Items Tagged ‘brain tumor’

April 14th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

ABC News
What patients need to know about new recommendations for prostate cancer screening
by Allison Bond

The new recommendations may help patients get personalized care to address their health and specific concerns. The guidelines empower patients to talk with their doctor about personalized care tailored to their health and priorities, Dr. Jeff Karnes, a urologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, who was not involved in the new recommendations, toldABC News logo ABC News. “A man should be allowed to discuss with his physician whether to have a PSA ordered or not,” Karnes said.

Reach: ABC News Online has more than 28.8 million unique visitors to its site each month. ABC’s World News Tonight with David Muir averages about 9.2 million viewers each night.

Additional coverage: NBC NewsKTIC Nebraska

Context: R. Jeffrey Karnes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic urologist. Dr. Karnes and his urologist colleagues diagnose and treat problems involving the male and female urinary tract and the male reproductive organs.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Daily Mail
Paralysed man moves his legs and STANDS for the first time after a computer-controlled electrode is inserted into his abdomen and stimulates his spinal chord
by Claudia Tanner

A man paralysed from the waist down has moved his legs for the first time after doctors inserted an electrode sending an electrical current to the spinal cord… Mayo Clinic researchers, who tested the pioneering treatment, say these results offer further evidence that a combination of this technology and rehabilitation may help patients with spinal cord injuries regain control.

Context: the Daily Mail has a circulation of more than 1.4 million readers. Its website has more than 16.4 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: ReliaWire, Infobae.com

Previous coverage in April 7, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the April 7, 2017 News Weekly Highlights

Context: Mayo Clinic researchers used electrical stimulation on the spinal cord and intense physical therapy to help a man intentionally move his paralyzed legs, stand and make steplike motions for the first time in three years. The case, the result of collaboration with UCLA researchers, appears today in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Researchers say these results offer further evidence that a combination of this technology and rehabilitation may help patients with spinal cord injuries regain control over previously paralyzed movements, such as steplike actions, balance control and standing. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Susan Barber LindquistRhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Twin Cities Business
Mayo Clinic Expanding Sports Medicine Facility In Minneapolis
by Sam Schaust

It was revealed last week when Chicago-based LaSalle Investment Management purchased Mayo Clinic Square that the building was 96 percent leased. Mayo spokeswoman Rhoda Madson told TCB that the medical institution’s expansion would be into the existing space on the second level connected to the skyway. “The cost of the project and our staffing needs are still beingTwin Cities Business Magazine Logo determined,” Madson said, noting that work on the new space is expected to wrap by the end of the year. Mayo said in a release on Friday that the expansion would include a number of additions and improvements to its current operation.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Additional coverage: Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal, KTTCPost-Bulletin

Context: Mayo Clinic announced April 6 that it is expanding its services, space and other capabilities at its sports medicine facility in downtown Minneapolis to meet the growing demand for its expertise. Construction on the 16,000-square-foot project at Mayo Clinic Square is expected to begin in late April. “This project builds on our commitment to patients in the Twin Cities area by providing more convenient and accessible sports medicine services,” says Edward Laskowski, M.D., co-director of Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine. “This expansion allows us to serve our patients better by tapping Mayo Clinic’s expertise, cutting-edge technology, research and educational capabilities." More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Star Tribune
Mayo doctor performs 'life-changing' surgeries on kids all over the world
by Allie Shah

Born with a congenital heart defect, a 13-year-old girl in Mongolia was suffering from severe heart failure. Even worse, she had no place to go for the medical care she desperately needed. Star Tribune newspaper logoEnter Dr. Allison Cabalka, a Mayo Clinic pediatric cardiologist. As part of a U.S. medical team, she traveled to Mongolia to treat children with heart defects in countries where heart surgical resources are limited or nonexistent. Cabalka also helped bring the girl to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, where she underwent surgery. “It was life-changing,” Cabalka said. “She graduated from high school and university training in Mongolia and moved to Istanbul this year to pursue further education.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Allison Cabala, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic pediatric cardiologist. Dr. Cabalka's research interests in the areas of congenital and interventional cardiac catheterization and congenital echocardiography. Dr. Cabalka cares for patients of all ages with congenital heart disease and also participates in the care of adult patients with structural heart disease with Mayo Clinic's structural heart disease team.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Florida Times-Union
Guest column: Medical research plays an important role in meeting patient needs
by Gianrico Farrugia, M.D.

Ingenuity, innovation and hard work have been the key drivers of our state’s economic destiny. The support of state and federal governments, the private sector and philanthropy must continue to advance research, promote discovery and develop the next generation of scientists and innovators. This is vital to solve the threats to public health while maximizing theFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo tremendous economic benefit of innovation for Florida’s communities…Mayo Clinic is a committed partner in accelerating Florida’s economy. While the NIH budget over the past decade has remained flat with the exception of some targeted funding from the 21st Century Cures Act, Mayo Clinic has doubled our investment in research. Right now we are testing a vaccine that could become a gold standard therapy and prevent recurrence of breast cancer, and testing drugs that starve cancers. We also are developing mechanisms for the body’s immune system to protect itself from cancer. Physician Gianrico Farrugia is CEO of Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Gianrico Farrugia, M.D. is CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

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Tags: ABC News, aging, birth control, Bitacora Medica, brain tumor, Breast Cancer, Cancer, Cardiology Advisor, cellulitis, Chatelaine, Clinical Advisor, CNBC


October 14th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

MPR
Your genes can affect how medications work in your body

Doctors are learning about a new tool that can help them determine what the best treatment option is for each individual patient. It's called individualized medicine and it's the topic of a conference happening this week at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester. MPR's Phil Picardi spoke with Dr.MPR News logo Keith Stewart, who is the director of the Mayo Clinic's Center for Individualized Medicine.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Keith Stewart, M.B., Ch.B is a Mayo Clinic hematologist and director of Mayo's Center for Individualized Medicine.  Individualized medicine, also known as personalized medicine or precision medicine, means tailoring diagnosis and treatment to each patient to optimize care. Patients have experienced this kind of care for a century and a half at Mayo Clinic, where teams of specialists have always worked together to find answers.

Contact: Susan Buckles

 

TIME
The Case for Being Messy
by Tim Harford

Messy disruptions will be most powerful when combined with creative skill. The disruption puts an artist, scientist or engineer in unpromising Time magazine logoterritory—a deep valley rather than a familiar hilltop…We’re often told that good work comes from the ability to focus, to shut out distractions. To choose from a plethora of self-help tips along these lines, a Mayo Clinic psychologist, Dr Amit Sood, advises us to focus more effectively by turning off the TV, logging out of email and taking up “attention training” to “train your brain.”

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Amit Sood, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in General Internal Medicine and the Cancer Center. Dr. Sood is editor of the  Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness and The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Wall Street Journal
Can New Smartphone Apps Help Migraine Sufferers?
by Laura Johannes

David Dodick, a professor of neurology and director of headache medicine at Mayo Clinic, in Phoenix, says some migraine sufferers may not need the apps if they have obvious triggers, such as alcohol use or menstruation. More likely to benefit are people whose migraine attacks occur whenWSJ Banner several triggers “stack” on top of each other. “For example, you’re an accountant and it’s tax time, you’re stressed, sleep-deprived and you have a glass of wine to unwind. All those factors together have pushed you over the edge,” suggests Dr. Dodick, who is president of the International Headache Society.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: David Dodick, M.D. is a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Huffington Post
What Your Body Type Can Reveal About Your Health
by Deborah Long

It’s important to know which body type you are, because your health risks vary accordingly. A quick look in the mirror should tell you whether you’re an apple or a pear, but if you’re not sure, you can ask your doctor next time you have a physical. Michael Jensen, M.D., an endocrinologist Huffington Post Logowith the Mayo Clinic, is an expert on the health risks associated with excess weight. He has spent fully three decades studying the risks overweight patients face and is considered a pioneer of correlating how body type – or where excess weight is carried – relates to the likelihood of developing various diseases. His research has led him to conclude that there is no question that one body type is especially at risk for life-threatening conditions.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique visitors.

Context:  Michael Jensen, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Jensen and his lab study the effects of obesity and how body fat (adipose tissue) and body fat distribution influence health. The regulated uptake, storage and release of fatty acids from adipose tissue play a major role in determining its health effects.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic hits 30th year in Jacksonville by Mayo Clinic hits 30th year in Jacksonville
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville opened to patients 30 years ago, including 2,700 people from 30 states who already made appointments. By today’s standards, the facility was a small scale operation: One medical building, 37 physicians, 158 other employees. Contrast that to what MayoFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo is today — a medical center today that sprawls over 18 buildings and a parking garage on the campus located off San Pablo Road. Four-hundred-ninety-five physicians and scientists — many researchers with doctorates — and 4,664 other employees work there.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida is celebrating 30 years of providing high-quality medical care in Northeast Florida. Since the clinic opened in 1986, more than 600,000 unique patients from all 50 states and 143 countries have come to the Florida campus for Mayo’s unique, patient-centered approach to medical care. “Innovation is in our DNA at Mayo Clinic,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., CEO, Mayo Clinic in Florida. “Through three decades of growth, Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida has invested in people, space and technology to carry forward the vision of our founders and meet the needs of patients, today and into the future.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

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Tags: A.L.S., alzheimer's disease, arthritis, ATRI, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, birth control, body type, brain tumor, Business Insider, canker sores, CBS News, Cuddle Cot


August 12th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Buzzfeed
What You Should Know About Zika If You’re Going To The Olympics
by Anthony Rivas

So much so that athletes from around the world — mostly golfers, but also basketball players and cyclists — have given up their chance at winning gold over concerns that they might get infected. Meanwhile, lots of other spectators getting ready to fly down are probably wondering,BuzzFeed Logo “Is it really worth the risk?” …For men and women who don’t plan on having kids anytime soon, “the impact of the Zika virus on you is probably going to be very minimal,” Tosh said. In fact, about 80% of people who become infected “have absolutely no symptoms whatsoever.”

Reach: BuzzFeed receives more than 15.7 million unique visitors each month to its website and targets pop culture and social media enthusiasts.

Additional coverage:
HealthDay, Zika Won't Pose Risks at the Olympics: Health Experts
Hospitals & Health Networks, Clinical Vaccine Trials Underway; Rio Olympics See Few Mosquitoes by Matt O’Connor

Context: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued an emergency travel advisory after health officials in Florida identified local transmission of Zika virus in a Miami neighborhood. The CDC advisory recommends pregnant women and their partners avoid nonessential travel to Lynwood, a neighborhood in Miami, Florida where the Zika virus is active. Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist Dr. Pritish Tosh says, "It is somewhat unprecedented for a travel advisory to be issued to a very specific neighborhood. That's a testament to the strength of the epidemiology that has been going on, and how well the CDC and other health authorities have been working at this." More information, including a video interview with Dr. Tosh, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Bob Nellis, Deb Balzer

 

Chicago Tribune
Dirty baby: Just how clean does your child need to be?
by Bill Daley

Cleanliness may be next to godliness, or so the old rhyme scolded us, but is it healthiest — particularly for babies and children? "People are very Chicago Tribune Logoconcerned, almost preoccupied, with their child touching a surface that is not clean," said Dr. Angela C. Mattke, a pediatrician at the Mayo Clinic Children's Center in Rochester, Minn. "Early exposure to their environment full of germs, bacteria and viruses is not a bad thing." "Not everything a child touches should be sterilized," she added. "You don't have to wash their hands every time."

Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 384,000 and a weekend circulation of more than 686,000.

Context: Angela Mattke, M.D. is a pediatrician with Mayo Children's Center which is rated in all US News & World Report pediatric specialty categories and is the only children’s hospital in the five-state region to rank in all 10 specialties.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Chicago Tribune
Crawling: The next best core workout?
by Alison Bowen

Your next best exercise doesn't involve equipment, running, jumping or even standing. "Make the floor your friend," says Danielle Johnson, a physical therapist at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program in Rochester, Minn. As a working mom, Johnson is always looking for ways toChicago Tribune Logo challenge exercise norms. "We're looking for things that are a little outside of the box sometimes," she said. Crawling is one of those things. She said it's an "amazing core exercise" that also benefits the legs, shoulders, arms and chest.

Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 384,000 and a weekend circulation of more than 686,000.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life. The program is research-driven around diet, exercise and resiliency, and, when all of these are connected, they encompass the power needed to make sustainable changes. For more information, visit https://healthyliving.mayoclinic.org/.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Wall Street Journal
At the Rio Olympics, Women Athletes Bump Against a Gold Ceiling
by Kevin Helliker and Matthew Futterman

Sports scientists say there is no physiological reason for shortening courses for female athletes or, for that matter, games such as tennis, where women play the best out of three sets versus best of five for men. In WSJ Bannerfact, some research suggests women are built to go farther than men, if at a slower pace. While that remains unproven, the notion that women have inferior endurance capacities has been debunked. “That’s totally anachronistic,” says Michael Joyner, a former competitive marathoner who studies sports science at the Mayo Clinic.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Related coverage:
ABC News, Olympic Swimmer Katie Ledecky Blows Competition Out of the Water
Business Insider, Why Katie Ledecky's Olympic world record Sunday night is even more amazing than you think
Business Insider, Here's an exact breakdown of why 6'4" Michael Phelps has the perfect body for swimming
Business Insider, The internet is driving athletes to do crazy things no one knew were possible
Tech Insider, People are stronger and faster than ever before, but the reason why isn’t what you think

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist.  Dr. Joyner's research team is interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

TIME
What Is Cupping? Here’s What You Need to Know
by Alexandra Sifferlin

…There is a difference between how cupping is practiced in traditional Chinese medicine and how it is used in Western medicine, says Dr. Brent Bauer, director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program. Bauer says a traditional Chinese medicine practitioner would likely offer cupping as part of a larger integrative health check, which might include recommendations around nutrition and otherTime magazine logo health things, and not just as a one-off therapy. “It’s kind of an American phenomena, I think, to consider cupping by itself,” he says.

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:
HealthDayDoes 'Cupping' = Success for Olympic Athletes?
Live ScienceMichael Phelps' Weird Bruises: Does Cupping Therapy Really Work?
Jakarta Post, Phelps puts spotlight on cupping
CCTV-AmericaIt works for Michael Phelps, so we tried “cupping” for the first time

Context:  Brent Bauer, M,D., is director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program. As director of the program, Dr. Bauer has broad and varied research interests. Since its founding in 2001, the program has promoted a collaborative spirit that enables researchers from both within and outside Mayo Clinic to share resources, ideas and expertise regarding research in this exciting realm.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

WCCO-Radio
Mayo Clinic ranks #1 in latest US News and World Report Rankings

Interview with Dr. John Noseworthy and Dave Lee.

WCCO-AM Dave LeeReach: WCCO radio, a CBS owned and operated affiliate in Minneapolis, boasts one of the largest coverage areas in the country as it reaches into portions of North and South Dakota during the day. At night, the station’s signal typically reaches across many U.S. states and Canadian provinces.

Additional coverage:
KTAR-TV, US News & World Report grades Phoenix’s Mayo Clinic top hospital in Arizona
Arizona Daily Star, U.S. News & World Report ranks Tucson hospital third in state
Healio, Mayo Clinic ranked as top hospital for neurology and neurosurgery
WIBW-TV, New ranking proves patients are in good hands at Stormont Vail Health 

Previous coverage in August 5, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Mayo Clinic was named the best hospital in the nation in U.S. News & World Report’s annual list of top hospitals published online today. In addition, Mayo Clinic is ranked No. 1 in more specialties than any other hospital in the country. Mayo Clinic took the No. 1 spot in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. It also ranked No. 1 in the Phoenix metro area and in the Jacksonville metro area. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Twin Cities Business
Mayo’s New Blood Test Could Predict Chances Of Experiencing A Heart Attack
by Sam Schaust

Mayo Clinic launched a new type of blood test on Wednesday that is the first-of-its-kind in the U.S. With the new test, measurements are taken from blood concentrations of plasma ceramides, a class of lipids highly linked to cardiovascular disease events, such as a heart attack. It’s believed the test could even predict the chance of a cardiovascular event as much as a year before it occurs. “Through our strongTwin Cities Business Magazine Logo collaboration with Zora Biosciences, we hope our new test will improve the evaluation of individuals at risk for cardiovascular disease,” said Jeff Meeusen, co-director of Mayo’s Cardiovascular Laboratory Medicine Group.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Additional coverage:
Clinical Lab Products, Mayo Clinic Launches Blood Test to Assess Heart Attack Risk

Context: Mayo Clinic has launched a new type of blood test that will be used to predict adverse cardiovascular events in patients with progressing coronary artery disease (CAD). The test measures blood concentrations of plasma ceramides, a class of lipids that are highly linked to cardiovascular disease processes. Researchers say this test is especially useful for patients with CAD when it does not improve with treatment or for young patients with premature CAD. The new test will help clinicians identify at-risk individuals and is available to Mayo Clinic patients and health care providers worldwide through Mayo Medical Laboratories (MML). MML is the reference laboratory of Mayo Clinic, offering advanced laboratory testing and pathology services to more than 5,000 health care organizations in more than 60 countries. MML collaborated on the test with Zora Biosciences Oy, a diagnostics discovery company based in Finland that specializes in cardiovascular disease. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Gina Chiri-Osmond

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Tags: ABC News, accupuncture, Addyson Cordes, AOL News, arthritis, Astrobiology, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, Best Hospitals, blood test, brain tumor, Breast Cancer, breast microbiome


May 13th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic in race for Florida patients
by Christopher Snowbeck

Like college kids at spring break, the nation’s biggest names in health care are spending some serious coin in Florida. In March, the Mayo Clinic said it would spend $100 million at its hospital in Jacksonville to better position the medical center as a health care destinatioStar Tribune Logon for the southeastern U.S. It was the latest move by Mayo in Florida, where the Rochester-based clinic isn’t the only out-of-town operator that’s growing in the state.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

Becker’s Hospital Review, What is drawing Cleveland Clinic, Mayo Clinic and other AMCs to Florida?

Context: Advancing its position as the premier medical destination center for health care in the Southeast, Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida will invest $100 million in major construction projects building on its 150-year history of transforming health care and the patient experience. This summer, Mayo Clinic will begin constructing an innovative destination medical building that will provide integrated services needed for complex cancer, as well as neurologic and  neurosurgical care. Initially rising four stories, the 150,000-square-foot building has the potential for 11 more stories. More than 126,000 patients are expected to visit the first year the building opens.  More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

 

KARE11-TV
New Mayo Clinic book offers women menopause solutions

Menopause expert Dr. Stephanie Faubion, M.D., has written a new book. “The Menopause Solution: A Doctor’s Guide to: Relieving Hot Flashes,
KARE-11 LogoEnjoying Better Sex, Sleeping Well, Controlling Your Weight and Being Happy.” The book is available now at major bookstores everywhere. Dr. Faubion, Director of the Mayo Clinic’s Women’s Health Clinic, appeared on KARE 11 News to talk about her book, which covers everything from perimenopause to post-menopause, debunks common myths, uses the most up-to -date research and confronts the controversial topic of hormone therapy.

Reach: KARE-TV is the NBC affiliate serving the Minneapolis-Saint Paul market.

Additional coverage: KCTV Kansas City, A menopause expert shares ways to be happy during and after menopause; KGUN-TV Tucson, National Radio

Context: As preteens, girls often take health classes to teach them about their changing bodies during puberty. For moms-to-be, classes deal with pregnancy and newborn care. Yet, few classes are offered about menopause, a part of life that 6,000 U.S. women reach every day. A new book released today aims to address that gap. Mayo Clinic The Menopause Solution is subtitled A Doctor’s Guide to Relieving Hot Flashes, Enjoying Better Sex, Sleeping Well, Controlling Your Weight and Being Happy! “This book serves to inform women about what’s happening to their bodies, what treatment options are available and how to remain healthy in the years past menopause,” says Stephanie Faubion, M.D., medical editor of The Menopause Solution and director of the Women’s Health Clinic and Office of Women’s Health at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Faubion, a North American Menopause Society-certified menopause practitioner, is one of the nation’s leading experts on menopause and regularly treats women with menopause-related conditions. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

 

USA Today
Study: Swaddling babies may increase risk of SIDS
by Mary Bowerman

An infant that is unable to flip from his or her back to their side or stomach can safely be swaddled, according to Chris Colby, division chair of neonatology at Mayo Clinic, who is not associated with the study. He notes that swaddling is used to mirror the constricted nature of the wombUSA Today newspaper logo and promotes the baby falling asleep more quickly. "The concern is that as babies get older – even tho swaddled -- they could wiggle around and end up in a prone position, face-down, looking at the mattress," Colby said. "You have to be mindful as your baby gets older, and assess if swaddling your baby tight at 2-3 months if still a safe practice."

Reach: USA TODAY  has an average daily circulation of 4.1 million which includes print, various digital editions and other papers that use their branded content.

Context: Christopher Colby, M.D., is affiliated with Mayo Clinic Children's Center.  At Mayo Clinic Children's Center, more than 200 medical providers in 40 medical and surgical specialties offer integrated care to over 50,000 children and teenagers every year, inspiring hope and providing healing.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Rapid City Journal
Mayo oncologist pioneer in new protocols
by Tom Griffith

Talk to a patient of pioneering Mayo Clinic oncologist Dr. Mark Truty, or even the doctor himself, and you’ll find he has a tendency to deflect Rapids City Journal Logocredit for advancements in the treatment of pancreatic cancer that have changed what was once a near-certain death sentence into real hope for survival. “Subconsciously, it’s probably been a huge motivator,” Truty admitted last week. “He went through the old approach. He was diagnosed, was in terrible shape, had an operation by a surgeon who was inexperienced, suffered complications, was in the hospital for three months, and died six months later. It was a pointless exercise, and it’s a problem that continues to happen on a daily basis around the world.”

Reach: Rapid City Journal is published daily for residents of Rapid City, SD and surrounding areas. The circulation is more than 23, 200 daily and its online version has nearly 129,000 unique visitors each month.

Related coverage: 

Rapid City Journal, Spearfish man defies odds, survives bout with pancreatic cancer by Tom Griffith — Tom Hoffman will never forget the day he received his death sentence…Following nine days of tests that confirmed the diagnosis, Hoffman was introduced to Dr. Mark Truty, assistant professor and section chair of hepatoeiliary and pancreatic surgery at the famed clinic in Rochester, Minn. The doctor, part of a team of Mayo oncologists developing pioneering protocols in the treatment of pancreatic cancer, was blunt.

Context: Mark Truty, M.D., who treated Tom Hoffman of Spearfish, leads a surgical team at the Mayo Clinic that is pioneering new protocols in the treatment of pancreatic cancer that have resulted in vastly improved survival rates.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Las Vegas Review-Journal
Sleep apnea causes problems from fatigue to traffic accidents
by Apt Nadler

People with sleep apnea are more prone to become a Type 2 diabetic, because of developing a resistance to insulin. Individuals with sleep apnea are also at risk for a stroke and depression. “Sleep apnea is one of our focuses in primary care management,” said Dr. Martina Mookadam, a family medicine physician at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. “It creates a very strong physical stress on the body. If your primary careLas Vegas Review-Journal Newspaper Logo doctor fails to ask you if you have symptoms, you should bring it up. Sleep apnea can happen at any age.”

Reach: Las Vegas Review-Journal is a daily newspaper written for the residents of Las Vegas.

Context: Martina Mookadam, M.D.  is a family medicine physician at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Mayo Clinic Family Medicine doctors in Arizona provide comprehensive care for individuals of all ages at facilities in Arrowhead (Glendale) and Thunderbird (Scottsdale).

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

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Tags: advisory board, Aiden Remme, Angie Gullicksrud, Arizona Republic, Aspirin, asthma, atrial fibrillation, Becker’s Hospital Review, Bend Bulletin, brain tumor, Camp Wabi, Captain Kids Program


May 1st, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

C-SPAN
New Medicare Law and the Future of U.S. Healthcare

Dr. John Noseworthy talked about a law that eliminated the Medicare sustainable growth rate (SGR) formula and reformed the way Medicare payments were made to physicians. He also spoke about how the change was affecting the Mayo Clinic. Dr. Noseworthy spoke via video linkC-Span from Rochester, Minnesota.

Reach: C-SPAN (Cable-Satellite Public Affairs Network), created in 1979 as a private, non-profit service of the cable industry, is a network dedicated to 24-hour a day public affairs programming. C-SPAN provides coverage of a variety of public affairs events. Speeches, news conferences, forums, seminars, government committee meetings and hearings in Washington, D.C. and beyond are some of the events covered by the network. C-SPAN has more than 86.2 million viewers.

Previous Coverage in April 24, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Mayo Clinic has been a strong advocate of modernizing Medicare and repealing the Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) and replacing it with a reimbursement system that truly rewards quality and efficiency not simply volume. The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act strengthens Medicare, extends the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and makes numerous other improvements to the health care system.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Huffington Post
This Is What Happiness Really Means by Lindsay Holmes

An excited puppy. The company of your loved ones. A rewarding volunteer experience. No matter how you define joy, chances are it boils down to Huff Post Healthy Living Logoprinciples over, well, stuff. As described in the video above by Amit Sood, M.D., a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, happiness is more about our circumstances than our possessions. Joy can be found in the present moment. It can also be discovered in your overall experiences. But most importantly, it can appear when we're creating, connecting and caring.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique visitors.

Context: Amit Sood, M.D., Mayo Clinic General Internal Medicine, has helped tens of thousands of patients and students with scientifically-validated programs which offer useful insights into human stress, well-being, resiliency, and happiness. His life’s mission is to share this scientific and practical approach with as many as he can so we can live peaceful, content and happier lives.

Contact: Brian Kilen

 

Arizona Republic
4 Arizona hospitals get top ratings in patient survey
by Ken Alltucker

…. "Most patients don't have the data or technical skills to judge quality and safety, so they fall back on service," said Dr. Wyatt Decker, CEO of Mayo Clinic in Arizona. "If the service is good, they equate that to good care." Though much of Mayo Clinic's focus is on quality and how well aArizona Republic newspaper logo patient fares, Decker said the hospital has paid attention to things like how courteous doctors, nurses and other employees can be and whether the hospital is clean and appealing. Mayo hired an executive who oversees such patient experiences and also contracts with a vendor who surveys Mayo patients.

Reach: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday and has an average daily circulation of more than 261,000 readers. The newspaper’s website Arizona Republic - Online, averages more than 5.4 million unique visitors each month.

Context: On April 16, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) added “star ratings” to its Hospital Compare website. Hospitals received ratings of one to five stars – with five stars being the highest score – based on data from the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) patient experience survey. This represents a change in how information is displayed, not the addition of questions to be answered or data to be collected. Thirteen of Mayo Clinic's 21 hospitals received star ratings – all 3 or above. 

Contacts:  Jim McVeigh, Ann Schauer

 

Florida Trend
The business of cancer therapy
by Andrew Corty

Unfortunately, cancer has touched us all. Sometimes it strikes family members, friends or colleagues -- and once in a while ourselves. There’s Florida Trendsimply no escaping it. Doctors diagnose about 114,000 cases of various cancers each year in Florida, so cancer has become a big business, both in medical care and in research… Our major hospitals are keeping pace. While Moffitt is the only NIH-designated cancer center based in Florida, there are other heavy hitters. Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville has a cancer specialty (and its own NIH designation, albeit from Minnesota), and the Cleveland Clinic has just opened a cancer center in Weston.

Reach: Florida Trend magazine and its website offer regionally-based stories and reporting. The magazine has a readership of more than 250,000 readers and its website receives 85,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center is a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center with a multisite presence. Its three campuses — in Scottsdale, Ariz., Jacksonville, Fla., and Rochester, Minn. — give the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center a broad geographic reach, enabling it to serve diverse patient populations around the world.

Contact: Paul Scotti

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January 8th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Wall Street Journal
What CEOs Expect for Business in 2015
by John Bussey

We asked the 153 members of the Wall Street Journal’s CEO Council to tell us whether they’re positive or negative about business prospects in 2015, and why. Here’s what several had to say:…John Noseworthy, Mayo Clinic,  Disruptive technologies – The Wall Street Journal newspaper logoranging from regenerative and genomic medicine to remote monitoring devices – have already begun to alter health care delivery. We’re excited to work with diverse business partners to quickly commercialize these and other novel scientific discoveries so they benefit patients everywhere.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Previous Coverage in December 12, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Dr. Noseworthy participated in the Wall Street Journal CEO Council. In early December, top global CEOs gathered once again in Washington, D.C., for the annual meeting of The Wall Street Journal CEO Council.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

 

Wall Street Journal
The Day You Look Up to Your Child
by Sue Shellenberger

It is a parenting milestone that seems to take place overnight: Your child is suddenly taller than you… Children are reaching their Wall Street Journal Business Logoadult height at younger ages, however, says Siobhan Pittock, a pediatric endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic Children’s Center in Rochester, Minn. She cites a gradual trend toward puberty starting a few months earlier, causing children to start their growth spurt earlier… Eric Sorenson’s son Tom rocketed past him in a matter of weeks, says Tom’s mother, Kristin, of Rochester, Minn. They noticed the shift when looking at a couple of family photos taken two months apart, when Tom was 14. In the first, Tom appears about 2 inches shorter than his 5-foot-9 dad.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Related Coverage:
Wall Street Journal, The 10-Point. A personal, guided tour to the best scoops and stories every day in The Wall Street Journal, from Editor in Chief Gerard Baker. A Tall Tale. It’s a strange thing to look up tThe Wall Street Journal 10-Point Columno your child. Our Work & Family columnist Sue Shellenbarger writes about a milestone that in many households seems to take place overnight: when a child grows taller than mom and dad. Adults’ height hasn’t changed much in recent years, but a pediatric endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic Children’s Center says children are reaching their grown-up height at younger ages.

Star Tribune
2014 Twelve in Review. Looking back at the newsmakers

Dr. John Noseworthy, CEO, Mayo Clinic. In 2014, the Mayo Clinic set in motion a 20-year, $6 billion economic development project in its hometown of Rochester. The goal is to enhance Mayo’s status as a global destination for health care,Star Tribune newspaper logo while growing the local economy.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Previous Coverage on the future of Mayo Clinic in December 12, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

Star Tribune
A visionary blueprint arrives for Rochester, Mayo Clinic
by Tina Smith and Ardell Brede

The 20-year plan for the Destination Medical Center lays out the steps toward a global center for health and wellness…A global Star Tribune commentaries logodestination for health care and wellness. This is the vision of the Destination Medical Center (DMC) initiative — a vision that is now one step closer to becoming reality with the completion of the comprehensive draft development plan on Dec. 17.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional Coverage: Chicago Chronicle, Florida Statesman, Atlanta LeaderWinona Daily News

Related Coverage:
KARE11 (AP), Rochester businesses closing amid Mayo plan. The face of downtown Rochester is changing as the city remakes itself amid Mayo Clinic's development of its massive Destination Medical Center. Minnesota Public Radio News reports several longstanding businesses will soon close due to the rising cost of commercial downtown space. The effects of the 20-year plan to cement Mayo as a global health care destination have prompted concerns from residents who want to ensure Rochester doesn't simply become a city for nonlocals.

Additional coverage: Pioneer Press, Mankato Free Press

Previous Coverage in December 18, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: The development plan proposed at the DMCC Board meeting  Dec. 17 is a BIG PLAN (694 pages) in support of a bold vision. And what everyone wants to know is: What’s going to happen and how much will it cost? More information can be found on the DMC blog.

Public Affairs Contact: Jamie Rothe

 

KMSP FOX9
2-time transplant survivor's new heart ready for a wedding
by Rob Olson

In a 100-year-old home in Rochester, originally built for one of Mayo Clinic's first surgeons, is where Alyssa Sandeen spent 5 months of her life. We first told you aMy Fox KMSP TCbout Sandeen in the summer of 2013, not long after she got her second heart transplant. She got her first at age 8 in 1998, a heart that lasted 15 years – but barely.

Reach:  FOX 9 News broadcasts in Minneapolis-St.Paul, the 16th largest television market in the United States with 1.7 million TV homes.

Context: Mayo Clinic Transplant Center, with transplant services in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota, performs more transplants than any other medical center in the world.

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

Red Wing Republican Eagle
2014 top stories: #4 - Cannon Falls has healthy development
by Michael Brunt

It was a big summer for Mayo Clinic Health System and the city of Cannon Falls, which celebrated the opening of a new 92,000-Red Wing Republication Eagle logosquare-foot medical center off Goodhue County Road 24. “The new facility has allowed us to serve our patients better in many ways,” said Bill Priest, operations administrator.

Reach: The Red Wing Republican Eagle, which is published twice each week and has a circulation of more than 5,400, has served residents of Red Wing, Minn., since 1857.

Previous Coverage in July 31, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
Context: The new clinic opened on Aug. 4, 2014 and the hospital and emergency department opened on Aug. 7, 2014. More information on the new clinic and hospital can be found here.

Public Affairs Contact: Asia Christensen

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September 4th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich


Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

TIME
Sitting is Killing You

by Alice Park

You’ve already heard that sitting is the new smoking. Now, scientists reveal exactly how it hurts the body—and novel ways to undo the damage (without clocTime magazine logoking hours at the gym). You might want to stand up for this…All of which has doctors and health experts calling for a paradigm shift. “In the same way that standing up is an oddity now, sitting down should be,” says Dr. James Levine, director of the Mayo Clinic-Arizona State University Obesity Solutions Initiative and probably best known as the inventor of the first treadmill desk.

Reach: Time magazine has a weekly circulation of 3.3 million. Time Online receives mores than 4.6 million unique visitors to its website each month and its monthy page views are more than 32.8 million.

Additional Coverage:

Arizona Republic
Workplace treadmill desks beginning to make strides
by Ken Alltucker

Arizona Republic newspaper logo…Now entrepreneurs and exercise companies have pounced on the idea that sitting can be hazardous to your health. "It is a hidden killer if you like," said James Levine, a Mayo Clinic doctor who examined the topic in his book "Get Up! Why Your Chair is Killing You and What You Can Do About It."

ReachThe Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday. The newspaper’s website Arizona Central, averages 83 million pages views each month.

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob NellisJim McVeigh

 

KARE11
Measles shot helps eliminate woman's cancer
by Adrienne Broaddus

Stacy Erholtz battled cancer for 10 years. But now, she says her cancer is in remission after a massive dose of the measles vaccine. While her journey has been tough, her faith hasn't wavered. After returningKARE-11 TV, Minneapolis-St. Paul from a taping a segment in Los Angeles with "The Doctors," Erholtz stopped by KARE 11 to chat about her journey. She said the show will highlight her treatment…Erholtz, 49, of Pequot Lakes, was one of two patients in a Mayo Clinic clinical trial last year using virotherapy. As she sips on a diet Pepsi, she can't stop smiling as she talks about her medical miracle.

Reach: KARE is a an NBC affiliate in the Minneapolis-St.Paul market.

Additional coverage: BringMeTheNews, WTVM Ga., WFSB, KCTV Kansas CityKCBD

Previous Coverage in May 15, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: In a proof of principle clinical trial, Mayo Clinic researchers have demonstrated that virotherapy — destroying cancer with a virus that infects and kills cancer cells but spares normal tissues — can be effective against the deadly cancer multiple myeloma. The findings appear in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Two patients in the study received a single intravenous dose of an engineered measles virus (MV-NIS) that is selectively toxic to myeloma plasma cells. Both patients responded, showing reduction of both bone marrow cancer and myeloma protein. One patient, a 49-year-old woman, experienced complete remission of myeloma and has been clear of the disease for over six months. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

 

MPR
Mayo doctor's tips for stress-free living and better health

MPR News logoDr. Amit Sood, author of the "Mayo Clinic's Guide to Stress-Free Living," speaks at a Minnesota Public Radio "Healthy States" event about the ways to improve your health by alleviating stress. Gratitude, compassion, acceptance, forgiveness and focusing on the meaning of life are key.Book cover Mayo Clinic's Guide to Stress-Free Living, with female doing cartwheel

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: In The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living, Mayo Clinic stress management and resiliency expert Amit Sood, M.D., draws on decades of groundbreaking research to offer readers a scientifically proven, structured and practical approach to reducing stress. He explains the brain’s two modes — focused mode and default mode — and how an imbalance between the two produces unwanted stress, and he shares new insights about how the mind works, including its natural tendency to wander. In this easy-to-follow guide, Dr. Sood provides actionable steps to cultivate emotional and mental strength, find greater fulfillment and nurture a kind disposition. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Sood, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Ginger Plumbo, Brian Kilen

 

Chicago Defender
Black Women Move Past ‘Tuskegee Experiment’ Mistrust
by Oretha Winston

If a research survey of African American professional women is any indication, attitudes may be changing towards participation in medical research. Mayo Clinic and The Links, Incorporated Chicago Defender newspaper logoresearchers teamed up to survey members of the international women’s organization, and found that a majority of African American women surveyed are willing to or have taken part in medical research…“Our findings are highly encouraging,” says Sharonne Hayes, M.D., Mayo Clinic cardiologist, co-author of the study, and director of Mayo’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion.

Reach: The Chicago Defender covers local and national news of interest to its black readership, residing in the Chicago metropolitan area. The publication has a weekly circulation of more than 7,400 readers. The online version attracts more than 13,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Elev8

Context: If a research survey of African American professional women is any indication, attitudes may be changing towards participation in medical research. Mayo Clinic and The Links, Incorporated researchers teamed up to survey members of the international women’s organization, and found that a majority of African American women surveyed are willing to or have taken part in medical research. The results appear in the Journal of Women’s Health. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

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April 18th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic builds 'Better' app to expand its name with consumers
By Dan Browning

The Mayo Clinic wants to help you feel “Better.” That’s the name of a new mobile app service launched by the Rochester-based health care provider, in partnershipStar Tribune Business section logo with a Silicon Valley venture capital firm and an accomplished tele-medicine entrepreneur. It’s part of Mayo’s overarching goal to put the clinic’s expertise into the hands of 200 million consumers.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

KAALMayo Launches New App to Reach Patients Worldwide

Bloomberg BusinessweekEngadgetMobi health newsPost-BulletinTech CrunchHIS Talk Mobile

Context: Better, a consumer health start-up, and Mayo Clinic have launched a new way for people to navigate the complexity of the healthcare system simply and quickly.  Through a mobile device, Better provides tailored Mayo Clinic health information, 24/7 access to the clinic's experienced and highly-skilled nurses, and a Better Personal Health Assistant who helps simplify and manage people's care so they can use their time to focus on being well. More information about Better can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

Florida Times Union
Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville receives $39.5 million grant for stroke study
by Charlie Patton

…the Mayo Clinic in Florida has received a $39.5 million grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke to conduct a seven-year clinical trial Florida Times-Union newspaper logoto look at the question of whether the use of medication is as effective in preventing stroke for someone with carotid stenosis, the narrowing of a carotid artery, as surgery and the placement of a stent, a small mesh tube that holds the artery open. Leading the study, which will be called the CREST-2, will be Thomas Brott, a neurologist who is director of research at Mayo’s Jacksonville campus, and his colleague, neurologist James Meschia.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:
Jacksonville Business JournalJacksonville's Mayo Clinic gets $39.5 million stroke study grant, The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke is funding a seven-year study at the Mayo Clinic in Florida examining whether medication is as effective in preventing stroke as is surgery or stents. Thomas Brott, a neurologist who is director of research at Mayo’s Jacksonville campus, and neurologist James Meschia will lead the study,  according to the Florida Times-Union.

Post-BulletinWTEV FlaHealth-News.wsDaily Star UKTelegraph UK
St. Augustine RecordWJXX Fla.WJCT Fla

Context: Is medicine as safe and effective as surgery or stenting in preventing a stroke caused by the buildup of plaque in the carotid artery? Thomas G. Brott, M.D., a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Florida, aims to find out. “It’s a critical question. The quality medicines we have today may mean that it is not necessary to perform invasive procedures on patients who do not have warning signs of stroke,” Dr. Brott says. “More than 100,000 carotid surgeries and carotid artery stentings are performed each year in the United States on such patients at risk — and that may not be necessary.” More information, including a video interview with Dr. Brott, about the international study to test best approach to stroke prevention can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

USA TODAY
Apathy could signal brain shrinkage in old age
by Mary Bowerman

A new study suggests that as people age, they should be aware of symptoms of apathy, which may indicate a decrease in brain volume and possible brain disease...Apathy, which has similar symptoms to depression, is hard to measureUSA Today newspaper logo because the symptoms are more subtle and complex, according to Ronald Petersen, the director of the Mayo Alzheimer's Disease Research Center at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who is not associated with the study.

Reach: USA TODAY  has the highest daily circulation of any U.S. newspaper with a daily average circulation of 2.9 million, which includes print and various digital editions.

Additional coverage: KARE11

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic


Post-Bulletin
Back and Forth: The early home of Dr. Henry Plummer
by Harley Flathers

Dr. Henry Stanley Plummer, the famed Mayo Clinic physician, was born March 3, 1874 to Dr. Albert and Isabelle Plummer in the little community of Hamilton. This Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperlittle village lies a mile and a half east and a mile south of Racine on the Mower-Fillmore County road. Sonja Hoag, a retired Mayo Clinic nurse, and her retired husband, many years a preacher, live in the home where Plummer was born.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Related coverage:
Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic mobile exhibit kicks off Monday

Mayo Clinic kicks off a free, mobile 150th-anniversary tour Monday in Kingman, Ariz., at Kingman Regional Medical Center, a member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. The exhibit is scheduled to visit more than 40 communities in Minnesota, Missouri, Colorado, California, North Dakota, Washington, Illinois, Nebraska, Maryland, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky and Michigan, along with Washington, D.C., Winnipeg and Toronto, Canada.

Context: On July 1, 1907, Dr. Henry Plummer and Mabel Root, Dr. Plummer's assistant, inaugurated Mayo's system of patient registration and medical record keeping. The single-unit record was central to the new system. It brought together all of a patient's records -- clinical visits, hospital stays, laboratory tests and notes -- in a single file that traveled with the patient and was stored in a central repository. This simple system quickly became the standard for medical record keeping around the world. This year marks 150 years of continuous service to patients, and Mayo Clinic is launching a yearlong recognition that will honor a legacy of medical accomplishments and a model for the future of health care. Dr. Mayo’s sons, Drs. William and Charles Mayo, joined the practice in the late 1880’s and, with their father, created Mayo Clinic’s medical hallmark: The integrated care model that focuses a team of experts on one patient at a time and puts patients’ needs first. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. 

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein


ABC15 Ariz.
Mayo Clinic's Simulation Center helps with team approach to medicine, reenacts real-life scenarios

ABC affiliate, channel 15 in Arizona

Mayo Clinic cardiologist, David Fortuin, M.D., joined the cast of Sonoran Living Live to talk about Mayo Clinic's Multidisciplinary Simulation Center and how it's used to perfect Mayo's team approach to patient care.

Reach:  KNXV-TV, ABC 15, is the ABC television station affiliate in Phoenix, Arizona.

Context: F. David Fortuin, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist.

Public Affairs Contact: Carol Benson

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February 7th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

 

 

 

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Star Tribune

Block E to be renamed Mayo Clinic Square
By Janet Moore

The nearly vacant and long-troubled Block E retail complex has signed one of Minnesota’s most respected brands as a tenant — the Mayo Clinic. The world-renowned medical center will open a sports medicine facility as part of a partnership with pro basketball’s Minnesota Timberwolves and Lynx, which will move their practice facilities and headquarters from Target Center to the retail complex this Star-Tribune-Logo-300x45fall.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:
Pioneer PressWill new facility keep Love in Minnesota?; Pioneer Press, Minnesota Timberwolves to announce partnership with Mayo Clinic; KMSP, Finance & CommerceMinnPostMPRPioneer PressPioneer PressVita.mnWCCONBAMinneapolis / St. Paul Business JournalSwish AppealPost-BulletinStar TribuneMinneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal, Finance & CommerceBringMeTheNews

Context: Mayo Clinic and the Minnesota Timberwolves and Lynx today announced a partnership which extends the Mayo Model of Care for patients in sports medicine to the Twin Cities. The collaboration includes: 1) the opening of a Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center at 600 Hennepin, 2) designating Mayo as the preferred medical provider for the teams, and 3) utilizing the teams’ international reach to educate the public about numerous health and wellness topics.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic, Minnesota Timberwolves & Lynx Announce Collaboration

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

USA TODAY
CVS ban on cigarettes could cut smoking rates
By Liz Szabo

… Canada has reduced cigarette sales simply by requiring retailers to store them under the counter, where they're invisible to customers, says Richard Hurt, director of Mayo Clinic's Nicotine Dependence USA Today NEWCenter. He notes that tobacco companies pay convenience stores a lot of money to position cigarette ads prominently near the register. "The tobacco industry has known for decades that if they can place their products in customers' faces, they have more attractiveness," Hurt says.

Reach: USA TODAY  has the highest daily circulation of any U.S. newspaper with a daily average circulation of 2.9 million, which includes print and various digital editions.

Additional coverage: KARE11Florida Times-UnionBethany Beach Wave Del.KHOU Texas (AP)Detroit Free PressWashington Post (AP)Titusville Herald Pa. (AP)Miami Herald (AP)CTV News CanadaWNYT NYNew RepublicKAAL

Context: Richard Hurt, M.D. is director of Mayo Clinic’s Nicotine Dependence Center and a leading expert on tobacco-related issues. As a former smoker, he once smoked three packs a day. Dr. Hurt had his last cigarette on Nov. 22, 1975.

Public Affairs Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Nick Hanson

Reuters TV
High hopes for space grown stem cells

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic are preparing to test their theory that stem cells grow faster in microgravity. With a grant from an organisation that promotes research aboard the International Space Station, Dr. Abba Zubair will send a batch of cells into space where he believes the future of human tissue generation with stem cells may lie. Ben Gruber reports. Reuters

Reach: Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing newsworld newsbusiness newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal financestock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, videomobile, and interactive television platforms.

Additional coverage: MSN

Context: Abba Zubair, M.D., Ph.D., believes that cells grown in the International Space Station (ISS) could help patients recover from a stroke, and that it may even be possible to generate human tissues and organs in space. He just needs a chance to demonstrate the possibility. He now has it. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS), a nonprofit organization that promotes research aboard the ISS, has awarded Dr. Zubair a $300,000 grant to send human stem cells into space to see if they grow more rapidly than stem cells grown on Earth. Dr. Zubair, medical and scientific director of the Cell Therapy Laboratory at Mayo Clinic in Florida, says the experiment will be the first one Mayo Clinic has conducted in space and the first to use these human stem cells, which are found in bone marrow.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

Atlanta Business Chronicle
WellStar strikes partnership deal with Mayo Clinic
By Urvaksh Karkaria & Ellie Hensley

WellStar Health System on Thursday announced a partnership with the Mayo Clinic Health System to boost delivery health care for patients, allowing many to avoid unnecessary travel for Atlanta Business Chronicleanswers to complex medical questions. The Mayo Clinic is a globally recognized research and health system that specializes in cancer and cardiac care. The group has a network of specialists and hospitals in Rochester, Minn., Jacksonville, Fla. and Phoenix.

Reach: The Atlanta Business Chronicle is a weekly publication with a circulation of more than 36,700. Its website receives more than 1.9 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Atlanta Journal-ConstitutionSacramento BeeDigital JournalModern HealthcareAtlanta Business Chronicle, 11 Alive Atlanta

Context:  WellStar Health System (WellStar) and Mayo Clinic today announced Feb. 6 that the metro Atlanta-based health system is joining the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a national network of like-minded organizations that share a commitment to better serving patients and their families. WellStar is the largest member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network in the southeast and the only member in metro Atlanta. Using digital technology to promote physician collaboration and sharing of the latest medical information, experts from WellStar and Mayo Clinic will work together to further enhance the delivery of healthcare for patients, allowing many patients to avoid unnecessary travel for answers to complex medical questions.

“WellStar is home to some of the most accomplished and preeminent physicians in the Southeast,” says Robert Jansen, M.D., executive vice president and chief administrative medical officer of WellStar. “Working with Mayo Clinic through the Mayo Clinic Care Network offers our physicians a new resource to ensure the kind of innovative and leading care that patients have grown to expect from WellStar.”

Mayo Clinic News Network: WellStar Health System and Mayo Clinic Announce Collaboration

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

Post-Bulletin
Back and Forth: It's Mayo Clinic's Sesquicentennial Year
by Harley Flathers

It's a special year in Mayo Clinic History — the 150th since Dr. William Worrall Mayo officially announced in area newspapers that he was opening a private practice in Rochester. Earlier, Dr.Post Bulletin Mayo had been summoned by President Abraham Lincoln to come to Rochester and be the examining surgeon of young men going into the Union Army for the Civil War. When the war ended, the family stayed.

Circulation: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: On Jan. 27, 1864, English-born Dr. William Worrall Mayo first notified the public about his medical practice in Rochester, Minn., planting the seeds of what would eventually become an international medical organization with more than 59,000 expert physicians, scientists and health care professionals, attracting millions of patients from across the globe.

This year marks 150 years of continuous service to patients, and Mayo Clinic is launching a yearlong recognition that will honor a legacy of medical accomplishments and a model for the future of health care.

Dr. Mayo’s sons, Drs. William and Charles Mayo, joined the practice in the late 1880’s and, with their father, created Mayo Clinic’s medical hallmark: The integrated care model that focuses a team of experts on one patient at a time and puts patients’ needs first.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic Commemorates 150th Anniversary in 2014

Public Affairs Contacts: Kelley Luckstein

Additional Mayo Clinic News Highlights This Week: Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: 11 Alive Atlanta, 11AliveAtlanta, ABC News, AccessAtlanta, adult stem cells, advisory board, Alabama.com, alzheimer's disease, American Stroke Association, Analitica.com, angina, Anti-VEGF drugs


January 31st, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Modern Healthcare
Symptoms, diagnosis and a prescription: How we can modernize healthcare in America
by Dr. John Noseworthy

Modern Healthcare

It is a tough time in many ways for our country—and for patients. The slow economy, the rapid growth in our aging population, the rising cost of healthcare and the new healthcare law have come together to make this a time of great change in how healthcare is delivered and paid for in the U.S.

Reach: Modern Healthcare, published by Crain Communications, is a healthcare news weekly that provides hospital executives with healthcare business news. The magazine specifically covers healthcare policy, Medicare/Medicaid, and healthcare from a business perspective. It also publishes a daily e-newsletter titled Modern Healthcare’s Daily Dose. The weekly publication has a circulation of more than 70,000 and its online site receives more than 29,700 unique visitors each month.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer,  Karl Oestreich

Reuters
U.S. says results encouraging for healthcare delivery reforms
By David Morgan

The Obama administration on Thursday reported what it called encouraging results from efforts to reduce healthcare costs and improve the quality of care for more than 5 million Medicare beneficiaries under Obamacare. As part of President Barack Obama's healthcare reform law, the Reutersefforts center around more than 360 accountable care organizations (ACOs), which are networks of doctors, hospitals and other providers specially organized to help move Medicare away from traditional fee-for-service medicine..."Today's report reflects important steps. More work is needed to modernize our antiquated Medicare payment system and base payment on evidence-based quality measures and proven patient outcomes," said Dr. John Noseworthy, chief executive of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, which is not part of the government's program.

Reach: Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing newsworld newsbusiness newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal financestock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, videomobile, and interactive television platforms.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

MPR
Mayo Clinic CEO John Noseworthy on the State of the Union

By Tom Crann

Minnesota got a brief shout-out in the State of the Union speech last night when President Obama pointed to the founder of Punch Pizza for the company's minimum wage practices. But Dr. John Noseworthy, President and CEO of the Mayo Clinic, was also at theMPR-News-300x45 address. Noseworthy spoke with MPR News' Tom Crann the State of the Union, the Affordable Care Act and the Mayo Clinic's 150th anniversary.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Additional coverage: KAALPost-Bulletin, KTTCKIMT, C-SPAN

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

KSTP
Mayo Clinic Celebrates 150th Year Anniversary
by Ellen Galles

The Mayo Clinic is celebrating 150 years. In that time, the clinic has brought the world dozens of medical breakthroughs like cortisone and the heart-lung machine. But some of the most KSTP-TV Eyewitness News Logimportant medical breakthroughs could be yet to come…Doctors like Anthony Windebank are researching to see if stem cells can be used to regenerate vital organs in patients who have heart disease, kidney disease and Lou Gehrig's Disease.

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Additional Sesquicentennial coverage: Post-BulletinKSTP morning show, Politico

Context: On Jan. 27, 1864, English-born Dr. William Worrall Mayo first notified the public about his medical practice in Rochester, Minn., planting the seeds of what would eventually become an international medical organization with more than 59,000 expert physicians, scientists and health care professionals, attracting millions of patients from across the globe.

This year marks 150 years of continuous service to patients, and Mayo Clinic is launching a yearlong recognition that will honor a legacy of medical accomplishments and a model for the future of health care.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic Commemorates 150th Anniversary in 2014

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

Florida Times-Union
Progress for Jacksonville, but big hurdles ahead, quality-of-life report says
by Steve Patterson

…“We see Jacksonville’s potential and have raised our expectations. This community demands to reach a higher standard,” said William Rupp, CEO of Mayo Clinic, who chaired the committeeFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo behind JCCI’s 29th annual progress report.

Circulation: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: William Rupp, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vice president and CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

Additional Mayo Clinic News Highlights This Week:  Read the rest of this entry »

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