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January 27th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik


CBS News
Healthcare providers on how healthcare may change under Trump

The CEOs of the Mayo Clinic, Cleveland Clinic and New York-Presbyterian Hospital sat down with CBS News at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. They offered their thoughts on how healthcare may change in the incoming Trump administration.CBS News Logo

Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

Related coverage in the January 20, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Star Tribune
Aging boomers, lack of funding for Alzheimer's may lead to 'major social and economic crisis'
by Allie Shah

Do we cure cancer, heart disease or diabetes? No, but we can make significant progress," said Dr. Ron Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Star Tribune newspaper logoAlzheimer's disease Research Center. "So if I'm destined to develop Alzheimer's disease-related changes in the brain at age 75, and I can push that to age 78 or 80, that's a big deal. That's why I say delaying onset and slowing progression is a more realistic goal than a cure." Petersen will participate in a panel discussion, hosted by TPT Tuesday, on the state of Alzheimer's disease in Minnesota. The event is sold out.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

NPR
Athlete-Turned-Trucker Works To Improve Truckers' Health
by Alex Smith

On a chilly winter morning, dozens of truck driver trainees file into a classroom at the headquarters of Prime Inc., a trucking company based in Springfield, Mo. At the front is Siphiwe Baleka, an energetic former swimming champion in his mid-40s. He delivers grim news about trucker
health to the new recruits. "If you haven't started to think about this, you need to start right now," Baleka says. ..The relatively small lifestyle changes that Baleka promotes could be enough to make a life-changing difference in the health of many truck drivers, says Dr. Clayton Cowl, chief of preventive, occupational and aerospace medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. "The drivers themselves — they don't need to be running marathons, necessarily," Cowl says.

Reach: Shots is the online channel for health stories from the NPR Science Desk.

Context:  Clayton Cowl, M.D. heads Mayo Clinic's preventive, occupational and aerospace medicine. The division consists of 22 physicians who have specialty training in internal medicine or family practice and a team of trained occupational health nurses. Several of our physicians are board-certified in preventive, occupational and/or aerospace medicine. Mayo Clinic's integrated group practice model makes consultation with any other medical specialists readily available.

Contact:  Kelly Reller

 

Star Tribune
Filmmaker Ken Burns on Mayo Clinic: 'One of the most amazing medical places on Earth'
by Neal Justin

Ever since a Mayo Clinic newsletter mentioned this past October that Ken Burns' production company was spending time on the Rochester Star Tribune newspaper logocampus for an upcoming documentary, details have been sketchy…On a website for the Better Angels Society, the foundation that supports Burns' work and raises funds for them, it categorizes "The Mayo Clinic" under "Ken Burns Presents: The Next Generation," a division dedicated to a new generation of filmmakers with their boss lending his reputation and guidance as an executive producer.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: City Pages

Context:  To learn more about the Ken Burns' film, check out this story in Mayo Clinic in the Loop.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

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Tags: ABC News, Affordable care act, ALN magazine, alzheimers, Apple, apps, Associated Press, Becker’s Hospital Review, blisters, Boston Scientific, Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer News


January 20th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highhlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

CNBC
Important not to lose ground on ACA

Dr. John Noseworthy, Mayo Clinic president & CEO, and Bernard Tyson, Kaiser Permanente CEO, talks about implementing reforms in the health care system.

Reach: CNBC is a 24-hour cable television station offers business news and financial information. The channel provides real-time financialCNBC logo market coverage to an estimated 175 million homes worldwide. CNBC online receives more than 26 million unique visitors each month.

Additional CNBC coverage:
CNBC, Drug pricing and regulations: Mayo Clinic CEO — Dr. John Noseworthy, Mayo Clinic president & CEO, and Bernard Tyson, Kaiser Permanente CEO, talk about the rising cost of drugs.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

New York Times
Getting Older, Sleeping Less
by Jane E. Brody

Nonmedical causes of insomnia are often successfully treated by practicing “good sleep hygiene,” a concept developed by the late Peter J. Hauri, a sleep specialist at the Mayo Clinic. That means limiting naps to less than 30 minutes a day, preferably early in the afternoon; avoiding stimulants and sedatives; avoiding heavy meals and minimizing liquids within two to three hours of bedtime; getting moderate exercise daily, The New York Times newspaper logopreferably in the morning or early afternoon; maximizing exposure to bright light during the day and minimizing it at night; creating comfortable sleep conditions; and going to bed only when you feel sleepy.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: The Mayo Center for Sleep Medicine (CSM) is a multidisciplinary enterprise comprised of pulmonologists, neurologists, psychiatrists and pediatricians who — with the support of a physician assistant, nurses and polysomnographic technologists — are engaged in a vibrant array of clinical, educational and research activities. Mayo Clinic doctors trained in sleep disorders evaluate and treat adults and children in the Center for Sleep Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. The Center for Sleep Medicine is one of the largest sleep medicine facilities in the United States. Staff in the center treats about 6,500 new people who have sleep disorders each year. The Center for Sleep Medicine is accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Washington Post
Why the ‘gluten-free movement’ is less of a fad than we thought
by Caitlin Dewey

There’s growing evidence that severe gluten sensitivities exist outside the realm of celiac disease. And researchers simply don’t know how many of the people following a gluten-free diet may actually have a legitimate health complaint — as opposed to a baseless fear of all things gluten, or a misplaced desire to lose weight. “We have no real inkling from our results,” said Joseph Murray, a celiac researcher at the MayoWashington Post newspaper logo Clinic and one of the authors of the new research. “We didn’t think to ask why people avoid gluten. When we designed this study 10 years ago, no one avoided gluten without a celiac diagnosis.”

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Chicago Tribune, News Herald

Other recent coverage regarding celiac disease and Dr. Joseph Murray:
January 6, 2017 edition of Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
November 4, 2016 edition of Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Joseph Murray, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist. Dr. Murray's research interests focus in two distinct areas: celiac disease and esophageal disorders. To learn more about celiac disease, check out this Mayo Clinic radio interview with Dr. Murray.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Bloomberg
The Two-Day, $5,000 C-Suite Physical
by Sam Grobart

I am in good health. I am out of shape. These two facts—one I hoped to be true, and one I absolutely knew to be true—were delivered to me at the end of a thorough two-day medical exam in early November at the Bloomberg Business LogoMayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. I underwent this battery of tests not because I was at risk for any major illness, nor because I’m a hypochondriac (I mean, no more of one than any unfit 42-year-old man has a right to be), but because the renowned medical center offers something called the Executive Health Program, which sounded exceedingly fancy.

Reach: Bloomberg BusinessWeek has a weekly circulation of more than 990,000 and has more than six million unique visitors to its online site each month.

Context: For more than 40 years, the Mayo Clinic Executive Health Program has been leveraging our nationally recognized expertise to help executives, business owners and entrepreneurs maintain good health.

Contact:  Kelley Luckstein

 

 

KJZZ
Summit Features Experts Making Sense Of Health-Care Payments
by Steve Goldstein

Paying for health care is complicated and confusing. Does a provider accept your health plan? How many bills can you expect to receive after the fact? What about catastrophic care? Mayo Clinic and ASU’s School for the Science of Health Care Delivery have teamed up to host a Payment Reform Summit featuring a number of experts trying to figure out what makes sense in the realm of health-care payments. We talked aboutKJZZ NPR -AZ Logo some possible reforms with Dr. Lois Krahn of the Mayo Clinic and Dr. Victor Trastek, director of ASU’s School of Science and Health Care Delivery.

Reach: KJZZ-FM is a commercial station owned by Maricopa Community Colleges in Tempe, AZ. The format of the station is news and jazz. KJZZ-FM's target audience is news and jazz music listeners, ages 18 to 64, in the Tempe, AZ area.

Additional coverage: Fierce Healthcare

Context: The Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University Alliance for Health Care Payment Reform Summit convened subject matter experts from around the country, including the voice of patients, to inform the development of alternative payment models. With a focus on the needs of patients, the expert participants examined data drawn from a variety of sources to assess the impact of various payment models on patient access and patterns of health care use. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Jim McVeigh

 

WOKV Jacksonville
Mayo Clinic receives $1.6 million to fund Alzheimer’s research in Jacksonville
by John Engel

Eight programs at Mayo Clinic’s Jacksonville campus are receiving a total of $1.6 million in grants to fund Alzheimer’s research in Jacksonville. Kevin Bieniek, a post-doctoral research fellow at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, will benefit from this most recent round of grant funding from the state. His study examines the relationship between brain trauma and Alzheimer’s disease. “There are so many people that get Alzheimer’s disease that have no family history of this disorder,” Bieniek told WOKV. “It’s really a complex interaction of your genetics; the environment; your lifestyle; there are so many factors that come into play.”

Reach: WOKV-FM is Jacksonville's 24 hour news station.

Additional coverage: Healthcare Business News

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida were awarded eight grants from the Florida Department of Health to investigate the prevention or cure of Alzheimer’s disease. These awards followed a peer-reviewed and competitive grant application process, where the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Grant Advisory Board reviewed applications and selected 27 studies statewide. “Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus is home to international leaders in neuroscience research who are focused on addressing the unmet needs of patients,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., vice president, Mayo Clinic, and CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida. “We integrate basic and clinical research and immediately translate our findings into better patient care. We very much appreciate the state’s investment in finding solutions for Alzheimer’s disease.” More information about the grants can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Kevin Punsky

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Tags: "liquid biopsies", ACA, acupuncture, aging, alzheimers, Arizona Republic, baby powder, blood donation, Bloomberg, Bradly Prigge, breastfeeding, C. Difficile


January 13th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

First Coast News
The Chat Wednesday January 11: Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa Part 1

First Coast News
The Chat Wednesday January 11: Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa Part 2

Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, Mayo Clinic neurosurgeon, joined “The Chat,” a live afternoon show on Jacksonville’s First Coast News. TheFirst Coast News Logo show’s web site breaks up the segments in two parts (see links below). The first segment focuses on his early life/career with images of his time at Johns Hopkins, and the second segment focuses on his role and work at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville.

Reach: First Coast News refers to two television stations in Jacksonville, Florida. WJXX, the ABC affiliate and WTLV, the NBC affiliate.

Previous coverage in September 23, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
Previous coverage in April 22, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, M.D., prominent neurosurgeon, researcher and educator, joined Mayo Clinic in 2016 as chair of the Department of Neurosurgery on the Florida campus, along with several members of his research team from Johns Hopkins Medicine. Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa is renown nationally and internationally as a surgeon, researcher, humanitarian and author. His laboratory has published many manuscripts and articles, submitted a number of patents and obtained three NIH grants. Students and fellows who worked with Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa have gone on to join leading neuroscience programs throughout the world. Mayo Clinic's world-renowned neurosurgeons perform more than 7,000 complex surgical procedures every year at campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota.

Contact: Kevin Punsky


Yahoo! News
Robert M. Jacobson stresses importance of flu vaccine

The Minnesota Department of Health released a report on Thursday on the increase of flu activity throughout the state. Friday afternoon, we Logo of Yahoo Newsspoke with a health professional at Mayo Clinic about the importance of getting the flu vaccine. According to the Minnesota Department of Health's report released on Thursday flu season is in full swing, and can indeed continue to increase in activity. In fact, Dr. Jacobson, a primary care physician and professor of pediatrics at Mayo Clinic, said in the last two weeks alone, there were 50 hospitalized patients in Minnesota from the flu.

Reach: Yahoo News receives more than 8.4 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: KTTC

Context:  Robert Jacobson, M.D. is a pediatrician with the Mayo Clinic Children's Center. Dr. Jacobson also serves as the medical director for the Population Health Science Program at Mayo Clinic's Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery. He also leads Mayo's Employee and Community Health (ECH) Research Initiative. You can read about his medical research here.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Wisconsin Public Radio
The Mayo Clinic Diet: Second Edition

It's the beginning of a new year, a time when many people resolve to make healthier choices--like eating a healthier diet. We learn how to improve health while losing weight with the medical editor of "The Mayo Clinic Diet." He says this plan is a lifestyle and not a diet in the traditional sense. We learn how it works.

Reach: Wisconsin Public Radio consists of 34 radio stations programmed by seven regional studios and carrying programming on three content networks: the Ideas Network, the NPR News and Classical Network and the All Classical Network.

Additional coverage: 

Post-Bulletin, The Mayo Clinic Diet earns top honor
KTTC, Mayo Clinic Diet is #1, according to U.S. News & World Report
KWLM Willmar Radio, KFGO Fargo-Moorhead, 104.7 DukeFM, WXOW La Crosse

Previous coverage in the January 6, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context:  As the second edition of The Mayo Clinic Diet hits store shelves, the diet plan has been named Best Commercial Diet by U.S. News & World Report.  “We are honored to be recognized for a weight-loss method that offers lasting results,” says Donald Hensrud, M.D., medical editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet and director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. Learn more about the Mayo Clinic by watching this Mayo Clinic Minute or read more about it on Mayo Clinic Network. “The Mayo Clinic Diet is much more than a diet,” Dr. Hensrud says. “It’s a lifestyle program in which people can eat great-tasting food and feel better right away ─ even while they lose weight. More importantly, these lifestyle changes are sustainable and can improve long-term health as people reach and maintain a healthy weight.”

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

MPR
For Rochester, becoming the 'Silicon Valley of Medicine' won't be easy
by Catharine Richert

The Destination Medical Center project wants to give Rochester a reputation for something it's never been: a magnet for tech start-ups and MPR News logoentrepreneurs. But turning the city into what the DMC calls the "Silicon Valley of Medicine" won't be easy. The DMC is a multibillion, 20-year economic development effort to remake Rochester so Mayo can better compete for both patients and top talent. It's also meant to help diversify the region's economy by attracting new businesses. But Rochester's risk-averse culture has held it back, said Jamie Sundsbak, an entrepreneur and former Mayo Clinic researcher. "When you have a large medical institution like the Mayo Clinic — a world renowned, top medical institution in the world — you get that way by eliminating risk," he said. "If you look at some of the entrepreneurial communities, risk is what they are excited about."

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: With Mayo Clinic at its heart, the Destination Medical Center (DMC) initiative is the catalyst to position Rochester, Minnesota as the world’s premier destination for health and wellness; attracting people, investment opportunities, and jobs to America’s City for Health and supporting the economic growth of Minnesota, its bioscience sector, and beyond.

Contacts: Duska AnastasijevicSusan Barber Lindquist

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Tags: 104.7 DukeFM, AccuWeather, advisory board, Albert Lea Tribune, Alzforum, apps, asthma, Austin Herald, Becker’s Hospital Review, Breast Cancer, breastfeeding, Brooke Werneburg


January 6th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik


Reuters

‘Hidden’ celiac disease less common now in U.S.
by Shereen Lehman

Fewer people in the U.S. have celiac disease without realizing it, a new study finds. The actual proportion of people with celiac disease in the United States has not changed since 2009, researchers say. “The total prevalence is stable,” Dr. Joseph Murray told Reuters Health in a phone interview. But there are fewer people walking around with “hidden” celiac disease. “When you look at the proportion that are diagnosedReuters Logo versus undiagnosed, that's gone up dramatically. Go back six years and most patients were undiagnosed, with only about one in five getting diagnosed,” said Murray, a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota who was part of the study team.

Reach: Reuters has 196 editorial bureaus in 130 countries and 2,400 editorial staff members and covers international news, regional news, politics, social issues, health, business, sports and media.

Context: Joseph Murray, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist. Dr. Murray's research interests focus in two distinct areas: celiac disease and esophageal disorders. To learn more about celiac disease, check out this Mayo Clinic radio interview with Dr. Murray.

Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Joe Dangor

 

Today.com
The real brain food could be fresh veggies and olive oil, study finds
by Maggie Fox

People got points for light to moderate drinking — in this case about a third of drink a day to no more than three drinks a day on average for men and two for women. Dr. David Knopman, a professor of neurology TODAY Showat the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota who was not involved in the study, said this could translate to real-life benefits. “Loss of brain volume is an inevitable part of the aging process,” Knopman told NBC News. “A bigger brain is in general better for you because at least in late life, it makes a person more resistant to the effects of brain diseases,” he added.

Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show.

Context: David Knopman, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist.  Dr. Knopman is involved in research in late-life cognitive disorders, such as mild cognitive impairment and dementia. Dr. Knopman's specific interests are in the very early stages of Alzheimer's disease, in cognitive impairment due to stroke (cerebrovascular disease) and in cognitive impairment due to frontotemporal degeneration.

Contacts: Susan Barber Lindquist, Traci Klein

 

Post-Bulletin
Brewer has FAITH in Rochester
by Brett Boese

When Mayo Clinic Dr. LaPrincess Brewer took the stage last month in Charlotte, N.C., Jackie Johnson couldn't help beaming with pride. Johnson, a vocal advocate within Rochester's Black community, hasn't stopped singing Brewer's praises as the Brewer's success has resonated across the country, even as it flies under the radar locally. Brewer's FAITH program, an acronym for Fostering African-AmericanLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaper Improvement in Total Health, was among the featured attractions at the 28th annual Healthy Churches 2020 National Conference that was held in her hometown. Its initial success in Baltimore and the ensuing impact in Minnesota since Brewer arrived at Mayo in 2013 has prompted significant accolades for the charismatic 35-year-old cardiologist.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context: LaPrincess Brewer, M.D., M.P.H., has a primary research focus in developing strategies to reduce and ultimately eliminate cardiovascular disease health disparities in racial and ethnic minority populations and in underserved communities through health promotion and community-based participatory research. Dr. Brewer also has special interest in increasing minority and women's participation in cardiovascular clinical trials through mobile health (mHealth) interventions. Additionally, she has published work on faith-based interventions for cardiovascular disease prevention, racial differences in weight maintenance and psychosocial factors influencing cardiac risk factors.

Contact: Ethan Grove

 

ABC News
US News and World Report Releases List of Best Diets
by Gillian Mohney

Every year many Americans make a New Year's resolution to lose weight, but finding ways to drop pounds and keep them off is difficult. Today, U.S. News and World Report released its annual list of the best diets, ABC News logoaccording to nutrition and medical experts. The diets were chosen by a panel of nutritionists, dietary consultants, physicians and other experts convened by U.S News and World Report. Mayo Clinic Diet: This diet is broken into two parts. The first part requires no calorie counting, but dieters are stuck with meals made up of healthy foods including whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and healthy fats, as well as at least 30 minutes of physical activity a day.

Reach: ABC News Online has more than 28.8 million unique visitors to its site each month. ABC’s World News Tonight with David Muir averages about 9.2 million viewers each night.

Additional coverage:
HealthDay, Plant-Based Diets Score Big for Healthy Weight Loss
WATE6 Knoxville, U.S. News and World Report ranks top diets
FOX News, US News ranks best diet plans for 2017
Atlanta Journal-ConstitutionWant to lose weight? Experts say these are the best diets of 2017
FOX4 Dallas, Lose weight faster by tracking habits

Context:  As the second edition of The Mayo Clinic Diet hits store shelves, the diet plan has been named Best Commercial Diet by U.S. News & World Report.  “We are honored to be recognized for a weight-loss method that offers lasting results,” says Donald Hensrud, M.D., medical editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet and director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. Learn more about the Mayo Clinic by watching this Mayo Clinic Minute or read more about it on Mayo Clinic Network. “The Mayo Clinic Diet is much more than a diet,” Dr. Hensrud says. “It’s a lifestyle program in which people can eat great-tasting food and feel better right away ─ even while they lose weight. More importantly, these lifestyle changes are sustainable and can improve long-term health as people reach and maintain a healthy weight.”

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

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Tags: ABC News, Affordable care act, Albert Lea Tribune, alternative medicine, anxiety, arthritis, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Attn:, Baltimore Sun, Becker’s Hospital Review, Beloit Daily News, Billings Gazette


September 23rd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Buzzfeed
27 College Health Tips They Won’t Teach You At Orientation
by Caroline Kee

Spoiler alert: it’s probably mono. BuzzFeed Health spoke to Dr. Pritish Tosh, infectious disease specialist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and germ expert Kelly Reynolds, PhD, director of environmental health sciences at the University of Arizona, about how collegeBuzzFeed Logo students can stay healthy when the odds (and germs) are against them.

Reach: BuzzFeed receives more than 15.7 million unique visitors each month to its website and targets pop culture and social media enthusiasts.

Context: Pritish Tosh, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist. Dr. Tosh is interested in emerging infections and preparedness activities related to them, ranging from collaborating with the Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group in basic science vaccine development to hospital systems research related to pandemic preparedness.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
Mayo Clinic sets schedule for $100M expansion — with work starting soon
by Alexa Epitropoulos

Mayo Clinic is beginning construction on the first building within its $100 million three-building expansion project in October – and it's setting its sights on more expansion in the future. The CEO of Mayo Clinic's Jacksonville campus, Dr. Gianrico Farrugia, said work on the 150,000-Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logosquare-foot destination medical center will have just under a two-year timeline, with the projected completion being summer 2018. That building has a number of unique features, including specialized care for patients with neurological problems, as well as patients who require neurosurgery, hematology and oncology. It will also have a chemotherapy section, which Farrugia says will be private and include an outdoor patio.

Additional coverage:
Becker’s Hospital Review, Jacksonville Mayo Clinic sets schedule for $100M expansion

Context: Gianrico Farrugia, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vice president and CEO of Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida. Earlier this year, Mayo Clinic announced that it will invest $100 million in major construction projects building on its 150-year history of transforming health care and the patient experience as the premier medical destination center for health care in the Southeast. 

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

WJCT Jacksonville
First Coast Connect: From Illegal Immigrant To Brain Surgeon
by Kevin Meerschaert

He jumped a California border fence in 1987, one day after his 19th birthday. Speaking no English and having no money, Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa spent the first years in this country working migrant jobs while raising the money for tuition at Joaquin Delta Community College. … screen-shot-2016-09-22-at-8-48-16-pmRecently Dr. Q joined the staff at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville as Chairman of Neurologic Surgery.

Reach: WJCT-FM is the NPR affiliate for the Jacksonville market. WJCT-FM Online has more than 259,000 unique visitors each month.

Previous coverage in April 22, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, prominent neurosurgeon, researcher and educator, recently joined Mayo Clinic as chair of the Department of Neurosurgery on the Florida campus, along with several members of his research team from Johns Hopkins Medicine. Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa is renown nationally and internationally as a surgeon, researcher, humanitarian and author. His laboratory has published many manuscripts and articles, submitted a number of patents and obtained three NIH grants. Students and fellows who worked with Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa have gone on to join leading neuroscience programs throughout the world. Mayo Clinic's world-renowned neurosurgeons perform more than 7,000 complex surgical procedures every year at campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

KSTP
10-Year-Old Minn. Girl Undergoes Facial Reconstructive Surgery after Near-Fatal Farm Accident

Doctor Uldis Bite, a plastic surgeon, took Amber Rose’s case. Now 10 years old, Amber Rose was about to embark on yet another journey; one her
KSTP-5 Twin Citiesfamily wanted to share and they invited 5 EYEWITNESS NEWS to come along. A 3-D model, made on the Mayo campus, helped Dr. Bite plan out the extensive facial reconstruction surgery Amber Rose was about to have. On an early July morning, almost exactly three years to the date of her accident, Amber Rose walked nervously into Mayo Clinic, her entire family by her side.

Reach: KSTP-TV is the ABC affiliate in Minneapolis that broadcasts on channel 5. KSTP-TV Online has more than 503,000 unique visitors each month. It is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., and is the only locally-owned and operated broadcasting company in the Twin Cities. KSTP-TV first broadcast in April 1948, and was the first television station to serve the upper Midwest.

Context: Last year, after receiving care at "numerous hospitals" and from "dozens of doctors," the Kordiaks were told nothing else could be done for their daughter. Then, "with fingers crossed, Jen reached out to Mayo Clinic," where a team led by Uldis Bite, M.D., came up with a new plan for Amber Rose. Dr. Bite used "a 3-D model, made on the Mayo campus" to help plan out the extensive facial reconstruction surgery. And last July — nearly three years to the day after the accident — Amber Rose underwent the 15-hour procedure. Six weeks later, at a follow-up appointment, Dr. Bite was pleased with the results. As was Amber Rose. "My nose looks way better," she said. "Nobody will stare at me." You can read more about Amber Rose's story at In the Loop.

Contact:  Sharon Theimer

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Tags: 873 AM, ABC15 Arizona, advisory board, aging, AIN Online, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers, American Trucker, Angie Murad, artificial Intelligence, AsiaOne, awake brain surgery


September 11th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich


Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Featured

KARE11
KARE 11 Investigates: High school football helmet safety

How the football helmets your school uses measure up…A recent study from a neurology professor at Florida State University found Virginia Tech's 'not recommended' helmet was actually the best atKARE-11 TV, Minneapolis-St. Paul preventing concussions and a University of Wisconsin study found no difference among helmets. So is the helmet enough? "When I think about concussion, it's not just about the equipment although that's very important," says Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Michael Stuart who is leading new football research at Mayo Clinic.

Reach: KARE is a an NBC affiliate in the Minneapolis-St.Paul market.

Additional helmet/safety coverage: MPR

Context:  Michael Stuart, M.D. is co-director, Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

Dallas Morning News
Methodist becomes the first Texas member of Mayo’s Care Network
By Gary Jacobson

Operating for a century and a half, the Mayo Clinic is probably the strongest health care provider brand in the country. Last year, about 4,500 Texans, including 1,000 patients from the Dallas area, went to Dallas Morning News logoMayo for treatment, said Stephen Mansfield, CEO of Dallas-based Methodist Health System…“This is not an acquisition or a merger,” Mansfield said at a news conference formally announcing the alliance. “It’s a clinical collaboration.” Mansfield and David Hayes, medical director of Mayo’s Care Network, said the alliance allows Methodist physicians to consult with Mayo specialists and share treatment protocols and other best practices as they collaborate on patient care.

Reach: Dallas Morning News has a daily circulation of more than 257,000 and more than 1.4 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional Coverage: Dallas Regional Chamber blog, Becker’s Hospital Review, Dallas Business Journal, News Medical, D Healthcare Magazine, Biz Beat Blog, KDFW Dallas, KTVT Dallas

Related Coverage:

Dallas Morning News, Big-name hospitals, retailers, clinics collaborate for cost control by Gary Jacobson, Never has more change come more rapidly to the health care industry. In North Texas, not-for-profit providers are collaborating with retailers on walk-in clinics at neighborhood drugstores and aligning with elite national providers. This week, Dallas-based Methodist Health System said it was becoming part of the Mayo Clinic’s nationwide Care Network. Similarly, Baylor Scott & White Health is working on an agreement to become part of the Cleveland Clinic’s national cardiology network.  Additional coverage: Post-Bulletin

Context: Mayo Clinic and Methodist Health System (Methodist) officials announced Sept. 9 that Methodist has joined the Mayo Clinic Care Network. Methodist, one of North Texas’ oldest nonprofit health systems, was selected following a comprehensive evaluation that ranged from its clinical and business practices to quality, safety and service efforts and patient satisfaction. More information about the announcement can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

Star Tribune
At Apple's product unveiling, Mayo takes a big role
By Evan Ramstad

When Apple Inc. unveils new products Tuesday, one of the tech industry’s most anticipated events of the year, it will have Mayo Clinic at its side to encourage people to use smartphones, and possibly aStar Tribune Business section logo smartwatch, to monitor health. The combination of Rochester-based Mayo, one of the best-known names in health care, and Apple could be a major boost to the practice of routinely tracking health conditions and fitness performance.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional Coverage:

KARE11, Apple's big reveal has Minnesota connection, The Mayo Clinic has found a new high-tech partner in Apple. On Tuesday, the tech giant introduced the new iPhone 6, which will come in two sizes that are both bigger than the current iPhone 5. The much anticipated Apple Watch was also introduced with a starting price of $349. With the announcement, we learned the Mayo Clinic has been working for two years to help develop software called HealthKit for the new devices…"By interacting with patients and their data at an earlier stage in their state of wellness or their state of illness, you can effect change so those patients potentially wouldn't have to present to the emergency department," said Mayo Clinic Dr. John Wald.

Modern Healthcare, Mayo eyes Apple collaboration to expand consumer outreach by Darius Tahir, The Mayo Clinic has decided to be involved with Apple as it rolls out its new iWatch Tuesday because it hopes the iWatch, along with Apple's HealthKit app, will allow it to better reach patients remotely.  Another major provider, Memorial Sloan-Kettering in New York, also reportedly an Apple partner, did not respond to requests for comment on its plans.

More coverage on Apple/Mayo:  NY Times, Star Tribune, ABC News, Forbes, AppAdvice, Geeky Gadgets, Good Morning America!, Tech 2, 9to5Mac, iDownloadBlog.com, Gadgest.esKAAL, Modern Healthcare, BringMeTheNews, Houston Chronicle, KTTC, WCCO, Apple Insider,The Advisory, RushLimbaugh.com, Post-Bulletin, Hospitals & Health Networks, iPhoneHacks.com, Bloomberg

Context: During the keynote address at the Worldwide Developers Conference 2014Apple, Inc., unveiled HealthKit, a digital repository for various types of health-fitness related data. Apple highlighted HealthKit through a new Mayo Clinic app under development that would offer users a more personalized experience and make their health data more actionable in supporting healthier lifestyles. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

KAAL
Mayo Clinic Partners With IBM's Watson
By Brianna Long

…For someone who has been a winner on Jeopardy and is featured at conferences nationwide, their resume must be pretty impressive. But in this case, it's not a someone at all, but rather a something. KAAL TV logoWatson is IBM's super-computer, and now, it got a new job at Mayo Clinic…"The clinical trials matching solution, that we're working with IBM on, based on the Watson technology, does would be to accelerate and streamline that, so that it will automatically show up on my computer, when I see a patient, which trials this patient might be eligible for," said Dr. Nick LaRusso, the Mayo physician who is the lead on the Watson collaboration.

Reach:  KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Additional Coverage:

Star Tribune, Mayo Clinic partners with IBM's Watson computer for matching patients, clinical trials by AP, The Mayo Clinic is partnering with IBM and its Watson supercomputer to pair cancer patients with the right clinical trials. The Rochester clinic announced Monday it's working with the Armonk, N.Y.-based computing company on trial matching starting in 2015. The Watson cognitive computing system will sort through 8,000 Mayo studies and approximately 170,000 ongoing studies worldwide to match patients. Watson rose to fame by defeating a pair of "Jeopardy!" champions in 2011. Dr. Nicholas LaRusso of Mayo is leading the collaboration and says Watson could "transform" how health care is delivered. He says the program could significantly increase the number of patients who enroll in trials, as well as the accuracy of the matching.

KTTC, Washington Post, Modern Healthcare, Post-Bulletin, HealthcareDIVE, WCCO, News Observer, CNN MoneyPolitico, MobiHealthNews, A Smarter Planet Blog, The Scientist, Vida en el Valle, KTTC

Context: Mayo Clinic and IBM announced plans this week to pilot Watson, the IBM cognitive computer, to match patients more quickly with appropriate clinical trials, beginning with research studies in cancer. A proof-of-concept phase is currently underway. “In an area like cancer —where time is of the essence — the speed and accuracy that Watson offers will allow us to develop an individualized treatment plan more efficiently so we can deliver exactly the care that the patient needs,” says Steven Alberts, M.D., chair of medical oncology at Mayo Clinic. More information about the announcement can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

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