Items Tagged ‘Business Standard’

December 2nd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

NBC News
Study: 1 in 6 Breast Cancer Patients Have Symptoms Other Than Lumps

A new study of more than 2,300 women in England showed 1 IN 6 patients have symptoms other than lumps — some symptoms far more subtle than others. Interview with Dr. Deborah Rhodes.NBC News Logo

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Context: Deborah Rhodes, M.D., is a physician with Mayo Clinic's Breast Diagnostic Clinic. Dr. Rhodes studies the application of a new breast imaging device, molecular breast imaging, to breast cancer screening. The long-term goal of Dr. Rhodes' research is to develop an individualized approach to breast cancer screening that incorporates breast density, age, and other factors that impact breast cancer risk and mammography sensitivity.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

KARE11
Mayo chef shares healthier holiday recipes
by Pat Evans

Chef Jen Welpert, Executive Wellness Chef for Mayo Clinic’s Healthy Living Program joined us on KARE11 News@4 to serve up some recipes. She showed some ways to use less fat, sugar and other rich ingredients KARE-11 Logomaking dishes lighter and healthier.

Reach: KARE-TV is the NBC affiliate serving the Minneapolis-Saint Paul market.

Related coverage of Mayo Clinic's Healthly Living Program:

WGN Radio, Healthy Thanksgiving Leftovers  Executive Wellness Chef at The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program Jen Welper talks about the healthy things you can make with Thanksgiving leftovers.

KAAL, Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program: Nutrition

KAAL, Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program: Fitness 

KAAL, Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program: Elements of Movement 

KAAL, Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program: Stress Management & Wellness Coaching

KAAL, Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program: Rejuvenate and Restore

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Arizona Horizon (PBS)
Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University Alliance for Health Care

Arizona State University and Mayo Clinic are joining forces to improve health care delivery, increase research and open up a Mayo Clinic School of Medicine in Arizona. ASU president Michael Crow and Dr. Wyatt Decker, Mayo Clinic Chief Executive Officer, Arizona, will discuss the Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University Alliance for Health Care.

Reach: Eight, Arizona PBS is a PBS station that has focused on educating children, reporting in-depth on public affairs, fostering lifelong learning and celebrating arts and culture. Its signal reaches 86 percent ofArizona PBS the homes in Arizona. With more than 1 million viewers weekly, Eight consistently ranks among the most-viewed public television stations per capita in the country. Eight is a member-supported service of Arizona State University.

Previous coverage in October 28, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context:  Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University have announced the launch of a comprehensive new model for health care education and research: the Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University Alliance for Health Care. The goal of the alliance is to innovate health care delivery to improve patient care, accelerate cutting-edge research discoveries, and transform medical education. The alliance further links two of the Phoenix area’s most recognizable institutions. ASU recently was named the nation’s No. 1 “most innovative” university by U.S. News & World Report.Mayo Clinic earned the No. 1 top ranking nationally on 2016 U.S. News & World Report's Honor Roll of America's Best Hospitals, as well as the No. 1 spots for top hospitals in Arizona and Phoenix, Minnesota and Florida. The formalized alliance provides cohesion to a collection of joint projects, which have evolved over the past decade and sets the stage for many more. This expansion promises growing impact and scale. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic New Network and on Mayo Medical School's website.

Contact:  Jim McVeigh

 

News4Jax
Doctors warn of extremely contagious virus this holiday season
by Francesca Amiker

Many doctors have been seeing patients with an extremely contagious virus this holiday season, causing appointments to book up at after-hours clinics across Jacksonville. The virus, which can include symptoms News Jax 4 Logosimilar to the stomach flu, usually lasts two to three days, but doctors said it's lasting much longer than that this year. Vandana Bhide at Mayo Clinic said the outbreak has already spread to many of her patients. She said it's a virus that can be one of two types. "It's usually the norovirus or rotavirus," Bhide said. "Both of them can cause watery diarrhea and it can be in adults and kids."

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville. This Week in Jacksonville is a weekly public affairs program on WJXT.

Context: Vandana Bhide, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic internist and pediatrician.

Contact: Kevin Punksy

 

WCCO
Mayo Clinic Nurse Recounts 100-Foot Fall

Six months after surviving a huge fall down an Arizona canyon, a Rochester woman is heading back to work, reports Jennifer Mayerle.

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

CBS Minnesota

Context: Amber Kohnhorst loves animals and adventure. The trip she'd planned to Best Friends Animal Sanctuary in Utah promised both. She'd spend time volunteering at the shelter and do some hiking in nearby Cane Beds, Arizona. But what sounded like a perfect vacation quickly became a nightmare when the 25-year-old Mayo Clinic nurse fell 100 feet down a cliff during what was supposed to be a short hike. You can read more about Amber's story on Mayo Clinic In the Loop.

Contact:  Ginger Plumbo

 

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Tags: 3D printing, active shooter situation, adenomyosis, Alzforum, alzheimers, Amy Davis, Arizona Horizon (PBS), ayo Family Clinic in Kasson, Breast Cancer, Business Insider, Business Standard, calcium


July 22nd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

New York Times
Fecal Transplants Can Be Life-Saving, but How?
by Carl Zimmer

Now scientists are testing fecal transplants against such diseases as ulcerative colitis, and even obesity and diabetes…The bacteria in stool seem to be particularly important. Dr. Sahil Khanna of the Mayo Clinic and his colleagues isolated the spores of about 50 different species of bacteriaThe New York Times newspaper logo found in stool samples donated by healthy people. They put the spores in pills, which they gave to 30 patients with C. difficile infections. As they reported in the July 15 issue of The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 29 of the patients recovered.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: Clostridium difficile (klos-TRID-e-um dif-uh-SEEL), often called C. difficile or C. diff, is a bacterium that can cause symptoms ranging from diarrhea to life-threatening inflammation of the colon. Mayo Clinic specializes in treating people with difficult cases of C. difficile who haven't responded to standard medical treatments or who have developed complications such as an inflamed colon. The Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, opened a C. difficile clinic that specializes in treating patients with C. difficile infection.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

New York Times
Pat Summitt’s Public Fight Spurs Research Support

Perhaps the most tangible evidence of the difference Summitt made is set to come in December with the opening of the Pat Summitt Alzheimer’s The New York Times newspaper logoClinic at the University of Tennessee Medical Center. “I think it’s going to become a real icon in the Southeastern part of the States for Alzheimer’s disease care and research,” said Ronald Petersen, the director of the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota…“People raved about her willingness to do this,” Petersen said. “She maintained a sense of humor as far into the disease as she could. She likened the battle to coaching basketball, and the way the players would react to a challenge on the court is the way she was reacting to dealing with this disease.”

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Post-Bulletin
Blue Cross honors Mayo's kidney donor program
by Brett Boese

An innovative Mayo Clinic program that pairs kidney donors with needy transplant patients was recognized Tuesday by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota's new Trailblazing Tour. It was one of 11 programs honored for its creative and forward-thinking methods, according to Blue Cross. Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperThe thought process behind Mayo's new donor program is simple, but it has drawn high praise while being hailed as revolutionary. "Mayo Clinic Living Donor Program's pioneering Paired Donation Program is evolving how patients receive transplants – in turn, proving how innovative trailblazers can accelerate the pace of improving health across Minnesota," said Garrett Black, senior vice president of health services at Blue Cross. "By recognizing the Mayo Clinic Living Donor Program, we hope to start a meaningful conversation and engage communities like Rochester throughout the state to reach their full potential and work together to transform health care."

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context: The Paired Donation Program came out of the knowledge that the current system simply wasn’t working as well as it could. Mayo Clinic – ranked number one in the nation for nephrology by US News & World Report –realized that by matching up people willing to donate a kidney with those in need of a transplant, they may be able to help someone else, if not their immediate friend or family member. A kidney from a living donor leads to better outcomes for the patients, and those that have had a friend or family member go through a kidney transplant tend to be more willing to be on the list to donate if a match arises. More information can be found here.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Chicago Tribune
How to shop for sunscreen
by Alison Bowen

Spray, stick or lotion? The Mayo Clinic lays out pros and cons. A stick might be easy to apply around the eye, or a gel might help with a hairy Chicago Tribune Logochest. Lotions are easy for large applications. And if you use a spray, stay away from the wind — spraying your limbs in the wind might not result in full coverage.

Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 384,000 and a weekend circulation of more than 686,000.

Context:  Mayo Clinic experts say the best sunscreen is one that you'll use generously and according to label directions. Here's help understanding sunscreen ingredients, types of sunscreen and more.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

ActionNewsJax
Expert weighs in possible Zika virus transmitted by mosquito in Miami
by Letisha Bereola

The first possible homegrown case of Zika transmitted by mosquito is being investigated in Miami. Action News Jax went to the Mayo Clinic to find out what health officials are zeroing in on. Dr. Vandana Bhide is an internist and pediatrician at the Mayo Clinic. She says a medical team will be examining the virus closely. “What are the DNA fingerprints of this particular infection? And we want to be sure it’s a recent infection ActionNewsJaxand not a similar infection like dengue fever,” she said.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Context: Vandana Bhide, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic internist and pediatrician.

Contact: Kevin Punksy

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Tags: ABC15 Arizona, AccuWeather, ActionNewsJax, ALS News Today, alzheimer's disease, anesthesia, back surgery, Becker’s Hospital Review, blood donation, blood donors, Blue Cross, Business Standard


February 19th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Heather Privett  with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

New York Times
Ask Well: Are Pomegranates Good For You?
By Roni Caryn Rabin

Pomegranates are rich in micronutrients with potential antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects and are often compared favorably with red wine and green tea in terms of health benefits. But there’s little good evidence that the level of nutrientsNew York Times Well Blog Logo found in the fruit translates into true gains for human health, said Dr. Brent Bauer, director of the Mayo Clinic’s complementary and integrative medicine program, because few clinical trials have been done. “There’s a suggestion pomegranate can do a lot of things,” Dr. Bauer said. “The trouble is there’s very limited data.”

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context:  Brent Bauer, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic General Internal Medicine physician who is also affiliated with Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. As director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program, Dr. Bauer has broad and varied research interests.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

ABC News
Loss for words can be a rare brain disorder, not Alzheimer's
by Lauran Neergaard

A mysterious brain disorder can be confused with early Alzheimer's disease although it isn't robbing patients of their memories ABC News logobut of the words to talk about them…Speech and language are hugely complex. Just to speak requires activating 100 muscles between the lungs and lips to produce at least 14 distinct sounds per second, said Dr. Joseph Duffy of the Mayo Clinic.

Context: New ways to diagnose and treat individuals who cannot speak, hear, or process language might not just ensure the right care—early intervention could also help treat or avoid other related disorders, according to findings presented by researchers at the AAAS Annual meeting recently.  Joseph Duffy, M.D., a Mayo clinic speech pathologist, is studying links between a particular speech disorder and other neurodegenerative problems.

Additional coverage:
The New York Times online, Star Tribune, Times of India, , Dajiworld.com, Business Standard, The Western Star, Yahoo! Maktoob News, The Economic Times, South China Morning PostDaily Mail, Yahoo! News Canada, Deccan Chronicle, The China Post, The Jordan Times

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

FOX News
Innovative treatment holds promise for new approach to Alzheimer's treatment

In decades of research, scientists have focused on eliminating the signature plaques of Alzheimer’s to fight the devastating disease…“TheFox News Health Logo field is taking a step back and re-examining where we are with regard to what we know, what we don’t know and what might be some of the best avenues going forward to look for treatments,” Dr. Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center and the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging, who is not involved in the LM11A-31 research, told Time.

Reach:  Fox News is available to 102 million households in the United States and further to viewers internationally. Fox News Channel Online has more than 22.9 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Arizona Horizon (PBS)
Proton Beam Therapy interview with Dr. Sameer Keole

Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Arizona PBSMayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix will soon open its proton beam center to treat cancer. In properly selected patients proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program is unique, using pencil beam scanning, which allows closer targeting of a tumor. Dr. Sameer Keole (key-olee), the medical director of the Mayo Clinic Proton Beam Center in Arizona, will tell us more.

Reach: Eight, Arizona PBS is a PBS station that has focused on educating children, reporting in-depth on public affairs, fostering lifelong learning and celebrating arts and culture. Its signal reaches 86 percent of the homes in Arizona. With more than 1 million viewers weekly, Eight consistently ranks among the most-viewed public television stations per capita in the country. Eight is a member-supported service of Arizona State University.

Additional coverage: KWGN-TVKFAB-Radio

Context:  Mayo Clinic introduced its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota in 2015 and in Arizona in by mid March 2016. Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients — especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures — proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

New York Times
New Culprit in Lyme Disease
by Karen Weintraub

Mosquitoes may be receiving all the attention amid the Zika virus epidemic, but they are hardly the only disease vectors to worry about. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., have discovered a new species of tick-borne bacteria thatThe New York Times newspaper logo causes Lyme disease… Dr. Bobbi Pritt, the medical director of the microbiology laboratory at the Mayo Clinic, where the new strain was first detected, recommended that patients with exposure to ticks in Minnesota and Wisconsin receive antibody and polymerase chain reaction testing to detect B. mayonii if they are concerned about Lyme infection but do not have the telltale bull’s-eye rash.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Additional coverage: Scientific American, Outbreak News Today, Paul Pioneer Press, Yahoo! News, Business Insider UK

Previous coverage in February 12, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Mayo Clinic researchers, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and health officials from Minnesota, North Dakota and Wisconsin, have discovered a new bacterial species that causes Lyme disease in people. The new species has been provisionally named Borrelia mayonii. Prior to this finding, the only species believed to cause Lyme disease in North America was Borrelia burgdorferi. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Gina Chiri-Osmond

 

Florida Times-Union
26.2 With Donna marathon winner runs the race of his life for his wife
By Clayton Freeman

Marc Burget dashed down the finishing straight at Sunday’s 26.2 With Donna marathon, broke the tape at the line and immediately looked to his right...The 42-year-old Burget dedicated Florida Times-Union newspaper logohis win to wife Christina, who was diagnosed with breast cancer on Jan. 7. “Cancer’s not going to stop us doing what we love to do,” he said. “We’re going to keep on pushing through it.” Christina began chemotherapy about two weeks ago at the Mayo Clinic, practically a stone’s throw from the race’s finish line.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:
Jacksonville Daily Record — $365,000 from runners in annual 26.2 With Donna
Augustine Record — Marc Burget dedicates 26.2 with Donna win to wife after she was diagnosed with breast cancer Jan. 7
WJXT.com 26.2 with Donna grows stronger
First Coast News 26.2 runners with Donna runners strive to end breast cancer

Context: For nine years, runners have gathered every February to participate in the 26.2 with Donna. It's a marathon to raise money and awareness for breast cancer research and care. Founder Donna Deegan is a three-time breast cancer survivor who was treated at Mayo Clinic. She wants to give back to the people and institution that cared for her. With funds raised from the marathon, Donna helped create and support a program at Mayo Clinic where experts can study breast cancer genes. The goal is to develop new and better ways to diagnose and treat breast and other cancers, tailored to each woman's needs. More information, including a video interview with Donna Deegan, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

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Tags: ABC 15 Arizona, ABC News, ABC15's Rally for Red, Advances in Radiation Oncology Journal, Alzforum, Arizona Horizon (PBS), Arizona Republic, Augustine Record, basal carcinoma, Becker’s Hospital Review, bioresorbable vascular scaffolds (BVS), Bloomberg News


November 13th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editors: Carmen Zwicker, Emily Blahnik

 

HealthDay
Just One Energy Drink Sends Young Adults' Stress Hormone Levels Soaring
by Dennis Thompson

Just one energy drink can cause potentially harmful spikes in both stress hormone levels and blood pressure in young, healthy adults, a new study shows. After drinking a 16-ounce can of "Rockstar Punched," young adults had a 74 percent increase in blood levels of the "fight-or-flight"Health Day Logo hormone norepinephrine, said lead researcher stress hormone levels , a cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:

Esquire — Are Energy Drinks Slowly Killing All the Bros?

FOX9 — Mayo Clinic: Single 16-ounce energy drink can increase blood pressure 'significantly'

Additional coverage: LA Times, Univision Salud, The Daily Beast, ATTN:, Yahoo!, Steelers LoungeInverse.com, Medscape, Business Standard, Mirror UK, Daily Mail UKSeating Chair, Youth Independent  (Canada), Consumer Reports, Next Shark, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, QuartzCTV News, Tiempo Argentino

Context: New research shows that drinking one 16-ounce energy drink can increase blood pressure and stress hormone responses significantly. This raises the concern that these response changes could increase the risk of cardiovascular events, according to a study presented this week at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015. The findings also are published in the Journal of the American Medical Association“In previous research, we found that energy drink consumption increased blood pressure in healthy young adults,” says Anna Svatikova, M.D., Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic cardiology fellow and the first author. “We now show that the increases in blood pressure are accompanied by increases in norepinephrine, a stress hormone chemical, and this could predispose an increased risk of cardiac events – even in healthy people.” More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Other news from the American Heart Association's Scientific Session 2015

Wall Street Journal — Inappropriate Stent Procedures Decline, Study Shows by Ron Winslow — Researchers said Monday that unnecessary use of devices called stents to clear blockages in diseased coronary arteries fell by about 50% between 2010 and 2014. The drop came after new practice guidelines were issued in 2009 as a quality improvement strategy designed to discourage stent use in patients with stable disease and minimal symptoms of chest pain…“The absolute decline in the nonacute PCI numbers is striking,” said Dr. Raymond Gibbons, a cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic, who wasn’t involved with the study. He described the data as supporting “true quality improvement.” Additional coverage: MedPage Today

AP — Study: Even the normal-weight should watch that apple shape by Lauren Neergaard — New research suggests normal-weight people who carry their fat at their waistlines may be at higher risk of death over the years than overweight or obese people whose fat is more concentrated on the hips and thighs…"We see this with patients every day: 'My weight is fine, I can eat whatever I want,'" said study senior author Dr. Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, preventive cardiology chief at the Mayo Clinic. "These results really challenge that."

Additional coverage: USA TodayCBS News,CNN, TODAY Show, LA Times, HealthDay KARE11, Telegraph UK, KCCI Des Moines, Medscape, com, Healthline News, The GuardianABC News, Star Tribune, NY Times, NBC News, Huffington PostNews4Jax, Yahoo! UK, Scotsman, Yorkshire Evening Post, CNN EspanolDaily Star UK, The Atlantic, Economic Times, CBC Canada, Michigan Live, Kansas City Star, Independent UK, Nature World ReportABC15 Arizona (Newsy) 

Medscape — Activity Levels Drop on Nitrate Therapy in Preserved-EF Heart Failure: NEAT-HFpEF by Steve Stiles — Activity levels in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) fell while they were on isosorbide mononitrate for a month compared with a similar period on placebo, in a small randomized, crossover trial in which participants wore accelerometers for activity measurementNitrates are often used for symptom relief in patients with reduced-EF heart failure, and in the literature they are used in a substantial minority of patients with HFpEF, even though they are far less well studied in that syndrome, explain Dr. Margaret Redfield (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN) and associates in the New England Journal of Medicinereport on the study.

Reuters — Advising people about heart risk genes helped cut cholesterol: study by Julie Steenhuysen — In the study presented on Monday at the American Heart Association meeting in Orlando, Florida, researchers at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, tested the theory that incorporating genetic risk information into an assessment of a person's heart disease risk could lead to lower levels of LDL, the portion of cholesterol that leads to heart attacks and strokes…"What we found is six months after the risk disclosure, the LDL cholesterol in those who got the genetic risk information was about 10 points lower, which was statistically significant," said Dr. Iftikhar Kullo, a Mayo Clinic cardiologist who led the study, said in a telephone interview. Additional coverage: Yahoo!, FOX News, Daily Mail UK, Philadelphia Inquirer, MyInforms, News List, MedPage Today,

AP — Big study suggests steep drop in needless heart procedures by Lindsey Tanner — Fewer heart patients are getting inappropriate angioplasties, a new study suggests. The analysis showed overuse of the common procedure to open clogged heart arteries has declined dramatically since 2009 guidelines, which were aimed at curbing inappropriate use…While some signs suggest up-coding could be happening, others "suggest true quality improvement," said Dr. Raymond Gibbons, a former American Heart Association president from the Mayo Clinic. Additional coverage: Pioneer Press, NY Times

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Huffington Post
The Pressure To Perform Is Destroying Our Well-Being
by Lindsay Holmes

…Amit Sood, a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic, says that while stressful circumstances are unavoidable, it's important to regularly take HuffPost Healthy Livingstock of our physical and emotional health before it results in an incident like a collapse. Below, Sood offers some tips for anyone facing a high-pressure situation -- whether it's a job presentation, an athlete in a game or just making a decision.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique viewers.

Context: Amit Sood, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in General Internal Medicine and the Cancer Center. The Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness combines wisdom from neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, and spirituality to help people choose contentment.

Contact: Rhoda Fukishima Madson

 

CNN
Alzheimer's is a young(er) person's disease -- so get to work
by Sanjay Gupta

Giving drugs to mildly or asymptomatic people is new," agreed clinical neurologist David Knopman at the Mayo Clinic. Researchers are exploring some fringe areas asCNN Logo well. Most intriguing to me was the reason why some people form the plaques in the first place. After all, it's just too easy to chalk it up to bad luck. As it turns out, the plaques may not be all bad. Just recently, we have learned that some people with Alzheimer's have higher levels of yeast, bacteria and viruses in their brains as compared to people of similar age without the disease.

Reach: CNN.com has 74.2 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Context: David Knopman, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist. Dr. Knopman's research focuses on late-life cognitive disorders, such as mild cognitive impairment and dementia. Dr. Knopman's specific interests are in the very early stages of Alzheimer's disease, in cognitive impairment due to stroke (cerebrovascular disease) and in cognitive impairment due to frontotemporal degeneration. He is involved in epidemiology, clinical trials and diagnostic studies of these disorders.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

NPR
Will Drinking Green Tea Boost Your Metabolism? Not So Fast
by Eliza Barclay

… Other studies have established that green tea contains caffeine and catechins that NPR - The Salt Logostimulate the nervous system, which can increase thermogenesis (burning stored energy) and fat oxidation. "The caffeine in green tea could raise your metabolic rate ever so slightly, but it wouldn't have a different effect than coffee," Michael Jensen, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic, tells The Salt.

Reach:  The Salt is a blog from National Public Radio's Science Desk about what we eat and why we eat it.

Context: Michael Jensen, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Jensen and his lab study the effects of obesity and how body fat (adipose tissue) and body fat distribution influence health. The regulated uptake, storage and release of fatty acids from adipose tissue play a major role in determining its health effects.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Star Tribune
New Mayo Clinic service has health care for pilots on radar
by Chris Snowbeck

Mayo Clinic has treated plenty of pilots over the years, including many who came to Rochester by corporate jet so their CEOs could get executive physicals…With a newStar Tribune newspaper logo service called ProPilot, Mayo Clinic promises to provide not just the physicals required of pilots by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), but also preventive care that can minimize the amount of time pilots are grounded for health reasons. One of the goals is to “break the old culture of … what the FAA doesn’t know won’t hurt them,” said Dr. Clayton Cowl, chairman of Mayo Clinic’s division for preventive, occupational and aerospace medicine. “These guys end up getting substandard medical care.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

Post-Bulletin, Heard on the Street: Mayo launches health program for pilots

Aviation Pros, (from Star Tribune) New Mayo Clinic Service Has Health Care For Pilots On Radar

Context: Mayo Clinic announced this week ProPilot, a new program for corporate flight departments that offers bundled services designed to keep and get pilots back on the flight deck quickly and safely. Mayo Clinic’s Section of Aerospace Medicine is launching the Mayo Clinic ProPilot Program on its Rochester, Minnesota, campus. more information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Ginger Plumbo
Arizona Republic
Phoenix researcher secures $12 million to study pancreatic cancer
by Ken Alltucker

A pancreatic cancer researcher in metro Phoenix will spearhead a research team that secured a $12 million grant to study new drug therapies for pancreatic cancer…Dr. Arizona Republic newspaper logoDaniel Von Hoff, physician in chief of Phoenix-based Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), will head the research team, which will include scientists from the Salk Institute for Biological Studies of La Jolla, Calif., and the University of Cambridge. Mayo Clinic will also be part of the research team.

Reach: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday and has an average daily circulation of more than 261,000 readers. The newspaper’s website Arizona Republic - Online, averages more than 5.4 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:

Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology NewsTracking Cancer Progression in Real Time Using Circulating DNA 

Context: A team of researchers, including scientists from the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), has reported that analyzing circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) can track how a patient's cancer evolves and responds to treatment. In a study published recently in Nature Communications, Dr. Muhammed Murtaza  of TGen and Mayo Clinic, and colleagues, describe an extensive comparison between biopsy results and analysis of ctDNA in a patient with breast cancer. The researchers followed the patient over three years of treatment. "When patients receive therapy for advanced cancers, not all parts of the tumor respond equally, but it has been difficult to study this phenomenon because it is not practical to perform multiple, repeated tissue biopsies," said Dr. Murtaza, Co-Director of TGen's Center for Noninvasive Diagnostics, and one of the study's lead authors. "Our findings empirically show that ctDNA analysis from blood samples allows us to detect cancer mutations from multiple different tumor sites within a patient and track how each of them responds."

Contact: Jim McVeigh

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October 1st, 2015

In the News Mayo Clinic Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

 

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

 

 

 

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor: Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Wall Street Journal
How One Family Faced Difficult Decisions About DNA Sequencing
by Amy Dockser Marcus

… Giusti realized that whole-genome or whole-exome sequencing—sequencing someone’s complete DNA or an impoWSJ Bannerrtant section of it—might yield information about the family’s cancer risk, particularly for her daughter, Nicole, 21, and her 18-year-old son, David. So, Ms. Giusti proposed an idea to A. Keith Stewart, the director of Mayo Clinic’s Center for Individualized Medicine: sequence my immediate family, and let’s study all the information. Dr. Stewart, curious about why identical twins got two different types of cancer, agreed.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Individualized medicine, also known as personalized medicine or precision medicine, means tailoring diagnosis and treatment to each patient to optimize care. Patients have experienced this kind of care for a century and a half at Mayo Clinic, where teams of specialists have always worked together to find answers. The Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine is solving the clinical challenges of today and tomorrow by bringing the latest discoveries from the research laboratory to your doctor's fingertips in the form of new genomics-based tests and treatments. A. Keith Stewart, M.D. is the center's director.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Wall Street Journal
The Price We Pay for Sitting Too Much
by Sumathi Reddy

New research is helping medical experts devise formulas for how long a typical office worker should spend sitting and standing… Michael WSJ BannerJensen, a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who specializes in obesity and diabetes, uses various ways to reduce daily sitting time that he also recommends to his patients. When he has meetings with just one or two people, he finds a place where they can walk together instead of sitting. And he tells his patients who are parents to use their children’s athletic events as a time to be on their feet. “There’s no reason you have to sit and watch those games,” Dr. Jensen said.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Additional coverage:

Good Morning America — Debunking Fitness Myths: Standing Desks; The Australian

Context: Michael Jensen, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Jensen and his lab studies the effects of obesity and how body fat (adipose tissue) and body fat distribution influence health. The regulated uptake, storage and release of fatty acids from adipose tissue play a major role in determining its health effects.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Star Tribune
Mayo receives $9M federal innovation grant
by Jeremy Olson

Mayo Clinic will receive up to $9 million in federal funding to help affiliated doctors and clinics outside Rochester adopt some of the team-basedStar Tribune newspaper logo medical techniques and integrated care that have been hallmarks of its success… “Health care is too expensive,” said Dr. Kari Bunkers, medical director for Mayo’s Office of Population Health Management. “This is our effort at reducing the high cost of health care and implementing a model that delivers more for less.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

Wall Street Journal — Grants Aim to Boost Patient Care 

Context: The Mayo Practice Transformation Network is one of 39 health care collaborative networks selected to participate in the Transforming Clinical Practice Initiative, announced today by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia M. Burwell. Mayo Clinic will receive up to $9.7 million to provide technical assistance support to help equip clinicians in the Mayo Practice Transformation Network with tools, information and network support needed to improve quality of care, increase patients’ access to information and spend health care dollars more wisely. This initiative is a collaboration between the Mayo Clinic Office of Population Health Management (OPHM) and the Mayo Clinic Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery (CSHCD). It is led by principal investigator Nilay Shah, Ph.D., health services researcher in the CSHCD, and co-principal investigator Kari Bunkers, M.D., primary care physician in the Mayo Clinic Health System and medical director of the OPHM. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Elizabeth Zimmerman Young

 

Reuters
Kids with asthma fare worse when they live with smokers
by Lisa Rapaport

Kids with asthma are more likely to have breathing problems and be hospitalized when they live with a smoker, a research review suggests…For Reuters Logoasthmatic kids, breathing in cigarette smoke was also linked to a more than tripled risk of poor lung function and 32 percent higher odds of wheezing symptoms. While the risk of smoke exposure exacerbating asthma symptoms is well known, fresh evidence on the extent of the danger posed to children may help convince some parents to abandon their cigarettes, said senior study author Dr. Avni Joshi, an allergist and immunologist at Mayo Clinic Children’s Center in Rochester, Minnesota.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world newsbusiness newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile and interactive television platforms.

Additional coverage: Yahoo! Canada, International Business Times, HealthDay, Nursing Times, CBS News, Medical Express, KYTX TexasUniversity Herald, US News & World Report, com, Medscape, Philadelphia InquirerKIMT 

Context: The risk for hospitalization doubles for kids with asthma who are exposed to secondhand smoke, according to a study led by Mayo Clinic Children’s Research Center. “The results of this review serve as a reminder to parents of just how dangerous it is to expose their children to secondhand smoke,” says Avni Joshi, M.D., senior author and pediatric allergist and immunologist at Mayo Clinic Children’s Center. “We knew that kids should not be exposed to tobacco, but how bad their asthma is likely to be with tobacco exposure was not clear. This study helped us quantify that risk, and so it informs as well as empowers us with the risk assessment. A child is twice as likely to end up in the hospital with an asthma flare if family members continue to smoke.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

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May 20th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

Florida Times-Union
Jacksonville's Mayo has breakthrough in treating ALS, dementia
by Charlie Patton

In what they call a major breakthrough, researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville replicated a genetic mutation Florida Times-Union newspaper logoassociated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease) and frontotemporal dementia in a mouse. Their findings, which were published online Thursday on http://www.sciencemag.org/ and will be in the next issue of the journal Science, will provide a model researchers can use to test drug therapies, said Leonard Petrucelli, chairman of the Department of Neuroscience at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville and the lead author of the study.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:
Science Times, Mayo Clinic Breakthrough With ALS Treatment In Mice 

NIH, Scientists create mice with a major genetic cause of ALS and FTD

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic in Florida have developed a mouse model that exhibits the neuropathological and behavioral features associated with the most common genetic form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), which are caused by a mutation in theC9ORF72 gene. They say their findings, reported today in Science, will speed further research into the molecular mechanism behind these disorders and that the animal model will offer a way to test potential therapeutic agents to halt the death of neurons in the brain and spinal cord. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
How clinical trials help Mayo — and its patients — be on the forefront of medicine
by Colleen Jones

Mayo Clinic has a multipronged mission: patient care, research and education. Its clinical trials program touches on all three. Mayo is one of a Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logoselect group of research-focused institutions across the country qualified to offer government-sponsored or privately funded clinical trials at each of its three campuses, including Jacksonville.

Reach:  The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Context: At Mayo Clinic, the needs of the patient come first. Part of this commitment involves conducting medical research with the goal of helping patients live longer, healthier lives. Through clinical studies, which involve people who volunteer to participate in them, researchers can better understand how to diagnose, treat and prevent diseases or conditions.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Phoenix Business Journal
Mayo Medical School gets state approval for $150M Arizona branch campus
by Angela Gonzales

Mayo Medical School has received licensure by the Arizona State Board for Private Postsecondary Education for its $150 million Arizona branch campus…Dr. Michele Halyard, a radiation oncologist at Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix, said the Mayo Medical School will take 50Phoenix Business Journal students each year, which is the same number as on its Rochester, Minnesota campus. Mayo's Jacksonville campus only allows for students in their third and fourth years of medical school.

Reach: The Phoenix Business Journal is published by American City Business Journals which owns more than 40 other local business newspapers.

Additional coverage:

Post-Bulletin, Heard on the Street: Mayo Medical School in Arizona advances 

Context: Mayo Medical School announced that its planned expansion in Scottsdale, has received licensure by theArizona State Board for Private Postsecondary Education, the group responsible for regulating private postsecondary degree-granting institutions within the state of Arizona. “This is a major milestone in our journey to open a full four-year branch campus of Mayo Medical School in Scottsdale,” says Wyatt Decker, M.D., CEO of Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Earlier this month, Mayo Medical School leaders announced they had also received endorsement for the expansion from the Liaison Committee for Medical Education (LCME), the accrediting body for medical education. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Everyday Health
6 Ways Quitting Smoking Is Good for Your Heart by Sara Altshul

Finding the Help You Need to Quit for Good “The evidence is clear: the most effective way to quit smoking is to Everyday Healthcombine behavioral support with medication,” says J. Taylor Hays, MD, professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and director of the Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center. People who use this multi-treatment approach are three times more likely to become successful quitters than smokers who try going cold turkey, he says.

Reach: Everyday Health Media, LLC is a provider of online consumer health content across a broad portfolio of over 25 websites that span the health spectrum — from lifestyle offerings in pregnancy, diet and fitness to in-depth medical content for condition prevention and management.

Context: J. Taylor Hays, M.D. is director of the  Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center.  The NDC was one of the first centers in the country to focus exclusively on treatments for tobacco dependence. The NDC's model of care has now become the standard in many medical centers around the United States. The treatment team at the center offers you support and works with you to help develop the motivation and skills needed to stop using tobacco.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

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Tags: ABC15 Phoenix, adult vaccinations, American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE), American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), AP, ArcaMax, Arizona Republic, Artificial pancreas, autism, autoimmune diseases, bacterial infections


April 2nd, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

 

WCCO
Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s Disease Study Gives Researchers New Hope
by Angela Davis

It’s a disease with no cure and limited treatment, but this week the Mayo Clinic announced the findings of a major study that is giving Alzheimer’s researchers new hope. The study is published in the latest edition of the journal “Brain.” It describes what MayoCBS Minnesota researchers have learned about proteins in the brain that fuel the progression of Alzheimer’s Disease. WCCO’s Angela Davis talked with a neurologist about the significance of this breakthrough. For decades, doctors have known two proteins, amyloid and tau, that contribute to memory loss, but their relationship has been focus of debate. Dr. David Knopman is a part of a team of neurologists at Mayo Clinic’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center.

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

Previous Coverage in March 26, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: By examining more than 3,600 postmortem brains, researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campuses in Jacksonville, Florida, and Rochester, Minnesota, have found that the progression of dysfunctional tau protein drives the cognitive decline and memory loss seen in Alzheimer’s disease. Amyloid, the other toxic protein that characterizes Alzheimer’s, builds up as dementia progresses, but is not the primary culprit, they say. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Star Tribune
Health beat: Cancer drug costs are an ill lacking a cure
by Jeremy Olson

Dr. Vincent Rajkumar has little incentive to care about the skyrocketing cost of cancer drugs. Prescribing them like a drunken sailor won’t change his Mayo Clinic salary. Warning patients about sticker prices Star Tribune Health Varietywon’t change their demand for drugs that offer hope of survival. But after seeing cancer drug costs escalate 10- to 20-fold in the last 15 years, the hematologist decided enough is enough. Calling it a “moral obligation,” Dr. Rajkumar and a Houston colleague wrote an article in Mayo Clinic Proceedings challenging the rising costs and calling out drug companies for practices that extend patents and inflate profits.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Increasingly high prices for cancer drugs are affecting patient care in the U.S. and the American health care system overall, say the authors of a special article published online in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. “Americans with cancer pay 50 percent to 100 percent more for the same patented drug than patients in other countries,” says S. Vincent Rajkumar, M.D., of Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, who is one of the authors. “As oncologists we have a moral obligation to advocate for affordable cancer drugs for our patients.” More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Reuters
Building Pathways: How a Native Oncologist Makes a Difference With Cancer Care, Prevention

Judith Kaur first began to think of herself as a healer at five years old. She says her grandmother, Ada, introduced her to nature and medicine by listening to animals outside and picking plants in the yard…Today, Dr. Judith Salmon Kaur (Choctaw/Cherokee) is oneReuters of only two American Indian medical oncologists in the country. Now an oncology professor at the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center in Rochester, Minnesota, she also directs the clinic's Native American outreach programs.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world newsbusiness newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile and interactive television platforms.

Context: Judith Kaur, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic oncologist who is affiliated with Mayo Clinic's Breast Diagnostic Clinic. Dr. Kaur is the medical director for the Native American Programs of the Mayo Comprehensive Cancer Center. All three Mayo sites are involved in outreach to American Indians and Alaska Natives through these programs. More information on Dr. Kaur's research can be found here.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon TheimerJoe Dangor

 

FOX News Latino
Opinion: Angelina Jolie’s transparency sheds light on standard but unknown procedure for high-risk women
by Jamie Bakkum-Gamez gynecologic oncologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

On Tuesday, Angelina Jolie Pitt publicly announced that she had her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed to decrease her risk of developing ovarian cancer, a highly Fox News Latinolethal cancer that at present has no screening test to detect it at an early, curable stage. Jolie Pitt has shared that she inherited a mutation in the BRCA1 gene. Women with a BRCA1 gene mutation have a remarkably high lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer of 40-50 percent as well as a nearly 80 percent lifetime risk of breast cancer.

Reach: Fox News Latino is a news website for Latinos in the United States. The website receives more than 207,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional Coverage:

Nature, Gene counsellors expect resurgence of 'Jolie effect' 

KTTC, Plainview woman living with BRCA1 gene takes preventative action 

Context: Jamie Bakkum-Gamez, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic oncologist and gynecologic surgeon. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Bakkum-Gamez, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Joe Dangor

 

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March 12th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

Star Tribune
Mayo's record financial results run counter to health care trends
by Christopher Snowbeck

To financial analysts, the outlook for hospitals has been tilting negative. Demand for inpatient care is soft. Insurers and the government want to pay less for each service. New payment arrangements ask hospitals to take a degree of financial risk that patientStar Tribune Business section logo costs exceed expectations. Against that backdrop, the record-setting financial results the Mayo Clinic released last week stand out…But the average length of stay for a Mayo Clinic hospital patient increased from 4.6 days in 2013 to 4.8 days last year. The change was significant because it signified that patients were sicker last year, and needed more revenue-producing services, said Jeff Bolton, the clinic’s chief administrative officer.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Previous Coverage in March 5, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Mayo Clinic reports a strong 2014 performance, including providing direct care for more than 1.3 million people, contributions of $410 million to its pension plan as a commitment to employees, and plans for a $1.5 billion investment to fund information technology infrastructure. “Whether viewed through the lens of quality, patient outcomes, research advances, operational performance or sharing our knowledge with the world — by all measures, we had an extraordinary year,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic. “That success allowed us to reinvest in our people, our infrastructure and our mission so we can better serve our patients.” More information about Mayo's 2014 performance can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

 

The Independent UK
Senolytics: Scientists identify new drug that slows the aging process and could dramatically increase our life expectancy
by Christopher Hooton

A new class of drugs has been identified that slow the aging process in mice, alleviating symptoms of frailty and extending a healthy lifespan. If their effect on humans is as marked as it is on animal models, their benefit could be enormous. The research was carried The Independentout by a team from Mayo Clinic, The Scripps Institute and other institutions and published in the journal Aging Cell yesterday…"The prototypes of these senolytic agents have more than proven their ability to alleviate multiple characteristics associated with aging," added Mayo Clinic Professor James Kirkland, MD, who also worked on the study.

Reach: The Independent is a United Kingdom-based newspaper with a daily circulation of more than 61,000.

Additional coverage: Fierce Biotech Research, Gizmag, Nature World News, HealthCanal, U-T San Diego, NewsMax, Health Canal, NDTV, Business Standard, Times Live, The Telegraph, The Independent, R&D Mag Failed Messiah, BioScience Technology

Context: A new class of drugs identified and validated by Mayo Clinic researchers along with collaborators at Scripps Research Institute and others, clearly reduces health problems in mice by limiting the effect of senescent cells — cells that contribute to frailty and diseases associated with age. The researchers say this is a first step toward developing similar treatments for aging patients. Their findings appear today in the journal Aging Cell. “If translatable to humans — which makes sense as we were using human cells in many of the tests – this type of therapy could keep the effects of aging at bay and significantly extend the healthspan of patients,” says James Kirkland, M.D., Ph.D., head of the Mayo Clinic Kogod Center on Aging and senior author of the study. More information about the study, including a video interview with Dr. Kirkland, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Financial Times London (subscription required)
The teleconference that saves lives
by Aaron Stanley

Larry Lee came close to death when a bloodclot lodged in his brain last year while walking his dog in rural Minnesota. Since his local hospital lacked the expertise to deal with the problem, it turned to the renowned Mayo Clinic. From a computer console at Mayo’sFinancial Times Newspaper Logo campus 65 miles away, a neurologist appeared via teleconference, took control of a robotic camera to examine Mr. Lee and shepherded the local team’s efforts to bust the clot…“We could see 10 years ago that healthcare was going to go through a period of great change,” says John Noseworthy, chief executive of Mayo. “So we said: ‘Let’s digitize our knowledge, digitize our work, knit together like-minded institutions and connect with them electronically’.”

The Reach: The Financial Times has a combined paid print and digital circulation of 690,000.

Context: Mayo’s Stroke Telemedicine Program allows stroke specialists to remotely evaluate people who’ve had acute strokes and make diagnoses and treatment recommendations working with emergency medicine doctors at other sites. Having a prompt neurological evaluation increases the possibility that a patient will receive clot-dissolving therapies or other interventions in time to reduce disability and death from stroke. The program began in Arizona, and now is represented nationally, with hubs in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota that serve more than 20 health care institutions in seven states. To read more about Larry Lee's story and the role his dog had in saving his life, go to Mayo Clinic's In the Loop.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Twin Cities Business
Fortune: Mayo Clinic Among Top 25 Cos. With Most Openings

Job seekers looking to find employment with a top-notch company need not look very far: the Rochester-based Mayo Clinic is Twin Cities Business Magazine Logoamong the nation’s best places to work—and they’re hiring—according to Fortune. The state’s largest private employer, based out of Rochester, was named among the 25 best companies hiring (it ranked 73rd overall on Fortune’s “2015 Best Companies” list) and has nearly 2,000 openings available across southeast and southern Minnesota.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Context: Fortune magazine named Mayo Clinic to its list of the “100 Best Companies  to Work For” in 2015. This is Mayo’s 12th consecutive year on the magazine’s annual compilation of companies that rate high with employees. The list ranks Mayo Clinic 73 overall among the top 100 companies. “We congratulate our employees for earning Mayo Clinic this distinction,” says John H. Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO of Mayo Clinic. “We hope they take great pride in this ‘100 Best’ national recognition.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein


Star Tribune
Risks, benefits weighed in JAMA study on valve replacement
By Joe Carlson

In the first analysis of mass commercial use of a new minimally invasive therapy for a narrowed heart valve, researchers reported Tuesday that nearly 24 percent of patients died within a year of treatment...
“Transcatheter aortic valve replacement has becomeStar Tribune Health newspaper logo transformational for patients who need a new valve and are at high risk for surgery or inoperable. But we have been lacking long-term data for this group of patients who are considering this procedure,” said a statement from Dr. David Holmes Jr., the interventional cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic who was lead author of the study in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional Coverage: Forbes

Context: Study results of one-year data for more than 12,000 patients who had transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in the United States show an overall one-year death rate of 23.7 percent and a stroke rate of 4.1 percent, according to a study published in the March 10 issue of JAMA. “Transcatheter aortic valve replacement has become transformational for patients who need a new valve and are at high-risk for surgery or inoperable. But we have been lacking long-term data for this group of patients who are considering this procedure,” says study lead authorDavid R. Holmes, Jr., M.D., a Mayo Clinic interventional cardiologist. “Before this study, we only had 30-day information. This is a milestone and will help us better guide patients and learn as physicians.” More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

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Tags: “healthy for humans” features, 4Hoteliers, a scheduling tool for doctors, Aging Cell, aging patients, Albert Lea Tribune, alternative to traditional fertility preservation techniques, Anti-aging drugs, AP, Arizona Family, autoimmune arthritis, Autopsies Can Teach


July 17th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

KAAL
Mayo Clinic Takes Top Spot on Best Hospitals List
by Jenna Lohse

Mayo Clinic in Rochester earns the top spot on a prestigious list of the nation's top hospitals. U.S. News and World Report ranked Mayo Clinic number one on its yearly list of the nation's best hospitals…"Oh, awesome. They know everything and if they don't know it they know where to get it,” said Peg Lesmann, who traveled to Mayo from North Dakota. "It's very well organized and run,KAAL-TV-6 logo everyone has been very friendly,” said Wayne Davis. "I’ve never seen anything go like clockwork, it's perfect," said Mary Bailey, patient at Mayo Clinic…"The fact that we're recognized for providing outstanding care in the community of outstanding health care organizations around the country, we're just very proud of that and I have to say, I think there's a little bit of a spring in our step today,” said Dr. John Noseworthy, Mayo Clinic CEO.

Reach:  KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Additional coverage:

Star TribuneMayo Clinic is ranked as top U.S. hospital by U.S. News

Baltimore Sun, Hopkins Hospital bumped from top spot to No. 3 on U.S. News ranking

ABC 15 ArizonaU.S. News and World Report ranks Mayo Clinic No. 1 in Phoenix and Arizona. Additional coverage: Tucson News

La Crosse Tribune, Gundersen, Mayo-Franciscan in top 15 Wisconsin hospitals on U.S. News list

WEAU Eau Claire, Mayo Clinic Health System recognized in annual best hospitals list

Eau Claire Leader-Telegram, Health Matters, High ranking: Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire is ranked No. 6 in Wisconsin and is recognized as the No. 1 hospital in northwestern Wisconsin in the 25th U.S. News & World Report annual America's Best Hospitals list released Tuesday. 

Endocrine Today, U.S. News & World Report announces top hospitals for endocrinology and diabetes care

US News & World Report, CNN, Huffington PostChicago Tribune, ABC News, Huffington Post, KTTC, Post-Bulletin, KSTP, New4Jax, KTTC, CBS News, MPR, KARE11, One American News, WebMD, Healio, NBC4 Calif., Twin Cities Business

Context: Mayo Clinic has achieved the highest honor in U.S. News and World Report’s ranking of top hospitalsMayo Clinic earned more number one rankings than any other provider, ranking number one or number two in 11 of the 12 specialties based on reputation, services and volumes, safety and clinical outcomes. “We have a deep commitment to delivering high-value health care that best meets patients' needs. We owe our success to truly dedicated staff that provide a seamless patient experience and the care that each individual needs,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Noseworthy, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Rebecca Eisenman

MPR
6 ways to improve childhood mental illness treatment

MPR News logoGuests: Jarrod Leffler: Child and adolescent psychologist in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychology at Mayo Clinic.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Jarrod Leffler, Ph.D., is a child and adolescent psychologist with Mayo Clinic Children's Center.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

Bloomberg Alzheimer Researchers See Protein as Target for Drugs by Michelle Cortez A protein discovered less than a decade ago appears to play a role in whether symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease emerge, suggesting another avenue for exploration in efforts to find a treatment…“This injects new vigor in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease,” said Keith Josephs, the lead author and a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, Bloombergin a telephone interview. “The world has focused on two proteins, beta amyloid and tau. TDP-43 is going to be the new kid on the block.”

Reach: Bloomberg has 2,300 media professionals in 146 bureaus across 72 countries. Bloomberg delivers its content across more than 400 publications, over 310 million households worldwide through Bloomberg Television and 500,000 in the New York metro area and 18.5 million subscribers through satellite radio.

Additional Coverage: AP, New brain protein tied to Alzheimer's disease Bloomberg, Alzheimer’s Drug Fails to Help Moderately Ill in Trials 

Tampa Bay Tribune, My FOX Philly, Gainesville Sun, WebMD, HealthDay, Star Tribune, ABC News, My FOX Phoenix

Context:  Since the time of Dr. Alois Alzheimer himself, two proteins (beta-amyloid (Aβ) and tau) have become tantamount to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). But a Mayo Clinic study challenges the perception that these are the only important proteins accounting for the clinical features of the devastating disease. In a large clinico-imaging pathological study, Mayo Clinic researchers demonstrated that a third protein (TDP-43) plays a major role in AD pathology. In fact, people whose brain was TDP positive were 10 times more likely to be cognitively impaired at death compared to those who didn’t have the protein, showing that TDP-43 has the potential to overpower what has been termed resilient brain aging. The study was published in the journal Acta Neuropathologica. “We wanted to determine whether the TDP-43 protein has any independent effect on the clinical and neuroimaging features typically ascribed to AD and we found that TDP-43 had a strong effect on cognition, memory loss and medial temporal atrophy in AD,” says Mayo Clinic neurologist Keith Josephs, M.D., the study’s lead investigator and author. “In the early stages of the disease when AD pathology was less severe, the presence of TDP-43 was strongly associated with cognitive impairment. Consequently, TDP-43 appears to play an important role in the cognitive and neuroimaging characteristics that have been linked to AD.” More information on the study, including a video interview with Dr. Josephs, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

Reuters
Mustaches may raise burn risk with home oxygen therapy
by Krystnell Storr

ReutersA new case report from U.S doctors suggests that men who use home oxygen therapy should consider a clean-shaven look to reduce their risk of serious facial burns. “If you’ve ever tried to start a campfire, you always start with some dry little twigs and once that starts - and that’s kind of the mustache - then that oxygen tubing lights on fire, it’s like a blow torch shooting up their nose,” said Dr. Andrew Greenlund of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. “So, if we can prevent it, it would be good.”

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world news, business news, technology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile, and interactive television platforms.

Additional coverage: Chicago Tribune, News Channel Daily

Context: Facial hair and home oxygen therapy can prove a dangerously combustible combination, a Mayo Clinic report published in the peer-reviewed medical journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings finds. To reach that conclusion, researchers reviewed home oxygen therapy-related burn cases and experimented with a mustachioed mannequin, a facial hair-free mannequin, nasal oxygen tubes and sparks. They found that facial hair raises the risk of home oxygen therapy-related burns, and encourage health care providers to counsel patients about the risk. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: ABC 15 Arizona, ABC News, ABC15 Phoenix, Albert Lea Tribune, Alzheimer's Association Medical and Scientific Advisory Council, alzheimer's disease, AP, AP Associated Press, Apache Mall, Argus Leader, Arizona Newszap, Arizona Pop Warner Football


May 29th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations


NY Times
Ask Well: For Fitness, 2,000 Calories a Week?
By Gretchen Reynolds

I have read and heard that a person should aim to expend 2,000 calories weekly in exercise for optimum health. Is there any basis at all for this notion?...Adhering to these guidelines means that most of us would burn about 1,000 calories per week in planned The New York Times newspaper logoexercise, said Michael J. Joyner, an exercise researcher at the Mayo Clinic. And with the stairs we climb and chores we do, we come closer to that 2,000 calorie a week number, he said.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anthesiologist. Dr. Joyner and his lab team are interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci KleinBryan Anderson

 

ABC News
Wrong Women Getting Double Mastectomies, Study Finds
By Suneeta Ganji, MD

…A growing number of women with cancer in one breast are choosing to have both breasts removed. But new research suggests that the women who should be doing this aren’t – ABC News logoand, ironically, those who don’t need to take this approach are opting for it.The study, published Wednesday in JAMA Surgery, reveals what some doctors are pointing to as a problematic trend – as well as possible evidence of a breakdown in communication between women anxious about a breast cancer diagnosis and their doctors...Dr. Judy Boughey, a breast surgeon at Mayo Clinic who was not involved in the study, said breast cancer patients often have various reasons for either opting for or avoiding surgery to remove a healthy breast.

Reach:  ABCNews.com is the official website for ABC News. Its website receives more than 16.9 million unique visitors each month.

Previous Coverage

Context: Unique laboratory testing during breast cancer lumpectomies to make sure surgeons remove all cancerous tissue spares patients the need for a repeat lumpectomy in roughly 96 percent of cases at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, a success rate much higher than the rate nationally, a Mayo study shows. During the years reviewed, 13.2 percent of breast cancer lumpectomy patients nationally had to return to the operating room within a month of their initial surgery, compared to 3.6 percent at Mayo in Rochester, which uses a technique called frozen section analysis to test excised tissue for cancer while patients are still on the operating table. The findings are published in the journal Surgery. More information on this study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

US News & World Report
Air Travel Safe After Chest Surgery, Surgeon Says

If you're returning home after having chest surgery at an out-of-town hospital, flying is as safe as driving, an expert says. It's widely believed that ground travel is safer than air US News & World Report Logotravel after chest surgery, but a study by Mayo Clinic thoracic surgeon Dr. Stephen Cassivi found that isn't true. He also concluded there is no reason to wait for weeks after chest surgery to fly home.

Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional Coverage:
HealthDay, Air Travel Safe After Chest Surgery, Surgeon Says
Health.com, MSN Healthy Living, Philadelphia Inquirer, HHS Healthfinder.gov, Newsday, Yahoo! Health, Winnipeg Free Press Ciencias Medicas News

Context: Summer travel isn’t for vacation alone. For some people, it may include a trip to an out-of-town hospital for surgery. If you are traveling for chest surgery, you may wonder whether it is safer to return home by car or plane. A new Mayo Clinic study found that, contrary to conventional wisdom, air travel is just as safe as ground travel after chest surgery, and there is often no reason to wait for weeks after an operation to fly home. Lead study author Stephen Cassivi, M.D., a Mayo Clinic thoracic surgeon, offers these five tips for safer, more comfortable travel home after surgery on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Star Tribune
Miracle fruit: Is the coconut all it's cracked up to be?
By Allie Shah

…“I always say: If all else fails, try coconut,” said Oprish, who recently wrote about the wonders of coconut for the Twin Cities Moms blog. The 33-year-old is part of a consumer movement that is transforming a tropical fruit once maligned for its high fat content into aStar Tribune Health newspaper logo super food embraced by people who swear by its therapeutic powers. The coconut’s healing abilities are said to be vast — from bad-breath-erasing mouthwash to Alzheimer’s treatment. As with other so-called miracle foods, “things start snowballing, and that’s what happened with coconut,” said Dr. Donald Hensrud of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Donald Hensrud, M.D. is a preventive medicine expert at Mayo Clinic and medical editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet; David Knopman, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist and Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L.D. helps people sort through the facts and figures from the fads and the hype to learn more about nutrition and diet.

Public Affairs Contacts: Joe Dangor, Duska Anastasijevic, Ginger Plumbo

 

KARE11
Mayo Clinic says sideline test detects youth concussions
by Renee Tessman

On the sidelines of youth sports, a new Mayo Clinic study shows a simple test, known as KARE-11 TV, Minneapolis-St. Paulthe King-Devick,can detect concussions. Dr. Amaal Starling of the Mayo Clinic is co-author of the study. She said for youth athletes, "This is really the first accurate, rapid, cost effective, removal-from-play tool that is available for concussion screen."

Reach: KARE is a an NBC affiliate in the Minneapolis-St.Paul market.

Additional Coverage:
KSTP, Forum at Edina High School Addresses Concussions in Sports
Healio Optometry News, King-Devick test effective in detecting concussions for adolescents, study finds

Context:  A rapid, easy-to-administer eye movement test is showing great promise as a sideline concussion test for youth sports, a Mayo Clinic study finds. In the study, Mayo Clinic researchers assessed high school hockey players using the King-Devick test. The test requires an athlete to read single-digit numbers displayed on cards. After suspected head trauma, the athlete is given the test, which takes about two minutes, and the results are compared to a baseline test administered previously. If the time needed to complete the test takes longer than the baseline test time, the athlete should be removed from play until evaluated by a medical professional. Amaal Starling, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist and a co-author of the study. More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Post-Bulletin
Back and Forth: Mayo’s 150 Years Included Dr. Donald Balfour
by Harley Flathers

One of the many people we might describe as a "Rock" at Mayo Clinic shortly after entering the 20th century was Dr. Donald C. Balfour, an early associate with Drs. Will andLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaper Charlie Mayo...Balfour took a liking to Dr. Will and Hattie Mayo's daughter Carrie…One of the Balfour daughters, Mary, married the late Henry Frederic Helmholz Jr., who died Jan. 6, 2012, at age 100. Their daughter, Martha Mayo Helmholz-Anderson, told me Balfour was a loving grandfather.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: This year marks 150 years of continuous service to patients, and Mayo Clinic is launching a yearlong recognition that will honor a legacy of medical accomplishments and a model for the future of health care. Dr. Mayo’s sons, Drs. William and Charles Mayo, joined the practice in the late 1880’s and, with their father, created Mayo Clinic’s medical hallmark: The integrated care model that focuses a team of experts on one patient at a time and puts patients’ needs first. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

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