Items Tagged ‘brain health’

February 3rd, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

CBS News
Busy minds may be better at fighting dementia

Mentally stimulating activities can protect your brain against aging, even if you’re genetically predisposed toward dementia or Alzheimer’s disease, a new study reports. Activities that keep the brain busy -- using a computer, crafting, playing games and participating in social activities -CBS News logo- appear to lower the risk of age-related mental decline in people 70 and older, the Mayo Clinic study found.

Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

Additional coverage:
HealthDay, Lexington Herald Leader, Mercury News, Associated Press, Live Science, Medical News Today, MedPage Today, UPI, Pulse Headlines, New York Times, Star Tribune, KTTC, Atlanta Journal-ConstitutionMiami Herald, News-medical.net, Globe and Mail, iTechPost, Kansas City StarFOX NewsIndian Express

Other Alzheimers' coverage:
USA Today, Trying to solve the Alzheimer's puzzle

Mayo Clinic researchers have found that engaging in mentally stimulating activities, even late in life, may protect against new-onset mild cognitive impairment, which is the intermediate stage between normal cognitive aging and dementia. The study found that cognitively normal people 70 or older who engaged in computer use, craft activities, social activities and playing games had a decreased risk of developing  mild cognitive impairment. The results are published in the Jan. 30 edition of JAMA Neurology. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

BuzzFeed
What Even Is Kombucha, Anyway?
by Anthony Rivas

Kombucha starts with a bologna-looking gelatinous thing called a SCOBY, which stands for Symbiotic Culture of Bacteria and Yeast. This can BuzzFeed News Logotake anywhere from 7-14 days, depending on the temperature of the environment, registered dietitian nutritionist Angie Murad, of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program, tells BuzzFeed Health. During that time, the yeast and bacteria feed off the sugar — and typically grow into a “daughter” SCOBY — making the tea carbonated and slightly alcoholic (store-bought kombucha should have less than 0.5% unless otherwise noted).

Reach: BuzzFeed receives more than 15.7 million unique visitors each month to its website and targets pop culture and social media enthusiasts.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Today.com
5 heart attack warning signs never to ignore
by A. Pawlowski

Almost two-thirds of women who die suddenly of coronary heart disease have no previous symptoms, according to the CDC. “Some people will say it was out of the blue, and that’s probably most people,” said Dr. Sharonne Hayes, director of the Women's Heart Clinic at the Mayo Clinic.  “A substantial minority of patients will have some symptoms that, had they paid attention to them or sought an outpatient evaluation, they might have had a different outcome.”

Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show.

Related coverage:
WebMD, SCAD: The Heart Attack That's Striking Young Women Context

Contact: Traci Klein

 

CNN
Former athlete helps truckers get healthy
by Alex Smith

On a chilly winter morning, dozens of truck driver trainees file into a classroom at the headquarters of Prime Inc., a trucking company based in Springfield, Mo. At the front is Siphiwe Baleka, an energetic former swimming champion in his mid-40s…The relatively small lifestyle changesCNN Logo that Baleka promotes could be enough to make a life-changing difference in the health of many truck drivers, says Dr. Clayton Cowl, chief of preventive, occupational and aerospace medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. "The drivers themselves -- they don't need to be running marathons, necessarily," Cowl says. "It's finding those times when there is some downtime, where they are able to find several days per week to do activities that they enjoy and find ways to reduce stress."

Reach: Cable News Network (CNN) is a worldwide news and information network providing live, continuous coverage of news from around the globe, 24 hours a day. CNN online received more than 55 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Previous coverage in January 27, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context:  Clayton Cowl, M.D. heads Mayo Clinic's preventive, occupational and aerospace medicine. The division consists of 22 physicians who have specialty training in internal medicine or family practice and a team of trained occupational health nurses. Several of our physicians are board-certified in preventive, occupational and/or aerospace medicine. Mayo Clinic's integrated group practice model makes consultation with any other medical specialists readily available.

Contact:  Kelly Reller

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Tags: ACA, alzheimers, Angie Murad, Associated Press, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Barron News-Shield, brain cancer, brain health, BuzzFeed, CBS News, Chicago Tribune, Chippewa Herald


March 11th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

International Business Times
Betting On Cancer: Phoenix Aims To Become Oncology Destination As More Cities Look To Biotech For Growth
by Elizabeth Whitman

A transformation has taken place in the Phoenix area over the past decade as oncology centers and research institutions have merged, expanded and reconfigured their operations….“We’ve said, ‘Hey, we’re good at cancer. We’re going to do more,’” saidInternational Business Times Logo Dr. Wyatt Decker, the CEO of the Mayo Clinic in Arizona as well as an emergency room physician. More than 20 percent of the clinic’s patients come from out of state, drawn by the Mayo brand's reputation and the perks of the temperate, picturesque desertscape of the Valley of the Sun. In 2010, the clinic generated a positive annual economic impact of more than $1.5 billion, the Mayo Clinic has calculated, and Decker estimated that amount has grown by 30 to 50 percent since then.

Reach:  The International Business Times has more than 1.6 million unique visitors to its website each month. International Business Times is a digital global news publication that provides comprehensive coverage and analysis of business, economic, political and technological issues around the world. It reaches over 55 million people every month in seven global editions and four different languages.

Context:  Mayo Clinic introduced its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota in 2015 and in Arizona in mid March 2016. Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients — especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures — proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

International Business Times
Obesity In America: As Healthcare Costs Rise, Hospitals Weigh New Ways Of Caring For Larger Patients
by Elizabeth Whitman

“It’s those little things that add up,” said Robert Cima, a colorectal surgeon at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Many International Business Times Logohospitals have neither the equipment nor the resources to move their patients efficiently, he said, even though they long ago began buying parallel sets of surgical equipment for operating on larger patients. Now, “the real issue is caring for them on the floor. That cost is huge, relative to the operating room,” Cima said.

Reach:  The International Business Times has more than 1.6 million unique visitors to its website each month. International Business Times is a digital global news publication that provides comprehensive coverage and analysis of business, economic, political and technological issues around the world. It reaches over 55 million people every month in seven global editions and four different languages.

Context: Robert Cima, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic colorectal surgeon. Mayo Clinic surgeons helped develop minimally invasive (laparoscopic) colon and rectal surgery and use these techniques on almost all surgeries. Laparoscopic procedures use smaller incisions than conventional surgery, which decreases bleeding, lessens pain and shortens both expected hospital stays and overall recovery times. They are also skilled in robotic surgery, a specialized form of laparoscopic surgery, and ileoanal anastomosis surgery that avoids the need for a permanent colostomy.

Contact:  Sharon Theimer

 

Los Angeles Times
As measures of health, fitness and fatness matter more than weight
by Melissa Healy

The new studies suggest that these caveats about BMI are especially true for people as they age beyond their 50s and enter seniority, said Mayo Clinic cardiologist Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, who researches obesity's health effects. In the CanadianLos Angeles Times Logo study and others that have raised what's called "the obesity paradox," Lopez-Jimenez said it's possible that older people who carry a few extra pounds are protected by having a reserve of excess weight they can afford to lose during an illness.

Reach:  The Los Angeles Times has a daily readership of 1.9 million and 2.9 million on Sunday, more than 8 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.5 million. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 128 years.

Context: Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Lopez-Jimenez studies obesity and cardiovascular disease from different angles, from physiologic studies assessing changes in myocardial mechanics and structural and hemodynamic changes following weight loss, to studies addressing the effect of physicians' diagnosis of obesity on willingness to lose weight and successful weight loss at follow-up.

Contacts: Joe Dangor, Traci Klein

 

Huffington Post
Why The Fat You Can See Isn’t The Fat You Should Worry About
by Erin Schumaker

In reality, the area of your body where you store your fat may be a better predictor of health -- regardless of your body mass index. "All fat is not the same," said Dr. Virend Somers, a cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Fat directly under the skin -- the stuff we can see -- isn't necessarily harmfuHuffPost Healthy Livingl.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique visitors.

Context: Virend Somers, M.D., Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic physician with joint appointments in cardivascular diseases and nephrology and hypertension. Dr. Somers directs the Cardiovascular Facility and the Sleep Facility within Mayo Clinic's Center for Clinical and Translational Science.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

CBS News
Can drinking lots of coffee lower risk for MS?
by Mary Brophy Marcus

In this case, a new study in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry suggests being a java drinker may lower the risk for multiple sclerosis (MS). Dr. Mark Keegan, professor of neurology and chair of the division of multiple sclerosis at theCBS News Logo Mayo Clinic, said, "They show some observational evidence that in two separate populations high amounts of coffee intake was associated with a reduction in the risk of MS," but he also cautioned that observational studies don't equal medical advice.

Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

Context: B. Mark Keegan, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist. Dr. Keegan is involved in clinical and translational research in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and other related inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Post-Bulletin
Mayo sees big potential for small MRI machine
by Brett Boese

After nearly nine years of planning, Mayo Clinic researchers are just weeks away from collecting data on a $5.7 million Logo for Post-Bulletin newspapercompact 3T MRI scanner on its Rochester campus. Lead researchers John Huston III, a neuroradiologist, and Matt Bernstein, a medical physicist, are optimistic that their targeted work on the brain will improve patient diagnoses and outcomes, particularly involving strokes, Alzheimer's, tumors and high-impact injuries such as concussions.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context: The reality of magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, machines is one of great size — both in price and physical space. This, then, restricts access to needed medical screenings. But what if you could shrink both and still produce high-quality MR images? Mayo Clinic researchers, in a partnership with GE and funding through a National Institutes of Health grant, are hoping to answer that question, and many others, now that a new, one-of-a-kind compact 3-Tesla MRI scanner is in place at the Department of Radiology research labs. More information about the new MRI scanner can be found on Discovery's Edge, Mayo Clinic's research magazine.

Contact: Ethan Grove

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Tags: 24news.ca, AARP, alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer’s Research Center at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Amazon.com, Ambient Clinical Analytics, APoE4 gene, Associated Press, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Atypical Afib, AWARE, bariatric patients


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