Items Tagged ‘Bradly Prigge’

January 20th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highhlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

CNBC
Important not to lose ground on ACA

Dr. John Noseworthy, Mayo Clinic president & CEO, and Bernard Tyson, Kaiser Permanente CEO, talks about implementing reforms in the health care system.

Reach: CNBC is a 24-hour cable television station offers business news and financial information. The channel provides real-time financialCNBC logo market coverage to an estimated 175 million homes worldwide. CNBC online receives more than 26 million unique visitors each month.

Additional CNBC coverage:
CNBC, Drug pricing and regulations: Mayo Clinic CEO — Dr. John Noseworthy, Mayo Clinic president & CEO, and Bernard Tyson, Kaiser Permanente CEO, talk about the rising cost of drugs.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

New York Times
Getting Older, Sleeping Less
by Jane E. Brody

Nonmedical causes of insomnia are often successfully treated by practicing “good sleep hygiene,” a concept developed by the late Peter J. Hauri, a sleep specialist at the Mayo Clinic. That means limiting naps to less than 30 minutes a day, preferably early in the afternoon; avoiding stimulants and sedatives; avoiding heavy meals and minimizing liquids within two to three hours of bedtime; getting moderate exercise daily, The New York Times newspaper logopreferably in the morning or early afternoon; maximizing exposure to bright light during the day and minimizing it at night; creating comfortable sleep conditions; and going to bed only when you feel sleepy.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: The Mayo Center for Sleep Medicine (CSM) is a multidisciplinary enterprise comprised of pulmonologists, neurologists, psychiatrists and pediatricians who — with the support of a physician assistant, nurses and polysomnographic technologists — are engaged in a vibrant array of clinical, educational and research activities. Mayo Clinic doctors trained in sleep disorders evaluate and treat adults and children in the Center for Sleep Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. The Center for Sleep Medicine is one of the largest sleep medicine facilities in the United States. Staff in the center treats about 6,500 new people who have sleep disorders each year. The Center for Sleep Medicine is accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Washington Post
Why the ‘gluten-free movement’ is less of a fad than we thought
by Caitlin Dewey

There’s growing evidence that severe gluten sensitivities exist outside the realm of celiac disease. And researchers simply don’t know how many of the people following a gluten-free diet may actually have a legitimate health complaint — as opposed to a baseless fear of all things gluten, or a misplaced desire to lose weight. “We have no real inkling from our results,” said Joseph Murray, a celiac researcher at the MayoWashington Post newspaper logo Clinic and one of the authors of the new research. “We didn’t think to ask why people avoid gluten. When we designed this study 10 years ago, no one avoided gluten without a celiac diagnosis.”

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Chicago Tribune, News Herald

Other recent coverage regarding celiac disease and Dr. Joseph Murray:
January 6, 2017 edition of Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
November 4, 2016 edition of Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Joseph Murray, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist. Dr. Murray's research interests focus in two distinct areas: celiac disease and esophageal disorders. To learn more about celiac disease, check out this Mayo Clinic radio interview with Dr. Murray.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Bloomberg
The Two-Day, $5,000 C-Suite Physical
by Sam Grobart

I am in good health. I am out of shape. These two facts—one I hoped to be true, and one I absolutely knew to be true—were delivered to me at the end of a thorough two-day medical exam in early November at the Bloomberg Business LogoMayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. I underwent this battery of tests not because I was at risk for any major illness, nor because I’m a hypochondriac (I mean, no more of one than any unfit 42-year-old man has a right to be), but because the renowned medical center offers something called the Executive Health Program, which sounded exceedingly fancy.

Reach: Bloomberg BusinessWeek has a weekly circulation of more than 990,000 and has more than six million unique visitors to its online site each month.

Context: For more than 40 years, the Mayo Clinic Executive Health Program has been leveraging our nationally recognized expertise to help executives, business owners and entrepreneurs maintain good health.

Contact:  Kelley Luckstein

 

 

KJZZ
Summit Features Experts Making Sense Of Health-Care Payments
by Steve Goldstein

Paying for health care is complicated and confusing. Does a provider accept your health plan? How many bills can you expect to receive after the fact? What about catastrophic care? Mayo Clinic and ASU’s School for the Science of Health Care Delivery have teamed up to host a Payment Reform Summit featuring a number of experts trying to figure out what makes sense in the realm of health-care payments. We talked aboutKJZZ NPR -AZ Logo some possible reforms with Dr. Lois Krahn of the Mayo Clinic and Dr. Victor Trastek, director of ASU’s School of Science and Health Care Delivery.

Reach: KJZZ-FM is a commercial station owned by Maricopa Community Colleges in Tempe, AZ. The format of the station is news and jazz. KJZZ-FM's target audience is news and jazz music listeners, ages 18 to 64, in the Tempe, AZ area.

Additional coverage: Fierce Healthcare

Context: The Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University Alliance for Health Care Payment Reform Summit convened subject matter experts from around the country, including the voice of patients, to inform the development of alternative payment models. With a focus on the needs of patients, the expert participants examined data drawn from a variety of sources to assess the impact of various payment models on patient access and patterns of health care use. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Jim McVeigh

 

WOKV Jacksonville
Mayo Clinic receives $1.6 million to fund Alzheimer’s research in Jacksonville
by John Engel

Eight programs at Mayo Clinic’s Jacksonville campus are receiving a total of $1.6 million in grants to fund Alzheimer’s research in Jacksonville. Kevin Bieniek, a post-doctoral research fellow at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, will benefit from this most recent round of grant funding from the state. His study examines the relationship between brain trauma and Alzheimer’s disease. “There are so many people that get Alzheimer’s disease that have no family history of this disorder,” Bieniek told WOKV. “It’s really a complex interaction of your genetics; the environment; your lifestyle; there are so many factors that come into play.”

Reach: WOKV-FM is Jacksonville's 24 hour news station.

Additional coverage: Healthcare Business News

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida were awarded eight grants from the Florida Department of Health to investigate the prevention or cure of Alzheimer’s disease. These awards followed a peer-reviewed and competitive grant application process, where the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Grant Advisory Board reviewed applications and selected 27 studies statewide. “Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus is home to international leaders in neuroscience research who are focused on addressing the unmet needs of patients,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., vice president, Mayo Clinic, and CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida. “We integrate basic and clinical research and immediately translate our findings into better patient care. We very much appreciate the state’s investment in finding solutions for Alzheimer’s disease.” More information about the grants can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Kevin Punsky

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Tags: "liquid biopsies", ACA, acupuncture, aging, alzheimers, Arizona Republic, baby powder, blood donation, Bloomberg, Bradly Prigge, breastfeeding, C. Difficile


December 23rd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. This will be our last edition of 2016.  Look for us again on January 6, 2017. Thank you and happy holidays.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Los Angeles Times
A senior-friendly workout to improve movement and prevent injury

Jogging outdoors, running on a treadmill or lifting weights at the gym aren’t always practical — or enjoyable — activities for everyone. However, one type of exercise works for everyone, no matter your age or ability, because it relies on improving practical movements often involved inLogo for Los Angeles Times newspaper everyday activities. “Natural movement is universal, and it’s about bringing movement back to the basics,” says Bradly Prigge, wellness exercise specialist with the Mayo Clinic’s Healthy Living Program. “It’s not about following the latest fitness craze or learning the newest secret to weight loss. Natural movement is about connecting with your body and cultivating an awareness of your full abilities.”

Reach:  The Los Angeles Times has a daily readership of 1.9 million and 2.9 million on Sunday, more than 8 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.5 million. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 128 years.

Additional coverage: Mountain Grove News-Journal

Other recent coverage in the Los Angeles Times related to Mayo Clinic's Healthy Living Program

Cosmopolitan, Do You Really Need to Take Vitamins?
WTOP Washington, Mayo Clinic expert: 4 actions for a healthy holiday season
Yahoo! News, 9 Ways to Boost Your Immune System by Michael O Schroeder
WEAU Eau ClaireTODAY INTERVIEW: Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Recipes

Previous coverage related to Mayo Clinic's Healthy Living program in the December 2, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life.

Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Joe Dangor

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic in Rochester adds customized plane to air fleet

The Mayo Clinic in Rochester has unveiled a customized $8.5 million airplane to transport high-risk patients to its facilities. The fixed-wing aircraft adds to the Mayo One fleet that was created in 1984. The program began with a single helicopter based in Rochester and now boasts four — two in Rochester, one in Mankato and one in Eau Claire, Wisconsin.Star Tribune newspaper logo

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: KSTP, Becker’s Hospital Review, KIMT

Context: While a certain red sled usually owns the flight-related headlines this month, Santa's sleigh isn't the only one getting press this December. Several news outlets, it seems, are reporting on another vehicle taking flight. But instead of delivering toys to good girls and boys, the new Mayo One airplane delivers patients in need of immediate, advanced care to Mayo Clinic. And like Santa's ride, this one also has some pretty unique features, and the equipment, medication and staff to make it function as a sky-high Emergency Department. You can read more about the new Mayo one airplane in Mayo Clinic in the Loop.

Contact:  Glenn Lyden

 

KIMT
St. Mary’s nurse returns to work after hiking accident
by DeeDee Stiepan

It’s an incredible story of survival that we first brought you in May when a St. Mary’s nurse fell 100ft while hiking in Arizona. Amber Kohnhorst spent 24 hours in extreme pain, without food or water until she was KIMT LOGOrescued by helicopter. Now, the 25-year old is back in Rochester, and it’s been quite some time since she was working as a Registered Nurse on the 5th floor at St. Mary’s Hospital. “My last shift was Friday May 13th, she tells us. “I’ve never really believed in Friday the 13th but now it kind of freaks me out.”

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Previous coverage in December 2, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Amber Kohnhorst loves animals and adventure. The trip she'd planned to Best Friends Animal Sanctuary in Utah promised both. She'd spend time volunteering at the shelter and do some hiking in nearby Cane Beds, Arizona. But what sounded like a perfect vacation quickly became a nightmare when the 25-year-old Mayo Clinic nurse fell 100 feet down a cliff during what was supposed to be a short hike. You can read more about Amber's story on Mayo Clinic In the Loop.

Contacts:  Ginger Plumbo, Kelly Reller

 

NBC News
Why Heart Attacks Are Striking Healthy Young Women
by Lauren Dunn and Parminder Deo

Researchers are discovering that SCAD heart attacks occur more frequently than once thought..."SCAD is a type of heart attack, but completely NBC News Logodifferent than the one we normally think of," says cardiologist Dr. Sharonne Hayes of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. "It's caused by a split or tear in an otherwise healthy artery that leads to a drop in blood flow to the heart leading to a heart attack."

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Context:  Sharonne Hayes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Hayes studies cardiovascular disease and prevention, with a focus on sex and gender differences and conditions that uniquely or predominantly affect women. With a clinical base in the Women's Heart Clinic, Dr. Hayes and her research team utilize novel recruitment methods, social media and online communities, DNA profiling, and sex-specific evaluations to better understand several cardiovascular conditions. A major area of focus is spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD), an uncommon and under-recognized cause of acute coronary syndrome (heart attack) that occurs predominantly in young women.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic sees innovation as key to the future

Mayo Clinic recognizes the historic changes taking place in the health care landscape. The health care provider has become famous for treating the whole patient by integrating various specialties of care. Now Mayo is going to be using its of health care innovation system as a model for generating revenue. Mayo-Jacksonville is setting aside spaces for innovators and is taking part in more collaborations.Florida Times-Union newspaper logo

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Charles Bruce, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist and serves as medical director of Mayo Clinic Ventures at Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville, Florida. James (Jim) Rogers is chair of Mayo's newly formed Business Development Department, which combines the functions of Mayo Clinic Ventures and the Office of Business Development. The new department will oversee Mayo's partnerships with external organizations, spearhead new business opportunities and support the advancement of medical technology in conjunction with Mayo Clinic leaders, entrepreneurs and inventors.

Contacts: Kevin Punsky, Duska Anastasijevic

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Tags: ABC15 Arizona, AccuWeather.com, advisory board, Affordable care act, Alatus, alcohol, Amber Kohnhorst, American Medical Association, anesthesia, Angie Murad, antibiotics, antidepressants


December 9th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Los Angeles Times
A senior-friendly workout to improve movement and prevent injury

Jogging outdoors, running on a treadmill or lifting weights at the gym aren’t always practical — or enjoyable — activities for everyone. However, one type of exercise works for everyone, no matter your age or ability, because it relies on improving practical movements often involved inLogo for Los Angeles Times newspaper everyday activities. “Natural movement is universal, and it’s about bringing movement back to the basics,” says Bradly Prigge, wellness exercise specialist with the Mayo Clinic’s Healthy Living Program. “It’s not about following the latest fitness craze or learning the newest secret to weight loss. Natural movement is about connecting with your body and cultivating an awareness of your full abilities.”

Reach:  The Los Angeles Times has a daily readership of 1.9 million and 2.9 million on Sunday, more than 8 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.5 million. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 128 years.

Additional coverage: Mountain Grove News-Journal

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life.

Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Joe Dangor

 

Prevention
4 Easy Moves To Ease Your IBS Symptoms

When you're dealing with the abdominal pain, bloating, cramping, constipation, or diarrhea that comes along with irritable bowel syndrome Prevention logo(IBS), the last thing you probably want to do is exercise. Yet according to research, moving your body can decrease the pain associated with this condition that affects an estimated one in six Americans. Brent A. Bauer, MD, director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program, says many movement practices, such as yoga and tai chi, as well as meditation and guided imagery, benefit those suffering from IBS thanks to the fact that they induce the relaxation response. "This in turn balances the autonomic nervous system," says Bauer, which influences the function of many internal organs, including the digestive system.

Reach:  Prevention magazine has a monthly circulation of more than 1.5 million readers and covers practical health information and ideas on healthy living. Its website has nearly 1.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context:  Brent Bauer, M,D., is director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program. As director of the program, Dr. Bauer has broad and varied research interests. Since its founding in 2001, the program has promoted a collaborative spirit that enables researchers from both within and outside Mayo Clinic to share resources, ideas and expertise regarding research in this exciting realm.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic co-sponsoring World Stem Cell Summit
by Brett Boese

The Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine is co-sponsoring next week's World Stem Cell Summit in FloLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaperrida. More than 1,200 people are expected to attend the 12th annual event. Mayo will have a delegation of administrators, researchers and clinical experts participating in presentations and panel discussions involving stem cell discoveries, promising clinical trials and therapy options currently available.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine is a co-sponsor of the 2016 World Stem Cell Summit. More than 1,200 attendees are expected at the 12th annual event in West Palm Beach, Florida. A delegation of administrators, researchers and clinical  experts from Mayo Clinic will participate in featured presentations and panel discussions highlighting advances in discovery science, promising clinical trials and available therapies. Diverse topics to be covered include cardiovascular regeneration, restoring eyesight, and growing stem cells in a microgravity environment in space. Mayo Clinic experts also will be involved in panel discussions regarding education, consumer information and stem cell clinics. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Angela Bingham

 

KIMT
Study: Changes in how someone walks could predict decline in memory and thinking
by DeeDee Stiepan

Researchers at Mayo Clinic believe that changes in how someone walks over time could help predict if they will develop memory loss. The study KIMT LOGOanalyzed gait, which is the manner in which someone walks that includes everything from stride length to speed, even arm swing. They found that changes in those parameters were associated with decline in memory, thinking and language skills. “The goal will be to identify these individuals that develop these changes through time and potentially do something to prevent the decline if possible,” explains Rodolfo Savica, M.D. a Mayo Clinic Neurologist and lead author of the study.

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Context: Walking is a milestone in development for toddlers, but it’s actually only one part of the complex cognitive task known as gait that includes everything from a person’s stride length to the accompanying swing of each arm. A Mayo Clinic study recently published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease found that problems associated with gait can predict a significant decline in memory and thinking. More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

KAAL
3D Printing Improving Surgery Outcomes at Mayo Clinic

For nearly ten years, Rochester’s Mayo Clinic has been creating life-like models of people’s organs, vascular systems, and bones to help with surgery. This is all done using a three dimensional printer, which Mayo Clinic says says the demand for is only growing. The very first modelKAAL 6 News Rochester Logo surgeons created was a liver, and neuroradiologist Dr. Jonathon Morris says the rest was history. "So then we went into spine models, complex congenital scoliosis cases, from there we went into tumor, and then after we went into tumors we went into cancer, and then there was no turning back," Dr. Morris said.

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Context:  Mayo Clinic’s 3-D anatomic modeling program started with a realization that surgeons needed a new way to look at human anatomy that went beyond two-dimensional images. Surgeons who were planning the separation of conjoined twins in 2008 approached the Department of Radiology about producing a 3-D model of the babies’ shared liver. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Ethan Grove

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Tags: "work-fit" stations, 21st Century Cures Act, 3D printing, alzheimers, Ambert Kohnhorst, Ashville Citizen-Times, Associations Now, AZFamily, Boston Globe, Bradly Prigge, brain games, Cancer


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