
Forget Last Year's Hiccups, Go Get Your Flu Shot
by Pattie Neighmond

Last year, public health officials were taken by surprise when new strains of the flu virus appeared. Not so this year and they advise everyone six nprmonths or older to get vaccinated against the flu…For scientists, every year presents a new challenge to predict exactly which strains of the flu will be powerful enough to make people sick. Pritish Tosh is an infectious disease doctor and researcher at the Mayo Clinic. He says there are dozens of different flu strains.

Reach: National Public Radio, NPR,  creates and distributes news, information, and music programming to a network of 975 independent stations and reaches 26 million listeners every week.

Context: Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist Pritish Tosh, M.D. says,"There’s a lot of research going on looking at some of these other options, in terms of our target for the influenza vaccine." Dr. Tosh, who is also a member of the Vaccine Research Group at Mayo Clinic, says the new avenues of investigation are definitely needed. However, he cautions, the single flu vaccine has only been tested in animals and is not yet available. So, he urges everyone to get immunized with the safe and proven vaccines that we already have. "Influenza is a real killer. It kills tens of thousands of Americans each year, either directly or through its complications. And we really only have one great way in terms of prevention and that is with [the current] influenza vaccine." More information, including a video interview with Dr. Tosh, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

US News & World Report
Improving Hospital Quality and Reducing Costs
by Kimberly Leonard

… Sunday at the U.S. News Hospital of Tomorrow conference in the nation's capital, hospital executives discussed how the act has changed the way they do business and deliver care. They discussed the impacts of innovation, coverage and how to reduceUS News Health Logo waste in the system.  Dr. John Noseworthy, president and CEO for the Mayo Clinic, opened the conference with a keynote speech on "The Faces of High-Value Health Care: People and Processes." He highlighted a few ways the Mayo Clinic has better coordinated care, including the creation of "Ask Mayo Expert," which allows patients to avoid a trip to the hospital by allowing them to connect with a health care professional online.

Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Previous coverage in Mayo Clinic in the News

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Dr. Noseworthy was the U.S. News Hospital of Tomorrow keynote speaker.

Contacts: Traci Klein, Karl Oestreich 

 

RobbReport
The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program Pampers Guests While Promoting Good Health
by Janice O’Leary

Can a wellness boot camp at a medical center feel like a luxury retreat? Upon entering the center where the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is headquartered, in Robb Report Health & Wellness LogoRochester, Minn., it is hard to remember that the building belongs to a medical center. Designed to maximize open space and sunlight, the architecture itself conveys a sense of health and well-being. Sun streams into stairwells, making them more appealing than the elevator. Seamless windows wrap around the fitness studios, so they have the feel of a luxury athletic club. The equipment in the strength-training area is top notch. This feels like the perfect place to hit reset.

Reach: The Robb Report publishes it's Health & Wellness publication quarterly. The magazine targets affluent individuals interested in health and wellness topics. The Robb Report Online has more than 648,900 unique visitor to its site each month.

Additional coverage in The Robb Report:

Robb Report — The Truth About Organic Food Labeling [Q&A] 

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

WQOW Eau Claire
Car Control Class prepares teens for emergency driving situations

Instructors said giving teens the practice they need for keeping control in emergencies is key. "The bigger crash comes from someone panicking or over-correcting orWQOW TV Logo overreacting, and if you have not felt those things with the car, what the car can do, you're likely to panic and overreact," Dr. Lee Mayer, Mayo Clinic Health Systems Orthopedic Surgeon said. Mayer played a key role in starting the Car Control Classes eight years ago.

Context: The car control classes held at Chippewa Valley Technical College & sponsored by Mayo Clinic Health System.

Reach: WQOW is an ABC affiliate serving the Eau Claire, Wis. area.

Contact: Kristin Everett

 

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Tags: 'Pregnancy Blues', ‘Women Rock’ event, "Feel the Beat", A.L.S., ABC15 Ariz., ABC15 Arizona, ACS mammography guidelines, addiction psychiatry, adenoma detection, ADHD, advisory board, Affordable care act


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