Items Tagged ‘brain cancer’

July 17th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

KAAL
Mayo Clinic Takes Top Spot on Best Hospitals List
by Jenna Lohse

Mayo Clinic in Rochester earns the top spot on a prestigious list of the nation's top hospitals. U.S. News and World Report ranked Mayo Clinic number one on its yearly list of the nation's best hospitals…"Oh, awesome. They know everything and if they don't know it they know where to get it,” said Peg Lesmann, who traveled to Mayo from North Dakota. "It's very well organized and run,KAAL-TV-6 logo everyone has been very friendly,” said Wayne Davis. "I’ve never seen anything go like clockwork, it's perfect," said Mary Bailey, patient at Mayo Clinic…"The fact that we're recognized for providing outstanding care in the community of outstanding health care organizations around the country, we're just very proud of that and I have to say, I think there's a little bit of a spring in our step today,” said Dr. John Noseworthy, Mayo Clinic CEO.

Reach:  KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Additional coverage:

Star TribuneMayo Clinic is ranked as top U.S. hospital by U.S. News

Baltimore Sun, Hopkins Hospital bumped from top spot to No. 3 on U.S. News ranking

ABC 15 ArizonaU.S. News and World Report ranks Mayo Clinic No. 1 in Phoenix and Arizona. Additional coverage: Tucson News

La Crosse Tribune, Gundersen, Mayo-Franciscan in top 15 Wisconsin hospitals on U.S. News list

WEAU Eau Claire, Mayo Clinic Health System recognized in annual best hospitals list

Eau Claire Leader-Telegram, Health Matters, High ranking: Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire is ranked No. 6 in Wisconsin and is recognized as the No. 1 hospital in northwestern Wisconsin in the 25th U.S. News & World Report annual America's Best Hospitals list released Tuesday. 

Endocrine Today, U.S. News & World Report announces top hospitals for endocrinology and diabetes care

US News & World Report, CNN, Huffington PostChicago Tribune, ABC News, Huffington Post, KTTC, Post-Bulletin, KSTP, New4Jax, KTTC, CBS News, MPR, KARE11, One American News, WebMD, Healio, NBC4 Calif., Twin Cities Business

Context: Mayo Clinic has achieved the highest honor in U.S. News and World Report’s ranking of top hospitalsMayo Clinic earned more number one rankings than any other provider, ranking number one or number two in 11 of the 12 specialties based on reputation, services and volumes, safety and clinical outcomes. “We have a deep commitment to delivering high-value health care that best meets patients' needs. We owe our success to truly dedicated staff that provide a seamless patient experience and the care that each individual needs,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Noseworthy, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Rebecca Eisenman

MPR
6 ways to improve childhood mental illness treatment

MPR News logoGuests: Jarrod Leffler: Child and adolescent psychologist in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychology at Mayo Clinic.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Jarrod Leffler, Ph.D., is a child and adolescent psychologist with Mayo Clinic Children's Center.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

Bloomberg Alzheimer Researchers See Protein as Target for Drugs by Michelle Cortez A protein discovered less than a decade ago appears to play a role in whether symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease emerge, suggesting another avenue for exploration in efforts to find a treatment…“This injects new vigor in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease,” said Keith Josephs, the lead author and a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, Bloombergin a telephone interview. “The world has focused on two proteins, beta amyloid and tau. TDP-43 is going to be the new kid on the block.”

Reach: Bloomberg has 2,300 media professionals in 146 bureaus across 72 countries. Bloomberg delivers its content across more than 400 publications, over 310 million households worldwide through Bloomberg Television and 500,000 in the New York metro area and 18.5 million subscribers through satellite radio.

Additional Coverage: AP, New brain protein tied to Alzheimer's disease Bloomberg, Alzheimer’s Drug Fails to Help Moderately Ill in Trials 

Tampa Bay Tribune, My FOX Philly, Gainesville Sun, WebMD, HealthDay, Star Tribune, ABC News, My FOX Phoenix

Context:  Since the time of Dr. Alois Alzheimer himself, two proteins (beta-amyloid (Aβ) and tau) have become tantamount to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). But a Mayo Clinic study challenges the perception that these are the only important proteins accounting for the clinical features of the devastating disease. In a large clinico-imaging pathological study, Mayo Clinic researchers demonstrated that a third protein (TDP-43) plays a major role in AD pathology. In fact, people whose brain was TDP positive were 10 times more likely to be cognitively impaired at death compared to those who didn’t have the protein, showing that TDP-43 has the potential to overpower what has been termed resilient brain aging. The study was published in the journal Acta Neuropathologica. “We wanted to determine whether the TDP-43 protein has any independent effect on the clinical and neuroimaging features typically ascribed to AD and we found that TDP-43 had a strong effect on cognition, memory loss and medial temporal atrophy in AD,” says Mayo Clinic neurologist Keith Josephs, M.D., the study’s lead investigator and author. “In the early stages of the disease when AD pathology was less severe, the presence of TDP-43 was strongly associated with cognitive impairment. Consequently, TDP-43 appears to play an important role in the cognitive and neuroimaging characteristics that have been linked to AD.” More information on the study, including a video interview with Dr. Josephs, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

Reuters
Mustaches may raise burn risk with home oxygen therapy
by Krystnell Storr

ReutersA new case report from U.S doctors suggests that men who use home oxygen therapy should consider a clean-shaven look to reduce their risk of serious facial burns. “If you’ve ever tried to start a campfire, you always start with some dry little twigs and once that starts - and that’s kind of the mustache - then that oxygen tubing lights on fire, it’s like a blow torch shooting up their nose,” said Dr. Andrew Greenlund of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. “So, if we can prevent it, it would be good.”

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world news, business news, technology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile, and interactive television platforms.

Additional coverage: Chicago Tribune, News Channel Daily

Context: Facial hair and home oxygen therapy can prove a dangerously combustible combination, a Mayo Clinic report published in the peer-reviewed medical journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings finds. To reach that conclusion, researchers reviewed home oxygen therapy-related burn cases and experimented with a mustachioed mannequin, a facial hair-free mannequin, nasal oxygen tubes and sparks. They found that facial hair raises the risk of home oxygen therapy-related burns, and encourage health care providers to counsel patients about the risk. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: ABC 15 Arizona, ABC News, ABC15 Phoenix, Albert Lea Tribune, Alzheimer's Association Medical and Scientific Advisory Council, alzheimer's disease, AP, AP Associated Press, Apache Mall, Argus Leader, Arizona Newszap, Arizona Pop Warner Football


May 29th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations


NY Times
Ask Well: For Fitness, 2,000 Calories a Week?
By Gretchen Reynolds

I have read and heard that a person should aim to expend 2,000 calories weekly in exercise for optimum health. Is there any basis at all for this notion?...Adhering to these guidelines means that most of us would burn about 1,000 calories per week in planned The New York Times newspaper logoexercise, said Michael J. Joyner, an exercise researcher at the Mayo Clinic. And with the stairs we climb and chores we do, we come closer to that 2,000 calorie a week number, he said.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anthesiologist. Dr. Joyner and his lab team are interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci KleinBryan Anderson

 

ABC News
Wrong Women Getting Double Mastectomies, Study Finds
By Suneeta Ganji, MD

…A growing number of women with cancer in one breast are choosing to have both breasts removed. But new research suggests that the women who should be doing this aren’t – ABC News logoand, ironically, those who don’t need to take this approach are opting for it.The study, published Wednesday in JAMA Surgery, reveals what some doctors are pointing to as a problematic trend – as well as possible evidence of a breakdown in communication between women anxious about a breast cancer diagnosis and their doctors...Dr. Judy Boughey, a breast surgeon at Mayo Clinic who was not involved in the study, said breast cancer patients often have various reasons for either opting for or avoiding surgery to remove a healthy breast.

Reach:  ABCNews.com is the official website for ABC News. Its website receives more than 16.9 million unique visitors each month.

Previous Coverage

Context: Unique laboratory testing during breast cancer lumpectomies to make sure surgeons remove all cancerous tissue spares patients the need for a repeat lumpectomy in roughly 96 percent of cases at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, a success rate much higher than the rate nationally, a Mayo study shows. During the years reviewed, 13.2 percent of breast cancer lumpectomy patients nationally had to return to the operating room within a month of their initial surgery, compared to 3.6 percent at Mayo in Rochester, which uses a technique called frozen section analysis to test excised tissue for cancer while patients are still on the operating table. The findings are published in the journal Surgery. More information on this study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

US News & World Report
Air Travel Safe After Chest Surgery, Surgeon Says

If you're returning home after having chest surgery at an out-of-town hospital, flying is as safe as driving, an expert says. It's widely believed that ground travel is safer than air US News & World Report Logotravel after chest surgery, but a study by Mayo Clinic thoracic surgeon Dr. Stephen Cassivi found that isn't true. He also concluded there is no reason to wait for weeks after chest surgery to fly home.

Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional Coverage:
HealthDay, Air Travel Safe After Chest Surgery, Surgeon Says
Health.com, MSN Healthy Living, Philadelphia Inquirer, HHS Healthfinder.gov, Newsday, Yahoo! Health, Winnipeg Free Press Ciencias Medicas News

Context: Summer travel isn’t for vacation alone. For some people, it may include a trip to an out-of-town hospital for surgery. If you are traveling for chest surgery, you may wonder whether it is safer to return home by car or plane. A new Mayo Clinic study found that, contrary to conventional wisdom, air travel is just as safe as ground travel after chest surgery, and there is often no reason to wait for weeks after an operation to fly home. Lead study author Stephen Cassivi, M.D., a Mayo Clinic thoracic surgeon, offers these five tips for safer, more comfortable travel home after surgery on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Star Tribune
Miracle fruit: Is the coconut all it's cracked up to be?
By Allie Shah

…“I always say: If all else fails, try coconut,” said Oprish, who recently wrote about the wonders of coconut for the Twin Cities Moms blog. The 33-year-old is part of a consumer movement that is transforming a tropical fruit once maligned for its high fat content into aStar Tribune Health newspaper logo super food embraced by people who swear by its therapeutic powers. The coconut’s healing abilities are said to be vast — from bad-breath-erasing mouthwash to Alzheimer’s treatment. As with other so-called miracle foods, “things start snowballing, and that’s what happened with coconut,” said Dr. Donald Hensrud of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Donald Hensrud, M.D. is a preventive medicine expert at Mayo Clinic and medical editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet; David Knopman, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist and Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L.D. helps people sort through the facts and figures from the fads and the hype to learn more about nutrition and diet.

Public Affairs Contacts: Joe Dangor, Duska Anastasijevic, Ginger Plumbo

 

KARE11
Mayo Clinic says sideline test detects youth concussions
by Renee Tessman

On the sidelines of youth sports, a new Mayo Clinic study shows a simple test, known as KARE-11 TV, Minneapolis-St. Paulthe King-Devick,can detect concussions. Dr. Amaal Starling of the Mayo Clinic is co-author of the study. She said for youth athletes, "This is really the first accurate, rapid, cost effective, removal-from-play tool that is available for concussion screen."

Reach: KARE is a an NBC affiliate in the Minneapolis-St.Paul market.

Additional Coverage:
KSTP, Forum at Edina High School Addresses Concussions in Sports
Healio Optometry News, King-Devick test effective in detecting concussions for adolescents, study finds

Context:  A rapid, easy-to-administer eye movement test is showing great promise as a sideline concussion test for youth sports, a Mayo Clinic study finds. In the study, Mayo Clinic researchers assessed high school hockey players using the King-Devick test. The test requires an athlete to read single-digit numbers displayed on cards. After suspected head trauma, the athlete is given the test, which takes about two minutes, and the results are compared to a baseline test administered previously. If the time needed to complete the test takes longer than the baseline test time, the athlete should be removed from play until evaluated by a medical professional. Amaal Starling, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist and a co-author of the study. More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Post-Bulletin
Back and Forth: Mayo’s 150 Years Included Dr. Donald Balfour
by Harley Flathers

One of the many people we might describe as a "Rock" at Mayo Clinic shortly after entering the 20th century was Dr. Donald C. Balfour, an early associate with Drs. Will andLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaper Charlie Mayo...Balfour took a liking to Dr. Will and Hattie Mayo's daughter Carrie…One of the Balfour daughters, Mary, married the late Henry Frederic Helmholz Jr., who died Jan. 6, 2012, at age 100. Their daughter, Martha Mayo Helmholz-Anderson, told me Balfour was a loving grandfather.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: This year marks 150 years of continuous service to patients, and Mayo Clinic is launching a yearlong recognition that will honor a legacy of medical accomplishments and a model for the future of health care. Dr. Mayo’s sons, Drs. William and Charles Mayo, joined the practice in the late 1880’s and, with their father, created Mayo Clinic’s medical hallmark: The integrated care model that focuses a team of experts on one patient at a time and puts patients’ needs first. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: 2018 Super Bowl, ABC News, ABC Salud, accidents, Affordable care act, air travel, Al Schilmoeller, Arizona ABC 15, atrial fibrillation, AVM, back pain remedies, Barbara McCarthy


December 6th, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

 

 

December 6, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Bloomberg
Personalized Flu Shots Offer Best Chance to Beat Season
by Michelle Fay Cortez

A wave of new flu vaccines designed for the first time to focus on individual groups, including children, the elderly and people with allergies, may help boost U.S. vaccination rates as the new season develops this year…Personalized Medicine “For the first time in human history, we can actually target an influenza vaccine to an individual patient,” said Gregory Poland, head of the Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group in Rochester, Minnesota. “That’s a great advance.”

Reach:  Bloomberg has 2,300 media professionals in 146 bureaus across 72 countries. Bloomberg delivers its content across more than 400 publications, over 310 million households worldwide through Bloomberg Television and 500,000 in the New York metro area and 18.5 million subscribers through satellite radio.

Additional Coverage: Chicago Tribune

Context: The  flu shot season includes several new vaccine options for consumers, Mayo Clinic vaccine expert Gregory Poland, M.D., says. Fearful of needles? There’s now an influenza vaccination just for you. Allergic to eggs? It won’t stop you from getting a flu shot. The new choices move influenza vaccinations closer to the personalized approach long sought by immunologists including Dr. Poland, but they may also prove bewildering to patients, he says.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Flu Vaccines – Changes & Choices for 2013

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob Nellis, Sharon Theimer

MinnPost
Google Executive Chairman Schmidt joins Mayo Clinic board of directors
By Joe Kimball

Eric Schmidt, Google's executive chairman, is now on Mayo Clinic's 31-member board of directors. Schmidt joined the Mayo board last month, the clinic said. Mayo is in the midst of a $5 billion expansion over the next 20 years; included is more than $500 million in state and local tax money to pay for parking, transit, utilities and other public amenities. 

Circulation: MinnPost is a nonprofit, nonpartisan enterprise which provides news and analysis based on reporting by professional journalists, most of whom have decades of experience in the Twin Cities media. MinnPost averages more than 78,000 unique visitors to its site each month.. In Dec. 2013, MinnPost also had 27,300 followers on Twitter and its main Facebook page was liked by 9,500-plus readers.

Additional Coverage: Post-Bulletin, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal, BringMeTheNews

News Release: Mayo Clinic Trustees Welcome New Member, Elect Emeritus Member

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

Star Tribune
Mayo plans $72 million expansion of St. Marys Hospital in Rochester
By Janet Moore

The Mayo Clinic said Monday that it will add five floors to Saint Marys Hospital and reno­vate other parts of the campus in Rochester, part of a $72 million project. The floors will be added to the Mary Brigh East Building, and the third floor of the Domitilla Building will be renovated. Both projects will begin in the second quarter of 2014 and are expected to be completed by early 2016.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional Coverage: Twin Cities Business Magazine, KARE11, KMSP, KARE11 online, Prairie Business, Sioux Falls Argus Leader, FOX 47, KEYC, Austin Daily Herald, WWTC The Patriot, KSTP, KAAL, Pioneer Press, Finance & Commerce, La Crosse Tribune, KSFY S.D., MPR, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal, BringMeTheNews, Pioneer Press, Post-Bulletin, KTTC, HealthDayMedPage Today

News Release: Mayo Clinic Planning Expansion and Renovation Projects at Saint Marys Hospital

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

Post-Bulletin
Track medical substance-use data, association board member says
by Jeff Hansel

A study by Mayo Clinic researchers shows nearly 1 in every 100 of anesthesiology specialists-in-training developed substance-use disorder during their residency programs. In addition "at least 11 percent" of those with confirmed substance use disorders eventually die "of a cause directly related to the disorder," says an announcement of a study appearing in the Dec. 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. "That's a pretty high mortality rate for a disease," said Dr. David Warner of the Mayo Clinic, a member of the American Board of Anesthesiology's Board of Directors and co-author of the study.

Circulation: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: According to a study conducted by Mayo Clinic and the American Board of Anesthesiology (ABA), nearly 1 in every 100 anesthesiology residents entering primary training from 1975 to 2009 developed substance use disorder (SUD) during training. The incidence of this disorder is continuing to increase and the risk of relapse or death is high. The study appears in the Dec. 4 issue of JAMA, a medical education theme issue.

Substance use disorder is a serious public health problem, and physicians are not immune. Anesthesiologists have ready access to potent drugs such as intravenous opioids, although only indirect evidence exists that SUD is more common in anesthesiologists than in other physicians, according to background information in the article. "Although relatively few anesthesiology residents develop SUD, the incidence is continuing to increase," says David Warner, M.D., of Mayo Clinic's Department of Anesthesiology, and the ABA Board of Directors and chair of the Research and Credentials committees.

News Release: Mayo Clinic, American Board of Anesthesiology Study Finds Substance Use Disorder Among Medical Residents And High Risk of Relapse

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

Additional Mayo Clinic News Highlights This Week:
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Tags: #GlutenChat, 10 News, ABA, ABC News, Affordable care act, AIDS, Al Jazeera America, Al Jazeera magazine, alcohol, American Board of Anesthesiology, Andy Thieman, anesthesiology residents


March 1st, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

March 1, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

CNBC
Cancer Roundtable with Maria Bartiromo

Maria Bartiromo talks with Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy, Cleveland Clinic CEO Toby Cosgrove and Novartis CEO Joe Jimenez about breakthroughs in treating cancer and the road to finding a cure.

Reach: CNBC provides real-time financial market coverage and business information to more than 340 million homes worldwide, including more than 95 million households in the United States and Canada.

Context:  John Nosweworthy, M.D., is president and CEO of Mayo Clinic. Dr. Noseworthy recently appeared on CNBC as part of a panel interview about changes in health care in United States.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Duska Anastasijevic

Business Insider
Mayo Clinic CEO: Here's Why We've Been The Leading Brand In Medicine For 100 Years
by Max Nisen

For more than 100 years, the Mayo Clinic's built an enviable reputation and medical practice. People all over the world regard it as one of the best places to treat any illness, and it has routinely come in at the top of hospital rankings. We've already written about the Clinic's plan to spread that knowledge worldwide, but we also spoke to CEO Dr. John Noseworthy about how the clinic built its reputation, attracts the world's best doctors, and manages to stay at the top.

Related Coverage:
Business Insider, It Takes Mayo Clinic 3 Whole Years To Decide If A Doctor's Good Enough For Them

Previous Coverage:
Business Insider, Mayo Clinic Has A Radical Plan To Expand Its Reach Across The World

Reach: Business Insider has more than 19.6 million page views each month. The on-line publication focuses on business news. The site provides and analyzes business news and acts as an aggregator of top news stories from around the web. Its content is sometimes cited by other, larger, publications such as The New York Times and domestic news outlets like National Public Radio.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D., is president and CEO of Mayo Clinic. Dr. Noseworthy recently chatted with Business Insider about Mayo’s work and pioneering leadership in shaping the future of health care.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

American Medical News
Health system brands go national
by Victoria Stagg Elliott

Some of the biggest brand names in health care delivery are deciding that it’s not enough to be a prestigious place in the distance. Places like Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., Cleveland Clinic and MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston have established affiliate programs…“We have to turn down patient requests to come to our campus for care,” said Mary Jo Williamson, administrative director of Mayo Clinic Care Network. “We’re trying to find ways to distribute Mayo Clinic culture and expertise and help physicians better serve local populations. We’ve always had lots of informal collaboration. This is an opportunity to extend our knowledge in a structured way…”

Reach: American Medical News is the print and online news publication for physicians published by the American Medical Association.

Context: Mary Jo Williamson is administrative director of Mayo Clinic Care Network, a network of like-minded organizations throughout the United States and world that share a common commitment to improving health care delivery in their communities.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

Star Tribune
Mayo’s Goal: Full Face-Lift for City
by Jennifer Brooks

There are company towns, and then there’s Rochester – where waiters make meal recommendations based on what sort of blood work you’re having drawn at Mayo Clinic the next morning…”When I first heard that figure, I gasped. ‘Are you kidding me? A [$585] million taxpayer handout?’” said Fran Bradley, a former state representative and fiscal conservative who has butted heads with Mayo on other issues – but not this one. “I can’t be opposed to it. I think the idea is way too creative.”

Circulation: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 514,457 copies and weekday circulation is 300,330. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

MPR
Mayo, a financial powerhouse, is poised to propel expansion
by Martin Moylan

The clinic's success in attracting such donations is one reason Mayo looks like a very good bet to make good on its promise to kick in $3.5 billion over 20 years to fund its latest expansion. "I don't think it's any stretch at all, within our current financial strength," said Pat McCarty, Mayo's vice chair of financial planning and analysis… Mayo is strong, despite its challenges, said Elizabeth Keating, a Boston University expert in assessing the financial performance of nonprofits. "From a profitability standpoint they are successful," she said.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Additional Coverage:
KSTP, KAAL, Post Bulletin, San Francisco Chronicle, Pioneer Press

Minnesota Daily
Mayo upgrade could boost Rochester campus
by Alma Pronove

“If it’s good for Mayo and it’s good for their patients and their visitors, it’s good for us as an institution,” UMR Assistant Vice Chancellor Jay Hesley said. “Having those resources in place helps us with our recruitment and our retention of students, faculty and staff.”… “Our goal is to be known as the best health destination in the world,” said Lisa Clarke, co-chair of the Destination Medical Center initiative.

Related Coverage:
Minnesota Daily, Editorial: Keeping the Mayo competitive

Reach: The Minnesota Daily is the student newspaper of the University of Minnesota and has a circulation of 20,000.

Other Destination Medical Coverage:
Pioneer Press
(AP), Mayo Clinic expansion bill gets tighter financial controls

KTTC, DMC making doctors happy

MPR, Mayo vs. Vikings stadium: state aid requests compared

Additional Coverage:
WCCO, KAAL, KTTC, KARE 11, Fox 47

Context: On Jan. 30, Mayo Clinic announced Destination Medical Center (DMC), a $5 billion economic development initiative to secure Minnesota’s status as a global medical destination center now and in the future. The goal of DMC is to ensure that Minnesota and Mayo Clinic are destinations for medical care in the coming decades. This initiative is the culmination of a three-year study by Mayo Clinic to chart its future business strategy in an increasingly complex, competitive and global business environment.

Previous Coverage from Feb. 22 Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage from Feb. 15 Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage from Feb. 8 Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage from Feb. 1 Weekly Highlights

News Release: Destination Medical Center Bill Introduced in Minnesota House, Senate

News Release: Mayo Clinic to Invest More than $3 Billion to Position Minn. as World Destination for Health Care

Destination Medical Center Website

Public Affairs Contacts: Karl Oestreich, Bryan Anderson

Minneapolis St. Paul Business Journal
Mayo Clinic says payments it receives could be cut 20-40 percent over five years
by Katharine Grayson

The Mayo Clinic could be paid between 20 and 40 percent less for its service over the next five years, due to cuts in reimbursement, the arrival of health-insurance exchanges, and other challenges facing the health care industry, CEO Dr. John Noseworthy said Wednesday…Noseworthy, speaking Wednesday at a news conference announcing the clinic’s 2012 financial results, outlined broad challenges the health provider faces, including aging demographics, chronic illness, and uncertainties related to health reform.

Related Coverage:
Pioneer Press, Mayo Clinic sees drop in earnings, endowment increase

Minneapolis St. Paul Business Journal, How much Mayo Clinic makes off its cafeterias and ‘other’ revenue

Similar Coverage: Post Bulletin, MinnPost, Star Tribune, KAAL, Post Bulletin, ModernHealthcare, KIMT, Phoenix Business JournalKARE 11, Star Tribune

Context: Mayo Clinic reported Feb. 27 a solid 2012 financial performance as it works to provide high-quality care at lower cost, strengthen its destination medical center practice and deliver expertise to patients and physicians in new ways. Mayo Clinic reported annual revenue of $8.8 billion for 2012. Mayo, a not-for-profit, has more than 61,000 employees and treats more than 1 million patients each year from roughly 135 countries. As part of our operational plan in 2012, Mayo Clinic expected expenses to grow faster than revenue; expenses rose 9.6 percent, to $8.4 billion.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Reports Solid 2012 Financial Performance

Public Affairs Contact:  Karl Oestreich

Florida Times-Union
Five big announcements highlight Jacksonville's Mayo Clinic's emphasis on research
by Charlie Patton

Five significant announcements by the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville over the last two weeks highlight what is perhaps an underappreciated aspect of the clinic’s contribution to health care: a focus on research. Four of the announcements concerned the publication of important research studies. The fifth announced that the National Institutes of Health had given the clinic a five-year, $7 million extension on a grant to do research on Parkinson’s disease.

Circulation: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: For  more details about the five annoucements, refer to the news release below.

News Release: Bracelet-Like Device Controls Chronic Acid Reflux, Study Finds

News Release:
NIH Extends Udall Grant Supporting Mayo Clinic's Parkinson's Research

News Release: Combo of Avastin, Second Drug Shows Promise Fighting Brain Cancer, Mayo Clinic Finds

News Release: Novel Protein May Help Detect Lou Gehrig's Disease and Dementia, Mayo Clinic Finds

News Release: National Screening Benchmarks For Finding Polyps During a Colonoscopy Might be Too Low, Mayo Clinic Says ABC 15-Phoenix

ABC-15, Phoenix
Talking robot helps stroke patients

A robot known as “Jimmy” roams the hospital rooms at Casa Grande Regional Medical Center. The purpose of the robot is to help patients in rural areas interact with experts at the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix. “Telemedicine was deployed in order to bring the expert to the patient, when they needed it most, where they needed it most as opposed to transferring the patient from the rural community to the large urban neurological center,” says Doctor Demaerschalk, a Medical Director at the Mayo Clinic.

Reach:  KNXV-TV, ABC 15,  is the ABC television station affiliate in Phoenix, Arizona.

Context: Bart Demaerschalk, M.D. is a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. In stroke telemedicine, also called telestroke, doctors who have advanced training in the nervous system (neurologists) remotely evaluate people who’ve had acute strokes and make diagnoses and treatment recommendations to emergency medicine doctors at other sites. Doctors communicate using digital video cameras, internet telecommunications, robotic telepresence, smartphones and other technology.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

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Tags: A.L.S., ABC-15, Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology, alzheimer's disease, American Gastroenterological Association, American Medical News, avastin, Barrett's esophagus, brain cancer, branding, Business Insider, chronic acid reflux


October 5th, 2012

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Admin

October 5, 2012

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relation

Philadelphia Inquirer
Disease names can pose ethical problems
by Melissa Dribben

… Wegener's granulomatosis, for example, a rare autoimmune disease, is named for Friedrich Wegener, a German pathologist recently outed as a Nazi storm trooper. Wegener's past was uncovered in 2006 when Eric Matteson, a rheumatologist at the Mayo Clinic, was researching a biographical article about the physician. Not only did he discover Wegener's Nazi connection, but he also found that Wegener's medical-school roommate had beaten him to describing the disease.

Circulation: The Philadelphia Inquirer operates in America's sixth largest market in population and household, including five counties in Pennsylvania and four across the Delaware River in southern New Jersey. The Philadelphia Inquirer has more than 354,000 daily readers.

Context: Eric Matteson, M.D., is chair of the Rheumatology Department at Mayo Clinic  in Rochester, Minn. The Division of Rheumatology provides diagnosis and treatment of diseases affecting the joints and connective tissue (rheumatic diseases), including more than 100 types of arthritis and many autoimmune diseases. Doctors in the division have been trained in internal medicine and rheumatology. Besides caring for patients, medical staff are also involved in research and in training new rheumatologists. The first chair of Rheumatology at Mayo Clinic, Dr. Philip S. Hench, started the tradition of research that still motivates the division today. His efforts led to the discovery of the beneficial effect of cortisone in rheumatoid arthritis, an observation that led to his sharing the Nobel Prize in 1950.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

KPHO-CBS5
Life comes full circle for one Eastern Arizona family

SCOTTSDALE, AZ (CBS5) - Kathy Hunt of Young, AZ, needed a liver transplant. Her husband, Jeff Hunt, wanted to be her donor. But while going through a series of standard pre-surgery tests at the Mayo Clinic, it was discovered for the first time that Jeff had the early stages of kidney cancer, for which he's currently being treated.

Reach: KPHO-5 is the CBS affiliate in Phoenix and is owned by Meredith Corporation.  

Context: The interview took place at the Village at Mayo Clinic, where Kathy Hunt is recuperating. The Village at Mayo Clinic is a low-cost, extended-stay lodging option for transplant and cancer patients receiving treatment at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. The Village at Mayo Clinic is located on the Phoenix campus of Mayo Clinic, allowing transplant patients easy and timely access to their appointments at Mayo Clinic Hospital and the Mayo Clinic Specialty Building.

Public Affairs Contact: Lynn Closway

Arizona Republic
Doctors shine light on concussions in Scottsdale symposium
by Paola Boivin

Three days ago, Mayo Clinic neurologist Dr. David Dodick met with an NHL player who had suffered at least five concussions. The athlete said his wife no longer asked him to bring things from the upstairs of his house to her. “I come downstairs a minute later, and I don’t have it with me,” he told the director of the clinic’s concussion program. “I don’t remember.” Memory impairment was one of many topics covered at the Mayo Clinic Symposium on Concussion in Sport held Friday and Saturday in Scottsdale. The event attracted many of the field’s foremost experts, including medical representatives from several professional leagues and a highly regarded doctor who has performed autopsies on some of the sports world’s more-concussed brains.

Circulation: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday. The newspaper’s website Arizona Central, averages 83 million pages views each month.

Context:  Mayo Clinic has assembled the nation's leading experts including professional sports league representatives to discuss the clinical and scientific aspects of concussions and the related growing public health concerns at the Symposium on Concussion in Sport, Sept. 28–29, at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. A news release was ditributed Sept. 19. The story was also picked up by USA Today below:

USA Today
Shining a light on concussions
By Paola Boivin, azcentral sports

Three days ago, Mayo Clinic neurologist Dr. David Dodick met with an NHL player who had suffered at least five concussions. The athlete said his wife no longer asked him to bring things from the upstairs of his house to her.

Circulation: USA TODAY  has a circulation of 1.8 million and a readership of 3.1 million. USA TODAY websites have 26.3 million unique visitors a month.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

Florida Times-Union
Early detection vital in breast cancer batttle
by Sandy Strickland

…Tomosynthesis is another technique that’s recently become available, said Michelle McDonough, assistant professor of radiology at Mayo Clinic Jacksonville. It takes multiple X-ray pictures of each breast from many angles and then sends them to a computer to create three-dimensional images. Mayo in Rochester, Minn., has a unit used for research purposes, she said.

Circulation: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context:  The Florida Times-Union published a series of Mayo-Clinic related stories recently as part of Octobers' Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Tomosynthesis takes multiple X-ray pictures of each breast from many angles and then sends them to a computer to create three-dimensional images, said Michelle McDonough, M.D., who has joint appointments in the Breast Clinic and Radiology at Mayo Clinic in Florida. The three others appear immediately below.

Public Affairs Contact: Paul Scotti

Florida Times-Union
Solid advice, but no magic bullet for keeping breast cancer at bay
by Diana Greenberg

There is no surefire way to prevent breast cancer, the experts say, no magic bullet to keep it at bay. But there are steps women can take to minimize their risk. And if they get the disease, there are things they can do to keep it from becoming life-threatening and lessen its impact on their quality of life…“About 70-75 percent of breast cancers occur sporadically, with no family history,” said Stephanie Hines, a doctor of internal medicine and assistant professor of medicine at Mayo Clinic. “Probably 5 to 10 percent of all breast cancers are caused by some gene that is being inherited through the family that we can track.”

Circulation: See Florida Times-Union entry above.

Context: Stephanie Hines, M.D. has joint appoointments in the Breast Clinic an Consultative and Diagnostic Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Public Affairs Contact: Paul Scotti

Florida Times-Union
Early detection makes lumpectomies a viable option
By Diana Greenburg

Years ago, when a woman developed breast cancer, she faced the prospect of losing her breast, a lifesaving necessity. Today she has another option — the removal of just the cancer and a bit of tissue around it, preserving the rest of her breast...“Early detection and increased patient awareness have allowed us to identify cancers when they’re not palpable, before patients recognize that they have something wrong,” says Sarah McLaughlin, assistant professor of surgery and fellowship-trained breast surgical oncologist at Mayo Clinic

Related Mayo Clinic coverage in The Florida Times Union on pancreatic and prostate cancer.

Circulation: See Florida Times-Union entry above.

Context: Sarah McLaughlin, M.D., has joint appointments in the Breast Clinic and General Surgery at Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Public Affairs Contact: Paul Scotti

Post-Bulletin
Medical conferences provide bump for local economy
by Jeff Hansel

Mayo Clinic's Individualizing Medicine 2012 conference kicks off today, bringing more than health providers and commercial representatives. This conference, added to others recently, pushes Mayo's local financial impact past the $1 million mark. Brad Jones, executive director of the Rochester Convention and Visitors Bureau, said final tallies aren't in yet. RCVB estimates Mayo's Transform, Cardiovascular Review Course, Karolinska Institute meeting and Individualizing Medicine conferences, together, will bring $1,035,000 into the city.

Circulation: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: The Individualizing Medicine 2012: Transforming Patient Care with Genomics conference was held Oct. 1-3 in Rochester, Minn. This inaugural conference from Mayo's Center for Individualized Medicine focused on the promise and challenges of incorporating genomics into patient care.

News Release

Related Coverage:

Post-Bulletin
Genome testing could help individualize treatments
by Jeff Hansel

Speakers at Mayo Clinic's Individualizing Medicine conference offered impressive examples of real-world genome-based treatment, and called for more research. Michael Snyder, director for the Center for Genomics and Personalized Medicine at Stanford University, said Stanford researchers chose to study Snyder's own genome rather than recruit a test subject. Speaking during this week's conference at Mayo Civic Center, Snyder said his entire genome has been sequenced. Whenever he gets a cold, he gets tested to see how the virus affects his genome — and it does.

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic genomics conference explores potentials, fears
By Ken Hanson

Two huge video screens overlooking the floor of Mayo Civic Center’s Taylor Arena showed a woman dressed as a fortune-teller gazing into a crystal ball and speaking to a man eager to hear about his future.

The woman told the man that he was going to be involved in a serious car accident. He responded by asking for details and about what he could do to prevent the calamity. Her craft, the fortune-teller explained, couldn’t supply details “but can only describe risks and possibilities.”

Additional coverage: Post-Bulletin

Public Affairs Contact:  Sam Smith

Chicago Tribune
Don't rush medical care for student athletes
by Janice Neumann

Some cash-strapped parents see group sports physicals or quick exams at walk-in clinics as a convenient and inexpensive way for students to meet health exam requirements before entering a new school or athletics…Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., provides station-based sports physicals by nurses, orthopedists, physical medicine and rehabilitation specialists, physical therapists, athletic trainers and cardiologists. "A station-based approach to the sports pre-participation examination enables a larger number of athletes to receive evaluations in a time-efficient manner," said Dr. Edward Laskowski, co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center. "It also enables specialists who staff each station to evaluate their area of expertise in a more focused fashion."

CBS News This Morning
Mayo Clinic blames monopoly for cancer drug costs

A new Mayo Clinic study says drug manufacturers are driving up the cost of popular cancer drugs. Gayle King reports.

Reach:  CBS This Morning airs from 7 to 9 am Monday through Saturday in markets across the United States.

Context: A virtual monopoly held by some drug manufacturers in part because of the way treatment protocols work is among the reasons cancer drugs cost so much in the United States, according to a commentary by two Mayo Clinic physicians in the October issue of the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Value-based pricing is one potential solution, they write.

"Cancer care is not representative of a free-market system, and the traditional checks and balances that make the free-market system work so efficiently in all other areas are absent when it comes to most cancer treatment," write authors, Mustaqeem Siddiqui, M.D., an oncologist and Vincent Rajkumar, M.D., a hematologist.

News Release

Public Affairs Contact: Joe Dangor

Ottawa Sun.com
Mayo Clinic – Tips for a Safe Hunting Season

A 22-year-old man is dead following a hunting accident in the Osgoode-area. A 911-call came in about 7 p.m. last nite and apparently the man shot himself accidentally. My condolences to the family during this extremely difficult time. Although hunting is generally considered a safe sport accidents do occur and hunters are reminded to be diligent…

Circulation: The Ottawa Sun is owned by Sun Media Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Quebecor Media Inc., Canada's largest newspaper publisher. Sun Media's English and French language papers are leaders in providing local news and information to more than 10 million readers every week. The Ottawa Sun's weekday readership is more than 128,000, Saturday readership more than 86,000 and Sunday readership of 74,000. 

Context: Mayo Clinic Health System issued an expert alert Oct. 1. Errant gunshots are an obvious health risk during fall hunting season, but a range of other dangers also can send hunters to the hospital or worse: heart attacks, injured backs and broken bones are among the most common medical emergencies. Emergency medicine physician Eric Grube, D.O., of the Mayo Clinic Health System in La Crosse offers several tips for a safe hunting season.

Public Affairs Contacts: Rick Thiesse, Sharon Theimer

Arizona Daily Star - Tucson
Robots to help stroke patients

Starting in October, Phoenix-based neurology specialist Dr. Bart Demaerschalk will be able to roam the halls of Casa Grande Regional Medical Center, look into the eyes of stroke patients, diagnose conditions and consult with colleagues. And he'll do it all from Phoenix using a joysticklike tool while looking at his computer monitor. His patients will be looking right back at him.

Circulation: The Arizona Daily Star is a morning daily newspaper that serves Tucson and surrounding districts of southern Arizona with more than 133,000 daily readers. 

Additional coverage:
Arizona Republic
Robots let Ariz. Mayo Clinic doctors treat remotely

TUCSON - Starting in October, Phoenix-based neurology specialist Dr. Bart Demaerschalk will be able to roam the halls of Casa Grande Regional Medical Center, look into the eyes of stroke patients, diagnose conditions and consult with colleagues...Demaerschalk is medical director of the Mayo Clinic's telestroke system, which consists of a mobile robot doctors can control, adjust and speak through. ER doctors in Casa Grande will be able to contact the Mayo Clinic staff on a telestroke hotline.

Circulation: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday. The newspaper’s website Arizona Central, averages 83 million pages views each month.

Context: TUBA CITY, Ariz. — Residents of the largest city in the Navajo Nation in need of emergency medical care for a stroke may benefit from a Mayo Clinic "telestroke" program that will now be available at Tuba City Regional Health Care. A recent agreement between Tuba City Regional Health Care and Mayo Clinic in Arizona means the service will start in Tuba City as early as November. Tuba City is located in north central Arizona within the Painted Desert. Most of the area's population belong to the Navajo and Hopi tribes.

News Release

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

ABC News
Blockers May Not Prevent Heart Attacks and Strokes
by Sydney Lupkin

New research suggests that beta-blocker pills don't prevent heart attacks, strokes or cardiac deaths in patients with heart disease, but doctors are torn over whether there's enough in the study to make them want to stop prescribing the drugs. Beta blockers have been a standard heart medication for decades… "This is a very compelling study that has the potential to shake up the conventional wisdom that exists regarding the role of beta blockers in the management of patients with cardiovascular disease," said Dr. Randal Thomas, a cardiovascular specialist at the Mayo Clinic. "At a minimum, it will lead to new studies that address this issue once again."

Reach: ABCNews.com is the official website for ABC News.

Context: Randal Thomas, M.D., Mayo Clinic Cardiovascular Dieases, offered his third-party expertise on the topic. The study was published in the Oct. 3, 2012 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Study Abstract

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein, Nick Hanson

Star Tribune
Running not for her best time, but for love
by Rachel Blount

Friends and family will run the Twin Cities Marathon with Johanna Olson as she battles a recurring brain tumor…During Olson's freshman year at Luther College in Decorah, Iowa, she began to see spots and suddenly was struck with excruciating headaches. One week later, she underwent surgery at the Mayo Clinic for a grade II glioma. She was told it was a slow-growing type of brain tumor. She also was told it almost certainly would return.

Circulation: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 514,457 copies and weekday circulation is 300,330. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Treatment of gliomas involves a multispecialty team effort at Mayo Clinic. A neurologist with expertise in brain cancers (neuro-oncologist) usually serves as the team lead. Brain tumor treatment team specialists work together to provide the integrated model of care for which Mayo Clinic is known. The neuro-oncologist helps coordinate your overall care with specialists from neurosurgery, medical oncology, radiation oncology, neuropathology, neuroradiology and brain rehabilitation, if needed.

Public Affairs Contacts: Nick Hanson, Joe Dangor

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

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Tags: ABC News, Arizona Daily Star, Arizona Republic, beta-blocker pills, Brad Jones, brain cancer, Cancer, Casa Grande Regional Medical Center, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, clinical trials, concussions, Dr Bart Demaerschalk


August 1st, 2012

Some Brain Tumors Are Linked to a Gene Defect

By Admin

A genetic mutation appears to be behind some cases of a common and aggressive brain cancer, researchers at Columbia University said, and targeting the abnormality with a drug prolonged the lives of mice with the condition…Robert Jenkins, professor of laboratory genetics at the Mayo Clinic, said it was particularly interesting that the researchers found the gene fusion in three patients. Glioblastoma is known to be genetically complex and when such abnormalities are found, they are often seen only in a single patient, said Dr. Jenkins, who wasn't involved in the research.

 

Wall Street Journal by Ron Winslow


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Tags: brain cancer, Columbia University, Dr. Robert Jenkins, gene fusion, genetic mutation, Glioblastoma, Wall Street Journal


March 15th, 2010

CaringBridge: Mondale’s Cancer Makes Inroads

By Kelley Luckstein

WCCO Radio host Eleanor Mondale is embarking on a new round of chemotherapy after an MRI scan showed her brain cancer has grown.

 

A message Sunday on Mondale's CaringBridge Web site says the scan at Mayo Clinic in Rochester showed her tumor "has made some small inroads." Mondale, the daughter of former Vice President Walter Mondale, was first diagnosed with brain cancer in 2005, and with a recurrence in 2008.

 

WCCO,3/2010

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Tags: brain cancer, Eleanor Mondale


September 10th, 2009

Eleanor Mondale’s husband gives upbeat report on her recovery

By Kelley Luckstein

Less than a month after surgery for a recurrence of brain cancer, Eleanor Mondale is showingeleanor-mondale-09 encouraging signs while recovering: traveling, hitting golf balls and hosting her parents for dinner.

 

Mondale, the 49-year-old WCCO Radio host and daughter of former Vice President Walter Mondale, had her surgery Aug. 12 at the Mayo Clinic.

 

In a posting over the weekend by her husband, Chan Poling, on Eleanor Mondale's Caringbridge.org Web page, he wrote: "Eleanor is doing well, healing and getting her strength back every day."

 

Star Tribune by Paul Walsh, 09/08/09

 

 

 

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Tags: brain cancer